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Title: Florida architect
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00172
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1968
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00172
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Back Cover
        Page 60
        Page 61
Full Text
The Florida


Architect October 1968


II






U -Ver ty' 0 Flo I brart'ea
G in svill F1
3 bOl30


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


Prefab room unit being lifted into I
on the Hilton Palacio del
San Antonio. Crane with special outri
is needed to lift the 35-ton units
place. Helicopter rotor mounted on lii
frame is used to keep room lined up
hotel as it is lifted. Hotel rooms
completely furnished before being li
-all the way from bathroom plum
and fixtures, wiring, interior wall finish
to carpets, furniture and even light bi


fpo



ic






54th Annual Convention

and

Building Product Exhibits


Florida Association

of The American Institute of Architects


The great demand for building construction in our rapidly
developing world has made many of our current building
techniques anachronistic. The architect's traditional intui-
tive approach is inadequate for the vast number of con-
straints required to design tomorrow's environment. Sys-
tems analysis, a method for solving problems with expand-
ing limits, will contribute heavily to tomorrow's design
techniques. If coordinated and controlled building systems
provided by industry offer the answer to present frag-
mented methods:
Will we see change in the concept of the inde-
pendent architect?
Will giant corporations with their own systems
dominate construction in the future?
Will the architect's failure to adjust result in his
abdication of leadership?
How can architecture keep up with current con-
struction demands?


2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968







Cover

4

6

7


10

11


13

14


16

18

19


38

41


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^ .... .. :" ;': r ..' ^ .. .....^^
NATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County 0 Paul Robin John
Robert E. Todd
Daytona Beach 0 David A. Leete
Carl Gerken
Florida Central James R. Dry
Ted Fasnacht / James J. Jennewein
Florida Gulf Coast 0 Frank Folsom Smith
Tollyn Twitchell
Florida North 0 William K. Hunter, Jr.
James D. McGinley, Jr.
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Warren A. Dixon
Florida Northwest 0 Thomas H. Daniels
William D. Simpson
Florida South 0 Robert J. Boerema
George F. Reed / Francis E. Telesca
Jacksonville Charles E. Patillo, III
Herschel E. Shepard, Jr. / John Pierce Stevens
Mid-Florida Wythe D. Sims, II
Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach 0 Jack Wilson, Jr.
H. L. Lewis/ Charles E. Toth
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
1600 N.W. Lejeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables


OFFICERS
Slerbert Rosser Savage, President
P.O. Box 280, Miami, Fla. 33145
II. Leslie Walker, Vice President/President
Designate
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218,
Tampa, Fla. 33602
Harry E. Burns, Jr., Secretary
1113 Prudential Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 32207
Myrl J. I lanes, Treasurer
P. 0O. Box 609, Gainesville, Fla. 32601






PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
James Deen / Roy NI. Pooley, Jr.
Russell ). Minardi

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John WV. Totty / Assistant Editor
Helen Bronson / Circulation


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is
owned and published by the Association, a
Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published monthly at the Executive Office of
the Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Bi'd.,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distrib-
uted without charge of 4,669 registered archi-
tects, builders, contractors, designers, engineers
and members of allied fields throughout the
state of Florida-and to leading financial in-
stitutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are wel-
comed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AlA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AlA
publications, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT for prior use . Controlled circula-
tion postage paid at Miami, Florida. Single
copies, 75 cents, subscription, members $2.00
per year, industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. February Roster Issue, $3.00 . Mc-
Murray Printers.


Feature Systems Construction on the Hilton Palacio del Rio, San Antonio

Convention Schedule
A good time to be had for all
Letters

Association Awards
These men will be honored at the Convention

Architecture for Florida Living

Corporate Business Practice
First of a series by Legal Council Jack Peeples

Medical Facilities Seminars

AIA/ASCA
A reprint reporting on a Professional Conference

Advertisers' Honor Roll

Advertisers' Index

Products Exhibits
Visit these at the Convention

Research at University of Florida

Architectural Awards
1968 FAAIA lonor and XMerit Award.s


THE FLORIDA ASSOC






Sessional Seminars Highlight Convention Schedule


Thursday: Exhibit set-up all day
October 24
6:00 PM Executive Committee Meeting -
University Room
8:00 PM Prc-Convention Board of
Directors NMecting-Board Room


Friday: 8:00 AM 2:00 PM Exhibit set up-completed by
October 25 2:00 PM
8:30 AM 7:00 PM Registration-Exhibit Arena
8:30 AM- 1:00 PM Delegate Accreditation-Exhibit
Arena
9:30 AM CORPORATE BUSINESS
STRUCTURE IN PRACTICE OF
ARCHITECTURE
Forum by Florida State Board of
Architecture
1:00 PM Business Session I

3:00 PM Seminar I
THE PROCESS OF SYSTEM
BUILDING SEMINAR I
Speaker Ezra D. Ehrcnkrantz THE PROCESS OF SYSTEM
BUILDING
6:00 PM Host Chapter Party-Building Ezra D. Ehrenkraniz
Product Exhibit Arena and
adjacent dining room


Saturday: 8:30 AM 6:00 PM Registration-Exhibit
October 26 Arena SEMINAR II
HILTON PALACIO DEL RIO HOTEL
8:30 AM 7:30 PM Exhibit Arena open
for Visitation | Daniel A. Cerna, Al


8:30 AM 10:00 AM

8:30 AM 2:30 PM


10:00 AM












12:00 Noon


Coffee Served in
Exhibit Arena
Balloting for FAAIA
Officers in Exhibit
Arena
Seminar II
HILTON PALACIO
DEL RIO HOTEL
Speakers: Daniel A.
Cerna, AIA
Laurence 1. Raba,
Design Coordinator
II. B. Zachary Co.
General Contractor
Dennis E.
Fcigenspan.
Structural Engineer
Oscar W.
Schuchart,
Mechanical
Engineer
Sandwich & Beer
Luncheon--Exhibit
Arena


4THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


Dennis E. Felgenspan Oecar W. Shunehart
Structural Engineer Mechanical Engineer






SEMINAR III
Saturday: William J. Mouton
Continued
3:00 PM Senminar III
SYSTEM BUILDING:
STEEL AND
CONCRETE
Speaker: William J.
Mouton, P. E.
6:30 PM Complimentary e ;
Cocktail Party in
Exhibit Arena
(Pre-Banquet
Social)
7:45 PM Annual Banquet
Presentation of:
a. Architectural
Honor Awards
b. Gold Medal
c. Introduction of
new officers
Guest Speaker:
Archibald C.
Rogers, FAIA
Dancing

BANQUET SPEAKER
Archibald C. Rogers, FAIA



Sunday:
October 27
9:00 AM 1:00 PM Registration
9:00 AM 2:30 PM Visitation of Building Product
Exhibit Arena
9:00 AM 11:00 AM Continental Breakfast-Exhibit
Arena
10:30 AM PROPOSED NEW
CURRICULUM 2+2+2
Forum by University of Florida
Department of Architecture
Speaker: Arnold Butt, AIA
12:00 Noon Sandwich Luncheon-Exhibit
Arena
1:30 PM Presentation of Awards-Exhibit
Arena
2:15 PM Seminar IV
NEW DIRECTIONS IN
SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
Panel: The "Texas Construction
Team"/William J. Mouton
P. E./Richard P. Geyser, AIA
and Howard O. Gilbertson,
P. E. of Portland Cement
Association
4:00 PM Business Session II
5:00 PM Convention Adjourns
5:00 PM Board of Directors Meeting


Note: Business Sessions and Seminars will be held in the
Lancelot Room.
Building Product Exhibits, Registration in the
Clarendon Ballroom.














6MAU- 4Z&>


90 'You MEAN 6F coue-s i-r
Morp M -ro UIL.- AJ OMIcAL




Letters

We in the Department of Architecture here are very
grateful for the opportunity which you, along with others,
afforded the students at Florida in putting out a student
issue of the "Florida Architect" this past summer. I was
quite pleased with the results and I trust you were also.
I am sure this will do a great deal toward strengthening
ties between the school and practicing architects.
John M. McRae
I wish to extend my enthusiastic congratulations and com-
pliments on the excellence of the University of Florida
issue of the Florida Architect. This is a very professional
job and the articles and illustrations representing contribu-
tions by architectural students are all of a very high calibre.
Undoubtedly, you are aware of the current developments
of the Architectural Student Magazine, "AS," which will
depend upon articles from architectural students all, over
the country and will provide a medium for publishing
them four times during the coming year. Contributions
for this publication may be sent to the student editor of
AS, Richard Kidwell, College of Architecture, Arizona
State University, Tempe, Arizona.
William H. Scheick, FAIA
EDITOR'S NOTE: Letter written to Student Editor, John
Toppe.)
"Architecture for Florida Living" is a very handsome
magazine. Congratulations!
William H. Scheick, FAIA

6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


NOW-TRI-ACTION... MERCER'S
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gations. Friction-Grip with exclusive pyramidal gripper design.
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the leaded With three 1" Friction-Grip strips as an integral part
of the tread for maximum traction. With a longer, sturdier nose.
With a smooth-finish back area for beauty. With a square or
round nose-in 6 attractive colors. It's the ideal stair tread for
heavy-traffic applications-and attractive enough for commercial
and residential installations
Tri-Action Sizes: 13" depth, lengths up to 12'. 1/4" wear area
tapers to /a"; 15/%" nose. Risers and stringers available. For com-
plete specifications on the entire Mercer Stair Tread line, write
for catalog sheet.
OTHER MERCER FLOOR AND STAIR SPECIALTIES
THRESHOLD/ CORNER GUARD
SDOORSTOP Flexible vinyl.
din I cushion 5116" thick
gasket acts as tapering to I/16'
weather seal. 54" sections.
36" sections x S colors.
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S to ero. NOSING
Friction.Grip
UTILITY style. 39" and 9'
MOLDING sections. Square
and round nose.
'/," x /,- 6 colors.
d *colors. INTERIOR STAIR
CAP STRIP NOSING
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i s o se -.125 J S .0 ,00"
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ISADDLE)
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half-saddle. .125" butting
30"/ 36", 42"- pauge.
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6 colors. 8 colors.
See your local distributor, orwrites
mercer
PLASTICS COMPANY, INC.
Main Oice A& Warehouse: 1 Jaboe St., Newark, N.J. 07105
Factory & Warehouse: Eustis, Florida 32726





Association Awards

The Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects has for many years
provided a few awards to honor the
members of the profession who have
contributed their time in behalf of the
Association and the profession. Two years
ago an enlarged program of awards was
adopted by the Board of Directors to include
additional awards for its members and to
honor a lay person who has contributed
to the betterment of the architectural
profession. The Awards Program does not
dictate that the awards be made annually,
only if an appropriate recipient is
nominated by an AIA Chapter or a group of
five architects or by the Board of Architects.
We are proud to present the recipients
of the 1968 Awards Program.



