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HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Change/frustration/jealousy
 To the editor
 Newsnotes
 1967 FAAIA architectural exhibit--merit...
 Production for profit--seminar
 Are you a salesman?
 Philosophy
 Advertisers' index
 Re-evaluation of highway desig...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00162
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: December 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00162
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Change/frustration/jealousy
        Page 6
        Page 7
    To the editor
        Page 8
    Newsnotes
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    1967 FAAIA architectural exhibit--merit awards
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Production for profit--seminar
        Page 16
    Are you a salesman?
        Page 17
    Philosophy
        Page 18
    Advertisers' index
        Page 19
    Re-evaluation of highway design
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text










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The Holiday Season gives us an
opportunity to express our
appreciation to you and to wish you
happiness and prosperity throughout
the coming year.


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
Division of
General Portland Cement Company
PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND. MIAMI
I


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Why dedicated builders

prefer Alger long-leaf:


1. GREATER STRENGTH the hard, tight growth
rings and cellular structure of kiln-dried Alger long-
leaf mean greater strength and stiffness, better over-
all performance.
2. GREATER NAIL-HOLDING POWER long-leaf
pine's tight growth rings grip nails tighter. This is a
key factor to the strength of a building, as the joints
are only as strong as the holding power of the nails
that join them.
3. GREATER STABILITY Alger's kiln-dried long-
leaf dimension timbers remain straight, true and level
in any structure because proper drying and seasoning


eliminates moisture and shrinkage, the major causes
of instability.
4. UNIFORM SIZES Alger kiln-dried wood prod-
ucts are machine surfaced and squared to size after
drying. As moisture departs wood, lengths and
widths vary, but Alger sets the specified surface
sizes after the moisture has been 'l...I .
extracted.
For more information on Alger-,
Sullivan long-leaf pine products,
including large structural timbers,
call Mabry Dozier, collect: AC 904-
256-3462.


ALGER-SULLIVAN COMPANY
Century, Florida
DECEMBER, 1967

























ire







penny .

pincher!
New homes and buildings equipped with natural gas
offer savings to builder and buyer alike. For the
builder... there's economy in installation. For example,
gas heating is still the most economical to install.
For the buyer gas equipment costs less to
operate. And it's also the most dependable.
Throughout Florida, prospective home buyers are
finding out the big difference that natural gas makes.
Your local Natural Gas Utility representative
will be happy to give you all the details. He's listed in
the Yellow Pages.




TRANSMISSION COMPANY
Serving all of Florida
through your local Natural
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I








A hotel with no hotel rooms


... built with concrete


The 765 accommodation units
of the Four Ambassadors range
from studio apartments to luxu-
rious penthouses. There's not a
"hotel room" in the house. Every
guest accommodation is a suite.
And each suite is masterfully
planned to provide the most imagi-
native use of floor space possible.
The architects selected concrete
to render this new idea in bay-
front, downtown living which
will serve both businessmen and
vacationers in Miami. And here,
as in new construction ideas
throughout the U.S., Lehigh
Cements helped make it happen.
Lehigh Portland Cement Com-
pany, Allentown, Pa., District
Sales Office: Jacksonville, Fla.
32216.


LEHIGH
CEMENTS -
DECEMBER, 1967


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=win


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The new Biscayne Bay-front complex
consists of four, 19-story residence
towers, an International Promenade
shopping plaza and entertainment cen-
ter, two yacht piers and two swimming
pools. Below-ground parking for 760
cars provides direct access to both the
Promenade and dwelling areas.
The entire complex is constructed of
concrete. Columns and floors are all
reinforced cast-in-place concrete. Walls
are Portland Cement stucco over con-
crete masonry. Each residence tower
measures 110' x 110' overall. And the
Shopping Plaza is 540' x 45'.

Owner:
Nathan Manilow, Harry Salter & Robert L.
Turchin (Partners), Miami Beach, Fla.
Engineer:
James O. Power, So. Miami Beach, Fla.
Architect:
Russell-Melton Associates, Miami, Fla.
General Contractor:
Robert L. Turchin, Inc., Miami Beach, Fla.


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Cement: Concrete = Sunshine: Florida


Yes, just as this simple ratio states cement is
to concrete as sunshine is to Florida. We all know
the important role Florida's delightful, year-round
climate has played in the state's tremendous
growth over the past twenty years.
Even more significant is what an adequate
amount of cement means to concrete. It is
portland cement that makes concrete the number
one construction material .. be it patios or
high-rise buildings, highways or seawalls.
Basic concrete mix formulas are designed to
use only enough cement to insure maximum
strength. durability, stability, watertightness and
other characteristics of quality concrete.
A significant reduction in cement content in
a mix cuts the concrete quality in one way or
another... be it the use of too much water, or


replacing cement with so-called "extenders"
or "additives."
Unfortunately, the undesirable effects of
such cutting may not show up until long after the
concrete is in use. Strength readings alone don't
tell everything, especially about durability.
The fact is there's no substitute for portland
cement in concrete. It is with good reason that
there should be absolute insistence on accurate
and adequate cement content.
If you have any questions on the proper design
of concrete mixes or any other phase of design
and construction, the Portland Cement Association
has a staff of trained specialists ready to assist
you. Feel free to call on them at any time.
,r,-.- PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
i J1612 East Colonial Drive. Orlando, Florida 32803
S
!i~is -.i S


An organization of cement manufacturers to improve and c \hir:d tihe itse' of portlhiid ct rint anId concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


COVER:
The North Key Largo Telephone
Dial Office, a Merit Award Win-
ner in Architectural Exhibit com-
petition at the 1967 FAAIA
Convention.
































THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use .. Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray
Printers.
DECEMBER, 1967


CHANGE/FRUSTRATION/JEALOUSY
by George E. Kassabaum, FAIA
6
TO THE EDITOR
8
ARCHITECTS IN FOCUS
Convention Photos
8
NEWSNOTES
9
IN MEMORIUM
9
CALENDAR
9
1967 FAAIA ARCHITECTURAL
EXHIBIT -MERIT AWARDS
12-15
PRODUCTION FOR PROFIT SEMINAR
16
ARE YOU A SALESMAN?
by George N. Kahn
17
PHILOSOPHY
II. Samuel Kruse, FAIA
18
ADVERTISERS' INDEX
19
RE-EVALUATION OF HIGHWAY DESIGN
20
MERRY CHRISTMAS
Back Cover

OFFICERS
Herbert Rosser Savage, President
P. O. Box 280, Miami, Fla. 33145
H. Leslie Walker, Vice President/President Designate
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218, Tampa, Fla. 33602
Harry E. Burns, Jr., Secretary
1402 Prudential Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 32207
Myrl J. Hanes, Treasurer
P. O. Box 609, Gainesville, Fla. 32601
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County A Paul Robin John / Robert E. Todd
Daytona Beach David A. Leete / Carl Gerken
Florida Central James R. Dry / Ted Fasnacht
James J. Jennewein
Florida Gulf Coast Jack West / Tollyn Twitchell
Florida North William K. Hunter, Jr.
0 James D. McGinley, Jr.
rlorida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest e Carlton Noblin / Thomas H. Daniels
Florida South Robert J. Boerema / George F. Reed
Francis E. Telesca
Jacksonville Charles E. Pattillo, III
Herschel E. Shepard, Jr. / 'John Pierce Stevens
Mid-Florida e Wythe D. Sims, II / Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Jack Wilson, Jr. / H. L. Lewis
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
James Deen / Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager


VOLUME
17
NUMBER
12
DECEMBER
1967







THE HONOR AWARDS LUNCHEON ADDRESS BY AIA
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT GEORGE E. KASSABAUM, FAIA


CHANGE


FRUSTRATION


JEALOUSY

It is difficult for one architect to
talk in a formal way to other archi-
tects, and be both challenging and
optimistic. Too often, when one
dwells on what still must be done, it
somehow comes out as pessimism
about where the profession is and
where it is going. I am not pessimistic.
I am very optimistic about the future.
But I am optimistic because of the
challenges not in spite of them.
Now this doesn't mean that I am
optimistic about the future of every
architect in this room because I'm
not. There is great potential, but as I
tour the country and talk to many
architects, I fear there arc some who
have little to offer, and I certainly see
many who seem to have little inten-
tion of making much effort to meet
their full potential.
The self-questioning, dynamic and
aggressive architects have the greatest
future imaginable ahead of them, be-
cause the challenges are stirring, the
need is great and there is a growing
awareness that our world needs help.
But, since our world does not yet know
that its architects are the ones that
can give it this help, there are things
to do today if we are going to have
much of a chance to realize our future
potential.
It seems to me that there are three
forces working on each of us today,
and the future of each of you will de-
pend on how you react to each of
these forces.
My purpose is not to beat all sorts
of drums for the AIA. It is imperfect
and probably always will be. Any or-
ganization that relies primarily upon
the volunteer services of busy practi-
tioners is bound to seem slow and in-
efficient. But if this is your complaint,
then I submit that the correction lies
in more volunteers and less critics.
Tomorrow's profession needs the
thoughtful help of today's architects,
for today's practitioners not today's
editors or today's educators but to-
day's practitioners are the best quali-
fied to plot the profession's future.
I may be a little idealistic, but you
really do owe some of your time and
energy to working for the good of
your profession. Generally, it has been
good to you, and without wishing to
seem melodramatic, as never before,


today's architects need to work to-
gether for a common cause and to-
ward a common goal!
Surely, in 1967, there can be no
question about trying to meet the
future in an organized way. There are
certain powerful groups, like govern-
ment, that simply respond to the pres-
sure of numbers, and our number has
Grown to the point where, if we speak,
we can be a force. Also, as our num-
ber grows larger, we more and more
need some vehicle to permit our ex-
changing ideas and experiences the
simplest form of research the ex-
change of information. So, if we
didn't have an organization like the
AIA, we would have to invent one, for
there are new, strong, eager and well-
organized forces working hard to re-
place us in the scheme of things. I am
optimistic, because I am confident
that we won't let them.


Change

Certainly the major force is the
force of change but primarily the
change that is being brought about
by the tremendous increase in popula-
tion. The world has always changed,
and the only thing that is unique
about our time is the rate of change.
There is nothing that says that
these changes are automatically going
to be for the best, or that they are
going to be easy. In fact, I suspect
that they probably will be painful for
many of today's architects, and will
be accepted, if at all, with the greatest
of reluctance.
But change is inevitable, so we can
only try and control it, go along with
it, or resist it. Change has always been
created by the few and resisted by the
many. Perhaps there is not outright
resistance on the part of today's archi-
tects, but, on the part of some, there
is a kind of a baffled confusion about
why it is all happening.
The most prominent forces seem to
be connected with urban living, and
since we can say that the year 2000
will be even more urbanized, and.
since the physical environmental side
of urban problems are an area where
the architect is, can be, or should b .
something of an expert, the profession
has a great opportunity to become
one of history's great forces for good
if its members will make the effort.
SAnd you can't be any more optimistic ,
than that. Pessimistically, it's only
I the "IF" we have to think about.
Today's architects should be con-
cerned they should be deeply con-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






cerned about air and water pollu-
tion. But even more important, to-
day's architects should be deeply con-
cerned about the visual pollution a
type of pollution that is more danger-
ous than the other two, for it is a
pollution that hammers at our nerv-
ous systems and smothers our sensi-
tivity the two things that do much
to make us humans rather than ani-
mals, and, therefore, very important
two things, that for some reason,
Sour world seems to consider unim-
portant.
There is no question about the op-
portunity ahead of us. But even to-
day's challenge is insignificant com-
pared to the one that is going to be
solved by someone solved by some-
one in the very, very, very near fu-
ture. After the events of this summer,
and when Viet Nam is settled, you can
be sure that Government's major ef-
forts are going to be directed toward
finding fast solutions to the social and
environmental problems created by
today's cities. As architects, we have
an obligation to see that they are fast
and good!
Are we will prepared to meet this
challenge? Optimistically, some of us
are. Pessimistically, many of us are
not. We must not be arrogant about
what an architect can do and what he
cannot do. We must admit that we
are not very well prepared as a total
profession, but we are better prepared
than anyone else, and that's quite a
bit. We at least care that our cities
become places where more and more
people can enjoy living closer and
closer together. And it's this concern
that seems to be lacking in many of
the other disciplines that say they are
qualified to take the leadership.
Perhaps I am prejudiced when I
take such a stand, but I do think that
many architects have much to offer
that this world badly needs. 'And
while I admit that what your City
wants, and what it needs, are probably
two different things; you will have a
much better chance to give it what it
needs, if you can first give it what it
wants.
With such a need, and with at
least something to offer, todya's archi-
tects should be among- the world's
most satisfied men. But, of course, we
aren't. We are really quite frustrated,
and this seems to me to be mostly
because we feel that our world refuses
to allow its architects a serious role.



