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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Convention seminars
 Editorial
 Newsnotes
 The salesman is a V.I.P.
 1967 FAAIA architectural exhibit--honor...
 Advertisers' index
 Necrology
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00161
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00161
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Convention seminars
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Editorial
        Page 6
    Newsnotes
        Page 7
    The salesman is a V.I.P.
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    1967 FAAIA architectural exhibit--honor awards
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Advertisers' index
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Necrology
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


COVER
J. Wayne Reitz Florida Union,
University of Florida, winner of
FAAIA 1967 Honor Award in
Architectural Exhibit competition.
































THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray
Printers.
NOVEMBER, 1967


CONVENTION SEMINARS
4-5
EDITORIAL
6
CONVENTION PHOTOS
6
NEWSNOTES
7
CALENDAR
7
THE SALESMAN IS A V.I.P.
by George N. Kahn
8
1967 FAAIA ARCHITECTURAL
EXHIBIT HONOR AWARDS
14-18
ADVERTISERS' INDEX
20
NECROLOGY
22
ORIENT TOUR
22


OFFICERS
Herbert Rosser Savage, President
P. O. Box 280, Miami, Fla. 33145
I-. Leslie Walker, Vice President/President Designate
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218, Tampa, Fla. 33602
Harry E. Burns, Jr., Secretary
1402 Prudential Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 32207
Myrl J. Hanes, Treasurer
P. O. Box 609, Gaincsville, Fla. 32601
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / Robert E. Todd
Daytona Beach David A. Leete / Tom Jannetides
Florida Central James R. Dry / Tcd Fasnacht
James J. Jennewein
Florida Gulf Coast Jack West / Tollyn Twitchell
Florida North William K. Hunter, Jr.
James D. McGinley, Jr.
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr. / Thomas H. Daniels
Florida South Robert J. Bocrema / George F. Reed
Francis E. Telesca
Jacksonville Charles E. Pattillo, III
Herschel E. Shepard, Jr. / John Pierce Stevens
Mid-Florida Wythe D. Sims, II / Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Jack Wilson, Jr. / H. L. Lewis
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
James Deen / Roy M. Poolcy, Jr. / Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager


VOLUME 17
NUMBER 11
NOVEMBER 1967






















'67 CONVENTION SEMINARS


The FAAIA 53rd Annual Convention-PHILOSO-
PHY DESIGN LIFE -is a tale that's told for
all who attended its sessions; herein is a brief
recount of that tale.

LIFE DR. HUMPHRY OSMOND
DISCUSSED HOW ARCHITECTS
DESIGN TO AFFECT LIFE.
Mental hospitals of 100 years ago were better
than those of today. Perhaps a shocking statement
to bring forth is the realization that architects of
today do not always solve a primary building func-
tion, design of an environment to enhance life for
the people using that building. Yet, only within
recent times has the architect's purpose been so
closely related to human functions.
Dr. Osmond traced history from times when
architects built on an impersonal scale for the im-
portance of place, through times when the archi-
tect designed buildings for one man's own personal
glorification, to the present day of personal client-
to-architect relationship. Perhaps because of this
history, or because of the very nature of the archi-
tect, there is not much common language between
architect and client. The architect does not find
out what the client wants in his building. On the
other hand, there are examples of very good client-
architect communication producing buildings which
become a human disaster.
A study of mental hospitals, the major realm of
Dr. Osmond's experience, is interesting because
these buildings are a microcosm of all the things
which affect architects, clients and the human
space. A place designed for the mentally ill should
work equally for the well. After all, the mentally
ill are only us, except with minds which are unable
to cut off and control the constant flow of infor-
mation which is life. The mentally ill need an
environment which is simple. They do not have the
perception to know people, and crowds destroy.
Their environment must be one of small units in


which they can interact in groups of four or less.
The mentally ill need space which means some-
thing, space which they can call their own and
which is under their control. This is knowledge
which was known in 1860 and applied to the design
of the great pioneering mental hospitals of that
day. But it is knowledge which has been largely
lost or ignored in the intervening years.
People are very spatial animals. Territory, which
must be readily identifiable, is vitally important. A
person feels bigger on his own territory. We are not
really intimately social. How many architects began
living in old houses while designing open plans for
their clients? Modern technology, far from produc-
ing a stamped-out world of conformity, must be put
to the task of producing differences.
We know from experiments that man is sensi-
tive to space. If his normal perception to space and
time is altered, he becomes sick. Verticality at first
brings a feeling of awe, then discomfort. Space,
time, color and sound, properly used, mold man.
The architect must know these factors. We must
find out what effects hardware (buildings) have on
software (people).