Gold Medal
ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA



















The recipient of the highest award of the FAAIA, the
Gold Medal is Archie G. Parrish, FAIA of St. Petersburg
and a member of the Florida Central Chapter, AIA.
The Gold Medal of the Florida Association of the AIA is
a long established award to honor an individual architect
who has rendered the most distinguished leadership and
service to the architectural profession over an extended
period of time.
Archie G. Parrish, FAIA was selected for his service of
many years ago to the Chapter and State Association. In
addition, Parrish has the distinction of having served on
the Florida State Board of Architecture for 29 years from
1939 to 1968. This contribution of time and effort, during
the 29 year period, to regulate the profession of architects
is a record that will remain in the archives for many a
decade.







Pullara
Memorial

Awards
The Anthony L. Pullara Memorial
Awards of State Member and State
Chapter were established in memory
of Architect Anthony L. Pullara of
Tampa because of his devoted service
over and above his official capacities.
The intent is to perpetuate Tony's
memory and those things for which
he stood in our profession.


STATE CHAPTER AWARD TO PALM
This award is given to an AIA Chap-
ter in Florida for outstanding service
during the current year. This year the
recipient is the Palm Beach Chapter
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects.
The Palm Beach Chapter was selected
to receive this award from among the
eleven AIA chapters for its dynamic
program during the current year.
Some of the activities are as follows:
1. The city of West Palm Beach has
asked the Chapter to lead the city in
establishing a Design Review Board
for all buildings except family resi-
dences.
2. Successfully held a competition for
a Viet Nam War Memorial.
3. Established a speakers bureau with
50 lectures given during the year.


BEACH CHAPTER
4. Provided a rotating exhibit show at
commercial locations.
5. Monthly television appearances dis-
cussing architecture for public service
groups.
6. Special newspaper feature editorial
on architecture.
7. Initiated a Technician Training
Program with the Palm Beach Junior
College.
8. Continued the annual two week
architectural exhibit at the Norton
Art Gallery.
9. Provided Education Seminars for
the Chapter members in the areas of
Office Practice, P u b Ii c Relations,
Electrical Refresher and Mechanical
Refresher seminars.


STATE MEMBER AWARD TO
HILLIARD T. SMITH
4-4
This award is given to the member of
the FAAIA for outstanding service to
the Association during the current
year. This year the recipient of the
State Member Award is Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr. of Lake Worth, a Past
President of FAAIA.
During the current year Smith has
served untiringly on the committee
researching the aspects of school con-
struction system components, with
the final product being the report on
this subject appearing in the Annual
Board Report. Smith also gave of his
time on behalf of the profession to
appear at several legislative committee
hearings, which committee had the
responsibility of recommending
whether Bill #6X should be reintro-
duced in the next session of the Legis-
lature. This legislation was defeated
in the Special Session this year which
provided mandatory use of one par-
ticular school construction s y s t e m
component.
Furthermore, Hilliard Smith was ap-
pointed by the Secretary of State to
the Architectural Planning & Advisory
Council to the Capitol Center Plan-
ning Committee. Smith was elected
Chairman of the Council by the ap-
pointed members and has s e r v e d
faithfully on behalf of the people of
Florida.


4th Annual

Craftsman Award
The FAAIA established this award to
recognize an outstanding craftsman in
Florida who has exemplified interest,
ingenuity, and performed outstand-
ing workmanship in the pursuance of
his craft or trade.
The recipient for the 4th Annual
Craftsman Award is Robert Adjemian
of Holly Hill, Florida who was nomi-
nated by Greening & Sayers, Archi-
tects of the Daytona Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects.
Adiemian was cited for his unusual '
skill and ingenuity in meticulously n,-,.
shaping the intricately designed door,
guided solely by his talent and a
photographic example desired by the
owner. The work is carefully sym-
metrical and all welded joints are ex-
ceptionally smooth and inconspicu-
ous.
The craftsman's employer is Atlas
Welding (Holly Hill), the general
contractor for the residence is Fred R.
Flores (Ormond Beach), and the
owner is Dr. and Mrs. Keith Eardley.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968






Architect Service Award


This award was established to recog-
nize an architect whose active leader-
ship in community activity and serv-
ice has been of direct benefit to the
community in which he lives.

Earl M. Starnes, AIA was selected to
receive the award this year. He resides
in Miami and is a member of the
Florida South Chapter, AIA.

Earl Starnes has served for many years
on many local committees. His major
contribution to community service
was initiated four years ago when he
was elected to the Metro-Dade
County Commission. While serving


as County Commissioner his accom-
plishments include:
Reorganization of Housing & Ur-
ban Development Departments
Passage of County-wide Land-
scape Ordinance
Acquisition of Cape Florida for
a State Park in Miami
Formation of policy to develop
a Sou t h Dade Governmental
Center
Establishment of Mental Health
Facility in Dade County.
Starnes was reelected to the County
Commission this year and was named
Vice Mayor by the Commission.


Award of Merit


Philip Pitts


The recipient of the Award of Merit
is Philip Pitts, the Tallahassee City
Planner who was nominated by the
Florida Central Chapter of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects.

Pitts was cited for his interest, ac-
tivity, and concern with professional
architecture during his four years as
city planner of Tallahassee. He as-
sumed his role of City Planner at a
critical time in regards to the expan-


sion and rezoning
of Tallahassee.


of much of the city


Tallahassee with Florida State Uni-
versity, Florida A. & M. University,
Tallahassee Junior College, and the
State Capitol Center has had large
programs of expansion all of which
have been guided and coordinated,
along with a huge expansion of pri-
vate enterprise, in an orderly city plan
under the leadership of Philip Pitts.


Special Citation


This special citation is given to F.
Blair Reeves, AIA, in recognition and
appreciation for his leadership in the
preservation and restoration of his-
toric places both in the State of Flor-
ida and the Nation; as Chairman on
Historic Buildings AIA, creating the
State Preservation Coordinator sys-
tem, re-establishing the H i s t o r ic
American Buildings Survey Advisory
Board, publishing principles for pres-


ervation as Historic Preservation To-
morrow; in a similar job for FAAIA,
promoting the Governor's Conference
for Preservation, designating Florida's
historic places and successfully urging
measures for their preservation; and
as a practicing teacher and preserva-
tionist making students, professionals,
and public participants in Historic
American Buildings Survey activities
in the State of Florida.


Earl M. Slarnes, AIA


F. Blair Reeves, AIA







Architecture

For

Florida

Living


The Florida Association of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects has pub-
lished its first annual edition. ARCH-
ITECTURE FOR FLORIDA LIVING.
This quality publication presents sig-
nificant examples of residential, pub-
lic, multi-residential, educational, and
commercial architecture.
Each architect has attempted to reflect
the environmental, natural, geograph-
ic, economic, and social forces of
modern Florida in his structure. We
believe they have succeeded in in-
tegrating these forces while maintain-
ing a sensitive counterbalance between
function and beauty.


Brief expository paragraphs give rele-
vant details regarding the buildings,
but the main emphasis is placed upon
dramatic, imaginative photography
which graphically portrays the sub-
jects. All of the buildings depicted
have been constructed in recent years
thereby assuring the timeliness of the
material. Yet we believe many of these
structures transcend the limitations of
fad and fashion and will remain
meaningful for future generations.
This 132 page publication (11" x 13")
is profusely illustrated with both color
and black and white photographs.
For your convenience an order form
appears below.


Please send me copies of "Architecture for Florida Living." The
cost per copy is $4.00 (3.00 for the publication and $1.00 to cover postage and
handling costs). Check or money order should be made payable to FAAIA.

Name

Firm Address

Address


State


Zip Code


Mail this form to: Architecture For Florida Living, c/o Florida Association of
The The American Institute of Architects, Suite 210, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134.


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968





The question of utilizing a corporate
business organization in connection
with the practice of architecture has
for some time perplexed the members
of the profession, and there is a strong
need for clarification.
On August 2, during the joint meet-
ing of the FAAIA Executive Commit-
tee and the Florida State Board of
Architecture, a great deal of back-
ground information was explored, and
based upon that joint conference and
our research of the statutory and regu-
latory provisions underlying this ques-
tion, we would like to offer our
opinion.
First, the precise statutory and regu-
latory language must be examined.
Section 467.08, Florida Statutes, pro-
vides:
"No certificate shall be issued either
with or without an examination to
any corporation, partnership, firm or
association to practice architecture in
this state, but all certificates shall be
to individual persons."
It is clear that this language creates a
statutory prohibition against the issu-
ance of a certificate to a corporation,
but it is silent with respect to the
utilization of a corporation in the
practice of architecture where indi-
viduals possessing certificates perform
the architectural services.
Turning to the regulations promul-
gated by the Florida Board of Archi-
tecture, we find that Rule 40-7.04
provides:
"A corporation cannot legally practice
or offer to practice architecture in its
corporate name or otherwise and this
is true even though the name of an
architect is a part of the corporate
name."
Rule 40-7.08 provides:
"(d) The use of any corporate name
in offering to practice or in practic-
ing architecture is illegal."
After setting forth certain permitted
and prohibited name u s a g e s, the
Board appears to approve, prospec-
tively, some corporate involvement in
the practice of architecture when the
rule provides:
"When the professional service cor-
poration statute has been legally ap-
proved, new examples will be given."
Analyzing the language of the statutes
and the regulations, we learn that a
corporation cafinot receive a certifi-
cate and that a corporation cannot
practice or offer to practice architec-
ture or use a corporate name in offer-
ing to practice.
In addition to the above quoted statu-
tory and regulatory provisions, we can
turn to a decision of the Supreme


Court of Florida which has apparently
escaped the attention of the profes-
sion in the past. In the case of Robert
L. Weed, Architect, Inc., vs. Hom-
ing, et.al., 33 So.2d 648 (1948), the
Supreme Court appears to approve
utilization of a corporate business
form in connection with the practice
of architecture when Chief Justice
Terrell stated:
"It is quite true that under the
law a corporation cannot be li-
censed to practice architecture,
but Robert L. Weed, Architect,
Inc., was nothing more than the
alter ego of Robert L. Weed or
a medium through which his
business as an architect was
transacted." (emphasis supplied)
This case arose out of an effort to
enforce a mechanics' lien when the
contract for professional services was
between Robert L. Weed, Architect,
Inc., and a lessee, and the court, in
overruling the contention that a cor-
poration was precluded from acquir-
ing an architectural mechaincs' lien,
indirectly approves the use of a gen-
eral corporate form with respect to
the practice of architecture where the
actual services are performed by an
individual possessing a certificate
under the architectural practice act.
It must -be pointed out with emphasis
that the Weed case dealt with a gen-
eral corporation because, at the time
of the decision in 1948, the state of
Florida did not have a Professional
Service Corporation Act. Of course,
any use of a corporation under the
Professional Service Corporation Act
would have to comply with its specific
provisions and we will discuss this
possibility first.
In 1964, the Florida Legislature
adopted the Professional Service Cor-
poration Act, which permits an indi-
vidual or group of individuals duly
licensed to render an identical pro-
fessional service within the state of
Florida to organize and become share-
holders in a professional service cor-
poration.
All shareholders of a professional serv-
ice corporation must be licensed to
practice the profession and the cor-
poration may not engage in any busi-
ness other than the rendering of the
professional services for which it was
specifically incorporated, with the ex-
ception of the ownership of certain
investments as set forth in the statute.
The Act also makes it clear that the
practice of the profession shall remain
on an individual basis and that the
creation of the corporation does not
affect the professional relationship
and liabilities between the person
actually furnishing the professional
services and the general public. There
is a limiting factor in liability in that
one shareholder would not be liable
personally for negligence or wrongful
Continued Pare 12 "-*


Corporate

Business

Structure

in the

Practice of

Architecture


11






Corporate

Business

Continued


Continued from Page 11
acts or misconduct of another mem-
ber of a professional service corpora-
tion except to the extent of the full
value of the property of the corpora-
tion including his interest.

