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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Perspective
 A.I.A. President's message
 Convention schedule
 Convention speakers
 Convention exhibitors
 Craftsmanship awards
 Advertisers' honor roll
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00160
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: October 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00160
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
    Perspective
        Page 8
        Page 9
    A.I.A. President's message
        Page 10
    Convention schedule
        Page 11
    Convention speakers
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Convention exhibitors
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Craftsmanship awards
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Advertisers' honor roll
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Advertisers' index
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

Hie lorida archileclloclober 1967


%J&DING CO010

























Cement: Concrete= Sunshine: Florida


Yes. just as this simple ratio states cement is
to concrete as sunshine is to Florida. We all know\
the important role Florida's delightful. )ear-round
climate has played in the state's tremendous
growth over the past twenty Nears.
Even more significant is what an adequate
amount of cement means to concrete. It is
portland cement that makes concrete the number
one construction material ... be it patios or
high-rise buildings. highways or seawalls.
Basic concrete mix formulas are designed to
use only enough cement to insure maximum
strength. durability, stability, wa ertightness and
other characteristics of quality concrete.
A significant reduction in cement content in
a mix cuts the concrete quality in one \%wa or
another... be it the use of too much \water. or


replacing cement with so-called "extenders"
or "additives."
Unfortunately, the undesirable effects of
such cutting may not show up until long after the
concrete is in use. Strength readings alone don't
tell everything, especially about durability.
The fact is there's no substitute for portland
cement in concrete. It is with good reason that
there should be absolute insistence on accurate
and adequate cement content.
If you have any questions on the proper design
of concrete mixes or any other phase of design
and construction, the Portland Cement Association
has a staff of trained specialists ready to assist
you. Feel free to call on them at an\ time.
.* PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
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Prepare now for the cool weather ahead with new and modern oil heat
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OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA IlLHNll
YOU CAN DEPEND ON IT


OCTOBER, 1967





AT
































THE

"WINGED V"

at


Deerfield Beach


George L. Bennett, A.I.A., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Architect
Walter C. Harry & Associates, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Engineers
Stinson Construction Company, Deerfield Beach, Florida, Contractors
Rinker Materials Corp., Boca Raton, Florida, Concrete Supplier

The River House Apartments at Deerfield Beach, Florida,
make a dramatic architectural statement in a state where pro-
gressive architecture is the rule.
Designed in a V-shape with flaring wings, the 50-foot deep
building has a frontage of 600 feet, 1000 running feet of in-
terior-and only two expansion joints.
The 6-story building is of reinforced concrete frame con-
struction, using Solite lightweight structural concrete for floors
and exterior walls. The use of Solite substantially reduced
dead load, thereby reducing column size and the number of
piles needed for foundation.
Dramatic and beautiful, River House is another outstand-
ing example of the interplay between gifted architect and
modern, versatile building materials.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















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OFFICERS
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President,
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth,
Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Desig-
nate/Vice President, 3250 S.W. 3rd
Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary, P.O. Box 609,
Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer, Citizens
Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin
St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County: Charles R. Kerley,
Robert E. Todd. Daytona Beach:
David A. Leete, Tom Jannetides.
Florida Central: J. A. Wohlberg, Ted
Fasnacht, James J. Jennewein. Florida
Gulf Coast: Frank Folsom Smith,
Jack West. Florida North: F. Blair
Reeves, William C. Grobe. Florida
North Central: Forrest R. Coxen.
Florida Northwest: Ellis W. Bullock,
Jr., Thomas H. Daniels. Florida
South: Robert J. Boerema, James E.
Ferguson, Jr., Francis E. Telesca.
Jacksonville: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., John Pierce Ste-
vens. Mid-Florida: Wythe D. Sims,
II, Joseph M. Shifalo. Palm Beach:
Jack Willson, Jr., John B. Marion,
Richard E. Pryor. Director: Florida
Region, American Institute of Archi-
tects, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600
N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami. Execu-
tive Director: Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects,
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Donald Singer, Milton C. Harry,
Lowell L. Lotspeich.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos, Editor; Donald
Singer, Assistant Editor; Black-Baker-
Burton, Photography Consultants; M.
Elaine Mead, Circulation Manager.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use .. Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray
Printers.


the
Ilorida

archllecl
olticial journal
ol he lorina
association
ollieamerican
insiluie ol
archlects


DEPARTMENTS

PERSPECTIVE ...........




FEATURES

A.I.A. PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE ...

CONVENTION SCHEDULE ......

CONVENTION SPEAKERS ......

CONVENTION EXHIBITORS .....


CRAFTSMANSHIP AWARDS .

ADVERTISERS' HONOR ROLL


ADVERTISERS' INDEX .


FRONT COVER: 53rd Annual FAAIA Convention, October,4-8,
Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood . Philosophy, Design, Life .
Be There!


VOLUME 17 U NUMBER 10 N OCTOBER 1967


OCTOBER, 1967


10


12

18


. 22







PERSPECTIVE


LOWE ART GALLERY
SCHEDULES EXHIBITS
A collection of 25 works from the
permanent collection, dating from the
17th through the 19th centuries, will go
on display Thursday, Sept. 21, at the
University of Miami's Joe and Emily
Lowe Art Gallery.
Titled "Selections from The Perma-
nent Collection," the exhibition is com-
posed of works pictured in "A Hand-
book of the Collections," published last
spring by the Friends of Art of the Lowe
Gallery, in conjunction with the gallery's
15th anniversary.
The selection includes works by Do-
menico Feti, Washington Alston, Jan Van
Goyen, Everett Shinn, Rembrandt Peale,
and Claude Monet, all donated to the
gallery over the years by community
leaders.
Their appearance in an exhibit that
will continue throughout the year re-
flects the wish of Dr. August L. Freund-
lich, director of the Lowe Gallery, to
show the UM students and the com-
munity more of the Lowe's art treasures.
"It is the role of the professional
museum staff to present as wide a range
of the highest quality objects of art as
possible, so that a rich and broad experi-
ence may be offered the viewer," said
Dr. Freundlich.
"My hopes are for the eventual ex-
pansion of the gallery so that the Virgil
Barker Memorial Collection of Ameri-
can Art and our vast group of Far East-
ern works may be placed on permanent
display."
Exhibits scheduled for later in the
year include a collection of the original
prints of Florida birds by John James
Audubon; a review of the work of re-
nowned satirist-artist, William Gropper;
a selection of paintings by nationally
known artist-couples; and a display of
photographs by Richard Merrick, show-
ing styles of Mexican architecture.
The Alfred I. Barton Wing of Primi-
tive Art, including the American Indian
Collection, is being refurbished and will
open in November.
In addition to the "Selections from
The Permanent Collection," the Kress
Collection of Masters of the 14th-18th
Centuries in the Kress Wing will be open
to the public throughout the year.
The Lowe Gallery is open 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 2 to
5 p.m. Sunday and 8 to 10 p.m. Wed-
nesday. Admission is free.