DISORDER
PHILOSOPHY: CULTURAL
OF OUR
DR. ALBERT GOLDMAN TIMES
We live in an age when most of the old values
have not only fallen into question but have mostly
fallen, period. It is not monetary. We do not yet
know the remedies for this age. It is a time when
no one seems able to answer the question, "What
do we really want?"
Youth is searching. Dr. Goldman spoke of one
avenue of that search the hippie culture. These
people, the hippies, do not believe in order. They
suspect it and deliberately create disorder. They
live by the law of anarchy. Everybody ought to know
what his "thing" is, do it, and the only sin is to
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






keep someone from doing his. Hippies.are a remark-
ably faceless people. Everything is done in groups.
Individual identities are submerged. They look for
meaning within.
The discovery of LSD was the greatest creator
of this new culture. But the drug is not an answer,
only a means for which the hippies must find a
sequel. Dr. Goldman asks, "Where is the fruit of
this mental release?" Their culture only cuts from
the past and restructures it. Society becomes only
protection and they revert to the social organization
of tribalism.
Religion, a revival of the spirit of primitive
religion, is the one area of greatest promise. But so
far a final crystalization and revelation is lacking.
Dr. Goldman termed the hippie, phenomenon a
remarkable institution of mass cultural regression.
He states that if it continues, and thus far it seems
to be doing so, our society will be brought to its
knees. This is the spirit of this age. It is real. It
has power.
The roots of this phenomenon go back to the
20th century. The price of civilization was discon-
tent. We have developed an obsession with all that
which is ancient. The culmination might have come
sooner except for intervention by both the depres-
sion and the second world war.
What was the trigger that began this move-
ment? Dr. Goldman places the time in the mid-
fifties when there occurred a shift on the level of
our mid-culture. The negro culture stopped trying
to be white; stopped striving for white values and
put on a "black" face. The negro suddenly realized
he was about to lose his identity. He began to revert
to his tribal primatism, in music especially, where
rock music has a sound of authority-truth. And
youth picked up the frequency.
Today we begin to reap the consequences.
Doors have opened on a devastating emptiness. New
values become boredom and play. We have lost our
cultural memories.
Dr. Goldman seets two avenues opening up. The
first is a peaceful anarchy as our whole society,
like the hippies, slowly grinds to a halt. This could
take place in a very short time. The second, and
more grim, is that when we start dictating culture
to primitive elements, we may revert to the dan-
gerous level represented by the Nazis and similar
groups.

DESIGN l LOUIS KAHN-THOUGHTS
I FROM A MASTER OF
ARCHITECTURE
Mr. Kahn spoke of his random thoughts on
living and architecture. He stated that nothing
new would be said which he had not said before.


Only when one person speaks to another can new
thoughts be generated. With three people, it be-
comes acting. One can't reach a group individually.
Our reason for living is to express, and to
express well. The architect is fortunate in that he
can constantly express himself. The inspiration to
live-to question-serves the will to express. The
will is in man to make that which nature cannot
Man can react to nature; nature cannot react. The
inspiration to express brings about the institutions
of man.
Kahn was once asked, "What is tradition?" He
replied that he did, and did not know. He said that
nothing which has happened can ever be repeated
in detail. What exists is within the vision of the
mind. That which is made as an expression cannot
die. History must be measured by the plan of the
battle, not the results. That which one is doing
when planning well is being traditional.
Architecture today ought to look primitive since
architecture is just beginning. We are in a cultural
time of white light and black light. We don't have
the inspiration of what to be. But there is a feeling
of new beginnings. There is a sense of the coming
of new institutions. The question is, how to make
present institutions come up to our time.
Mr. Kahn said we are in a very restless period,
both culturally and architecturally. It is not a great
period because there is no wonder-no call-no
promises. As soon as wonder enters, a leader will
enter. There is no leader. We will then find some
semblance of new institutions appearing. These in-
stitutions will need the mind of .a great statesman.
We have no genie, only new lamps for old without
a genie.
Art is the language of man, not science. Science
feeds art. Art gets us in touch with how we were
made. A building must convey to a client the spirit
and wonder of architecture. Kahn feels that in gen-
eral, we're building pretty bland things today, not
inspiring, not spatial, but dumb and inexpensive.
This is not so much a criticism of architects, as a
reflection of the times. Architecture does not know
personalities, only the essence of spirit architecture.

EDITORIAL COMMENTS:
Each speaker had a few individual comments, which taken for
themselves, had significance to architects as random bits of
information to be filed away for future use. Viewed as a whole,
these speakers were concerned with the very nature of an archi-
tect's work: Life, and an involvement in it. Our society and
world of today is so fast-moving, in such a flux of change, that
the architect must have knowledge and understanding of events
around him. Such was the purpose of Dr. Goldman's speech.
The architect must keep open the perspective of history so as
not to lose the knowledge gained from past processes and to
gain an understanding of events which preceded the forces of
today. Such was Dr. Osmond's purpose. And finally,.,in relating
to the masters and thinkers of his own profession, such as Louis
Kahn, the architect can retain an inspired image of the scope
and purpose of his work