It is our firm judgment and opinion
that nothing within the Florida Stat-
utes or Regulations of the Board of
Architecture would prevent any archi-
tect or group of architects in the state
of Florida from forming a professional
service corporation and thereby taking
full advantage of the Professional
Service Corporation Act, provided of
course that the formation of the cor-
poration and the conduct of its affairs
are in total compliance with the pro-
visions of that act.

Turning to a more complex question,
we have inquired into the legality of
architects becoming shareholders in a
general corporation and using this
medium as the administrative and
business framework for the conduct of
the practice of architecture and pos-
sibly related professional and business
activities.

Based upon the language of the
Weed case, as well as the controlling
statutes and regulations, it is our
opinion that nothing prevents archi-
tects from utilizing the general cor-
poration business structure provided
great care is given to the details of its
formation and the conduct of its af-
fairs in the following regard.

First, it is absolutely clear that the
corporation itself cannot practice
architecture. The actual practice of
architecture must be conducted at all
times on an individual basis and the
duly licensed architect performing the
architectural services must affix his
individual seal to all architectural
work products and perform all of the
architectural services on an individual
basis.
Secondly, due to the wording of the
regulations of the Board of Architec-
ture, the corporate name could not be
used in any way to hold out the cor-
porate entity in the practice of archi-
tecture. The corporate name may not
be used on letterheads or office signs
or in any other way used to indicate
that the corporation itself is engaged
in the practice of architecture.

It is our opinion that the corporate
entity could engage in a contractural
relationship with the general public
to provide architectural services pro-
vided that the language of any such
contract between the corporation and
other parties would provide that the
corporation would be obligated to
cause the architectural services to be
provided by an individual duly li-
censed to practice the profession of
architecture and not by the corpora-
tion itself.


12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


In other words, it must be absolutely
clear that the only permitted activity
would be a situation where architects
owned all or a part of the stock in a
corporation and that the corporate
entity, including shareholders in the
corporation, could provide a continu-
ing business and administrative me-
dium through which the business af-
fairs of the corporation would be
managed but that the practice of
architecture would, at all times, be an
individual function of architects as
individual practitioners. It would call
for a clear delineation between the
personalized service involved in the
relationship of an architect to a client
as contrasted with the internal busi-
ness affairs of the practice not related
to professional activity and responsi-
bility.

The counsel for the Board of Archi-
tecture shares our opinion as to the
ability of architects to utilize a cor-
porate form in the business aspects of
the practice, but points out that the
Board will have to design and promul-
gate additional regulatory controls to
regulate the practice of architecture
under this system if it in fact becomes
an accepted method of business ac-
tivity in the profession.
It would probably be helpful to point
out the difference in the utilization
of the Professional Service Corpora-
tion Act and the General Corporation
Act as it relates to the practice of
architecture.
First, under a professional service cor-
poration, all shareholders would be re-
quired to be duly licensed architects
in the state of Florida and the pur-
poses of the corporation would be
limited exclusively to the practice of
architecture modified only by the
ability to hold certain investments
and real property.
Also, the Internal Revenue Service
continues to reject the view that pro-
fessionals utilizing a professional serv-
ice corporation are entitled to the tax
saving benefits and deductible retire-
ment plan contribution advantages
available to general corporations de-
spite the failure of the Internal Reve-
nue Service to prevail in even one of
the seven major judicial contests the
existing federal tax treatment of pro-
fessional service corporations.

It would appear, therefore, that the
utilization of a general corporation
would afford a great deal more flexi-
bility and advantage to an architect.
For example, persons other than archi-
tects could become shareholders in
the corporation. The corporation
could engage in activities not related
to the practice of architecture and
would be limited only by the general
incorporation act, and the purposes
and powers set forth in the corporate
charter. It is assumed that the utiliza-
tion of the general corporate form
Continued Page 13





Continued from Page 12
would also avoid the disadvantage of
the current position maintained by
the Internal Revenue Service with
respect to professional service corpor-
ations, but no assumptions are safe
with respect to future Internal Reve-
nue Service attitudes.
Assuming the validity of our opinion
and judgment as to the legality of
utilizing a professional service cor-
poration or general corporate form in
the business aspects related to the
practice of architecture, a great deal
of caution must still be maintained.
For example, nothing in this opinion
should be construed as recommending
the utilization of a corporate structure
even though it may be permitted
under the law. Many businesses, with-
out any impediment in the utilization
of a corporate form of business, elect
to remain a sole proprietorship, part-
nership, limited partnership or other
form of business organization. It
would be a matter, of individual elec-
tion based upon legal and accounting
counsel and business judgment.
Secondly, extreme caution should be
exercised in structuring a corporate
entity with respect to the practice of
architecture to insure that its forma-
tion complies with the requirements
of law with respect to the architec-
tural practice act and the regulations
of the Board of Architecture.
In summary, it is our opinion and
judgment that there are no prohibi-
tions in Florida law or applicable
regulations against the utilization of a
professional service corporation or
general corporation as a medium


through which a practicing architect
may transact business provided this
method of operation does not abuse
the specific provisions of law and
regulations controlling the practice of
the profession of architecture.
It is our recommendation that any
architect, or group of architects, desir-
ing to explore the utilization of a cor-
porate form of business seek individ-
ual legal, accounting and tax counsel,
and if this method is adopted, to set
forth in written form to the Board of
Architecture your exact plans and
seek its approval prior to incorpora-
tion.
At best, the law governing this ques-
tion is hazy and indefinite and it is
our further recommendation that the
Association should cause the architec-
tural practice act to be amended to
specifically authorize utilization of a
general corporation in the practice of
architecture, similar to Section 471.06
of the Professional Engineers Practice
Act, if it is the judgment of the Asso-
ciation to affirmatively authorize this
type of activity. This corrective legis-
lation would remove all doubt and
concern about the legality of corpor-
ate involvement in practice of architec-
ture and would equate the business
opportunities of architects and engi-
neers. This seems particularly import-
ant to us in view of the fact that
some architects and engineers are en-
gaged in a joint practice and in some
instances the engineering provision is
being utilized to provide for corporate
activity and thereby placing architects
who practice with engineers under a
different statutory standard than
those who practice alone or only with
other architects. 0


The Producer's Council is sponsoring
three Medical Facilities Seminars dur-
ing November, 1968 in Florida. The
seminars will bring together architects,
engineers, hospital administrators and
consultants, public health officials,
legislators, and building product man-
ufacturers.
Basic objective of the seminar is to
provide a forum for the exchange of
data, ideas, and information among
various groups involved in the plan-
ning, design and construction of hos-
pitals and other medical facilities of
all types.
Featured at each seminar will be a
van-carried traveling exhibit of medi-
cal facility building products and
equipment. The seminar programs
will begin in-the afternoon.
The schedule of the Medical Seminars
and the keynote speaker for each is
as follows:
November 13, 1968
Jacksonville Chapter Producer's


Council
George Washington Hotel -
Jacksonville
1:30 p.m. with evening dinner
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Lewis Block,
of the Architectural Consulting
firm for hospitals, Block, McGib-
oney, Coburn & Associates, Inc.,
of Silver Spring, Md.
November 20, 1968
South Florida Chapter Producer's
Council
Dupont Plaza Hotel- Miami
12:00 noon luncheon
Keynote Speaker: Dr. William H.
Stewart, M.D., Surgeon General
of the U. S. Public Health Serv-
ice.
November 26, 1968
Florida West Coast Chapter
Producer's Council
International Inn Tampa
2:00 p.m. (Cocktails at 4:30)
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Anthony J.
J. Rourke, Hospital Consultant,
New Rochelle, N.Y.


Medical

Facilities

Seminar


13






AIA-ACSA

Teachers

Seminar

"Industrialized
Construction and
Architectural Education"

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This represents a
memorandum report by Mr. J. C.
Crandall, Professor at the University
of Michigan of the Department of
Architecture, relating to the AIA-
ACSA Teachers' Seminar.)


From June 9 to 14, about 60 delegates
from schools of architecture in the
United States and Canada met at the
University of Montreal to consider
problems and potentials of industrial-
ized construction and implications for
architectural education. I was privi-
leged to represent The University of
Michigan at this seminar. Although
the proceedings will be published for
participants, I felt a brief summary of
the sense of the seminar would be
helpful.

The tone of the meetings was set on
the first two days of formal presenta-
tions. The speakers represented several
important contacts with industrialized
construction. John Eberhard (former
director of the Institute for Applied
Technology, N.B.S.) issued a some-
what gloomy challenge to the archi-
tectural profession to pick up the re-
sponsibility for management of the
design process in an industrialized
building industry. Moishe Safdie
(Habitat Architect) and Joseph Sher-
man (Vice President of CONRAD)
described further developments of pre-
cast concrete technology and design.
Current applications of the Habitat
concept were illustrated, pointing up
the compelling need for new under-
standing of what constitutes adequate
minimum housing, especially in high-
density urban areas.

Frank Matzke (SUNYCF), Joseph
White (formerly vice president for
SCSD of Inland Steel), and Colin
Davidson (Washington University;
formerly associated with the develop-
ment of CLASP) discussed the con-
tributions and potentials of these
approaches for industrializing the
construction process. The relationship
of the architect to other factors of
building production in each frame-
work (SUNY, SCSD and CLASP)
was outlined in detail by the speakers.
As the seminar continued, other
speakers described current attempts by
their organizations to elaborate and
refine their involvement in building
construction. These included Roland
Wilson (Boeing), Gunter Schmitz
(Texas A & M; formerly with ULM),
Terry Collison (G.E. Community De-
velopment Division) and Neil Harper
(SOM).

A double barreled blast at current
efforts to industrialize and rationalize
the building design and construction
process was leveled by Bernard Weiss-
bourd (Metropolitan Structures, Inc.)
and Horst Rittel (Berkeley). Mr.
Weissbourd argued convincingly that
nothing short of a major breakthrough
on all fronts of the building industry
could possibly provide adequate new
housing economically available to the
lower third of the population. Mr.
Rittel, focusing on systematic design,
emphasized the futility of the design-
er's attempt to foresee all possible
consequences and all possible alterna-
tives in his decisions. Any open-ended


system is doomed to suffer from un-
expected side effects of decision-mak-
ing, some of which may be adverse.

The workshops and panels which met
in this context attempted to discover
possible roles for the designer in rela-
tion to industrialized construction,
and to evaluate various educational
proposals for meeting the require-
ments of these roles. It became ob-
vious almost immediately that each
of the participants has a particular set
in two areas which conditioned his
contribution and involvement in the
seminar. One set was generated by a
participant's image of a designer -
is he primarily artist, or predominantly
scientist? Is the design process an art
or a science? Participation in the
seminar has led me to the conclusion
that the designer's legitimate activity
is neither artistic (implying that it is
self expressive) nor scientific (which
suggests that the designer observes,
records and generalizes). By contrast,
the designer more often than not
creates an object that is "other" ex-
pressive or only expressive of his cul-
tural milieu. His influence is almost
anti-scientific in the sense that his
overriding objective is to invent a new
object or organization which will have
some specific desirable effects which
have not previously been observed.
By contrast, the scientific tradition of
observing existing processes and rela-
tionships with as little effect as pos-
sible is in direct contradiction to the
designer's primary motive.