hOUIS I. KAHN

DR. ALBERT GObIDHA

DR. HUMPHRU OSOHND



53rd ARnURI


FRARI GORUERTIOD


OCTOBER 4- 8


HOLhhluOOD









PLANNING SEMINAR
Critique of The Campus Plan
of the University of South Florida
At the Student Center, University of South Florida, Tampa,
Florida, July 15, 1967, FAAIA held its third Seminar of the
current year in the Association's program for continuing
education.
The third Seminar was a critique of the campus plan of the
University of South Florida. By reviewing the history and
development of the plan for the University of South Florida and
touring the campus, those attending the Seminar prepared
themselves for the evaluation workshop with the panelists.
Through the workshop, the individual was exposed to the pres-
sures to be exploited and avoided, the characteristics desirable
and undesirable, and the process which the concept and
accomplishment of campus planning undergoes.
The Seminar Moderator was H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, of the
firm Watson, Deutschman & Kruse. The four panelists were:
Hilario F. Candela, AIA, of Pancoast, Ferendino & Grafton;
Clyde B. r-Iill, PE, Head of the Physical Plant Division of the
University of South Florida; Milo M. Smith, AlP, of the plan-
ning firm Milo Smith & Associates; and Robert Swilley, archi-
tect with the-3oard of Regents.
Kruse opened the Seminar by describing those general
needs one must satisfy when planning a campus. He reminded
the panelists that architects are concerned with environment
not only to satisfy the requirements of academic functions, but
also to provide the optimum opportunities for emotional and
social, as well as the intellectual maturity of adolescents so
near to becoming legal adults.
The campus plan should provide the example of quality,
for the student has in all probability never seen quality environ-
ment at home and probably won't after he leaves college. The
campus should make it easy for him to learn about love, beauty
and the fun of developing one's talents to the fullest out of
class as well as in the formal setting for learning.
Mr. Hill outlined the historical development of the campus
plan for USF. In this he was assisted by Mr. Breitenbach, who
was assigned the planning task while still a member of Guy
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I I









AIA NATIONAL
SCHOLARSHIP
PROGRAM
The American Institute of Architects
has announced the opening of the 47th
annual scholarship program of the AIA
and the AIA Foundation for students and
professional architects. By November I,
application forms for students will be
available from the deans of all accredited
schools of architecture. Interns and pro-
fessionals may apply directly to the AIA
scholarship secretary at AIA headquar-
ters in Washington.
The scholarships, ranging from $200
to $2,000 for students, $1,000 to
$3,000 for post-graduates, totaled ap-
proximately $37,000 for 58 awardees in
the 1967-68 program. In addition to
AIA endowments, donors include Blum-
craft of Pittsburg, Desco International
Association, Eaton Yale & Towne Inc.,
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Foundation, and
Syska and Hennessy, Inc. of New York.
Deadline for all submissions is No-
vember 30. The AIA scholarship com-
mittee meets in January, and awards -
based on scholarship and need will be


announced in the spril





FRlton's staff of the old Board of Control. The history demon-
s.rated the confusion and vacilation by which much of the
early planning was done in the absence of clear-cut objectives,
the inadequacy of planning and consultants' budget, and the
effect of decision-making by persons with inadequate back-
ground for it.
Mr. Candela started the afternoon session, after Mr. Hill
and Mr. Swilley led the Seminar on a tour of the campus, with
a resume of all the shortcomings he had observed during the
tour. The distances between buildings were out of scale with
people, and cars were better served than people. There were no
environmental opportunities for the student to teach himself by
meditation or social exchange between classes. Buildings were
generally good, but their placement as related to commons and
other buildings was not the best. Around and between build-
ings there were no amenities for people. There was monotony
in spite of the excitement of a good many buildings because
there were no dominant elements as counterpoints to the uni-
form height of buildings. The water tower and the blue smoke
stacks of the power plant came closest to dominant elements
and these obviously were not designed as an integral part of
the campus design because they were exceptionally badly-
placed and ugly.
Mr. Smith followed Candela and explained some of the
early concepts which fell by the wayside as decisions were made
by non-planners and the reduction of budget. He explained
the proposed use of bulk landscaping as a foil to building mass
and to create smaller court-like spaces between buildings.
Automobile traffic and parking was kept out of the academic
area and routed at the periphery of the campus. He explained
that distances between buildings had been reduced from the
original concept, but that non-designers have great difficulty
feeling scale and these were the people making the decisions.
Covered walks had been considered, but these were eliminated
to save money.
Mr. Swilley pointed out the difficulties of campus plan-
ning for a political client in a dynamic growth period and with-
out adequate budget. The present campus was already in a
OCTOBER, 1967


FLORIDA
ARCH ITECT
RECEIVES AWARD
FROM MAGAZINE
ASSOCIATION
The Florida Magazine Association,
based in St. Petersburg, has awarded
the Florida Architect an Award of Merit
for the Best Column.
The President's Message, which has
appeared regularly in this magazine was
of course edited by President Hilliard T.
Smith Jr. The award cited President
Smith's writing as "direct and forceful
and well done."


transitional phase as a result of changing policies and demands
which bear very little resemblance to the original requirements.
He reminded the group that at that time there was no planning
team in the state which was skilled and experienced in campus
planning. He thought that the USF campus had been accom-
plished as well as could be expected in the trial-and-error
procedure as compared with some of the later campuses which
were done with a more orderly planning procedure and with
many consultants, and that the wide spaces around existing
buildings will be closed as those buildings are enlarged and
new buildings erected between them. It was suggested that the
campus would look good and be in scale when it developed
toward the ultimate configuration.
SUMMARY OF AUDIENCE DISCUSSION
An education specification prepared by the disciplines
related to the education process is the functional program for
the campus plan, but it isn't the only specification for the
design. Administrative and maintenance considerations play
their part in shaping the solution as well as philosophical and
aesthetic parameters.
Buildings must be related functionally, philosophically and
physically, for no single building comprises the university -
only the sum total of all buildings and activities.
The functional commons should also be the unmistakable
visual commons which student, faculty or visitor can sense as
well as see as the facilities for all.
The campus should be a pleasant, aesthetic entity at all
stages of development. More concern should be given to the
expansion of buildings instead of erecting separate buildings
for each department or function.
The master plan for an institution is not ideally a picture,
but should be an "environmental specification" recommending,
describing and illustrating all the things the environment is
expected to provide for a long period of time.
There must be great flexibility built into a master plan
because programs and techniques change drastically with the
passage of time.
Master planning is a serious affair. It should not be done
just to get an architectural commission for one of the buildings.
9