NOVEMBER, 1967







EDITORIAL


An occasional review of the
objectives of THE FLORIDA
ARCHITECT is necessary in
order for our readers to be prop-
erly informed.
The intent of the publication
is threefold: To serve as a public
relations vehicle for the Associa-
tion and the architectural pro-
fession; to provide educational
material for individuals of the
profession and for those persons
in related and non-related fields;
and to inform the profession of
specific FAAIA affairs and pro-
grams which require larger dis-
tribution than our newsletter,
CONTACT.
The circulation includes all
registered architects in Florida,
consulting engineers, contractors
and builders, architectural stu-
dents, public officials on local
and state levels, financial institu.-
tions, all libraries in Florida,
manufacturers of building prod-
ucts, others who have specifically
requested to receive the publica-
tion and, of course, advertising
agencies and newspapers.
There has never been any in-
tent in the 17 years of our publi-
cation, to supplant the AIA
JOURNAL, ARCHITECTURAL
RECORD, FORUM, or other na-
tional publications. Our scope is
statewide. Occasionally there may
be a need to reprint an article
appearing in a national publica-
tion, since everyone receives a
multitude of periodicals and
surely every important article
isn't read by everyone.
Therefore, it is important to
understand that every item ap-
pearing in THE FLORIDA ARCH-
ITECT may not be of interest to
everyone, since specific material
may be directed to a certain seg-
ment of our readership. We hope
most of the editorial content will
be such that you will enjoy the
reading.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is
our means of monthly contact
with public officials such as legis-
lators, the Cabinet, agencies and
local, officials. Our publication
will begin to feature material on
architectural services, the role of
the architect and related data so
the non-architect segment may
be better informed on our pro-
fession. We would not expect
our architects to read this ma-
terial; perhaps a general browse
through will suffice, since archi-
6


FAAAIA's Highest Award the Gold Med
was received by H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA f,
his service to the profession above and beyor
that expected in any official capacity. Preside,
Smith made the presentation at the Annu
Banquet.


CONVENTION PHOTOS


tects know their role and serv-
ices. At the same time, our arch-
itects should not jump to criti-
cizing these features as unneces-
sary and waste of space, since
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, as
mentioned previously, is not in-
tended only for the architects.
And if you do not realize it, you
should know the public is gen-
erally not aware of architecture
and its significance to our soci-
ety.
For the architectural and re-
lated professions other material
of educational value will be in-
troduced for your reading inter-
est. We desperately hope our
FAAIA Committee structure will
produce material for publication
as additional content to what is
planned. Besides the Commit-
tees, we urge the interest of
architects to support their pub-
lication with ideas that the edi-
torial staff can investigate and
follow through; with written ar-
ticles on architectural matters
which may pertain to research in
your own office, or a new method
use in the construction of a build-
ing. This type of support certain-
ly has been lacking.
We are seeking the services
of an additional person for the
editorial staff. When this person
will be found cannot be deter-
mined. In the meantime, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT will carry
on with the intent for which it
was established.
EDITOR


ABOVE: "Award of Merit" received by
Rep. Robert Graham who by his interest,
activity and concern with the profession
of architecture, has advanced the cause
of good planning and design. H. Samuel
Kruse, FAIA, left, presented the Award.


ABOVE: "Award of Honor" was received
by Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA, for
his continual high quality and originality
of his work over an extended period of
time. Award was presented by Vice Presi-
dent Savage.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







NEWSNOTES

FAAIA LEADERSHIP ASSUMED BY SAVAGE
Herbert Rosser Savage, AIA, of Miami, as-
sumed the Presidency of the Association from
retiring President Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., at the
recent annual state convention. Savage is chief
architect of the Mackle Bros. Division, Deltona
Corporation, and has been a member of the Florida
Development Commission since 1964.


.ZA


F


1968 FAAIA OFFICERS
(Left to right) Harry E. Burns, Jr., Jacksonville, Secretary;
Myrl J. Hanes, Gainesville, Treasurer; Herbert Rosser Savage,
Miami, President; H. Leslie Walker, Tampa, Vice President/
President Designate.


ADAMS NAMES SMITH AND
ARNETT TO STATE GROUP
Secretary of State Tom Adams
has announced the appointment
of architects Hilliard T. Smith,
Jr., AIA, of Lake Worth, and
William T. Arnett, AIA, of
Gainesville, to the seven-man
Planning and Architectural Ad-
visory Council to the State Capi-
tol Center Planning Committee.
These appointments were made
with the recommendations of the
FAAIA.
The Capitol Center Planning
Committee is a legislative com-
mittee responsible for develop-
ing and guiding a comprehensive
and long-range plan for the state
capitol in Tallahassee.
The Planning and Architec-
tural Advisory Committee will
act as consultants to the Capitol
Center Planning Committee.
Other appointed members of the
Council are Milo Smith of
Tampa, who is a Planner; Lane
L. Marshall of Sarasota, Land-
scape Architect; Fred Sherman,
a MIAMI HERALD Editor; and
F. Blair Reeves, AIA, f a c u I ty
member of the Department of
Architecture, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville.


BRASILIA TO BE FEATURED
BY SOUTH FLORIDA
PC COUNCIL
The story of Brasilia, a city of
the future carved out of a wilder-
ness will be the program spon-
sored by the South Florida Chap-
ter of Producers' Council on No-
vember 2.8, 1967.
Robert Alton Peterson, travel-
er, lecturer, linguist, writer and
photographer, will make the pres-
entation. In his lecture Mr. Peter-
son will describe how an ultra
modern city planned for 500,000
people was built in the wild un-
inhabited interior of Brazil over
400 miles from the nearest city.
The architecture is outstanding
and has had widespread coverage
by all design publications.
He will discuss how, in a 4
year crash program virtually
everything from bricks to door-
knobs had to be brought in by
air and then in the dark days
following the official opening
how people deserted the new city
faster than new inhabitants ar-
rived.
Mr. Peterson has i v e d and
traveled extensively t h r o u g h
South and Central America, Eur--
ope and the Far East.
The meeting is to be held at
the new Sheraton Four Ambassa-
dors on Brickell Avenue begin-
ning at 6:30 p.m. and all archi-
tects are invited.