It is reasonable to me, after hearing
Terry Collison (an urban planner),
Roland Wilson (architect), Horst
Rittel (operations research) and Joe
Sherman (engineer), discuss striking-
ly similar motives and methods, co
conclude that this century has
spawned a new type of professional in
all fields call him the designer -
whose responsibility is the overall co-
ordination of the artistic and scientific
disciplines relevant to the solution of
a particular problem. I think this is
what John Eberhard means by "man-
agement of- the design process."

The second set which participants
brought to the conference was the
meaning imputed to the word, "in-
dustrialization." The definitions given
for this term imply widely varying
concepts. Some of the principal ideas
suggested are "capital intensive pro-
duction" (Eberhardt), "increasing
level and prevalence of industrial pro-
cesses" (Davidson), factory produc-
tion and assembly of components,
"generalization of environmental sol-
utions to the entire population"
(Safdie), "design, research, develop-
ment, analysis and production all take
place within same corporate structure"
(Sherman), "systematic design and
construction" (Rittel). It was clear,
however, that all but the most con-
servative definitions of industrializa-


14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968





tion support a tacit assumption of
increased investment and risk-taking
on the part of producers. In a free
market, this means the expectation of
larger profits or other tangible bene-
fits.

Three possible directions were seen.
Current investigations by large, so-
phisticated corporations may suggest
community development to be a fruit-
ful area for extended capitalization.
This will motivate such companies to
move into the construction field in
force, bringing their own design per-
sonnel with them to help solve the
problems of under-development, low
capacity and poor quality which char-
acterize the present supply of build-
ings. Many companies like Bendix,
General Electric, Boeing and Aerojet
General are currently conducting in-
vestigations of building construction
and community development. But
these are preliminary studies and the
personnel involved are reluctant to
make any estimates of the probability
that their corporations will enter the
construction field at all, to say noth-
ing of the near future.

A second direction is indicated by the
probability that increasing building
costs and labor shortage will lead
traditional organizations to seek alter-
native methods in order to meet the
burgeoning demand for adequate
buildings. That this demand must be
supported in part by greatly expanded
governmental subsidy seems inescap-
able. Some evidence of movement in
this direction is provided by recent
activities of U. S. Gypsum, a consor-
tium of Construction Research and
Development (CONRAD), the Uni-
ment Corporation and Chemstress,
Inc., large-scale redevelopment of
slum areas by companies like John
Hancock, etc. The major efforts in
this area exploit the profit potential
of financing and ownership, however,
rather than unique advances in con-
struction techniques.

The third direction suggested is direct
government intervention on a scale
matching the practice in some social-
ist countries. Eric Dluhosch (C.P.I.)
presented a comprehensive paper and
slides describing the post-war develop-
ments in building technology in the
USSR and Eastern Europe, progress
which can only be described objective-
ly as very impressive. Although the
space standards do not yet match
those of the upper middle class in
this country, it is important to recog-
nize that the present standard of 100
sq. ft. dwelling unit space per person
is an accomplished fact for the popu-
lation as a whole, and that this objec-
tive has been achieved in the last
twenty years starting from a practical
base of zero.


There are a number of factors oppos-
ing these processes. For the most part,
the opposing factors are of no little
consequence. There is, for example,
the institutionalized conservatism of
large, mature corporations reported by
the A. D. Little Company in Patterns
and Problems of Technological Inno-
vation in American Industry. The
pressures against innovation in tradi-
tional construction and those against
large-scale governmental intervention
need little elaboration. Nevertheless,
most seminar participants were opti-
mistic that such innovative processes
would begin to affect building con-
struction in this country in the im-
mediate future on a large scale. The
statistics supporting this attitude are
the 35,000,000 people who are badly
housed in 6,000,000 substandard
dweling units. If the socio-economic
conditions for rapid technological in-
novations to solve this problem do
not now exist, then they will be cre-
ated, one way or another.
The seminar ended with very little
confidence on anyone's part that it
was possible to predict the direction
of industrialization of the construc-
tion process. Nor did we feel that the
educational objectives for architects
could be stated specifically at this
point. I was asked to lead a workshop
to propose curriculum changes in the
light of industrialization. We con-
cluded that the most pressing problem
for architects is to define the social
and humanitarian problems which
might be solved by an industrialized
building construction industry.
Among the specific suggestions made
by the seminar are the following:
1. Schools were encouraged to pursue
divergent lines of curriculum develop-
ment. The participants felt that there
is no artistic or technical skill or
knowledge which will not find some
application in the emerging design
professions. Diversity in the design
professions will help to insure the
availability of the specific skills and
abilities required by a variety of prob-
lems.
2. The architectural profession which
has historically had a strong artistic
bias must develop even higher levels
of performance in the areas of design
theory and scientific method. In par-
ticular, it is important that curriculum
include familiarization with advanced
theoretical concepts and methods
used by the design professionals in
other disciplines. Since definition of
the problems to be solved is of im-
mediate and fundamental importance,
curriculums should foster the techni-
cal and scientific basis required to
develop theoretical relationships be-
tween the physical environment and
human behavior. E


15






14th

Annual

Advertisers

Honor

Roll


Alger Sullivan Company
Century, Florida
WOOD PRESERVATIVE PROCESS
Agency Dodson, Craddock and
Born Advertising, Inc.
P. 0. Drawer A
Pensacola, Florida 32502
Apgar & Markham Construction Co.
2790 Bird Avenue
Miami, Florida
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Beam Industries
P. 0. Box 192
Webster City, Iowa 50595
CENTRAL BUILT-IN VACUUM
SYSTEM
Agency- George Sampson 6
Associates
1680 N. Vine Street, Suite 1000
Los Angeles, California 90028
Belcher Oil Company
P. 0. Box 1751
Miami, Florida 33101
OIL AND OIL-POWERED
EQUIPMENT; ASPHALT
Agency Agey Advertising, Inc.
35 N. E. 17 Street
Miami, Florida 33132
Bohn Aluminum & Brass Company
Danville, Illinois 61832
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING
Agency- Grubb Advertising, Inc.
111 North Market Street
Champaign, Illinois 61820
Peter Bromer
2979 Flamingo Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Certified Plumbers of South Florida
2526 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED
MASTER PLUMBERS AND
CERTIFIED JOURNEYMEN
Climate Master Products, Inc.
930 N. W. 13 Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS
Agency Greenman Associates,
Inc.
307 S. 21 Avenue
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Dantzler Lumber & Export Co., Inc.
P. 0. Box 6340
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
WOOD WHOLESALERS AND
EXPORTERS
Agency The Griswold-Eshleman
Company
Grant Building
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219
Delta-Macon Brick & Tile Company,
Inc.
P. 0. Box 539
Indianola, Mississippi 38751
BRICK & TILE
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
P. 0. Box 5
International Airport Branch
Miami, Florida 33148
DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS
E-Bond Epoxies, Inc.
501 N. E. 33 Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
EPOXY MATRIX


16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


Elkay Manufacturing Company
2700 South 17th Avenue
Broadview, Illinois 60155
STAINLESS STEEL SINKS
Agency The Biddle Company
737 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Flintkote
10 Stuyvesant Avenue
Lyndhurst Avenue
Lyndhurst, N. Jersey 07071
INSULROCK ROOF DECK SYSTEMS
Agency Fred Gardner
Company, Inc.
50 East 42nd Street
New York, New York
Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Jos. L. Rozier Machinery Co.,
Orlando-Tampa
Kelly Tractor Company, Miami-
W. Palm Beach-Clewiston
Ring Power Corporation,
Jacksonville-Tallahassee-Ocala
PACKAGED ELECTRICITY FOR
PRIME AND STANDBY POWER
Agency Fry/Hammond/Barr,
Inc.
600 E. Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
3737 N. W. 43 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
CUSTOM CAST PLAQUES
Florida Gas Transmission Company
P. 0. Box 44
Winter Park, Florida 32790
GAS--COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Shattuck-Roether, Adv.
22 Lake Beauty Drive
Orlando, Florida 32806
Florida Investor-Owned Electric
Utilities Companies
Florida Power & Light Company
Gulf Power Company
Florida Power Corporation
Tampa Electric Company
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
Agency Bishopric/Green/
Fielden, Inc.
3361 S. W. 3rd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
Florida Natural Gas Association
1500 E. Highway #50
Winter Garden, Florida
GAS COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Palmer Tyler and Co.
3000 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33137
Florida Portland Cement Division
General Portland Cement Company
P. 0. Box 1528
Tampa, Florida 33601
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency- Bill Reed 6
Associates, Inc.
Clearwater Professional Building
Clearwater, Florida 33516
Georgia-Pacific Corporation
P. 0. Box 311
Portland, Oregon 97207
Jacksonville-Miami-Orlando-Tampa
PLYWOOD AND PANELING
Goddard Painting Company
450 N. W. 71st Street
Miami, Florida
COMMERCIAL PAINTERS





Harris Paint Company
P. 0. Box 1381
Tampa, Florida 33601
PAINT MANUFACTURER
Agency Louis Benito/
Advertising
P. 0. Box 3382
Tampa, Florida 33602
In-Sink-Erator Manufacturing
Company
Racine, Wisconsin 53406
STAINLESS STEEL DISPOSER
Agency Peitscher, Janda/
Associates, Inc.
660 North Wabash Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Lambert Corporation of Florida
P. 0. Box 226
Orlando, Florida 32802
WATERPROOFING MATERIALS,
CONCRETE
Agency David G. Chapman
215 S. Lake Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32801
Light Portland Cement Company
District Sales Office
Jacksonville, Florida 32216
PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS
Agency- Lewis 6- Gilman, Inc.
6 Penn Center Plaza
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103
MacDonald Computer Supplies Co.
P. 0. Box 68-501
Miami, Florida 33168
COMPUTER ENGINEERED
FLOORING SYSTEMS
Fred McGilvray, Inc.
1101 West 29th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33011
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS
The Ben Meadows Co.
553 Amsterdam Avenue, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30306
ENGINEERING SUPPLIES &
EQUIPMENT
Agency Mark-Ad Inc.
1401 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
Northwest Orient Airlines, Inc.
Campbell-Mithun, Inc.
Northstar Center
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402
Oil Fuel Institute of Florida
P. 0. Box 1947
Orlando, Florida 32802
OIL HEATING
Agency McAllister-Barker, Inc.
P. 0. Box 6966
Orlando, Florida 32803
PPG Industries
1 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL GLASS
Agency Ketchum, MacLeod 6
Grove, Inc.
Four Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
Palm Beach Clay Tile Company
P. 0. Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404
TILE SPANISH BARREL,
FLAT SHINGLE, FLOOR


Ply-World Corporation
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando
924 Sligh Blvd.
Orlando, Florida 32806
PANELING, ARCHITECTURAL
PLYWOOD, DOORS, AND LAMINATE
Portland Cement Association
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
PORTLAND CEMENT AND
PRODUCTS
Agency Fuller/Smith/Ross, Inc.
410 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Solite Corporation
1114 Seaboard Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS
AND STRUCTURAL CONCRETE
Agency Cabell Eanes Inc.
509 West Grace Street
Richmond, Virginia 23220
T-Square Miami Blue Print Co., Inc.
635 S. W. 1 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
DRAFTING EQUIPMENT AND
SUPPLIES
John W. Thomson & Son Inc.
2101 S. W. 32nd Avenue
Miami, Florida
PLASTERING CONTRACTOR
Trinity White General Portland
Cement Co.
4400 Republic
North Bank Tower
P. 0. Box 324
Dallas, Texas 75221
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency- Alex T. Franz, Inc.
1 East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Vacu-Maid of Orlando
940 Highland Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32803
CENTRAL BUILT-IN VACUUM
SYSTEM
Agency -Walter H. Mitchell
Advertising Agency
229-B Pasadena Place
Orlando, Florida 32803
Wood Products, Inc.
3310 No. Main Street
Gainesville, Florida
TECHNICAL FURNITURE &
CASEWORK
Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace &
Company
135 So. LaSalle Street
Chicago, Illinois
LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING FILL
Agency- Fuller 6 Smith 6
Ross, Inc.
410 No. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611

Listed here are firms whi:h
have helped this Official
Journal of the FAAIA grow
during the past year. All
services, materials and
products which they make
or sell are of quality to
merit your specification.
They seek your approval.