Frustration

And so, our second force our own
frustration. Like the force of change,
our frustration can be a force for
good, or a force for bad. Some men
DECEMBER, 1967


Sreact to frustration by inventing new
things and making the world a better
place to live, while some withdraw in
I sullen confusion.
We have a choice to make. We can
retreat into our laboratories and be
content with producing architecture
for architects and some will or
we can reconsider our own values and
make the tremendous effort that it
will take to move out into the main
stream of the life of our communities.
The profession's hope is that enough
will, for it is our only hope and, quite
possibly, one of our age's great hopes
for the future. I don't know too much
about your cities, but if you take a
moment and name the five people
who have the greatest influence on
the development of your city, would
you honestly name an architect
among them? From my experience
around the country, I doubt it. Bank-
ers certainly, real estate men -
yes, political leaders-obviously, busi-
nessmen of course. Maybe even a
few engineers, but no architects. So
most of you will have to admit that
many important environmental deci-
sions are being made without the
benefit of an architect's close and inti-
mate advice.
For some reason, today's profession
is content to let the basic decisions be
made before they bring their talents
into the picture. Too often, some
more or less insensitive person decides
to build a building of a certain type
and size, pick the site and set the
budget. We are satisfied if he then
calls in the architect to solve what is
left of the problem. This is not being
a dynamic part of environmental de-
sign. It can only be considered to be
environmental perfume.
If we do have much to say that our
world should hear, we have to first
get its attention. So, we must become
involved in government, serve on
boards and make every other kind of
effort to be a leader in our commu-
nity. At least, we must speak up on
important matters- especially if they
affect the development of the en-
vironment.
Now I know that architects are not
unanimous on anything we can
paraphrase an old Syrian saying, "If
,you get four architects together, you
get five opinions." And perhaps we
disagree among ourselves more than
other professional groups, but we have
let this lack of unanimity discourage
us from taking a position on anything.
This just has to be interpreted by
others as a form of weakness. One can
not even" hope to show leadership by
meekly keeping quiet. Even when we
have spoken out in the past, it has too
often been only in a negative way of
opposing the ideas of others. Is this


leadership? IF WE ARE THE EX-
PERTS, AND EVERYTHING IS
ACCEPTABLE TO THE EX-
PERTS, HOW CAN WE HOPE
FOR A SOCIETY THAT IS SENSI-
TIVE OR QUALITY-CONSCIOUS
OR SHARES THE VALUES THAT
WE CONSIDER IMPORTANT?
There is another effort we have to
make. There are a lot of architects in
this country, and it is proper that
some should do kitchens while others
design large sections of big cities, but
each has one thing that he owes his
profession and his society each
needs to at least be a highly compe-
tent technician. I have to confess that
there are at least some who aren't.
They hurt us all.
It's time to quit blaming the pack-
age dealer, the engineer, the contrac-
tor, to prefabricator, and others for
many of the problems facing today's
architect. It's time we looked at our-
selves and very honestly ask ourselves
each of you today tonight -
tomorrow what are you doing that
will make you a better architect?
If we are going to honestly suggest
that our age follow us into new and
better worlds, it seems to me that we
should be able to give them what they
need in this one. It expects great skill
from its scientists and its other profes-
sionals it expects great technical
competence from its experts. It has a
right to. Perhaps a major cause of our
frustration is our own conscience.
My main condemnation of our pro-
fession today is that we do not chan-
nel our frustrations into a compulsion
to be a better architect, but we release
them into the third force affecting
tomorrow's architects today's jeal-
ousy.



Jealousy

In your awards program, a few of
your fellow architects were singled out
and given some recognition for mak-
ing the effort to do a better job. For
those whose projects were not re-
warded, I ask you to be honest and
analyze your reaction. I fear that
there is at least a flash of resentment,
and an inner blast at the lack of taste
and stupidity of the judges.
I know that we live in a competi-
tive world and, perhaps, I am asking
too much when I ask that such re-
actions stir you into a desire to do
better, make you analyze the stand-
ards you've established for your own
work, and give you the necessary spur
to try harder.
Most often, the effect is bad. Jeal-
ousy leads to outspoken criticism of a
Continued on page 20
7








LETTERS

Once again it was a genuine pleasure to
participate in the 53rd Annual Convention
which convened in Hollywood last week.
We should like to share with the other
Exhibitors, our appreciation for the many
courtesies which you accorded us. It was
indeed a well-organized meeting and every-
thing seemed to progress with a minimum
of confusion. Unlike previous meetings,
there was li'fle or no criticism on the part
of either the Exhibitors or the many archi-
tects who attended the meeting.
Please accept our heartiest congratula-
tions on an excellent meeting not to
mention the good fortune and enhance-
ment of the activities by the presence of
Governor Kirk at the Annual Banquet.
Hopefully, we shall look forward to
your kind and welcome invitation to par-
ticipate in the 1968 meeting at Daytona
Beach.
With kindest personal regards and again,
many thanks to your staff and committee
members who should be congratulated for
their splendid efforts in making this meet-
ing a really successful one!
LAMBERT CORPORATION
V. L. Sinisi, President


It was a pleasure working the conven-
tion in Miami this past week and you are
to be complimented on the arrangements
and the smoothness.
Personally, I enjoyed the arrangements
and hope to see you in Daytona Beach
next year.
PPG Architectural Representative
J. Velma Lamb


Would appreciate your placing Mr.
John Harvey on your complimentary mail-
ing list. Mr. Harvey is the Director of
Planning for the City of St. Petersburg
and we feel that THE FLORIDA AR-
CIIITECT would be of interest to him.
C. Randolph Wedding, AIA


Thank you so much for rushing the two
films to us. We were able to review each
one before the meeting, and decided to
use "No Time For Ugliness." It proved
to be a highlight of the luncheon, and was
viewed by approximately 40 people.
The purpose of our luncheon was to
"kick off" the plans and projects of the
Beautification Committee of the Down-
town Council. This committee is compos-
ed of downtown business people, as well
as representatives of civic groups through-
out the county. We have embarked on an
ambitious program this year, one'that in-
cludes paint-up, fix-up in the immediate
area surrounding downtown, and a county-
wide litter campaign spearheaded by the
Jaycees.
Again, thank you for lending us the
films. Your cooperation was deeply appre-
ciated.
DOWNTOWN COUNCIL,
JACKSONVILLE AREA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
Mrs. Alice Parrish, Executive Secretary


RIGHT: Knoll Associates received the
1967 Exhibit Award for "Display Ex-
cellence." Left to right, John McDivitt,
Jay Hammer, Knoll representative, and
President Smith.