CALENDAR
November 18
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting at
9:30 a.m., Robert Meyer Motor Inn,
Orlando.
November 19 22
AIA Student Forum, Octagon, Washing-
ton, D. C.
November 28
South Florida Chapter of The Producers'
Council meeting, with BRASILIA to be
featured program, at 6:30 p.m. Four
Ambassadors (Brickell Avenue), Miami.
Architects of Palm Beach, Broward Coun-
ty and Florida South Chapters, AIA, in-
vited.
November 30
FAAIA/ Building Product Manufacturers'
meeting, 10 a.m., Robert Meyer Motor
Inn, Orlando. Purpose: Meeting of pres-
ent, past exhibitors, and manufacturers
who are interested to participate in fu-
ture state conventions, for discussion of
1968 convention planning, etc.
December 1
FAAIA/AIA Chapter and Section Presi-
dents' meeting at 1 p.m., Daytona Plaza
Hotel, Daytona Beach. Meeting will re-
cess at 5:30 p.m., and reconvent at
9:30 a.m., Saturday, December 2.
December 1
School Design Seminar sponsored by
FAAIA/Daytona Beach Chapter, AIA at
the Daytona Plaza Hotel at 6:30 p.m.
with cocktails and dinner. AIA Chapters
are asked to send a representative to view
this presentation.
December 2
FAAIA Council of Commisisoners' meet-
ing, 8 a.m. Breakfast meeting, Daytona
Plaza Hotel, Daytona Beach.
December 2
Reconvening of AIA Chapter and Section
Presidents' meeting, 9:30 a.m.
December 8 9 10
Legislative Weekend Miami.
January 11 -12- 13, 1968
AIA Chapter and Section Presidents'
"Grassroots" meeting, Shoreham Hotel,
Washington, D. C.
October 25 26 27 28, 1968
54th Annual Convention and Building
Products Exhibit of the FAAIA, Daytona
Plaza Hotel, Daytona Beach.

WINTER PARK ARCHITECT
ELECTED VP OF GRA
Nils Schweizer, AIA, was re-
cently elected Vice President of
the Guild for Religious Architec-
ture, national organization de-
voted to common problems of
religious leaders, architects and
artists. The election took place
at New York City during the In-
ternational Congress on Religious
Architecture and Visual Arts.


NOVEMBER, 1967







SMOOTH SELLING
BY GEORGE N. KAHN, MARKETING CONSULTANT
1967 George N. Kahn

THE SALESMAN IS A V. I. P.


There is a foolish idea in some
circles that selling is not digni-
fied. For this attitude we shower
blame on the colleges, the pro-
fessors, and anyone else within
range. Rarely does anyone put the
blame where it really belongs--
on the salesman himself.
Selling will never achieve its
rightful status in the business
world until salesmen start think-
ing of themselves as Very Im-
portant People. The salesman's
image in the public's mind will
improve only when he starts giv-
ing himself a higher rating. You
can't convince prospects of the
value of your product or your
company unless you can first con-
vince them of your own value.
Rate Yourself High
The salesman who speaks apol-
ogetically of his vocation or de-
rides his colleagues is simply cut-
ting his own throat. When the
salesman g lo a t s of "pulling a
fast deal," he is doing great
harm to himself and his profes-
sion. In short, if you talk and act
like a sidewalk pitchman, that's
the way you'll be treated.
Management is much quicker
to recognize the salesman's im-
portance than he is h i m s e f .
Businessmen know that creation
of demand is a vital factor in
their profit and loss statements.
These days all top executives and
even technical engineers are sales
oriented. Engineers must think
like salesmen to design products
that appeal to consumers. Even
the production department must
gear its effort to a sales cam-
paign.
Salesmen Are First Class Citizens
The salesman is the key per-
son without whom there would
not be any business. But many
salesmen behave like second class
citizens--and too often that's
the kind of reception they get in
a prospect's office.
I remember running into an
old friend, Jack Creswell, whom
I hadn't seen in years. I asked
him what he was doing. Jack
smiled deprecatingly and said he
was "on the road" for a flooring
company, adding:
"Of course, this is just until I
can find something better."


He made his job sound as if he
were washing dishes in a cheap
hash house.
"Jack," I said, "there is prob-
ably nothing wrong with the job
except yourself. Before you move
to what you think are greener
pastures, why not give this job
your best. If you think of your-
self as .a failure in selling you'll
wind up as one. But if you see
this as an opportunity to push
ahead to success, your future is
assured."
I think the advice took, be-
cause Jack stayed in selling with
the flooring company and became
a top producer with a loyal fol-
lowing of customers. Years later
he told me: "You hit pretty hard
that day, George, but you open-
ed my eyes to what I was and
what I could become."
No Room For Amateurs
In today's competitive market
there is no room for amateurs
and dabblers in selling. For those
who really want to make selling
a career, there is a rich reward.
But you must be willing to work
for it.
Selling has its problems, heart-
aches and frustrations. It's a
lonely job. But these very factors
are what separate the men from
the boys.
Millions of people are embed-
ded in dull, prosaic jobs that af-
ford them little or no excite-
ment, drama or challenge. The
salesman can look forward to
steady growth and can enjoy a
stimulating, lively life on the
way. His future is limited only by
the strength of his desire to suc-
ceed.
Frontier of Selling
The trouble with many unin-
spired salesmen is that they
don't understand the dynamics