17









New Zonolite

fire-rated

constructions

can save you

thousands of dollars

on your

next building!

With Zonolite's specifications, it is a simple
matter to select the lightest, most inexpensive
fire-rated constructions appropriate to your
building design.
The rated systems cover every aspect of build-
ing where fireproofing is needed: girders, beams,
columns, roof decks, walls, floors, and ceilings.
New lightweight composite steel floor and com-
posite beam assemblies are included.
Although many of these recent, rated assem-
blies are not known to the entire industry as yet,
they have already been responsible for cutting
millions of tons of unnecessary weight from ex-
isting buildings, and millions of dollars of un-
necessary construction costs.
As you will quickly see, they can reduce total
building weight and costs for you, too, while
giving your buildings total fire protection.
For complete information,
burn along dotted line and
mail coupon
today.

r -------------------
Zonolile Div.sion, W. R. Grace & Co. i
m ow AT^ "^ -^ "^^^S Depl. rA-10
G RACEj Merchandise Marl Plaza
t n Chicago. Illnois 60654
t -IL' nU,=ntle men pFi i .- n,j m- con-',ip.l:lle inl.orra nlon
S lr or, Z rohii T IaI Fr. I-'r. .:i.In rr, L r
\ Ir,;.pe r.ie V* y. I a-m 1:,3ri -ularlij ,r r, l ..d in

S in3rrir b C1 1|P)

T TiTLLE.________________



,, T 5 T A TE __ ZIP__



STHE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968-----------------------


Advertisers' Index
ALBRITTON-WILLIAMS, INC.
36
ALFRED S. AUSTIN CONST. CO.
34
AMERICAN CYANAMID CO.
58
CERTIFIED PLUMBERS OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
60
CONCRETE PRODUCTS
DIVISION, W. R. GRACE & CO.
21
DELTA DOOR CO.
37
FLA. CATERPILLAR DEALERS
61
FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION
CO.
29
FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
32 -33
FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSN.
22
FLORIDA PORTLAND
CEMENT DIVISION
27
FORMAT 10
37
GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS,
31
HARRIS PAINT COMPANY
24 25
JOE PAYNE & SON, INC.
39
KOPPERS COMPANY, INC.-
DANTZLER LUMBER &
EXPORT CO., INC.
40
LAMBERT CORP. OF FLORIDA
59
MERCER PLASTICS CO., INC.
6
ORLANDO UTILITIES
57
PPG INDUSTRIES
28
PAXSON ELECTRIC CO.
35
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSN.
30
RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORS
26
SOLITE CORPORATION
23
STANDARD MECHANICAL CO.
37
SUMMERLIN BROS., INC.
39
TITUSVILLE NURSERY
38
TSCHIRGI-HUNTER CONST. CO.
35
UNISTRUT DIVISION OF
HEYL & PATTERSON
20
W. S. LEE COMPANY, INC.
38
ZONOLITE DIVISION,
W. R. GRACE & CO.
18






#106 AMERICAN OLEAN TILE COMPANY
1000 Cannon Avenue
Lansdale, Pennsylvania 19446
#101 AMERICAN SAINT GOBAIN CORPORATION
1400 Lincoln Street
Kingsport, Tennessee 37662
#204 AUTOMATED BUILDING COMPONENTS, INC.
7525 N. W. 37th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33147
#203 BRADENTON STONE CO.
BURNS BRICK CO.
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
#501 BRADLEY WASHFOUNTAIN COMPANY
W142 N9101 Fountain Boulevard
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53051
#100 CONCRETE PRODUCTS DIVISION
W. R. Grace & Company
P. 0. Box 130
Brunswick, Georgia 31520
#102 DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
2766 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33306
#205 FAAIA SERVICE CENTER
#503 FLORIDA-INVESTOR OWNED ELECTRIC
504 UTILITY COMPANIES
Florida Power & Light Company
Florida Power Corporation
Gulf Power Company
Tampa Electric Company
1213 16th Street North
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
#407 FLORIDA LAMINATORS
P. 0. Box 1722
Lakeland, Florida 33802
#201 FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC.
Tampa Orlando
P. 0. Box 1259
Tampa, Florida 33601
#603 FLORIDA SOLITE COMPANY
1114 Seaboard Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
#408 FOLDOWN AWNINGS, INC.
1060 E. 33 Street
Hialeah, Florida 33013
#311 GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
P. 0. Box 1259
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
#300 GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION
P. 0. Box 7215
Orlando, Florida 32804
#103 GOTHAM EDUCATIONAL EQUIPMENT CO., INC.
91 Weyman Avenue
New Rochelle, New York 10805
#105 HARRIS PAINT COMPANY
1010-26 N. 19th Street
Tampa, Florida 33601
#206 HEYWOOD-WAKEFIELD CO.
53 Jamestown Drive
Ormond Beach, Florida 32074
Equipment & Furniture Co.
250 Layne Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
#210 HOUDAILLE-DUVAL-WRIGHT CO.
P. 0. Box 1588
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
#308 KAWNEER COMPANY
7651 N. W. 25 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33147
Lounge
Area KNOLL ASSOCIATES
111 N. E. 40th Street
Miami, Florida 33137
#500 LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
20 North Coburn
Orlando, Florida 32802
#309 LENNOX INDUSTRIES, INC.
P. 0. Box 340
Decatur, Georgia 30032
#200 LIBBEY OWENS FORD GLASS COMPANY
6600 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33138


Product

Exhibits

Will Be

A

Convention

Highlight





#607 MERRY COMPANIES INC. MERRY AR-LITE
PANEL DIVISION
P. 0. Box 1474
Augusta, Georgia 30903
#306 THE MOSAIC TILE COMPANY OF FLORIDA/
307 A Subsidiary of Stylon Corporation
(formerly Miami Tile and Terrazzo, Inc.)
6454 N. E. Fourth Avenue
Miami, Florida 33138
#402 MURPHY PAINTS INC, & GLEEM PAINTS
Division of Baltimore Paint & Chemical Corp.
5030 Gulf Blvd.
St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 33706
#605 NUTONE-DIVISION OF SCOVILL
Madison & Red Bank Roads
Cincinnati, Ohio 45227
#312 PPG INDUSTRIES, INC.
600 Gateway No. 1
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
#505 PALM BEACH CLAY TILE COMPANY
P. 0. Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404
#400 PAVLOW OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
401 2801 S. W. 31st Avenue
Miami, Florida 33133
#108 PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
# 104 REZTONETM Division of Florida Tile Industries, Inc.
P. 0. Box 447
Lakeland, Florida 33802
#403 NELSON ROMERO
7026 W. Hillsborough Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33615
#207 SAUNA ROOMS OF AMERICA, INC.
5794 Commerce Lane
South Miami, Florida 33143
#107 SOUTHERN BRICK & TILE MANUFACTURERS ASSN.
230 Spring Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
#406 TUBE-O-MATIC, INC.
12220 N. E. 13th Court
North Miami, Florida 33161
#211 TUNISON BRICK, INC.
P. 0. Box 905
Lake Park, Georgia 31636
#310 U. S. PLYWOOD
Box 3256, Sta. F
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
#606 VACU-MAID OF ORLANDO
940 Highland Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32803
#604 WESTERN WATERPROOFING COMPANY, INC.
4924 LaSalle Street
Tampa, Florida 33607
#202 ZONOLITE DIVISION, W. R. GRACE & COMPANY
1555 N. W. 1st Avenue
Boca Raton, Florida 33432











UNISTRUT DIVISION
HEYL & PATTERSON, INCORPORATED
P. 0. BOX 749, COCOA, FLORIDA
TELEPHONE 632-8686 TELETYPE 305-632-0409






Photo: Robert Dittrich


-g.
UNISTRUT space frame, Imperial Estates
Elementary School, Titusville, Florida. Lemon
and Megginson, A.I.A., Architects.


20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968





[;ID
AmI0


FEATURES
Structural strength
Water resistance
Thermal insulation
Noncombustibility
Accoustical control
Beauty
Light reflection


ZONOLITE DIVISION


CONCRETE
PRODUCTS
DIVISION
W. R. GRACE & CO.


P.O. Box 130, Brunswick, Georgia 31520 Telephone 912-265-6900


21


ROOF DECKS





SIR, I'M THE CONTACT MAN
FORTH LOCAL NATURAL GAS
UTILITY AND I'D LIKE
TO HAVE YOUR ADVICE
AS TO WHAT IS THE
BEST APPROACH TO
YOU FELLOWS




1.



WELL, HOW ABOUT THE
'VISUAL AIDS" ROUTE,WITHI
SUDES SHOWIN6 OPERAT-
IN6 ECONOMY OF 6A5
OVER OTHER ENERGY
SOURCES...SAVINS
ThROU6H INTERRUP-
TI1BLE RATES...CASE 1
HISTORIES ON AIR.
CONDITIONING, 6AS
FIRED BOILERS...YOU
KNOW...A.LTHAT STUFF


FOR INSTANCE, THERE'S THE
PEDANTIC APPROACH...ON
A VERY IH16H LEVEL...60 -
IN6 BA(K 1TOTHE ORIGINS
OF NATURAL 6A.S...ITS
146HER BTU CONTENT,
lACK OF RESIDUAL
HYDROCARBONS... (.
SUPERIORITY OVER
OTHER FOSSIL FUELS



2.


WOULDN'T 11HAT BE
RAT7LER 30RIN6?


THAT'S THE BUDDY-BUDDY
TECHNIQUE... PLAY GOLF,
RAVE FUN... AND SLIP IN
BITS ABOUT6AS BOILER
CONVERSIONS FOR
FUEL ECONOMY AND
TO ELIMINATE AIR
POLLUTION, KEEP PEO-
PLE OFF YOUR BACK...
I DIDN'T THINK
YOU'RE THE TYPE.