PRESIDENT'S MiESSRGE
When talking with a visiting Swedish architect about the lack of
art in the American church, he startled me by saying in essence, "Look
bub! Wait until you grow up! Your forefathers landed here without a
penny in their pockets. Give yourself time. Be patient. You're not
going to see art in the church until you have art in your homes. So far
I haven't seen much!"
Now that we have two cars in most carports perhaps we should be
less patient. Philosophy must come first however, and this is the very
reason that The Institute has established a Task Force on Primary and
Secondary Education. Some of the work which your members have
done in Florida has contributed generously to the information gathered
so far. It seems pretty obvious that we are not going to have design-
oriented clients until we graduate design-oriented students. This then
becomes a major goal.
Philosophy- Design- Life! Which comes first? No doubt we
must conclude that life comes first but we are uneasy when we assume
that warm bodies, reasonably well fed and out of the rain, indicate
the "abundant life".
This then becomes our search--to discover a philosophy so
fundamental that it leads to a design-enriched life. The fellowship of
architects made possible through Institute service forms one bridge
allowing us to pool our discoveries and assist each other up the path.
As we reach out to each other, and to the public we serve, the pattern
will form until the design becomes clear.
We have it within our power to inspire our country to produce
cities in which design reflects the underlying philosophy-A philos-
osophy rich in culture available to all. Who'inows, we might even end
up with art on our living room walls.

ROBERT L. DURHAM, FAIA
President, of The American Institute of Architects


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







COnUEnTIon SCHEDULE


WEDNESDAY-OCTOBER 4, 1967
8:00 AM Installation of Building
to Products and Architectural
6:00 PM Exhibits (Convention Hall)
10:30 AM Registration (Convention
to Hall)
6:00 PM Delegate accreditation
(FAAIA Service Center -
Convention Hall)
11:00 AM FAAIA Executive Commit-
tee Meeting President
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr. pre-
siding
1:00 PM Ladies' Hospitality Room
to (Card Room-Mezzanine)


5:00 PM
1:30 PM


Board of Directors Meeting
- President Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr. presiding (Em-
bassy Room-Mezzanine)


THURSDAY-OCTOBER 5, 1967
9:30 AM Ribbon cutting Ceremony
officially opening Building
Products Exhibits Presi-
dent Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
officiating (entrance to
Convention Hall)
9:30 AM Building Product Exhibits
to Arena (Convention Hall)
6:00 PM Registration (Convention
Delegate Accreditation
(FAAIA Service Center -
Convention Hall)
10:00 AM Ladies' Hospitality Room
to (Card Room-Mezzanine)
4:00 PM
11:00 AM Refreshments / Entertain-
to ment Building Products
6:00 PM Exhibits Arena (Convention
Hall)
12:00 Noon Sandwich/Beer Luncheon-
Building Products Exhibits
Arena (Convention Hall)
2:30 PM Seminar I. LIFE
to Speaker: Dr. Humphry
4:30 PM Osmond
Moderator: Larry King
(TV Theatre-Mezzanine)
4:30 PM Refreshments / Entertain-
to ment Building Products
6:00 PM Exhibits Arena (Convention
Hall)
Dinner On Your Own
9:00 PM "A Host Happening" -
to Free swinging party with
Midnight Daniel E. Skidmore and The
Los Olas Brass, and Go-Go
Girls at the Turf Club of
Gulfstream Park
Evening Hours Hospitality Suites


FRIDAY-OCTOBER 6, 1967


9:00 AM
to
6:00 PM





9:45 AM
to
11:30 AM

10:00 AM
to
11:30 AM


11:00 AM
to
6:00 PM


Building Product Exhibits
Arena (Convention Hall)
Registration (Convention
Hall)
Delegate Accreditation
(FAAIA Service Center -
Convention Hall) (Closes
at 9:30 a.m.)
BUSINESS SESSION I -
President Hilliard T. Smith,
Jr. presiding (TV Theatre
-Mezzanine)
Ladies' "Wiggery Festival"
with the House of Wiggery,
Boca Raton Continental
Breakfast (Card Room -
Mezzanine)
Refreshments / Entertain-
ment Building Products
Exhibits Arena (Convention
Hall)


12:15 PM "Awards Luncheon"-Pres-
ident Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
presiding
Speaker: George E. Kassa-
baum, FAIA, 1st Vice Presi-
dent of the American Insti-
tute of Architects
Presentation of Awards (Les
Ambassadeurs-Lobby)
2:00 PM Building Product Exhibits
to are open for visitation by
6:00 PM representatives of construc-
tion industry (engineers,
builders, contractors, sub-
contractors, dealers, suppli-
ers, etc.)
2:00 PM Ladies' Hospitality Room
to (Card Room-Mezzanine)
4:00 PM
2:30 PM Seminar II. PHILOSOPHY
to Speaker: Dr. Albert Gold-
4:30 PM man
Moderator: Larry King
(TV Theatre-Mezzanine)
4:30 PM Refreshments / Entertain-
to ment Building Product
6:00 PM Exhibits Arena (Convention
Hall)
6:30 PM "Dinner and Broadway
Show" Jack Valentine's
Country Dinner Theatre and
Broadway cast production of
Tennessee Williams' "Peri-
od of Adjustment"-Host:
Broward Chapter, AIA
(Buses begin to depart from
hotel buses will return
after show, approximately
10:20 p.m.)
Evening Hours Hospitality Suites