involved in s e I I i n g They are
really clerks at heart whose hori-
zons are limited.
The earnest, imaginative sales-
man can write his own ticket to
wherever he wants to go. With
faith in himself, drive and the
right tools, he can make big
money and climb high in his
firm.
But he must feel and act im-
portant to accomplish this goal.
He must think of himself as one
of the world's key people a
man who rates high in the
scheme of things.
Act Like A V. 1. P.
Do you stride boldly into a
prospect's office or do you sidle
in, glancing back at the door as
if it were an escape hatch? Do
you apologize for taking up a
buyer's time? Do you feel like an
intruder in his office?
If the answers are yes you are
letting yourself, your family and
your company down. To be a
V.I.P. you must act like one.
That's the only way to command
respect and so sell merchandise.
Only then will you earn what you
are dreaming of earning.
The head of the sales training
program of a big paper manufac-
turer once said to me:
"About the fifth day of the
program my instructors can
usually spot those who will be
top salesmen. There's something
about their attitude, they handle
themselves in a certain way. They
act like they are proud to be
here. It's almost like getting a
successful salesman ready made."
That man put his finger right
on the heart of the matter.
Pride. Are you proud to be sales-
man? If not, something is wrong.
If you're not proud of your work,
chances are you are not acting
like a Very Important Person.


EDITOR'S COMMENTS:
We are pleased to announce a new and provocative series of Sales Training articles
by George H. Kahn designed to motivate, inspire and train you to do a better job in a
highly critical area of our economy-namely, salesmanship.
One does not have to be engaged in selling a certain product to be known as a
salesman. The professions of architecture and engineering are basically service-oriented
professions providing basic services to clients, which services ultimately bring about
an end product-a building or other type of facility for public or private use.
As we speak of public relations and the fact that every architect, each day of the
year, is a better P/R weapon than paid counsel can bring about, we must recognize
salesmanship is an important role of the architect and his conduct of office practice.
These 12 articles are "must" reading, not only for representatives of building
product manufacturers, but for architects, engineers, contractors, bankers, public
officials all of whom receive our publication.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















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Selection. In rental structures the appeal of
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3 more beautiful panelings for G-P Wall Systems


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Commonwealth ui.i, Portland, Oregon 97204
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The grooves are 4 inches apart. This effect used
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OKINAWA


THE PHILIPPINES


EMIL r


I'. 1
NiEE RL 9




NOVEMBER, 1967


It's

Not-So-Far East

on

Northwest.

In fact, it's up to 8 hours closer.
Our shortcut routes have shrunk the globe.
Our smooth, swift Fan-Jets fly the Pacific with-
out stopping.
That's why it's not "The Far East" anymore -
not on Northwest.
With us, it's "The Not-So-Far East."
Tokyo, for example, is less than half a day's
flight from Seattle-on Northwest. And from
Tokyo, it's just a short hop to anywhere in
the Orient.
Take your pick.
Tokyo. Osaka. Hong Kong. Okinawa. Taiwan.
The Philippines. We fly to more places in the
Orient than any other U.S. airline.
And we've been flying there for years.
20 years, to be exact. So when you fly with
us, you know you're in the hands of an airline
that really knows the Orient.
Next trip, come our way to the Orient-and
see for yourself.
It's Not-So-Far East on Northwest.

Northwest's routes make it "Not-So-Far East"








NORTHWEST ORIENT
THE FAN-JET AIRLINE

We fly to the Orient from more
U.S. cities than any other airline. Choose
from 23 flights a week.


- -


I i;~t~ t-~li
!Jjw. l I m
M j:---?








LLULCTI


Architect: Carl N. Atkinson. AIA, St. Petersburg.
Consulting Engineers: Ebaugh & Goethe. Inc. Gainesville.
Contractor Richard Deeb. St. Petersburg.
This multi-purpose all-electric building houses all
administrative offices, police and fire departments,
plus public auditorium. Year-round air conditioning
and heating accomplished through electric
heat pumps serving six individually controlled zones
Total capacity. 60 tons.


ii
I"


-- pfiL~a


Civic Buildings throughout
(TAXPAYERS PROFIT BY 1


With civic buildings increasingly becoming centers of year-round com-
munity activities, flameless electric cuts costs as the source for all
cooling, heating, lighting and power.
The civic buildings shown here typify Florida's growing trend toward
ALL-ELECTRIC... signified by the All-Electric Building Award and the
Award of Merit for Electrical Excellence.
Cheaper than in combination with flame-type fuels, the total-electric
concept lowers construction costs and reduces maintenance expense,


all
\ALEE IC,


MUNICIPAL BUILDING,
Springfield, Florida


Architect & Contractor: J. T. Barton, Panama City.
This all-electric building serves as City Hall, Police
Department, Fire Department, Municipal Court
and Jail. Year-round heating and cooling is provided by
a compact electric heat pump. The prison kitchen is
all-electric and even the jail cells are air conditioned.