BELOW RIGHT: Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Co. received the 1967 Exhibitor's Award
for "Educational Value of Display." Left:
Velma Lamb, PPG architectural repre-
sentative, and FAAIA President Smith.







MORE PHOTOS FROM
THE FAAIA CONVENTION


ARCHITECTS IN FOCUS


ABOVE: Architects and guests enjoying
the Sandwich Luncheon in the Exhibit
Hall.


BELOW: Anthony L. Pullara Memorial
State Members Award was received by
Thomas H. Daniels, of Panama City for
his outstanding service to the Association.
President Smith presented the Award.


ABOVE: Anthony L. Pullara Memorial
State Chapter Award was presented by
President Hilliard T. Smith, Jr. to George
Reed, President of the Florida South
Chapter, AIA, whose Chapter was recog-
nized for its strong program of public
service.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







NEWSNOTES


BOOKLET ON SELECTING AND
WORKING WITH AN
ARCHITECT PUBLISHED
BY AIA
The AIA has just published a book-
let for prospective building owners on
"your building & your architect." An
abridgement of a series of articles
originally published in the "Architec-
tural Forum" and copyrighted by Ur-
ban America, Inc., the series was writ-
ten by Donald Canty, then senior
editor of "Forum," and now director
of the Urban Information Center of
Urban America and editor of its
magazine "City."
The articles present an informed
non-architect's candid view of h Aw
both client's and profession's interests
can be best served. Written primarily
for the client who is involved in his
first building project, they explain
how to select an architect, what his
role and responsibilities are, and how
to work with him for the most satis-
factory results.
Copies are available from the Flor-
ida Association of The American In-
stitute of Architects. Cost per 100
copies is $25 and smaller quantities at
50c each plus postage.
PENSACOLA NAMES
ARCHITECTURAL
REVIEW BOARD
An Architectural Review Board
with authority to say what can and
cannot be built and renovated in the
historical district to be established in
Seville Square was named by the
Pensacola City Council.
Serving on this Board are architects
Hugh J. Leitch, AIA, Kenneth H.
Woolf, Ellis W. Bullock, AIA;
Thomas McAdam, appraiser; Peter
DeVries, city planner; Pat Dodson,
advertising executive; and Lansing
Smith, Chairman of the Planning
Board.
ASPHALT JUNGLES IN DADE
TO BE GREENER
An ordinance proposed by Archi-
tect and Metro Commissioner Earl
M. Starnes, AIA, was recently
adopted.
The ordinance sets minimum land-
scaping standards that will apply
throughout Dade Countys unincor-
porated areas as well as the cities. Any
city may set more stringent regula-
tions if it desires.
The measure controls the type of
landscaping to be used, the quality,
maintenance and installation. Af-
fected are all parking lots and all
other land where vehicles drive as a
function of the property's primary
use.
DECEMBER, 1967


PRYOR AND REED
RECEIVE AWARD
At the recent FAAIA Convention,
the "Architect Community Service
Award" was presented to both Rich-
ard E. Pryor, AIA, and George F.
Reed, AIA. This award recognized
their leadership in community activity
and service. One such award is pre-
sented annually, but the Awards
Committee agreed both were deserv-
ing to receive this honor.

SCHOLARSHIPS TO UF
From the University of Florida, a
faculty member and a student of
architecture have been awarded schol-
arships for the 1967-68 academic year
by the American Institute of Archi-
tects.
Forrcst F. Lisle, Jr., Gainesville,
Florida resident and Assistant Pro-
fessor in the Department of Architec-
ture, received a $1,000 Waid Educa-
tion Fund Scholarship for doctoral
study at Cornell University.
Sergio J. Rodriguez of Gainesville,
is the recipient of the $750 Langley
Fund Award. Rodriguez will enter
Graduate School at the University of
North Carolina, City Planning De-
partment.

DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION SIGNS
$4.8 MILLION
PLANNING CONTRACT
The Department of Transportation
(DOT) signed a $4.8 million plan-
ning contract on September 23, under
which "a design concept team" will
plan Baltimore's Interstate highways.
The team concept, strongly advocated
by AIA and proposed to that city by
the Baltimore AIA Chapter and to
the Federal Government by Archibald
C. Rogers, FAIA, chairman of the
committee on Urban Design, involves
architects, city planners, sociologists,
and economists, in addition to high-
way engineers.
Their goal is to integrate freeway
design with overall city planning, and
to avoid displacement of numbers of
people, disruption of neighborhoods,
and unnecessary destruction of build-
ings. In so doing, they will plan new
housing, community centers, and
parks along the new highway.
Transportation Secretary Alan S.
Boyd said that Baltimore may set a
national .pattern for designing urban
highways. He indicated that all en-
vironmental skills will be put into
play with early consideration given to
the highway's social, economic, his-
toric, and functional impact.


IN MEMORIUM

Upton Clary Ewing, AIA, who in-
fluenced art and thought in Miami,
died at his home in Coral Gables
October 30 at the age of 72.
A man of many talents, Ewing was
an architect and author, a painter and
sculptor, a philosopher and theologian,
an inventor and a musician.


CALENDAR
December 8- 10
Legislative Weekend Miami.
December 8
Jacksonville Chapter of the Producers'
Council, Inc. Informational Pro-
gram and "Open House" sponsored by
Florida Glass & Mirror Co. Location:
5555 W...--. Beaver Street, 4 7 P. M.
January 3 -6, 1968
FSBA registration examinations,
School of Architecture, Univ. of Flor-
ida.
January 11 13
AIA Chapter and Section Presidents'
"Grassroots" meeting, Shoreham Hotel,
Washington, D. C.
January 26 27
FSBA Meeting Architects invited -
Attorney Harry Gray's office, Jackson-
ville.
February 3
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting,
9:30 A.M., Robert Meyer Motor Inn,
Orlando.
April 30 May 3
Annual Conference Guild For Re-
ligious Architecture Hilton Plaza
Hotel, Miami Beach.
October 25 28
54th Annual Convention and Building
Products Exhibit of the FAAIA, Day-
tona Plaza Hotel, Daytona Beach.