SATURDAY-OCTOBER 7, 1967


9:00 AM
to
2:00 PM


Building Product Exhibits
Arena (Convention Hall)
Registration (Convention


Hall)
Balloting for FAAIA officers
(FAAIA Service Center -
Convention Hall)
NOTE: Construction indus-
try personnel invited to
visit exhibits Saturday.
8:30 AM Office Practice Forum-H.
to Samuel Kruse, FAIA, pre-
10:30 AM siding
Speaker: D'Orsey Hurst,
President of his firm in
Management Consulting &
Business Research (TV
Theatre Mezzanine)
11:00 AM Refreshments / Entertain-
to ment Building Products
2:00 PM Exhibits Arena (Convention
Hall)
12:00 Noon Sandwich/Beer Luncheon-
Building Products Exhibits
Arena (Convention Hall)
12:00 Noon Ladies' "Fashion Forum"
with Lilly Pulitzer, designer
of hand-screened fabrics,
clothes and jewelry (Cafe
Cristal)
2:00 PM Exhibit Arena officially
closed
2:30 PM Seminar III. DESIGN
to Speaker: Louis I. Kahn,
4:30 PM FAIA
Moderator: Larry King
(TV Theatre-Mezzanine)
6:30 PM President's Reception (Re-
to agency Room) (Complimen-
7:30 PM tary to everyone-cocktails,
hot & cold hors d'oeuvres)
7:45 PM Annual Architects' Banquet
(Regency Room) Presi-
dent Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
presiding
Introduction of new officers
9:30 PM Dancing to Hugh Martin
Orchestra
Hospitality Suites


SUNDAY-OCTOBER 8, 1967
10:00 AM BUSINESS SESSION II -
President Hilliard T. Smith,
Jr. presiding
(TV Theatre-Mezzanine)
12:00 Noon Board of Directors Meeting
Vice President Herbert
Rosser Savage presiding
(TV Theatre-Mezanine)
1:30 PM 53rd Annual Convention
Officially Adjourns.


OCTOBER, 1967







53RD AnnUAR FAIR congEnTlOn SPEAKERS=


GEORGE E. KASSABAUM, FAIA
George is President-Elect of the
American Institute of Architects. He has
been awarded a Fellowship for service
to the profession. George served two
years as Vice-President of the Institute,
and during that period he was Chairman
of the Council of Commissioners. His
other duties as a Vice-President included
chairmanships of the Government Liaison
Committee, the National Capital Plan-
ning Committee, and various liaison ac-
tivities with other organizations. He will
attend the convention to represent the
institute and to speak at the awards
luncheon.
George is 46 years old, and he and
Marjory have three children. After his
graduation from Washington State Uni-
versity in 1947, he taught architectural
design for three years, leaving the Uni-
versity to join the St. Louis office of
Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum where he
is responsible for the production and
construction services.
Many of his firm's projects have been
published, and they represent a wide
variety of building types such as the
Priory Church and McDonnell Plane-
tarium in St. Louis; Southern Illinois
University at Edwardsville; The National
Air and Space Museum in Washington,
D.C. (to be built); Federal Office Build-
ings in Washington, D.C. and Denver,
Colorado; the I.B.M. Research Laboratory
at Los Gatos, California; the United
States Embassy in San Salvador; and the
University of the West Indies in Trinidad.


D'Orsey Hurst, a 1932 graduate of
Yale College and The Yale Law School,
is the President of D'Orsey Hurst &
Company, Inc. This is the leading man-
agement consulting firm specializing in
work for Professional and Business Serv-
ice Firms. He will address the office
practice seminar on Saturday morning.
Mr. Hurst's business experience in-
cludes investment banking, sales plan-
ning and training with The Sales Anal-
ysis Institute, and sales and executive
positions with Time Incorporated for
over 15 years. Returning to consulting,
he was Vice President and General Man-
ager of the international management
consulting firm of Bruce Payne & Asso-
ciates and, in 1959, founded his present
Firm.
Clients of his Firm include Engineers,
Architects, Engineer-Contractors, Pub-
lishers, Banks, Management Consultants,
and other companies in the "Services"
sector of our economy.
Mr. Hurst was the first Chairman of
the American Management Association
Seminars on "Managing the Professional
Service Firm for Profit and Growth" and
has continued to chair these annually
since 1960.
Mr. Hurst's articles and papers on
management and profitable growth of
Professional Firms have appeared in vari-
ous publications, including the Journal
of the American Institute of Architects,
American Engineer, Engineering News-
Record, Inland Architect, and Architec-
tural & Engineering News.
He is a member of the American
Economic Association, the American
Marketing Association, the American
Statistical Association, the American
Sociological Association, the American
Association for Public Opinion Research,
the American Management Association,
and the American Society for Public
Administration


LARRY KING
Larry King is a name familiar to all
South Floridians who pay any heed to the
communications media. As a regular
member of the television and radio scene,
Larry has interviewed the personalities
who make up our world today and he
hasn't missed many.
His nightly talk show on Miami radio
. WIOD is a byword to South
Florida.
He joins us at our convention as the
moderator of our seminar sessions. Those
attending can expect the speaker to be
questioned by an inquisitive mind that
leaves no stone unturned.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




































LOUIS 1. KAHN, FAIA ALBERT GOLDMAN


Louis I. Kahn, FAIA, was born in
1901 on the Isle of Osel, Estonia. He
attended school in Philadelphia, Pa., and
has kept that city as a home during a
career of more than 40 years that has
taken him many times around the world,
brought more honors than could possibly
be mentioned here, and won the esteem
of his colleagues as one of the great
architects of this, or any other time.
He will speak to the convention on the
application of a sense of order to archi-
tectural design. His background as Chief
Critic of Architectural Design at Yale
University, Resident Architect at the
American Academy in Rome, Professor of
Architecture at the School of Architec-
ture and Planning at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, and Professor
of Architecture at the University of Pen-
nsylvania (current) more than qualifies
him for this task.


Albert Goldman is currently Assistant
Professor of English and Comparative
Literature at Columbia Universiay in New
York City. He is also a regular book re-
viewer for Vogue magazine, host and
writer of The Wednesday Review, a one
hour cultural review which appears on
Channel 13 in New York City, and the
Editor in Chief of Cultural Affairs, a
quarterly published by the Associated
Councils of the Arts.
Dr. Goldman will address the conven-
tion on the need for order in our lives
in a time of cultural hysteria. We hope
to discuss tije matter of if in fact a sense
of order both spiritual and material -
affect our mental well being.


.-












Dr. Humphry Osmond was born and
educated in England. In 1963, he came
to the Bureau of Research in Neurology
and Psychiatry of the New Jersey Neuro-
Psychiatric Institute as Director of Re-
search.
In addition to his research studies, Dr.
Osmond has lectured extensively in Can-
ada, the United States, Britain and Europe
upon schizophrenia research. He is or has
been a consultant in psychiatric architec-
ture to the governments of Saskatchewan,
the states of New Jersey, New York and
Pennsylvania, the universities of Utah,
Princeton, Rice, the Maudesley Hospital,
England, the APA, and the Federal Gov-
ernment of the United States.