Florida's Electric Companies



12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


CIVIC BUILDING,
Town of Belleair, Florida


&,sr

$: P


I *









SFLORIDA CITRUS SHOWCASE BUILDING,
Winter Haven. Florida


Architect & Engineer: Sydney Stilley & Associates.
V Jacksonville.
Contractor- Hungerford Construction Co, Tampa.
This all-electric circular-shaped building features
St more than 23,000 sq. ft of floor space, with 17.000 sq. ft.
devoted to useful exhibit area Appioximately
250,000 people attend the annual Florida Citrus
Showcase held here.









da are going Total-Electric

NAMELESS ADVANTAGES)


leaning and redecorating. Architects can effect significant savings and
achieve greater flexibility of design.

Automatic, flameless reverse-cycle electric air conditioning offers
greater year-round comforts and eliminates big-expense items like boiler
rooms, fuel storage facilities, flues and vents.

Get the money-saving facts! You and your architect or engineer are
invited to consult your electric utility company at any time, without
obligation.









MIAMI BEACH AUDITORIUM. T
Miami Beach. Florida 'I.ro
L ,E,,U ,,7.

Architects: Russell T. Pancoast & Associates;
Henry Hohauser; L. Murray Dixon.
City Engineer: Morris N. Lipp'
Contractors: L & H Miller Co.; Zanet Construction Corp.
This spacious all-electric auditorium is the home of the -
Jackie Gleason Show, the Miss Universe International
Beauty Contest, big-time sport events,.etc. Its
electric air conditioning system is-of 415-ton as
capacity. Hot water needs are supplied by two IA R -
500-gallon electric water heaters. Interior "7.
lighting is ample and decorative.


I -paying, Investor-owned




NC\. EMBER I'; i







FAAIA HONOR AWARD/1967

THE J. WAYNE REITZ FLORIDA UNION BUILDING/UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


JURY COMMENTS
This entry set a high standard of ex-
cellence in its clean detailing of rail and
sun shade. These features with variations
in scales unified this building that houses
a variety of functions. The crisp con-
sistency of design was admired by the
jury.

OWNER
Board of Regents, State of Florida
ARCH ITECTS
Barrett, Daffin & Bishop / Tallahassee
Moore and May / Gainesville
ENGINEERS
Wellman-Lord Engineering, Inc., Struc-
tural / Lakeland
Ebaugh & Goethe, Inc., Mechanical
Gainesville
Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Acous-
tical / Cambridge, Massachusetts
INTERIORS
Atrium, Inc. / Jacksonville
CONTRACTOR
H. L. Coble Construction Company-
Greensboro, North Carolina
PHOTOGRAPHY
G. Swade Swicord / Gainesville
STATISTICS
Area of Building 249,080 sq. ft.
Construction Cost $4,481,600.00
Cost/Square Foot ___ $17.91


THE COLONNADE CONNECTING LINK BETWEEN THE MAIN UNION
BUILDING AND THE THEATRE UNIT


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







PROGRAM:
In the design of the new J. Wayne
Reitz Florida Union, circulation of people
into and through the building established
itself as a primary consideration in the
early stages of planning.
The site for the new Union was sel-
ected because of its central location on
the major pedestrian mall, midway be-
tween the men's and women's residence
areas and central to the academic areas,
thus reinforcing its role as "community
center." Estimates indicated that the new
Union would, at times, contain 4,000 to
5,000 people attending various and un-
related events. Inviting and easy access
into and through the building had to be
provided.
Some of the design problems are de-
scribed below.
* Irregular site, with approximately
25'-0" elevation change and a large
pond near its center.
* Circulation for hotel guests, students
and theatregoers and access for serv-
ice functions.
* The assimilation of large volume
spaces (ballroom, cafeteria, theater,
games area, student activity center
and auditorium) into a union of ele-
ments that will relate to each other in
purpose and will be pleasing in their
relationship to other smaller elements.
* Food service facilities of many types,
including cafeteria, snack bar, formal
dining and catering for groups of 10
to 2,000 people.
* The problem of fitting large volume
areas on the proper floor into a de-
sired relationship with other elements
-all within a simplified framing sys-
tem.
* To provide a subtle exposure to the
arts for all who use the building.
* The creation of a space suitable for
groups of 20 to 2,000 persons for
meetings, banquets, dances, exhibits,
films, etc.
[ A theater for the performance and
teaching of drama, designed as an in-
tegral part of the Union complex.
H A recreation area with a central con-
trol desk, enabling supervision over
several hundred students from a cen-
tral location.
The challenge to the architects was for
a solution that would amalgamate all
these varied activities and functions into
a building that would create a feeling that
cultural activities and the arts can be
pleasant adjuncts to other activities and
interests.


The Honor Awards Program thanks all the architects who participated.
The exhibits were a very interesting part of the program. The entrants
ranged from residences to a college campus plan. There were more
large scale projects this year. The wide variety of projects and their
architectural solutions once again emphasize the vast architectural
talent we have in our architectural association.
GEORGE KASSABAUM/CARL DECKER/GEORGE POLK


THE GRAND STAIRWAY LOCATED IN THE UNION LOBBY
AT THE END OF THE COLONNADE


a






V V1
7 A'


NOVEMBER, 1967





REITZ STUDENT UNION


Qk.I '--.1
P-. A.~X* -.~-~-


di.