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Commercial. Industrial. Institutional. Rec-
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multifold.
ELECTRIC COOLING / HEATING.
Compact electric reverse-cycle air con-
ditioning systems are designed to meet
any remodeling requirement and to give
year-round temperature comfort. Flame-
q less, clean, safe and quiet in operation. No
combustion by-products. Eliminates the
need for boiler room or fuel storage facilities.
ELECTRIC WATER HEATING.
Electric water heaters can be installed just
about anywhere and assure a never-ending
supply of hot water. No vents or flues are
required. Flexible placement avoids long
pipe runs and the consequent waste of
heat due to water cooling in the pipes.
Operation is clean, safe, quiet and eco-
nomical. Automatic and maintenance-
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types of heaters.
ELECTRIC KITCHENS.
Modernization lets you take advantage of
the latest worksaving appliances and
conveniences, for commercial or residen-
tial use. Electric cooking saves hours of
cleaning and scouring; saves on repaint-
ing costs; because flameless electric makes
no smoke or soot.

When involved in new construction or
modernization, be sure to look into the
benefits of flameless electric. Your elec-
tric utility company will be happy to work
with you.


UrZELtrALL


Florida's Electric Companies-Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













U- rif F rr k'-
II gIr 1111115r Ii

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CIO "it'
If _1 --


DAVIS ISLAND TOWERS, TAMPA, FLORIDA
"Four years ago, when we decided to remodel one of
Tampa's finest hotels and convert it into a distinctive
apartment building, we made two decisions. First, that
the new Davis Island Towers would truly be an exclusive
address, featuring the very finest conveniences for mod-
ern living. Secondly, we chose to go all-electric because
electric living is the modern, convenient way of life."
-Mrs. C. E. Burnham
Manager, Davis Island Towers


MAAS BROTHERS, INC.
SST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
S"Successful merchandising demands up-to-date facil-
; cities and techniques. We switched to modern electric
cooking and water heating in our St. Petersburg store
because we felt an all-electric operation would reduce
operating costs and enable us to merchandise more effi-
ciently...And as an added benefit, our kitchen personnel
are really pleased with our new cooking equipment. The
-Alfred L. Schelm
U Vice President & General Manager


E B


..- ..




f 7 ~
I I"i "


PATTON OFFICE BUILDING
FORT WALTON BEACH, FLORIDA
"I'm thoroughly satisfied with the conversion to the
year-round electric heating and cooling system that was
installed in my office building in 1965. Maintenance has
been practically negligible and there have been no more
complaints about poor heat distribution from my tenants."
-Wayne Patton, Owner


REMODELED FORT MYERS HOME AWARDED
THE TOTAL-ELECTRIC GOLD MEDALLION
"The health and happiness of our children always
comes first in our home. So when we remodeled we
eliminated the hazard of flame-type appliances and in-
stalled an electric water heater, an electric clothes dryer,
and electric reverse-cycle air conditioning. The house
is comfortable the year-round and stays clean because
the air is filter-pure. We already had an electric range,
refrigerator and clothes washer. Now we're total-electric
and proud of our Gold Medallion Home Award."
-Mrs. Raymond Thaggard


DECEMBER, 1967 11


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FAAIA MERIT AWARDS/1967

NORTH KEY LARGO COMMUNITY TELEPHONE DIAL OFFICE


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JURY COMMENT
Thi- 1mall crli. pel -lio, a -killliil
iise of uosd in llhe de-ign. The Bell
Touer i- a fre-Is apprJach io ailn .i1s'
nold problem.


OWNER
Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph
Company
ARCI IITECT-ENGINEER
Reynolds, Smith and Hills
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Duffey Construction Company










JURY COMMENT
This small building is an example
of the nice treatment that can be given
with a relatively trivial design prob-
lem. This firm is to be commended
for taking advantage of this opportu-
nity that might easily have been
passed by.


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3L


A.
7


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Located in a remote area of the
Florida Keys, this community tele-
phone dial office serves the exclusive
resort community of Ocean Reef.
Communications with this commu-
nity and the outside world are via
radio relay. The Key on which this
building is erected has a natural ele-
vation of 3 feet above sea level and
has during several hurricanes been
completely inundated to a depth of
6 feet. This dial office was placed on
stilts designed to withstand the winds,
and wave action of hurricanes, and
was designed of concrete for mini-
mum maintenance. Simplicity of
form was the design key, with adapta-
bility for expansion by repetition of
the building module. The entire site
was filled with limerock to an eleva-
tion of 5 feet and landscaping was
minimized to several large on grade
planting beds.


UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST
CHURCH OF
JACKSONVILLE



ARCHITECT
Robert C. Broward, AIA





The buildings were designed so as
to do as little harm to the existing
natural beauty as possible. Unitarian-
ism respects the works of nature and
every attempt was made to create
repose and an extension of the natural
beauty already evident.
Stairs, bridges, and decks tie the
individual buildings together as a unit
while allowing existing trees to remain
and come through as part of the de-
sign. The Chapel overlooks the lake
and has a central nave skylight which
sets various moods within according
to the weather and the moving sea-
sons.
The Chapel and educational wing
are the first units of a master plan
which will wrap around a wooded
hilltop overlooking a small lake. The
buildings are constructed of lami-
nated pine with redwood siding and
cedar shakes left to weather. Masonry,
where used, is unpainted concrete
block.
DECEMBER, 1967


UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CENTER FOR THE STUDY
OF MENTAL RETARDATION


ARCHITECTS
Pancoast/Ferendino/Grafton
and Watson, Deutschman, Kruse
























JURY COMMENT
The form of the broad base rising
into a slim tower gives an interesting
shape that should serve as an identfi-
able symbol to the many persons who
will be working there.


The Center will be a part of the
Jackson Memorial Medical Center
Campus and is designed to become an
element of order in the midst of a
hodge-podge of non-related buildings
and spaces. This coupled with a small
site and varied functional require-
ments, dictated shape and form.
The curving rising fins of the tower
arose from clear functional require-
ments. A large out-patient clinic had
to be easily accessible; an administra-
tive area required one floor of 13,000
square feet; floors of approximately
10,000 square feet met requirements
of flexible office, study and laboratory
spaces. The solution was to stack
these in a tower of diminishing floor
sizes. The fins also give privacy for
patios opening off clinic spaces.
The third low of the center is a
building designed to relate to the
lower tower floors. This building
houses a school and in-patient living
areas for mentally retarded children.
Each classroom of the school is de-
signed as a multi-use activity area and,
taking advantage of Florida climate,
opens out into enclosed courts. The
upper floor consists of ward and
family housing units and a roof top
play yard.