WHY DON'T YOU JUST SAY,
"LOOK, YOU'VE GO6T CLIENTS...
WEVE 60T NATURAL6AS.
A LOT OF MIGHTY SMART
PEOPLE ARE BUYING OUR
PRODUCT. IN ALL FAIR- /
NESS TO YOURCLIENTS/ \
HADN'T YOU BETTER
LOOK INTO IT?" t


Natural gas is in plentiful supply in virtually all areas of Florida.
For details on natural gas service, contact your local natural gas utility
or Florida Natural Gas Association, P. 0. Box 579, Ocala, Florida.

22 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968







































Lawrence Lewis, Jr., Richmond, Va., Owner Oliver & Smith, A.I.A., (Herbert L. Smith, III, F.A.I.A., Partner In Charge), Norfolk, Va., Architects Henry
von Oesen & Associates, Wilmington, N. C., Structural Engineers The Auchter Co., Jacksonville, Fla., General Contractor S & G Concrete Co.,
Wilmington, N. C., Concrete Supplier S & G Prestress Co., Wilmington, N. C., Prestress Supplier Point Peter Block Co., Wilmington, N. C. and
Smith Concrete Products Co., Kinston, N. C., Masonry Unit Suppliers









BLOCKADE RUNNER MOTOR HOTEL
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA
Poised like a blockade runner of old between rolling surf and a calm blue
sound, this luxurious hotel surrounds its guests with pleasures. They usually sur-
render quickly.
Among the modern, luxurious facilities of this uncrowded resort: all guest
rooms overlook water . six spacious dining and meeting rooms .. a sweeping
oceanside terrace and swimming pool . miles of beach fun.
Time-saving and economical construction made full use of Solite's lightweight
structural concrete and masonry units. Dead load was substantially reduced in
floors, roof deck, columns, walls and partitions. Lower weight was important to
the foundation piling, and in the use of lightweight reinforced concrete and pre-
stressed T's in the frame.
Embodying modern design at work with versatile materials, the Blockade Run-
ner makes a charming "island of pleasure" for conventions or personal vacations.






Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
S.C.L. Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202


22




.-.I 13 ,--
00000 00000000000
O 01
0D




<0



0

,O o DOO"'"000O0'


Some people
believe that
painting
should be

A

WORK

OF ART


HARRIS does! Paint should be many things.
It should be the final touch of beauty to
every home and building you design. It
should please the eye excite the senses -
issue a warm invitation to enter. It should be
an enduring thing -- able to withstand the
test of time.
That's why HARRIS PAINT COMPANY has
created a line of paints tailored to meet year
needs and specifications. For exteriors you'll
find that HARRIS Vinyl-X Masonry & Stucco
Coating is climate-tailored for Florida's sub-
tropical weather and it complements your
creative plans with immediate good appear-
ance and supreme durability.
There are HARRIS PAINTS created specific-
ally for metal pipes, flashings and ductwork
that can protect and at the same time -
serve as a warning in industrial areas.
HARRIS PAINTS protect such diverse opera-
tions as the Sunshine Skyway in St. Peters-
burg, Florida; NASA's "Moon Shot" at Cape
Kennedy; and the marine research ship
"Oceanographer". The paints are widely


u' During the Convention-visit the HARRA
24 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968




7- Z.
' "* " . ' . 1 . o 1 *, .


sed wherever corrosion protection and main- '
tenance are required such as federal and local
government installations, marine, chemical,
f processing and automotive industries
as well as in the home.
Ceraimi-Cote a thermosettg coating
which self-converts and catalytically reacts
Ifrom a liquid plastic to an enduring vitreous-
like coating was created by HAmRIS in such
a way that franchised, operations are not
required.
1 HARRI PArNms are made in the South and
climate-tailored to meet our sub-tropical liv-
ing conditions. Colors, too, are keyed to our
environment. Mildew resistant exterior
.ints, scrubbable, durable interior finishes
nd fashion colors to delight the most dis-
iminating taste do much to make living
particularly enjoyable in the New South.
There are 34 HARRIS PAINT Centers in
Florida ... factory operated branches ...
staffed by trained paint men who are ready
and able to assist you.in every phase of the
Painting Section in your latest specifications.
No paint manufacturer can offer you more.
A can of HARRIS Paint is a can of paint that
makes economic and artistic sense. A paint
that has no equal.


HARRIS





COMPANY


TAMPA,


FLORIDA


A now Chemle.al selnbal


SAINT COMPANY DISPLAY Y IN Booth No. 105


/*4


i- *


, 13


A,'
*"1~














AiD
25'^





OUTSIDE and INSIDE


GULF LIFE TOWER
Architect: Welton Becket and Associates
Associate Architect: Kemp, Bunch & Jackson, Architects
Interior Designer: Lloyd G. Gross, A.I.D.
the combined efforts of architect and
interior designer produce fine structures
26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968




THE

REAL

BEAUTY

IS

ECONOMY

AND

DURABILITY


Versatility of concrete masonry is illustrated in these three structures in Southeast Florida: Atlantic-
Bedford and Scenery, Inc., Hialeah, and Al Pflueger, Inc., Hallandale.


Concrete masonry walls and pre-stressed roofs
provide you the best buy in warehouses today.
The advantages over other types of construction
are numerous: lowest initial cost, most flexible
and attractive designs, best protection and insula-
tion, lowest maintenance costs, savings in insur-
ance payments and longest life. From the time
you start building, you save money all the way.


The permanence of concrete means you'll have
a better looking building far longer. And you'll
keep on saving money throughout those addi-
tional years'.
For further information on the advantages of
concrete for your plant, warehouse or other com-
mercial structure, write Florida Portland Cement,
P. 0. Box 1528, Tampa, Florida 33601.


SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA CEMENTS, MANUFACTURED IN FLORIDA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
Division of
General Portland Cement Company
PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI




























IH








































3 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968











Gas heating and water
heating and shopping cen-
ter complexes? You can't
beat it for economy and
dependability. The figures
prove it! And that vital
fast recovery rate prevents
hot water shortage. "

For your next design project,
consider the prestige... and the
advantages of specifying gas.
Contact your local Gas Utility.
He's in the Yellow Pages.


Trail Plaza, Sarasota
Architect: Demetrious J. Athan, A.I.A., Tampa
Served by Southern Gas and Electric Corp.






TRANSMISSION COMPANY
the natural way to modern living!







A concrete roof



for the


price of wood?



SSure, you always knew concrete would be
great for roofs.
But the expense.
Concrete can't burn. It stands up to high winds


Then there is the concrete roof system's
conditioning costs. And concrete's easy maintenance.
Rust-free, rot-free, damp-resistant.
B But the expense?
Not any more. Right here in Florida, Engineer-Builder
Jack Sullivan has built more than 150 concrete
masonry homes with concrete roof trusses and roof
decks. His system, using cast-in-place concrete, is
competitive with any other roofing material-
including wood.
The same system would work just fine for
low-rise motels, apartments and other commercial
structures.
Want to know more? We just happen to have a
14-minute film we would like you to see. That's what
the coupon is for.
See it on film
I--------------------------------
I Yes, we would like to see your film on the Sullivan System
I of concrete roof construction.
I Name
Company
I Address
City State Zip
I Portland Cement Association
I 1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization of cement manufacturers to improve
I and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete
30 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968






















You are looking at one of Gem's

top door-to-door salesmen.
Nothing sells Gem Doors like Gem Doors.
That's why we're showing you how Architect Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.,
A.I.A., used our Series 400 Rim Type Gem Door with M" porcelain pan-
els in a variety of colors to achieve architectural excellence with econ-
omy and efficiency at Lantana Junior High School, Lantana, Florida.
Gem extruded-aluminum, heliarc-welded doors and frames are
available in a variety of models for residential, commercial, and indus-
trial use. And with far to many features to list here.
That's why we'd like you to take a good look at our doors. Please
write for our free catalogs and for the location of Gem Door instal-
lations near you. Then you can see for yourself how Gem Doors com-
bine beauty, strength, and economy, while conforming to the most
rigid architectural standards of performance and durability.
Open a new door. Contact:

Gem
Aluminum Produets, Inc.
715 Barnett Drive
Lake Worth, Florida
Phone: (305) 585-1766


31




- *~'~
* I


Whether you
buy,
sell,
use,
install
or
specify
coMM/HEATING
EQUIPMENT
for
stores,
offices,
restaurants,
motels,
industrial plants,.
homes,
or
apartment units
...there's no -match for
flameless electric!


32 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


w N


'q


















today's key"card"
for Florida's better livin
and business climate.
FLAMELESS electric reverse-cycle air conditioning
taves the higher cost of separate heating and cool-
ing systems. One compact, space-saving unit does
the work of two systems.
FLAMELESS... no fumes, smoke, soot or odors.
Saves on cleaning and redecorating bills.
FLAMELESS... requires no flues or vents. Easily
installed in out-of-the-way places. Cheaper to
maintain and operate.
FLAMELESS ... year 'round right for Florida's
climate. The rapid trend toward electric reverse-
cycle air conditioning4-as brought substantial price
reductions. Many models, sizes and styles available.
Want more facts? Contact your electric utility
company... no obligation.

Florida's metric Companies. ..
Taxpaying, Investor-Owned.

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
GULF POWER COMPANY





bib




Congratulations to McLane, Ranon,
Mcintosh & Bernardo, AIA, on their
deserving recognition for the Office
Building for Florida West Coast
Chapter of Associated General
Contractors, Inc.
We are proud to have been General
Contractors on this project


Alfred


S. Austin


Construction


Company


Inc.


GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS


P. 0. Box 18451
Tampa, Florida 33609
Suite 501, Bayside Building
2909 Bay to Bay Blvd.
Telephone 839-5454


34 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968





We are happy to have been a part of the team
which built Imperial Estates Elementary School













ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR
1050 Flagler Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
Telephone 398-1101


Paxson Electric


Company


John B. Tschirgi
and
Hunter Construction Co.

1212 Omar Road
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
Telephone 832-1944


Congratulations to Imperial Estates Elementary
School for an award winning design.


35




























Congratulations on an
Award winning design
for the Killearn Golf
and Country Club
We are proud to have
been part of the team


ALBRITTON-WILLIAMS, INC








P. 0. Box 567
Tallahassee, Florida
(910) 877-1191


36 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


./general
contractors






STANDARD MECHANICAL, INC.


mechanical


contractors

m '0"77'-


MECHANICAL
CONTRACTOR
FOR
IMPERIAL
ESTATES
ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL








950 S.W. 12 Avenue
P.O. Box 308
Pompano Beach, Florida 33061
305-933-9321
WINTER PARK/305 644-4412
MIAMI/305 945-2281


Dell Corp.
MANUFAC Tu.. ER r L.- Doo s



P. 0. Box 10586
1040 W. 15th Street
Lewis Terminals
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404












Imperial Estates Elementary
School / Congratulations from
the manufacturers of custom
sliding glass dors.