The Student Union Building
was designed as a joint venture
between two architectural firms.
Because such an arrangement
offers possibilities of small firms
combining to offer services for
large projects, we present here
an outline of how this system
was organized for this project.
A joint venture agreement
was drawn up and signed by part-
ners of both firms. Major provi-
sions of this agreement were:
* The Barrett, Daffin and Colo-
ney office in Tallahassee was
established as the office for
client contact and business.
Joint venture r e c o rd s and
books were kept at this office
A joint venture checking ac-
count was set up in a Talla-
hassee bank; checks could be
drawn by a partner of either
firm. Each firm contributed
equal shares to this account
monthly.
* The member f i rm s were to
contribute approximately
equal to the production of
services, had equal status and
responsibility, and were to
share equally in the profits
and losses.
* Mr. Pearce Barrett acted as
chairman of the joint venture.
comm ittee and Mr. Jack
Moore as vice-chairman. All
decisions were made by unani-
mous agreement between
these two persons.
* Each firm kept a monthly ac-
counting of "direct project
costs" and were paid from the
joint venture funds.
* Each firm developed early de-
sign studies with the parti of
the Barrett, Daffin, Coloney
firm being selected as the
basic design solution. Prelimi-
nary drawings were then
developed in that office.
B The production of working
drawings was handled in the
offices of Moore and May in
Gainesville, with a representa-
tive from Barrett, Daffin &
Coloney in charge of design
development.







FAAIA HONOR AWARD/1967

RESIDENCE FOR DR. & MRS. DANIEL A. OSMAN/KEY BISCAYNE


JURY COMMENTS



This residence, built on Key Biscayne, has
a true tropical flavor accented by the
elevation of the house to capture the
breeze and also to escape any hurricane
water. The intriguing solution separates
functions of the house but groups them
around a central pool and interconnects
these units with elevated walkways.

ARCHITECT
George F. Reed, AIA / Coconut Grove


LOOKING INTO THE POOL AREA FROM THE WATERWAY-LIVING UNIT IS ON RIGHT


- r- _


Lt~ _






OSMAN CONTINUED:
The site is located on Key Bis-
cayne, overlooking a natural har-
bor that opens on one end to the
bay. Prevailing breeze is from
the water. Site will prob a b I y
flood to a depth of four feet dur-
ing severe hurricanes.
The solution is three separate
wood houses placed atop wood
umns at varying heights and posi-
tions to provide protection
against high water while permit-
ting light and air passage thru
and around them, opening and
framing views, and offering pri-
vacy for the individuals. A long
pool for active swimming is cross-
ed by a foot bridge between the
Family House and the Master
Bedroom. Children have t h e i r
own spaces for sleep and study.
Shingled roofs shelter from sun
and rain wood jalousie slats open
to breezes and filter the bright
sunlight on a tropical house.
This all wood house depends
on the material in many differ-
ent ways. Because the weight of
the wood structure is lighter than
masonry it made possible the
elimination of expensive pi l e
foundations. Further, the height
above ground with a joist floor
system on wood columns and
beams made possible a dryer
structure both during high water
as well as during the normal rainy
season. The structural framing,
Fir, provides a certain flexibility
during wind storms. Cedar roof
shingles were selected for ap-
pearance and long life. Cypress
is used for exterior and interior
wall paneling, as well as for all
casework. Redwood is found in
the many wood jalousies and fix-
ed glass framing. Narrow strips
of Red Oak are used in the wood
flooring. Even the furniture is of
wood, made of great slabs of
English Walnut and American
Black Walnut.
This all wood house is dry and
cool in the summer; yet, warm
and comfortable in the winter
months. And more, the wood ex-
presses the love of the craftsmen
that worked, shaped, stained and
fitted it. In this way wood be-
comes a very personal and ex-
pressive material, offering friend-
ly shelter to all.


VIEW ACROSS COURT TO MASTER SUITE


plan


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





*ZC~RF t T;~'~ ';2#i-i~ ~e-~~F

i


Credits: The Publix Market, Hollywood. Fla.; Architect: Charles N. Johnson; Gen. Contractor: Frank J. Rooney Co.; Terrazzo Contractor: Hollywood Tile and Terrazzo Co.


The biggest bargain in this store is the floor


... it's Portland Cement Terrazzo

The best floor you can put in any building will have four advantages:
1. It will last the life of the building. 2. It will be sensible in initial cost.
3. It will be beautiful-and it will remain so. 4. It will be simple and
inexpensive to keep clean. Only when a floor offers all this can it be consid-
ered successful-and economical. No floor meets all these standards as
capably as Portland Cement Terrazzo. Consult your terrazzo contractor.


PORTLAND CEMENT


A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY. P.O. Box 324, Dallas, Texas 75221
Offices: Houston Tampa Miami Chattanooga Chicago Fort Wayne Kansas City. Kan. Fredonia. Kan. Los Angeles
NOVEMBER, 1967 19





ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Climate Master Products, Inc. . .

Dunan Brick Yards, Inc .. .

Florida Gas Transmission Company . [

Florida Investor-Owned Electric Utilities .

Florida Natural Gas Association . .

Georgia-Pacific Corporation . .

The Ben Meadows Co ... . .

Northwest Orient Airlines . .