:3VtUA .AAwrda


VILLA MAY


ARCHITECT
Jorge Arango, AIA
PHOTOGRAPHY
Alexandre Georges




The house was finished at the end
of 1964 for Mrs. Irving May, a lady of
over 70 years whose husband died
during construction.
It sits on a lot 90 feet wide by 170
feet deep in Miami Beach, looking
west at the bay and beyond to Miami.
Villa May was designed with privacy
and safety in mind, but no high walls
or grilles were necessary since they
were assimilated into the design. The
house was designed to be air condi-
tioned but cross ventilation is pos
sible.
An effort was made to reduce and
diffuse the level of light throughout
the house. The garden with its
screened opening to the sky and the
deep porch on the west give the house
pleasant and peaceful feeling.
The plan, an old concept of 2,000
or so years, has provided a large space
70 feet long by 20 feet wide, present
visually but broken by the central
garden.
The house has a complete structure
of beams and columns in exposed
concrete with exterior walls of stuc-
coed concrete block and interior par-
titions finished with rough plaster.
Stucco and plaster are painted white.
The roof is flat with exposed wood
beams and stucco painted white be-
tween them.
Construction cost was $20.00 per
square foot.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























JURY COMMENT _p ... .
This quiet design reflects its Florida
origin in a most refined way. The ver- -
tical seams of screws and the overhead -
fan off the patio contrast with the 4 AT-
compact closed-in air conditioned
spaces. V

STUDENT AWARDS
The student displays were the high points of the judging.
One of the entire we did not know whether to judge it or
wear it mod architecture, you know, but the students
really are not as far out as the drawings first appear. Some
of them were so far out the jury could not quite make the
scene. Our flower awards are:





I- ., I










STUDENT AWARD/UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

3 ,.. URBAN RENEWAL HOUSING
.. -- DEVELOPMENT
: Mrs. MIargarita Alcjandrc Khuly



ii ----








JURY COMMENT
The plan shows a sensitive handling
of living space for many people in a
relatively small area. The varied char-
acter of the spaces in the court yard
should provide play space for small
children and family activities while the
--- -central play area could be used for the
needs of the older children. The car
parking problem has been well handled
by establishing a clear separation of
vehicles and pedestrian circulation.
DECEMBER, 1967 1





PROPOSAL FOR
PRODUCTION FOR PROFIT: OFFCE PRACTICE
SEMINARS BY
CASE & CO.


Your assistance is required to determine whether suf-
ficient attendance can be expected at five tentatively-
planned Office Practice Seminars, "Production For Profit."
These seminars will be presented by management
personnel, Dr. Charles J. Marsh and Al Werolin of the
Case & Co. in San Francisco. This firm and its personnel
are extremely knowledgeable with office problems in archi-
tectural offices, meaning individual practitioner and small,
medium or large firms. Case & Co. was retained by the
AIA to conduct a nationwide architectural cost study and
the results have been made available (August issue, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and AIA JOURNAL, Novem-
ber issue).
Highly successful seminars have been presented to the
profession in California and Minnesota. Three hundred
attended the three sessions in California.
The reason for considering five locations in Florida
for this seminar, is the intent to reduce travel time and
cost for the majority of the profession, thereby bringing
this program to you. The locations under consideration
and the day of the week are as follows: Pensacola (Fri-
day), Jacksonville (Saturday), West Palm Beach (Thurs-
day), Tampa (Friday), Miami (Saturday).
The seminars will not be a review of the results of the
recently-published AIA study. The program will get into
the nuts and bolts of your practice with documented facts
involving varied annual gross dollar volume representing
small to large practices, and will bring to you "how to do
it" facts, not theory.
You will not sit back and be a mere listener. This you
will do, but more important, you will be involved in a
working seminar with the kit of illustrative and working
materials.


The program content would be as follows:
THE CHALLENGE the need for profit plan-
ning in architecture problems approach.
MECHANICS OF PROFITS nature and be-
havior of costs mechanics of profits .
overall profit planning professional com-
pensation.
MECHANICS OF PLANNING application to
individual practitioner and projects sug-
gested forms planning and controlling costs.
DYNAMICS OF PROFIT PLANNING cost-
volume-profit-inter-relationships visualizing
how profits are created and influenced.

(Discussion on these various topics will take place
throughout the seminar.)
To bring this program to Florida, a sizeable sum of
money must be obligated regardless of the final attend-
ance. These costs involve travel costs for the personnel of
Case & Co. from California and within Florida; accommo-
dations in Florida; seminar fee for the program partici-
pants; kit material and visual aid equipment. Therefore, it
is absolutely necessary for you to assist FAAIA in deter-
mining whether sufficient attendance will warrant five (5)
locations for this seminar prior to a final obligation of
funds.
Please clip the following form, complete the informa-
tion, and return to FAAIA.
Do it now as we must hear from you by December


PRODUCTION FOR PROFIT

The following will attend the seminar as indicated. The Registration Fee of $25.00 will be paid upon receipt of final notice
and program indicating sufficient response was received to proceed with arrangements.


Locations (check one)

D Pensacola (Friday, May 17)


FD Jacksonville (Saturday, May 18)

D West Palm Beach (Thursday, May 23)

D Tampa (Friday, May 24)


F Miami (Saturday, May 25)


Persons To Attend


Firm

Address


City


___ Zip Code-__


FI I will not attend.


Return promptly to: FAAIA
Suite 210
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







SMOOTH SELLING
BY GEORGE N. KAHN, MARKETING CONSULTANT
1967 George N. Kahn


ARE YOU A SALESMAN?
Certain words mean d if erent
things to different people. Rich, poor,
smart, dumb -all these terms take
on various shades of meaning, de-
pending on the person using them. A
Calcutta beggar would consider any
American rich; a man who can read
and write is thought of as smart by
an illiterate.
The term "salesman" produces the
same kind of semantic problem. To
many people, the noun would apply
to anyone who sold anything to any-
body. This would include sidewalk
pitchmen, door-to-door gadget vend-
ors, newsboys and store clerks as well
as the men making $100,000 a year
selling highly technical industrial
equipment.
A salesman is a creative individual.
He also is a man who develops mar-
kets, who aids the buyer as well as
himself, and who is constantly trying
to increase his sales through bold,
imaginative thinking.