Format Ten, Inc.
ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE

8644 49th Street N.
P. 0. Box 707
Pinellas Park, Florida 33565
Telephone 544-8243

The following Hardware Manufacturer's products
were used on the Imperial Estates Elementary
School:

1. Sargent & Company-
Locksets, Door Closers, Exit
Devices, Door Stops, Flush
Bolts.
2. Hager Hinge Company-
Butt Hinges.
3. Baldwin Hardware Co.-
Push Plates, Door Pulls.
4. Viola Associates-
Thresholds.
5. Glynn Johnson-
Door Stops & Holders.


37






















Research at the

University of

Florida


In a long dormant corner of the Uni-
versity of Florida campus, rumblings
of research are erupting that may
change concepts in man-made en-
vironments.
The search for new light in modern
living is being carried on by archi-
tects, artists and specialists in build-
ing construction, lighting and even
music instruction.
Catalyst for the research is William
G. Wagner, an associate professor of
architecture, who directs the not-so-
well-known Bureau of Research in the
College of Archiecture and Fine Arts.
Wagner explained that although the
bureau was established 20 years ago,
it remained inactive until two months
ago when it became a budgeted unit.
The bureau acts as a clearing house
for College of Architecture and Fine
Arts personnel who wish to engage in
research.
One such research project-by faculty
members in architecture and build-
ing construction is exploring the
feasibility of an underfloor air dis-
tribution system for conditioning Flor-
ida homes. At present, the system
utilizes wood framing, eliminating
duct work.
The project, which renewed interest
in research in the areas of architecture
and fine arts, began under a series of
grants, totaling $92,000, from the
U. S. Forest Service. The objective of
the project, begun more than a year
ago, is to determine the performance
of an underfloor air distribution sys-
tem using wood floor framing.
Continue on Page 39 -


We provided the finish hardware and
toilet partitions for the Killearn Golf and
Country Club


















Mill Avenue
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
(904) 224-0147

CONTRACT HARDWARE AND BUILDERS SPECIALTIES


W. S. Lee Company, Inc.


Titusville Nursery

100 North Washington
Titusville, Florida 32780
Telephone 267-5391






















Trees and plants for the Imperial Estates
Elementary School came from our nursery


38 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968






Millwork for the Imperial Estates
Elementary School

















MANUFACTURERS OF QUALITY MILLWORK FOR 38 YEARS
IN FLORIDA / MEMBERS OF AWl.




405 Loomis Avenue
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015
Telephone 252-0581


Summerlin Bros. Inc.


Joe Payne & Son, Inc.


2101 Florida Avenue
P. 0. Box 9145
Tampa, Florida 33604






















We are proud to have done the painting and caulking
on the Headquarter's Building, Florida West Coast Chapter
Associated General Contractors of America.


RESEARCH AT U.F.
Continued from Page 38

About 150 temperature and moisture
probes are distributed throughout the
1,900 sq. ft. building to determine
building materials performance as well
as humidity, temperature and air
movement inside the rooms as related
to human comfort.

Research in interior design to deter-
mine effective lighting in both atmos-
pheric and critical situations is being
conducted by James McFarlane, as-
sistant professor of architecture, using
a composite model to study and ana-
lyze light in space with color.

A project that may make teaching
music more meaningful to children in
the lower grades is being conducted
by James Hale, associate professor of
music.

Hale explains that modern methods
of teaching elementary age students
music leave out the bass part of com-
positions. But he believes it is im-
portant to include the bass so the
child will receive a full awareness of
the musical scale while he is young.

To help teach bass early, Hale is de-
veloping a prototype instrument
which includes the five basic tones
usually associated with children's
music. The instrument and music will
be color coded for ease in teaching
early primary, handicapped and brain-
damaged children to play simple
tunes.

Byron Prugh, associate professor of
building construction, is working to
make construction slopes safer. His
project involves development of a
method of soil analysis to determine
how the ground can be excavated to
avoid cave-ins and landslides when
foundations are being dug.

Leland Shaw, assistant professor of
architecture, has been involved with
designing an adaptive playground for
pre-school age, physically handicapped
children. His research has been in the
area of perception, using forms, tex-
ture and colors to provide a stimulus
and reinforcement for the perceptu-
ally handicapped child.

The objective of his research is to
create a therapeutic environment with
equipment of unique design to help
the child improve his motor percep-
tion. E


The Florida North Central Chapter,
AIA has established an Award for
"Excellency in Draftsmanship." The
Tallahassee Chapter has requested the
FAAIA to consider this Award for
State-wide competition.


39







Kopp ers


fire-fighting


suner wood


P.S'S.,,


0ome


I I1.


cut construction


costs 10%


Here's how the J. C. Penney Com-
pany built lasting fire protection
into their newly enlarged and
modernized store in Phoenix,
Arizona. By using Non-Com lum-
ber on the job, construction costs
were cut an estimated 10%!
Non-Com lumber is the Koppers
super wood with proven fire re-
tardant qualities. It has gained
Code acceptance from coast to
coast, and its use can often re-
sult in lower insurance rates.


Non-Com lumber gets its deep-
in-the-cell protection against fire
through pressure-treating with
chemicals-yet Non-Com lumber
keeps all of wood's workability!
That's where real savings come
in: Carpenters can do all the
work. Hardware, wiring, plumb-
ing are easier to install or attach.
Wouldn't savings and fire protec-
tion like this make Non-Com lum-
ber the ideal choice for your next
construction project?


r ---------------- I
Dantzler Lumber & Export Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 6340
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
I] Send copy of Catalog W-578
I Have representative call
NAME
I
COMPANY.
ADDRESS
I
I CITY
STATE ZIP___
I------- ------- -----I


40 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968






For the 1968 FAAIA Awards Program


These Three Men











LAWRENCE B. ANDERSON, FAIA CHARLES COLBERT, FAIA ROBERT L. GEDDES, FAIA
Boston, Mass. New Orleans, La. Princeton, N.J.


Selected these projects for

HONOR AWARDS:
Imperial Estates Elementary School
Titusville, Florida
Architects: Lemon & Megginson
Headquarters, West Coast Chapter
Associated General Contractors Assn. of America
Tampa, Florida
Architects: McLane, Ranon, McIntosh & Bernardo'
Killearn Golf & Country Club
Tallahassee, Florida
Architects/Engineers: Barrett, Daffin & Coloney
Sebastian Trovato Residence
Miami, Florida
Architects: Milton C. Harry & Associates


And these for

MERIT AWARDS:


GENERAL COMMENTS
The Jury selected four projects for
honor awards and five for merit
awards.
We noted, with surprise, that no
buildings accommodating commercial
activities survived the selection, and
that four of the nine awards were
for public buildings and three for
group housing.


Sarasota City Hall
Sarasota, Florida
Architects/Engineers: West/Conyers
Lynndale Homes
Dade County, Florida
Architects: Russell-Melton Associates
Place-by-the-Sea Apartments
Atlantic Beach, Florida
Architect: William Morgan, AIA
Miami Lakes Senior High School
Hialeah, Florida
Architects/Engineers: Greenleaf/Telesca
George A. Smathers Plaza
Miami, Florida
Architect: Robert Bradford Browne, AIA


41








Honor Award

Imperial Estates Elementary School

Titusville, Florida

ARCHITECT:
Lemon & Megginson, AIA
DESIGNER:
Clyde Brady, RA
CONTRACTOR:
Tschirgi & Hunter


Recently developed educational speci
fications for Brevard County elemen
tary school describe the need fo
complexes of space suitable for house
ing a teaching team, 120 students
and virtually all required facilities
within a complex of spaces for 121
students. Six such complexes corn
prise a plant for 720. The program'
space allocations suggest a school
within-a-school approach as an archi
tectural solution.
Food service from portable serving
equipment is planned to travel around
to each complex at 20-minute intel


Photos by Keith Ycany


42 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968







vals, using hot/cold carriers dispatch-
ed from a prep-kitchen at a nearby
elementary school. The serving kit-
chen is designed and located so that
serving and eating may take place in
the court as well as within the six
complexes. U


JURY COMMENTS
We believe that this is the most
significant project in its potential to
shape human life. The central open
area sheltered by a space frame, while
not without percursors, is an innova-
tive idea appropriate to Florida. It
provides an environment that can af-
fect educational method for the stu-
dents fortunate enough to attend this
school. Also, every part of the inner
educational spaces of the school is
handled with loving care. Not only
the architects, but the educators re-
sponsible, deserve high commendation
for their willingness to accept innova-
tions of substance.


TYPICAL
EDUCATIONAL W7
COMPLEX & I DuT, *VRM


OVERALL PLAN -







Honor Award

Headquarters, Florida West Coast Chapter,

Associated General Contractors of America
Tampa, Florida
ARCHITECT:
McLane, Ranon, McIntosh and Bernardo
DESIGNING ARCHITECT:
Rick Rados
CONTRACTOR:
Alfred S. Austin Construction Co., Inc.


Photos C. Wade Swicord







The program required an office and
conference center in which the Asso-
ciation will carry out their routine
administrative functions as well as
labor negotiations and apprentice pro-
grams. They expressed a desire for a
relaxed atmosphere in a structure
which would be exemplary of the con-
struction industry's highest standards.
The plan groups offices, conference
rooms, and other spaces around a
central reception space where all cor-
ridors originate as low open balconies.
The raised roof levels which provide
natural light to the corridors converge


at the reception space. The conver-
gence of the raised roof levels upon
the reception space provides this area
with natural light and the spatial
strength necessary to make it the vis-
ual, as well as functional, hub of the
structure. N


JURY COMMENTS





The small office headquarters is an
interesting tiering of structural ele-
ments to provide highly controlled
natural light. In sheer craftsmanship
of space organization and clarity of
detail, this little building stands out
as expressing extraordinary coherence
of purpose. The clients took a delib-
erate risk of excellence and will reap
long-term benefits.


FLOOR PLAN


A. Reception H. Kitchen
B. Toilet I. Mechanical Equipment
C. Lounge J. Janitor
D. Offices K. Board Room
E. Work Room L. Conf./Classroom
F. Clerical Office M. Courtyard
G. Executive Director Office N. A/C Condenser


45








Honor Award

Killearn Golf & Country Club

Tallahassee, Florida


ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS:
Barrett Daffin & Coloney
CONTRACTOR:
Albritton-Williams, Inc.


The design concept developed from
studies of the approach to the build-
ing site. The massing of the building
and its lines continue the lines and
direction of the hill. Through this se-
quence of movement up the hill, the
viewer follows the gentle rise of the
land which culminates in the build-
ing itself. The extensive use of ex-
posed wood for columns, trusses and
siding reinforces this repose with the
site. The building culminates the hill.
Upon entering a major space, the anti-
thesis of this repose comes into play.


46 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968







Glass walls that were opaque on ap-
proach reveal the view that you were
not aware of. The interiors employ a
very strong use of raw color on the
horizontal plane and are like a slap
in the face upon entrance; but once
you have been seated, the stronger
repetition of the structural modules
and the extensive use of wood, re-
focus the viewer's attention to the
site to complete the cycle and return
to repose with the completion of the
site. N


JURY COMMENTS





This building is a breath of fresh
air in the structural organization of
space. It does not belong to any de-
sign school, and it has a kind of un-
sophisticated exploratory quality that
is part of its charm, even if marred
by some discontinuities and lapses of
detail. The most coherent massing is
that seen from the golf course.