Oil Fuel Institute of Florida . .

Portland Cement Association . .

T-Square Miami Blue Print Co., Inc. . .

Trinity White -General Portland Cement Co. .


1

3rd Cover

2

12-13

21

9-10

20

11

20

2nd Cover

22

19


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20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







People w ho We in GAS houses...


MR. ARCHITECT: With the tremen-
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that natural gas is not just highly com-


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service when

NATURAL GAS


FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION, P. O. BOX 548, VALPARAISO, FLORIDA 32580


NOVEMBER, 1967






NECROLOGY

DONALD G. SMITH, AIA, senior partner of
Smith, Korach & Associates, architectural firm in
Miami, died October 13 in Washington, DC.
A resident of Miami for 32 years, Mr. Smith,
was a Fellow of the CSI, a Corporate member of
the AIA, and a member of the American Hospital
Association.
He studied architecture at Western Reserve
University, John Huntington Polytechnic Institute,
and the Beaux Arts Institute of Design, all in
Cleveland.

MAURICE H. CONNELL, P.E., senior partner
of the architectural and engineering firm, Connell,
Pierce, Garland and Friedman, passed away on
October 19 in Hendersonville, N.C.
A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania,
he was formerly an instructor at Yale University
and University of Miami.
Mr. Connell was a member of many profes-
sional organizations, including Fellow of the Flor-
ida Engineering Society.


.I'


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105 MM Micro-Film Tracing Reproductions
Transits Levels


POST CONVENTION ORIENT TOUR
JUNE 27 JULY 14, 1968


How many of us have had an opportunity to
study the Japanese way with spaces, materials,
nature and symbolism? Our warm climate causes
an immediate identity with open-to-nature archi-
tecture. Many of our recent technical and design
concepts are ancient Japanese habits. The frus-
trated creative person who deals with rampant
western individuality can bathe in an atmosphere
of exalted aesthetics and the profound quiet of
harmonious tranquility. Japan is also an excellent
place to begin introspection of ones western self.
Dovetailing neatly with the finish of the AIA
Convention in Portland and Honolulu next July
will be a special tour of Japan open to anyone
interested in architecture or the allied arts. Two
intensive weeks have been planned with the object
of opening the eye and the mind to the best of
ancient and modern Japanese art and architecture.
Members of the tour will experience shrines,
temples and tea houses, meetings with Japanese
architects, the visually beautiful Japanese cuisine,
man's most refined and expressive use of organic
materials, modern and traditional handcrafts, fes-
tivals and ceremonies, dry and wet water moss,
gravel and rock gardens, the world's most advanced
modern rapid rail transit, midnight noodle vendors,
kabuki, noh, and bunraku theater, ancient and
contemporary pottery, painting, printing and
flower arranging, an extraordinary sense of ma-
terials and how to honor them, the calculated illu.
sions of great space achieved in small areas, strong
tradition, adaptive ingenuity and originality; and
to conclude a random list, the extraordinary rural
scenery and urban phenomenon of Japan.
The experience of a fine Japanese inn is never
forgotten. Although much of the tour is carefully
scheduled, there will also be times for rest or ex-
ploration by the individual. For those who feel the
pull of nearby Hong Kong, the five final days of
the tour may be passed there; those who remain
in Japan will visit a feudal castle, an ancient city,
and remarkable folk arts museum.
Tour advisor will be Miami architect Lester
Pancoast, who studied Japanese architecture with
the help of Kyoto University in 1957. Lorraine
Travel Bureau and Northwest Orient Airlines are
making arrangements, and requests for itinerary
and particulars should be addressed to Lorraine
Travel Bureau, 179 Giralda Ave., Coral Gables,
Fla. 33134, phone 445-8853.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






This Is Zyrian Stone ..


This is an angle photograph of an actual panel 17' wide.


It began over 500 million years ago in a quarry outside Min-
eral Bluff, Georgia. Through the ages, it adapted to a multitude
of earth changes. Today, It is a fine-grained mica schist that has
remained remarkably adaptable. It breaks into slabs of any desired
thickness (stocked only in /2" thickness) or cut and saw it
to any shape. Variety is infinite. No two slabs show the same color
shades they range from greens and bluish-greens through yel-
lows, browns and chocolate tones. Blend them to produce striking,
artistic effects. This unusual stone is ideal for veneering .. future
uses are unlimited. It took over 500 million years for Zyrian Stone
to reach such perfection of beauty and facility. It was worth the wait.


iiFUIN


DUNAN
MIAMI, FLORIDA


BRICK


BRICK YARDS, INC.
TUXEDO 7-1525




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


Univ2rsrty of Florlia Libraries
Gaiesville, Fla.
32b01


"Beauty of style and harmony
and grace and good rhythm
depend on simplicity."
PLATO


NEXT MONTH
* 1967 Architectural Exhibit Merit Awards
* Talk presented by George E. Kassabaum, FAIA,
at Awards Luncheon of FAAIA Convention -
Subject: Change/Frustration/Jealousy
* "Are You A Salesman?"
* Architectural Services

COMING UP
* Louis Kahn's talk at FAAIA Convention Sem-
inar
* Proceedings of Office Practice S e m i n a r by
D'Orsey Hurst
* How the "Turn Key" Method Works a New
Approach to Public Housing.