Selling Credentials
Unless you can really communicate
with a customer so that he thinks like
you and is motivated to buy through
your persuasive powers, you are not a
salesman.
Unless you can see the customer's
point of view and turn it to your ad-
vantage, you are not a salesman.
Unless you can determine what a
customer needs not what he wants
you are not a salesman.
Unless you have a thorough knowl-
edge of yourself, you are not a sales-
man.
Unless you have studied other peo-
ple so you have some insight into
their character, you are not a sales-
man.
Don't Stop Growing
Are you still growing? Growth is at
the heart of salesmanship. Even if you
have been selling for 25 years you
should still look for new ideas and
methods.
One of the nation's leading insur-
ance salesmen surprised his supervisor
one day by volunteering for the firm's
training course for sales recruits.
"But, Dan", the boss said, "you sell
more insurance than anyone in the
organization. This will be kid stuff to
you.
"Jack," Dan replied, "not a day
goes by that I don't learn something
DECEMBER, 1967


new. In that training course, no
matter how basic it is, I'll pickup
some piece of information that will
help me sell more insurance."
Some people stop learning the day
they leave school, whether its gram-
mar, high school or college. These are
the individuals who are passed by in
earnings, promotion and prestige.

Qualities Needed
A mark of the successful salesman
is his work habits. If you are com-
mitted emotionally or philosophically
to the eight-hour day, then forget
salesmanship. The man who writes
the big ticket thinks nothing of put-
ting in a 10, 15 or 18-hour day.
Thomas Edison said that genius is
99 percent work. The salesman's in-
come will invariably be related to the
time he puts on the job. Planning is
also important.
A sales manager for a well-known
rubber company once asked a discour-
aged salesman how many prospects he
had seen that day.
"Two," the salesman said.
"How many had you planned to
see?" the boss continued.
"As many as I could," the salesman
answered.
"That isn't planning, that's hop-
ing," the supervisor said.
There is a lot of concern today
about whether this country is on the
moral skids. The television quiz scan-
dals, the price fixing conviction of
some businessmen, the link between
sports and gambling all these have
prompted serious soul searching.
I'm also concerned about this ques-
tion, but I do not believe for a minute
that morality particularly business
morality is an outdated product.
No salesman should think honesty
is old fashioned. The man who cyni-
cally disregards business principles is
deluding himself.


Honesty and dependability are not
outworn attributes. The salesman who
has them is endowed with human
values that will translate into earning
power.
Let me mention another equally
important: maturity.
A man who flies off the handle at
criticism is not mature. The mature
individual, who is criticized, will use
the censure as a lever for improve-
ment.

About People
It's human nature that men are
drawn to individuals who are under-
standing and sympathetic. If someone
knows that you care about him, he
will care about you. This is especially
true of the customer-salesman rela-
tionship. A genuine liking for people
is another invaluable asset for a sales-
man.
A buyer for a midwestern electrical
firm was such a grouch that salesmen
used to go miles out of their way to
avoid him.
"Who wants to be insulted by that
crank?" they would say.
Fred Naylor, had a different idea.
He breezed into the buyer's office one
day, stuck out his hand and announ-
ced:
"Mr. Grant, I've made up my mind
about two things: I'm going to like
you and you're going to like me."
The crusty purchasing agent was so
surprised that for a few seconds he
simply stared at Fred, open mouthed.
Then he began roaring with laugh-
ter and put out his hand.
Fred walked off with a huge order.
There must be sympathy before a
salesman can truly cater to the needs
of his customers. You can't be ex-
pected to read a customer's mind, but
you should have a fairly good idea of
the things which motivate him his
fears, aspirations, likes and dislikes.


EDITOR'S COMMENTS
The second article on Smooth Selling is also important to architects. In the
area of Office Practice we have client relationship and this involves salesmanship.
Your ability to properly communicate why you as an individual, or your firm,
should be commissioned is imperative. The profession provides a service and you
must communicate.
New market areas, meaning new clients, new purchasers, are developed by
a salesman. Architects, too, must be sales-minded in order to bring about new
clients by means of investigative market research.
Keeping yourself abreast of new developments in architecture is a must for
proper performance to the public. Therefore, continuing your education by
various means is as important to you as an architect as it is to the product
salesman.
Can you sell yourself ethically is a question you must answer in this world
of competition. You cannot afford to wait for new business to knock at your door.


























PHILOSOPHY


H. SAMUEL KRUSE FAIA / MIAMI


Architecture is the result of plan-
ning to fulfill a social function artisti-
cally and can be brought into exist-
ence only through the construction
process. This planning and construc-
tion process is becoming increasingly
complex and requires for success the
leadership of a person who is a prob-
clm solver, a pragmatist, a humanist,
then an artist. Such a person, I be-
lieve, is an architect. I try to be such
a person.
I do not believe that architecture is
a personal art in which an individual
artist may make the needs of others
second to his privilege of self-expres-
sion. Painters, dancers, composers,
and the like can create to satisfy their
egos even in complete seclusion.
Architects must create for the needs
of others, not for self; and, of neces-
sity, he must not be ignorant of the
needs and aspirations of society. I
believe that architecture is the all-
embracing art, but a unique art, that
serves practical necessity, yet, more
than any other art, embodies the
spirit of society, and that it is created
by a team effort.
The process for creating architec-
ture is an exciting yet tedious, an in-
tuitive yet scientific, a personal yet
social total involvement in design,
where the individual with the help of
many synthesizes social need with the
pressures of law, economy, technical
capacity and social mores to accom-
plish necessities artistically. That in-
dividual should be an architect. How-
ever, lest he become a pawn for
others to manipulate, the architect
not only must be involved in the
creative process, he must lead it. A
leader is never a hermit, an innovator
divorced from the world around him.
I find essential free and fluent,
two-way communication with the in-
stitutions of society, with the disci-
plines who advise and shape these
institutions, and with my professional
colleagues who help me do those
things I haven't done before or can-
not do alone. In my involvement with
others, I become more knowledgeable
about techincal matters, more pro-
ficient in manipulating the pressures
or removing them from the creative
process, and more understanding of
the aspirations of men related to my
ideals and ethics, so that the artist in
me can inspire those who help create
architecture as well as those who use
it and see it. With this growth I be-
come happier, of greater service to
society, and more able to affect archi-
tecture.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.I:




