OCTOBER, 1967


I












4 out of 5*


new dwelling units


heat water electrically

An overwhelming preference for the flameless way.

There must be good reasons ... and architects, builders,
plumbing and heating contractors and realtors know why.


I~


*84% of the 80,061 new homes
and apartment units built in
1965-1966 in the areas served
by Florida's four investor-
owned electric companies
have electric water heating.


4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'1


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1. '
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'**r*


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1;, h
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c. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -'* ,'*', '4*'c.'r~;I*


It's good business...


and increases profits





1. In Florida, electric water heating is by far the first choice... for
cleanliness, safety, economy and dependability.

2. Easiest to install-anywhere. Only an electric water heater is
FLAMELESS, so it can be tucked away in a closet in an unused
corner, closest to the point of maximum hot water use.

3. Needs no venting. No heat is wasted up a flue. All the heat is
concentrated inside the tank.

4. Free from by-products of combustion. No flame, no fumes, no
soot and no odor .. silent as a light bulb.

5. Insulated all around-top, sides and bottom. Stays cool to the
touch, for safety.

6. New speedy "Quick-Recovery" models can deliver as much hot
water in 24 hours as the average family uses in 2 full weeks!

7. Completely automatic. Electric water heaters can be depended
upon to provide a constant supply of hot water, without any
attention.

8. Electric water heaters cost less to buy, less to use.


A*
F*,ida" C'sciric^Compeoieu,..''
.ri "


4 ., ^ **,* ** *. ,
"

hTaxayinglhvastqr-Owaed *
r *t~ 5 )w> 'ft ^ "
,. s" *- *


OCTOBER, 1967 11


***..









Orchids to Florida Architects!


For Your Enthusiastic
Acceptance and Confidence
in Specifying Lambert
Quality Products.

Piesehted by the:

Lambert

Corporation

of Florida

The Sunshine State's

Number 1
Manufacturer of
Construction Chemicals
and Architectural Coatings


Check these 7 reasons why more Florida Architects specify Lambert
Quality Products than any other brand:


S 50 Years of Technical Experience
and Know-how!
/ Manufactured in FLORIDA .
FOR FLORIDA'S CLIMATE!
/ Our Staff of Qualified, Trained Field
Engineers is at your Disposal!
/ Prompt, Low Cost Delivery on the
Job Site!


/ Most Complete Product Line in the
Construction Field!
/ Our Field Engineers work with
you to assist Contractors in Appli-
cation Control!
/ Lambert Corporation is dedicated
to the concept that the Florida
Architect contributes the vision
and design for Florida's future!


LAMBERT CORPORATION
OF FLORIDA
Plants and Offices
Box 2226, Orlando, Florida

You are cordially invited to visit our booth .Number 63.


6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













I ,




"U-t
9 *


Aii
n^^


I I"


ir.


penny /

pitcher!
New homes and buildings equipped with natural gas
offert savings to builder and buyer alike. For the
builder there's economy in installation. For example,
gas heating is still the most economical to install.
For the buyer gas equipment costs less to
operate. And it's also the most dependable.
Throughout Florida, prospective home buyers are
finding out the big difference that natural gas makes.
Your local Natural Gas Utility representative
will be happy to give you all the details. He's listed in
the Yellow Pages.



TRANSMISSION COMPANY
Serving all of Florida
through your local Natural
Gas Utility.


OCTOBER, 1967








PRODUCTS, EXHIBITS BRINH WIDE RAGE OF

. . HERE IS A COMPLETE LIST INCLUDING BOOTH NUMBER


#67 ALDORA ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
4875 NW 77 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33166
ALUMINUM ENTRANCES, STOREFRONT METAL,
ALUMINUM EXTRUSIONS


Representatives:
O. C. Kelley,
Dudley Munger


Charles McEwen


#36 AMERICAN OLEAN TILE COMPANY
1000 Cannon Avenue
Lansdale, Pennsylvania 19446
CERAMIC TILE FOR WALLS AND FLOORS; COLOR
COORDINATION SERVICE FOR LARGE PROJECTS
Representatives:
Paul W. Horton


Frank J. Jones


George W. Thorp


#44 BRADLEY WASHFOUNTAIN CO.
9101 Fountain Boulevard
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53051
GROUP WASHING EQUIPMENT
Representatives:
John W. Holian, Sr.
Jack Holian Charles Bere


#2 CONCRETE PRODUCTS DIVISION,
W. R. GRACE & CO.
P. O. Box 130
Brunswick, Georgia 31520
PERMADECK ROOF DECKS, FORMING SYSTEMS,
ACOUSTICAL CEILING TILE AND RORETE
CHANNEL SLABS
Representatives:
Jack Torbett
T. R. Bryan John C


#30 ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
DOORS AND PANELS, FLUSH ALUMINUM,
PORCELANIZED STEEL, AND VINYL FACINGS;
ALUMINUM FRAMES AND CURTAIN WALLS


Representatives:
Arthur A. Kimmel
Alan E. Jones
Jack E. Wiley


/
John H. Mathis
Jesse A. Kimmel
Jack Clayton


#32 FEDERAL SEABOARD TERRACOTTA CORP.
2 Catherine Street
Perth Amboy, New Jersey 08862
Represented by:
DUNAN BRICK YARDS INC.,
1001 SE 11 Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010
CERAMIC VENEER
Representatives:


Joseph Maffei
Bruce Richmond


Barney Riveira
Otis Dunan


nger


FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC
UTILITY COMPANIES
1213- 16 Street North
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
GULF POWER-CO.
TAMPA ELECTRIC CO.
ELECTRIC SERVICES


uster


#62 CORONIS FRAMING SYSTEMS, INC.
P. 0. Box 877
Trenton, New Jersey 08605
"TRUSSFRAMES," A PATENT-PENDING LINE OF
PREENGINEERED STEEL BUILDING FRAMES USED
TO FRAME OUT COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL
BUILDINGS 30' TO 160' CLEAR SPAN AND IN TWO
STANDARD SLOPES. ARCHITECTS MAKE USE OF
LOCALLY-FURNISHED CHOICE OF PURLINS AND
COVERING TO DEVELOP DESIRED ARCHITECTURAL
TREATMENT


Representatives:
Emanuel A. Coronis
Grant G. Gilder


#66 DECOR-ROCK OF FLORIDA
1160 Highway A1A
Hillsboro Beach, Florida
SEAMLESS FLOORS
Representative:
Cliff McCoy


,Representatives:
C. W. Martin
John Ray
Jim Shirley


Irving Nettles
Clark Cook
Bill Davis


#8 FLORIDA SOLITE COMPANY
1114 Atlantic Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 33201
LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE


Representatives:
Charles B. Laws
Jim McLeroy /


Malcolm Driver
Ken Newton


Steve A. Petros


#34 GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
P. O. Box 1259
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
PRIME ALUMINUM EXTERIOR DOORS & FRAMES
Representative:
James Henry
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








nEW IDEAS TO OUR COnUEATIO

AND REPRESENTATIVES' NAMES.