Honor Award

Sebastian Trovato Residence
Miami, Florida





ARCHITECT:
Milton C. Harry & Associates, AIA


The owner is a painter and a sculptor.
His wife, also an artist, works closely
with her husband on many of his
projects. Their day to day pattern -
iving, working, exhibiting and enter-
taining- all flow easily one into the
other. The problem was to provide a
self contained environment which
would permit this easy flow to occur.
As resolved, the major elements of the
house consist of a studio, exhibit gal-
leries and sculpture courts, all con-
tained under a single large roof. Into
these volumes are introduced mezza-
nines and alcoves which define areas


48THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968







for sleeping, dining, entertaining and
displaying finished work.

The site, flat pine and palmetto
woodland, provided little in the wav
of views or vistas. It was developed
primarily as a setting for the house
and for outdoor sculpture. Exterior
openings on the lower work and gal-
lery lcvel are limited to avoid dis-
tractions. The upper living level is
piovidcd with larger openings and a
balcony looking into the tree tops. E


JURY COMMENTS






The Trovato Residence is a highly
seductive composition that accom-
plishes its purpose of providing what
appears to be a very accurate fit for
a way of life organized around sophis-
ticated and opulent visual effects. The
forms are harmonious and well-pro-
portioned, and the play of light is
consistently developed.


Photos by Peter R. Bromer



























N


FIRST FLOOR PLAN_ .>'


Merit Award

Sarasota City Hall
Sarasota, Florida




ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS:
West & Conyers
CONTRACTOR:
E. E. Simmons


This design is an integrated building,
parking, park and aims at the revitali-
zation of a blighted downtown area.
Stepped terrace parking with retain-
ing walls to conceal the cars, with
landscaping, pedestrian halls, pools
and fountains all combine to achieve
this.
Provided as the public meeting room
is a chamber in which the role of the
citizen as participant is expressed bv
way of a sloped floor "theatre" with
the governing body function below
the elevation of the surrounding elec-
torate.


50 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968
































Photos Lionel Murphy


JURY COMMENTS









Sarasota City Hall is remarkable for
its successful site organization and its
pleasant informality; it is a place to
carry on municipal business without
pomposity.


51



















FRONT ELEVATION COMBINATION OF ROW (TOWN) HOUSES


LYNNDALE


H 0 M E S ROW (TOWN) HOUSE TYPE "F"

SCALE : I'. 4'*0"


Merit Award

Lynndale Homes

Dade County, Florida






ARCHITECT:
Russell-Melton-Associates, AIA


This project is a master plan for
mixed development garden apartments
and row (town) houses with shopping
facilities within the limits of obtain-
able zoning.

Recreation and pedestrian areas con-
nect the row houses and apartments
to community shopping. These spaces
vary in size and scale to furnish vari-
ety and individuality as well as points
of reference along the path-like link
between living units and shopping
facilities. E


JURY COMMENTS


Lynndale Homes and Place By The
Sea Apartments are two very merito-
rious solutions to medium density
group housing. The first has not yet
been built, but the design shows a
real control of the problem, both in
its site plan and in the unit plans of
the dwellings. It would appear to have
promise of realization without strain.
The second has been constructed, at
least in part; it is in some ways more
original and ingenious, but also more
difficult to evaluate.


52 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


LYNNDALE HOMES


SCALE f1'-


FIRST FL-R PLAN




















































This one hundred apartment group is
the first phase of a master plan for a,
7.7 acre site on a former hotel reser-
vation. The three story apartments
form a single articulate mass along
the western side of the site with maxi-
mum exposure toward the beach. A
main entry drive passes through the
building and leads to the center of the
complex. Vertical entries between
units give maximum privacy and
through ventilation. Typical apart-
ments have fireplaces with built-in
seating and private gardens on the
ground floor or balconies on the sec-
ond floor. 0


Merit Award

Place By The Sea Apartments

Atlantic Beach, Florida



ARCHITECT:
William Morgan, AIA
CONTRACTOR:
Preston H. Haskell Company


53








_d ......, _. -
,*- .... ., .--1. -_^_-


-1:




















_.j.....*x._









-- A compact, ordered arrangement of
M erit A w ard flexible yet integrated spaces, with
minimum circulation distances.
Miami Lakes Senior Hxiign Scnool ments are provided for in all areas.
The divisible auditorium with stage
Hialeah, Florida and rear screen projection provides
for a total seating of 894 or three
separate instructional areas, one seat-
ing 678, and two seating 108 each,
with counterwork surfaces. The Little
Theatre provides an additional group
instructional area.
ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS: The gymnasium is divisible into two
Greenleaf/Telesca activity areas.

54 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968




























SITE PLAN


The planetarium serves this school as
well as others in the area not having
planetarium facilities.
General instructional areas are sub-
divided by movable chalkboard parti-
tions and in required places by fold-
ing partitions.
Acoustics and lighting have been
studied extensively and given careful
consideration in the project.
Audiovisual and television facilities are
provided to support present "Educa-
tional Objectives" and the "Discern-
ible Trends" of future educational
application for all areas of learning. U


JURY COMMENTS



Miami Lakes Senior High School
whose program is probably typical of
many large urban schools today, has
a successful vertical organization of
major assembly spaces and a well-con-
trived circulation system. This and
other school projects submitted raised
deep concerns on the part of the
Jury as to the wisdom of the current
practice and false economy of isolat-
ing young minds from the outside
world by the complete suppression of
windows.


55


r l"d


LONITUDINAL SECTION A.A
t ,.o










































'hlotos Iby (corgc userna


This project was featured in THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT/FEB. '68


Merit Award

George A. Smathers

Plaza
Miami, Florida

ARCHITECT:
Robert Bradford Browne, AIA
CONTRACTOR:
Apgar & Markham Const. Co., Inc.


The solution is a poured concrete
building complex, in which structure,
form and finish are combined in a
single building operation. Because
each set of forms has many reuses,
and because those forms are designed
to be moved in huge completed as-
semblies, the penalty for a greater per-
imeter is absorbed. Furthermore, be-
cause of this system; curves and angles
could also be introduced to wall sur-
faces without penalty.
The exterior concrete walls wcre
stained and waterproofed to the archi-
tects specification with a mixture of


Thompson's Color and Thomp
clear Waterseal, creating a t
parent coating which allowed
beauty and texture of the con
surface to show through leavir
with a permanent "wet" look.



JURY COMMENTS
The George A. Smathers Plazi
serves its award in that it furnisl
level of amenity that none of us
thought possible under the PHA
gram as defined by law and bud


56 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968





Everybody profits when the
plans specify...
ALL-ELECTRIC

- -. --7 -Nn


withncreased Client Satisfaction
Increased Client Satisfaction


SInvestor/Owners realize a better
return with all-electric construction. They
get more revenue-producing space, and
lower initial cost is possible through the
reduction or elimination of much
equipment needed for conventional
energy systems.

SArchitects and Engineers enjoy
greater design freedom with more
usable space, and they are able to give
their clients a higher profit/cost ratio.
All-electric buildings also help to create
cleaner, smog-free cities.


For additional information EfECTRI
contact our Sales ?"
Engineering Division,
telephone 841-1230
Owned and operated by the p,


N General Contractors are
able to build faster, better, and more
economically.

*Real Estate Management finds that
the year-round comfort of zonal heating
and cooling means satisfied occupants;
the result is minimum turnover.


*Occupants enjoy a more modern,
comfortable and efficient atmosphere
with electric space-conditioning.


HlitAes
people of Orlando. Florida, who enjoy ALL its profits


57







The look-alikes that make

the bie difference!


These two new carpets from
Columbus are identical to the eye. The
same crisp, contemporary air, the same
eight matching stock-dyed heather tones
that set off an installation.
The difference is the weight.
Contract X is engineered for normal traffic
areas. Contract XI is built for extra-heavy
wear.
By using them according to traffic
loads, you give every foot of floor space
exactly the carpet it requires. Makes a


carpet budget stretch when you don't pay
for weight you won't be using.
This special flexibility makes
Contract X and Contract XI particularly
suitable where there are wide variations in
traffic. In schools, churches, offices,
restaurants, hospitals, department stores,
showrooms.
Both carpets are made with 100%
Type 61B Creslan acrylic fiber with
exceptional bulk. This means extra strength,
extra ease of cleaning. And it means much


more carpet for the money. Both carpets
meet FHA requirements for wear.
So cash in on this latest, greatest
discovery by Columbus. To receive a
sample kit with all the facts on Contract X
and Contract XI, just use the coupon below.



Creslan is a product of American
Cyanamid Company, New York.


Columbus Mills, nc.

Columbus Mills, Inc., P.O. Box 1560, Columbus, Georgia 31902
Gentlemen:
Please send me Technical Information Kit for Contract X and XI *
: carpeting.

NAME___
SADDRESS___________________
CITY ____STATE ZIP_____


58 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968









Orchids to Florida Architects!


.....:.:. For Your Enthusiastic
Acceptance and Confidence
in Specifying Lambert
Quality Products.
Presented by the:

Lambert

Corporation

of Florida

The Sunshine State's
:Number 1
Manufacturer of
Construction Chemicals
and Architectural Coatings

Check these 7 reasons why more Florida Architects specify Lambert
Quality Products than any other brand:


/ 50 Years of Technical Experience
and Know-how!
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FOR FLORIDA'S CLIMATE!
/ Our Staff of Qualified, Trained Field
Engineers is at your Disposal!
/ Prompt, Low Cost Delivery on the
Job Site!


/ Most Complete Product Line in the
Construction Field!
/ Our Field Engineers work with
you to assist Contractors in Appli-
cation Control!
/ Lambert Corporation is dedicated
to the concept that the Florida
Architect contributes the vision
and design for Florida's future!


LAMBERT CORPORATION
OF FLORIDA
Plants and Offices
Box 2226, Orlando, Florida
You are cordially invited to visit our booth .. Number 500.


59























































An Association of Certified Master Plumbers and See Our Display at the Galerie of Building Products, Douglas Village.
Certified Journeymen, members of Plumbers
Local 519, who indicate through their contribution
of Lime and money that they are concerned with CERTIFIED PLUMBERS OF SOUTH FLORIDA
the proper installation of plumbing for the pro-
lection of Public Health and Safety. 2526 W. FLAGLER STREET. MIAMI. FLORIDA / TEL. 642-5031





60 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / October 1968


































Chews up cars faster than

rush hour traffic


Scrap Metal Processing Corporation's Ham-
mermill Car Shredder chews-up 400 cars a day.
Their operation, located in Opa Locka, Florida,
processes junk cars into useable scrap metal.
0 Their giant car shredder can reduce a car to
small pieces of useful scrap metal in seconds.
It's powered by two dependable Caterpillar
D398B diesel engines. The engines produce
2150 horsepower, necessary to operate the


shredder. 0 Scrap Metal Processing Corp., like
so many other businesses, selected Caterpillar
engines because of their economical, depend-
able service. 0 No matter what your power
needs -prime power or stand-by power -
contact your Florida Caterpillar Dealer, he can
assist you in engineering Caterpillar capabili-
ties to fit your needs.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.


61




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