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DECEMBER, 1967


ADVERTISERS INDEX

ALGER-SULLIVAN COMPANY
1

FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS
Third Cover

FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WORKS
19

FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY
2

FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC UTILITIES
10-11

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION
Second Cover

LEHIGII PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
3

OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA, INC
19

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
4





KASSABAUM, Continued

fellow architect, and withdrawal from
the profession. The profession needs
constructive self-criticism, but it needs
less public complaining.
I have an idea I would like to see
tried. In line with my earlier feelings
that our first obligation is to be tech-
nically competent, and tying in the
advantages of healthy criticism, what
if your Chapter established a "profes-
sional" committee who regularly re-
viewed each set of documents that
were submitted for a building permit?
Reviewed-not for design-but just
for skill, thoroughness, clarity and
completeness. Shoddy documents -
and my friends in the Building Com-
missioner's Office say there are many
--would be discussed with their
author in private. Perhaps in this way,
the AIA would prove to its critics
that it was a force that could do more
than prepare legal documents. Think
about it.
Jealous complaining does great
harm to every member of the pro-
fession. It confuses a client who
thought he was doing the right thing
in hiring an architect. It also does
great harm to the group, for the re-
sentment that it creates prevents joint
action on important matters, results
in an unwillingness to share lessons
and experiences that could greatly
benefit those that follow, and frac-
tures any set of architectural values
that our society might wish to estab-
lish.
When you get a few architects to-
gether, too often the conversation
turns to a disgruntled talk of fee cut-
ting, to sadistic discussion of another
man's leaky roof, or a sarcastic descrip-
tion of a project in which others have
done less than they might. There is
very little exchanging of new knowl-
edge and very little discussion of how
each could be a better architect. After
all, this is the most important thing.
Somehow we have allowed our jeal-
ousy of our fellow architects to pre-
vent the creation of an environment
in which everyone can learn.
It seems to me that we are in great
danger of allowing our jealousy to
come forth in outspoken and caustic
expressions that are doing more than
anything else to destroy the chance
of today's and tomorrow's architects
being a major force in shaping to-
morrow's world.
Even though I would admit that
many of today's good AIA members
fall short of what they should be as
architects, I can still say that a build-
ing today is a better building if an
architect has been connected with it.
I can still say that we are less ignorant
than others. The only thing that con-


cerns me today is how long this sort
of statement will be true, if we don't
do more than we are doing to make it
so.
Perhaps it's our fault, but at least,
presently, we can say that we still
have time, because the construction
industry has done very little to keep
up with such groups as the space
industry, the automotive industry, the
electronic industry or practically any
other industry that is a respected part
of our society today. The position of
leadership for this industry is still
open.
By tradition, the architect has been
the leader of the industry. In the next
few years, we can expect that this will
be seriously challenged. There is
nothing that your Chapter or the AIA
can do by taking a vote that will
insure such a position. In a competi-
tive world, the most fit survive, and
the leader of the construction indus-
try tomorrow will be the man that is
best qualified to be that leader,
whether he calls himself an engineer
or an architect or a contractor, or
some name that has not yet been in-
vented. I hope the AIA can help
make the architect this man and I
intend to try.
We are living in a time of motion.
Motion is created by forces. I have
suggested that your future will be
determined by the outer forces of
change, and the inner forces of frus-
tration and jealousy. Others will fill
any gaps that are created by our in-
effectiveness today, and while there
will always be somebody who draws
blue prints, an architect can do so
much more for a country that is
floundering with its urban problems,
with its pollution, with its housing
problems, with its social problems,
and looking for a man-made environ-
ment where men can live closer to-
gether and be happier. Many are look-
ing for leadership in areas and in a
field where we are supposed to be, or
could be, the expert.
Predicting the future is very risky,
but we can be quite sure that tomor-
row's world will be an urban world.
It will be a world that man has built
for himself, and since nothing was
ever built by chance, it will be a
world that someone will design. Such
a world desperately needs the sensi-
tivity and awareness of human values
that today's architect could be the
best qualified to give.
We will determine our own future
if we can control our inner forces in
a way that will permit all of us to be-
come better architects and a more vital
force in our community. We will never
control our future if we allow our
inner forces to splinter our efforts and
confuse our friends.


RE-EVALUATION OF
HIGHWAY DESIGN


The American Institute of Archi-
tects has called for a major re-evalua-
tion of policy in highway design in
testimony before the Senate Commit-
tee on Public Works. President Rob-
ert L. Durham, FAIA, urged immedi-
ate and complete implementation of
the design team concept in the design
and execution of all future highways.
There is too much evidence in cities
across America that in selecting the
corridor and constructing the highway
we have overlooked what the highway
is supposed to serve. We have de-
stroyed whole neighborhoods, ruined
or buried parks and waterfronts, and
displaced entire communities without
exploring all the opportunities.
Our roads, rails, power lines and
sewer systems form the public spine
or backbone of our physical environ-
ment The placement of future
highways and utilities on maps fixes
our national posture determining
the future use of our natural land-
scape. To achieve socially responsive
decisions professional know-how must
be teamed with political skills.
He said that in the selection and
design of highway corridors Federal
and state highway officials should
work with a complete design team -
the sociologists, planners, architects,
economists, engineers, and others
with special training. He said that we
must have a new client representative
of citizen groups, the community,
state and Federal governments with
the authority to act. He said that to
overcome the transportation imbal-
ance, user charges from highways, air-
ports and other transportation facili-
ties should be collected in one trans-
portation fund and used to develop a
balanced system.
In regard to the Department of
Transportation's relationship with the
client, Mr. Durham urged that direct
liaison be maintained with the local-
ity through which the highway tra-
verses. He urged that DOT and the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development be encouraged to use
their research authority in environ-
mental fields to determine the high-
way's effect upon topography, resi-
dential quality, water and potential
economic and industrial growth and
related matters.
President Durham commented that
these points are "a modest beginning
for what needs to be done about high-
way planning, design and decision
making." But, he concluded, with
their implementation, "We are con-
vinced that the highway will, in fact,
become a 'catalyst' to urban develop-
ment."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































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