#64 GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION
3201 NW 110 Street
Miami, Florida 33168
BRASILIA PREFINISHED PANELING


Representatives:
William M. Dilley
E. C. Moore
Ben B. Harper
Ben Kleemann
Ron Klees


Don Barton
Joe Ledford
Joe Kozlowski
Vincent Vertuli


#27 HOUGH MANUFACTURING CORP.
1029 So. Jackson Street
Janesville, Wisconsin 53546
MOVEABLE PARTITIONS WITH INTERCHANGEABLE
FACE PANELS; SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM
DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION
Representatives:


Drew Harris
Allen Morgan
Ray Misseghers


Vernon Brant
Phil May
Fred Grimmig


#35 GORY ROOFING TILE
1773 NE 205 Street
Miami, Florida 33162
ROOFING TILE
Representatives:
Frank Gory


#6 INTERCOSTAL, INC.
7275 NW 7 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33150
DECORATIVE STONE AND COATING PRODUCTS


Representatives:
A. D. Gory


Ernest Hufnagel


#40 GOTHAM EDUCATIONAL EQUIPMENT CO., INC.
91 Weyman Avenue
New Rochelle, New York 10805
COLOR CORK


Representatives:
Morris Miller


A. DeAngelis


D. Perry


#5 KNOLL ASSOCIATES INC.
111 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
RECENT ADDITIONS TO THE KNOLL FURNITURE
COLLECTION, FEATURING THE AWARD-WINNING
WARREN PLATNER GROUP OF STEEL WIRE
FURNITURE


Representatives:
J. Carlyle Hammer
John A. McDivit


Norman H. Leathers


#42 HARRIS PAINT COMPANY
1010 26 No. 19 Street
Tampa, Florida 33601
PAINTS
Representative;
Ed Thompson


#28 HILTI FASTENING SYSTEMS
360 Fairfield Avenue
Stamford, Connecticut 06904
POWER ASSISTED TOOLS FOR FASTENING A WIDE
VARIETY OF MATERIALS TO CONCRETE AND
STRUCTURAL STEEL


Representatives:
Tom Cassidy
John Deem
Martin Pierce


Herbert Hildenbrand
Tom Cravey


#63 LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
20 North Coburn
Orlando, Florida 32802
ARCHITECTURAL & PROTECTIVE COATINGS,
BONDING AGENTS, CAULKING COMPOUNDS &
SEALANTS, CONCRETE FLOOR TREATMENTS,
CONCRETE & MORTAR ADMIXTURES, CONCRETE
& MORTAR COLORANTS, CURING COMPOUNDS,
FORM COATINGS, GROUTING COMPOUNDS, WATER-
PROOFING & DAMPPROOFING COATINGS,
WOOD FINISHES
Representative:
V. L. Sinisi


#37 LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS COMPANY
1819 Peachtree Road, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
HEAT-ABSORBING AND GLARE-REDUCING
PLATE GLASS


Representatives:
Frank C. LaVrar
W. A. Joyner


R. D. Lauter


#3 HOLLOWAY MATERIALS CORPORATION
P. O. Drawer 1360
Winter Park, Florida 32789
BUILDING MATERIALS
Representative:
Frank Williamson
OCTOBER, 1967


#33 LIMELIGHT CEILINGS INCORPORATED
4318 NE 5 Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308
COMPLETE LUMINOUS CEILING SYSTEMS
Representatives:
J. W. Greene, Jr.
Fred J. LaPointe Richard Kammerling
19


n






#41 THE MILLER COMPANY
99 Center Street
Meriden, Connecticut 06450
SELECTED NEW ITEMS OF COMMERCIAL
FLUORESCENT LIGHTING EQUIPMENT
Representative:
R. L. Kirshner



#24 THE MOSAIC TILE COMPANY
55 Public Square
Cleveland, Ohio 44113
GLAZED AND UNGLAZED CERAMIC MOSAICS,
GLAZED WALL TILE, QUARRY TILE


Representatives:
Allen Kern


Miquel Molina


#39 PALM BEACH CLAY TILE COMPANY
P. O. Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404
CLAY ROOF--TILE, CLAY FLOOR TILE AND CLAY
DECORATIVE SCREEN BLOCKS


Representatives:
Rafael L. Compres


Joseph M. Schmidt


#45 THE CHARLES PARKER COMPANY
50 Hanover Street
Meriden, Connecticut 06450
WASHROOM EQUIPMENT, ACCESSORIES, HEAVY
DUTY GRAB BARS, FRAMED MIRRORS, CABINETS


Representatives:
H. C. Wolf
L. L. Ellis
John Holian


#54 PHOTRONIX INC.
111 S. Meramec Avenue
St. Louis, Missouri 63105
SCAN PROJECTION TABLE
Representatives:
L. P. Rinehart


John W. Holian, Sr.
John C. Roth
Charles Berenger


Leonard J. Rusciani


#1 PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
Gateway No. 1
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
GLASS, CURTAINWALL CONSTRUCTION


Representatives:
-f. V. Lamb
-N. P. Owen


D. C. Hegnes


#7 PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida -32803
CEMENT AND CONCRETE


Representatives:
R. S. Gordon
J. C. Bennett, Jr.
W. N. Hollman


R. J. McCormack
Pat Nash
L. R. Robertson


#29 SCHLAGE LOCK COMPANY
2401 Bayshore BouTevard
San Francisco, California 94119
DOOR LOCKS


Representatives:
Gilbert A. Viola


W. J. Williamson


#26 SOUTHERN BRICK AND TILE MANUFACTURERS
ASSOCIATION
230 Spring Street, NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
THE CONTEMPORARY BRICK BEARING WALL
Representative:
Z. A. Snipes, Jr.

#25 U. S. PLYWOOD CORPORATION
3675 NW 62 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
ARCHITECTURAL WELDWOOD DOORS AND
FINISHES


Representatives:
Tom Attaway
A. R. Banks


G. M. Lehman


#65 VENETIAN MARBLE PRODUCTS, INC.
P. 0. Box 727
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33441
VENETIAN MARBLE PRODUCTS FOR THE HOME
Representative:
J. L. Cole, Jr.

#10 WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION
1299 Northside Drive, NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
WESTINGHOUSE WATER COOLERS CONSISTING OF
FLOOR TYPE, WALL MOUNT AND SEMI-RECESSED


Representatives:
Thomas F. Seabridge
John S. Ryan


Lloyd W. Roberts, Jr.
Carl J. Harshbarger


#43 RALPH WILSON PLASTICS CO.
311 W. 21 Street
HiaPeah, Florida 33010
WILSON-ART LAMINATED PLASTICS


Representatives:
Jack Wetzel
Bob Kessler


Ralph Fernandez
Don Marquess


#38 PLASTILINE, INC.
1251 NE 48 Street
Pompano Beach, Florida 33061
PLASTIC PIPE FITTINGS; PVC SCHEDULE 40 DRAIN,
WASTE, AND VENT; STYRENE SEWER AND DRAIN;
PVC SOCKET AND THREADED PRESSURE FITTINGS;
HI MAX AND NYLON FITTINGS FOR FLEXIBLE PIPE
Representative:
E. C. Schneider


#31 ZONOLITE DIVISION, W. R. GRACE & CO.
1555 NW 1 Avenue
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
ZONOLITE ROOF DECK SYSTEMS, MONO-KOTE
STEEL & CONCRETE FIREPROOFING, DYFOAM
POLYSTYRENE INSULATION, MASONRY
INSULATION, PLASTER AGGREGATES


Representatives:
C. S. Breslauer


"Red" Mitchell
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Florida Cements
FOR THE FLORIDA CONCRETE
AND PRODUCTS INDUSTRY


Independent ready-
mixed concrete and
concrete products pro-
ducers have plants lo-
cated in cities and towns throughout the
state. These local businesses contribute
millions of dollars annually to Florida's
economy through plant investments,
payrolls, taxes, operating expenditures
and material purchases.


Florida Portland Cement, with plants
in Tampa and Miami, is proud to be part
of this industry by manufacturing for
its use uniformly high quality Florida
Cements and Trinity White Cements.
Support your Florida industries.
Money spent on Florida-made products
helps keep Florida's economy growing
and benefits the state, your community
and you!


SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA CEMENTS, MANUFACTURED IN FLORIDA FOR FORTY YEARS

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION
general Portland U PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI
Cement Company I.


'sq.,, ""~' '~UL


OCTOBER, 1967







CRRFTSMRn AWARDS


M 19B7


CRAFTSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD
WILLARD C. HUNDALL
This award is given to an individual craftsman
in the state of Florida who has exemplified inter-
est, ingenuity, and performed outstanding work-
manship in the pursuance of his craft or trade.
This year the winner of this award is Mr. Wil-
lard C. Hundall, 1410 Georgia Avenue, West Palm
Beach. Mr. Hundall.is a mason, and was employed
by the McLaren Construction Company to con-
struct seven eliptical brick arches at the 721 Center
at 721 Northlake Blvd., West Palm Beach.
The structural arches are sprung from a Nor-
man soldier course with two radii in the elipse. The
craftsmanship awards committee was impressed
with the uniformity of the coursing and the joint
work on a job that was obviously difficult. Archi-
tect for the 721 Center was Eugene Lawrence AIA,
West Palm Beach.


I


I22

22


4.
* -


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































CRAFTSMANSHIP AWARD
JOHN DEC
This award is given to a company or firm in the
state of Florida which has exemplified a sincere
and genuine interest in encouraging and effecting
outstanding craftsmanship and workmanship in the
performance of its work on a specific project.
The winner of this initial award is John Dec,
General Contractor, 2261 SW 28th Way, Fort Laud-
erdale, Florida. Mr. Dec was nominated by the
Broward Chapter for his work on the Frank Buck
residence at 2218 NE 15th Court, Fort Lauderdale,
Dan Duckham, Architect. This house, built of and
finished in wood, is an excellent example of the
high quality of craftsmanship practiced by the Dec
firm at a consistent level over the seven years it
has operated in the Fort Lauderdale area.
It was obvious to the craftsmanship award com-
mittee from the photographs submitted, that this
house was built with a special understanding, tal-
ent, and interest.


OCTOBER, 1967







13TH AnnUAI ADVERTISERS HONOR ROhbD

. . . LISTED HERE ARE THE FIRMS WHICH HAVE AIDED IN THE


Alger-Sullivan Company
Century, Florida

WOOD PRESERVATIVE PROCESS
Agency Dodson, Craddock and
Born Advertising, Inc.
P. 0. Drawer A
Pensacola, Florida 32502


Belcher Oil Company
P. O. Box 1751
Miami, Florida 33101

OIL AND OIL-POWERED
EQUIPMENT; ASPHALT
Agency Agey Advertising, Inc.
35 NE 17 Street
Miami, Florida 33132


Peter Bromer
2979 Flamingo Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140

ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY


Butler Manufacturing Company
Buildings Division
7418 East 13 Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64126

INTEGRATED STRUCTURAL AND
MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
Agency- The Griswold-Eshleman Co.
One East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601


Certified Plumbers of South Florida
2526 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135

ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED
MASTER PLUMBERS AND
CERTIFIED JOURNEYMEN


Climate Master Products, Inc.
930 NW 13 Street
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33311

HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS
Agency Greenman Associates, Inc.
307 S 21 Avenue
Hollywood, Florida 33020


Cline Aluminum Products, Inc.
112-32 Avenue West
Bradenton, Florida
ARCHITECTURAL ALUMINUM
DOORS


Dantzler Lumber & Export Co., Inc.
P. O. Box 6340
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
WOOD WHOLESALERS AND
EXPORTERS
Agency The Griswold-Eshleman
Company
Grant Building
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219


Diplomat Hotel
Hollywood-by-the-Sea, Florida
SITE OF THE 1967 FAAIA
CONVENTION


Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
1001 SE 11 Street
Hialeah, Florida
DECORATIVE MASONRY
MATERIALS


Endure-A-Lifetime Products, Inc.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH
QUALITY ALUMINUM BUILDING
SPECIALTIES
Agency Advertising Directors
1 Lincoln Road Building
Miami Beach, Florida 33139


Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Jos. L. Rozier Machinery Co., Orlando-
Tampa
Kelly Tractor Company, Miami-
West Palm Beach-Clewiston
Ring Power Corporation, Jacksonville-
Tallahassee-Ocala
PACKAGED ELECTRICITY FOR
PRIME AND STANDBY POWER
Agency- Fry/Hammond/Barr, Inc.
600 E Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801

Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
3737 NW 43 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
CUSTOM-CAST PLAQUES

Florida Gas Transmission Company
Orlando and Orange Avenues
Winter Park, Florida 32790
GAS-COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Shattuck-Roether, Adv.
22 Lake Beauty Drive
Orlando, Florida 32806


Florida Investor-Owned Electric Utilities
Florida Power & Light Company
Gulf Power Company
Florida Power Corporation
Tampa Electric Company

ELECTRIC UTILITIES
Agency Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc.
3361 SW 3 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145


Florida Municipal Utilities Association
P. O. Box 2402
Lakeland, Florida 33803

STATEWIDE MUNICIPAL
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
Agency-Walter H. Mitchell
229-B Pasadena Place
Orlando, Florida 32803


Florida Natural Gas Association
1500 E. Highway #50
Winter Garden, Florida
GAS-COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Palmer Tyler and Co.
3000 Biscayne Bvd.
Miami, Florida 33137


Florida Portland Cement Division
General Portland Cement Company
P. O. Box 1528
Tampa, Florida 33601
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency-Bill Reed & Associates, Inc.
223 Fort Harrison South
Clearwater, Florida 33515


Georgia-Pacific Corporation
P. 0. Box 311
Portland, Oregon 97207
Jacksonville-Miami-Orlando-Tampa
PLYWOOD AND PANELING


Gory Roofing Tile Manufacturing, Inc.
1773 NE 205 Street
North Miami, Florida
CONCRETE ROOFING TILES


Houdaille-Duval-Wright Company
A Division of Houdaille Industries
100 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
CONCRETE STRUCTURAL
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









GROWTH OF THIS OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FAAIA IN THE PAST YEAR.


Lambert Corporation of Florida
P. O. Box 2226
Orlando, Florida 32802

WATERPROOFING
MATERIALS, CONCRETE
Agency David G. Chapman
215 S. Lake Ave.
Orlando, Fla. 32801


Lehigh Portland Cement Company
Allentown, Pa.
District Sales Office
Jacksonville, Florida 32216

PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS
Agency-Lewis & Gilman, Inc.
6 Penn Center Plaza
Philadelphia, Pa. 19103


Lennox Industries, Inc.
P. O. Box 530
Decatur, Georgia 30030

AIR CONDITIONING AND
HEATING
Agency-The Biddle Co.
108 E. Market Street
Bloomington, Illinois 61701


The Ben Meadows Co.
553 Amsterdam Avenue, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30306

ENGINEERING SUPPLIES
& EQUIPMENT
Agency-Mark-Ad Inc.
1401 Peachtree St. NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30309


Oil Fuel Institute of Florida, Inc.

OIL HEATING
Agency-McAllister-Barker, Inc.
P. O. Box 6966
Orlando, Florida 32803


Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
1 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222

GLASS-COMMERCIAL MARKET-
GLASS CONDITIONING
Agency-Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove,
Inc.
4 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222


Richard Plumer Business Interiors
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137

INTERIOR DESIGNERS
Agency-Blackwood Advertising
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137


Portland Cement Association
1612 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803

PORTLAND CEMENT
AND PRODUCTS
Agency-J. Walter Thompson
410 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 11, Illinois


Reflectal/Borg-Warner Corporation
1000 W. 120 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60643

ALUMINUM FOIL BUILDING
INSULATION
Agency-The Biddle Company
108 East Market Street
Bloomington, Illinois 61702


Solite Corporation
Richmond, Virginia

LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS
AND STRUCTURAL CONCRETE

Agency-Cabell Eanes Inc.
509 West Grace Street
Richmond 20, Virginia


T-Square Miami Blue Print Co., Inc.
635 SW 1 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130

DRAFTING EQUIPMENT
AND SUPPLIES


Trinity White-General Portland
Cement Co.
4400 Republic
North Bank Tower
P. O. Box 324
Dallas, Texas 75221

PORTLAND CEMENT

Agency-Alex T. Franz
1 East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601


U. S. Plywood Corporation
77 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10017

CURTAIN WALLS, PLYWOOD
DOORS AND PANELING


F. Graham Williams Co.
1690 Monroe Drive, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30324

MASONRY BUILDING MATERIALS,
PRODUCTS


Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace & Co.
135 So. LaSalle Street
Chicago, Illinois

LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING FILL

Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross
410 No. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611


OCTOBER, 1967







Custom-Cast


Plaques


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


ADVERTISERS' InDE


PETER BROMER, ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

DANTZLER LUMBER & EXPORT CO, INC ..

DIPLOMAT HOTEL .

FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS .

FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WORKS .

FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY .

FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC UTILITIES

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION ..

GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION ....

LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA ..

OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA . ..

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION .

SOLITE CORPORATION ..
26


p. 3


Sp. 4

S p. 1

INSIDE BACK COVER

. .p. 26

p. 17

.. p. 14-15

. p. 2 1

p. 5-6

. .p. 16

p. 1

INSIDE FRONT COVER

S .p. 2
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










CAT POWER KEEPS BUSINESS GOING AS USUAL


. I % .


* ~ ~ *


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L .





HURRIC E-PROOE ....R
HURCN-RttO PWER
.. i
AMIRM L alit L~t~









HURRICAlNEmPROOF POWER


When a monster hurricane hit Jacksonville with
winds up to 100 miles per hour, three years ago,
almost the entire area was thrown into total dark-
ness for days including a Holiday Inn.
Business had to go on. The Holiday Inn was
booked solid and they couldn't turn people away.
The city utility department couldn't promise power
for a week.
The motel manager turned to his local Florida
Caterpillar dealer for help. In four hours, a Cat


Diesel Electric Set had been put on a trailer, de-
livered and connected. All-electric power was then
supplied to the 66-unit motel and restaurant, in-
cluding the entire air-conditioning load. The engine
and generator ran continuously until municipal
power was restored eight days later.
In a hurricane or during an untimely electrical
outage keep your business going with Cater-
pillar power. No matter what your requirements,
your Florida Caterpillar dealer can engineer the
job to fit your needs.


YOUR FLORIDA CATE RPILLAR" DEALERS


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.


LIE~U




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


University of Florila Libraries
Gainesville, Fla. 10
32601






PHIhODSDPH DESIGn hIFE

53RD ARRNNURh
F. A. A. I. A. CORnVERTIOn
OCTOBER 4-8
HOhIUWOOD, FhORIDA
DIPhODART HOTEh


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