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Florida architect
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00159
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: September 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00159
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

Ihe Ilorida archltclleseliember 1967






Everyone Benefits
When You Buy Florida-
Manufactured Products


When Florida prospers, everyone benefits! The money spent
on Florida-made products keeps Florida's economy growing
goes on working for the state and for you!
Florida Portland Cement Division, Florida's first cement
manufacturer, has invested many millions of dollars in the
TAMPA and MIAMI plants, and in other facilities. Many
millions of dollars more, by way of payrolls, taxes, services
and supplies, have contributed greatly to Florida's economy.

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SEPTEMBER, 1967




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Build a huge
steam generating plant
in a beautiful valley...and
keep the valley beautiful.


SOLUTION:
Use materials that blend.
Like precast white concrete panels
with exposed river stone aggregate.
You can't build the world's largest anything in a rural
setting and make it look like a grove of oaks. But you
can, with care and skill, make your structure a part of
its site-not an imposition on it.
Precast white concrete panels with natural river stone
aggregates were chosen for much of the exterior and
interior of the TVA Bull Run Steam Plant. From any
point of view; economical, aesthetic, practical-it's a
highly successful choice that recommends itself to
buildings of all types.



n 1 f1 I PORTLAND CEMENT

A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
S4400 Republic National Bank Tower, Dallas, Texas 75201
Offices: Houston Tampa Miami Chattanooga Fort Wayne
Kansas City, Kan. Fredonia, Kan. Los Angeles
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














































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3. GREATER STABILITY . Alger's kiln-dried long-
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SEPTEMBER, 1967







JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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Represented in Florida by
RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North


Jacksonville, Florida 32211


Telephone: (904) 724-7958


AIR


DoCUmEnTS




REVISED

EDITIONS

Abh

AIR

COnTRACT

FORMS

&

DOCUMEnTS




FAAIA
1000 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard
Coral Gables
Florida
33134
305 444-5761


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.







OFFICERS
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President,
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth,
Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Desig-
nate/Vice President, 3250 S.W. 3rd
Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary, P.O. Box 609,
Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer, Citizens
Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin
St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County: Charles R. Kerley,
Robert E. Todd. Daytona Beach:
David A. Leete, Tom Jannetides.
Florida Central: J. A. Wohlberg, Ted
Fasnacht, James J. Jennewein. Florida
Gulf Coast: Frank Folsom Smith,
Jack West. Florida North: F. Blair
Reeves, William C. Grobe. Florida
North Central: Forrest R. Coxen.
Florida Northwest: Ellis W. Bullock,
Jr., Thomas H. Daniels. Florida
South: Robert J. Boerema, James E.
Ferguson, Jr., Francis E. Telesca.
Jacksonville: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., John Pierce Ste-
vens. Mid-Florida: Wythe D. Sims,
II, Joseph M. Shifalo. Palm Beach:
Jack Willson, Jr., John B. Marion,
Richard E. Pryor. Director: Florida
Region, American Institute of Archi-
tects, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600
N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami. Execu-
tive Director: Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects,
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Donald Singer, Milton C. Harry,
Lowell L. Lotspeich.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos, Editor; Donald
Singer, Assistant Editor; Black-Baker-
Burton, Photography Consultants; M.
Elaine Mead, Circulation Manager.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use . Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 . McMurray
Printers.


the
florida

archilecl
o0ci0l iournal
Ilmellorila
associatlllon
oll he american
Inslltule ol
archlleci


DEPARTMENTS

PERSPECTIVE . . . .



FEATURES

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING

CONVENTION INVITATION ....

NOMINATIONS OF OFFICERS .

PROFILES
A presentation of the work of
four young Florida architects . .



ADVERTISERS' INDEX........


FRONT COVER: Jerry Uelsmann is a photographer whose work is
known from the University of Florida where he is an instructor in
the School of Art to New York City where his work was recently
the subject of an exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. His
photograph of the Robert Ernest house in Atlantic Beach is a
reminiscence of the old, out of which has grown the new. We
offer a look at some of this new work in our feature article this
month PROFILES beginning on page 15.


VOLUME 17 E NUMBER 9 U SEPTEMBER 1967


SEPTEMBER, 1967


7


16







PERSPECTIVE


F. BLAIR REEVES
HEADS HISTORICAL SURVEY
PARTY IN RECORDING
OF KEY WEST
ARCHITECTURE


GAINESVILLE, July The Key West
home of Nobel Prize winner Ernest
Hemingway is one of several old houses
in the area being surveyed by a team
directed by a University of Florida archi-
tect.
F. Blair Reeves, associate professor of
architecture at the University and chair-
man of the American Institute of Archi-
tects' Committee on Historic Buildings, is
supervising the project this summer.
The Historic American Building Survey
will include documentation of the Audu-
bon House; Capt. Francis Watlington
House, the oldest house in Key West;
Sand Key Lighthouse; the home of Capt.
John H. Geiger; the Bahama houses of
Richard Roberts and Richard Kemp; U.S.
Coast Guard headquarters; the Convent
of Mary Immaculate; the Old Post Office
and Customs House; Fort Jefferson and
others.
The survey is sponsored by the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, the National


Park Service and the Library of Congress.
Many valuable historical records, con-
sisting of measured drawings, photographs
and data, have already been deposited in
the survey's archives in the Library of
Congress.
The survey team consists of Reeves
and three architectural students John
O. Crosby of the University of Florida;
John D. Davenport and John F. Grimm,
Texas A&M University. J. Frank Brooks
of Key West is photographer for the
survey.
Co-sponsor of the survey is the Old
Island Restoration Foundation, Inc., a
local group organized in 1960 and dedi-
cated to the preservation of the archi-
tectural heritage of Key West.
The Key West survey began June 17
and wiil continue through Sept. 15.
Other teams are working in Chicago,
III.; Galveston, Tex.; Nantucket, Mass.;
S:. Louis, Mo.; Sl1t Lake City, Utah, and
Hawaii.


REPRINT OF
AIA DOCUMENT
A-201
The AIA has announced the reprint of
Document A-201, General Conditions of
the Contract for Construction. This new
Document incorporates the modifications
developed from field experience, discus-
sions with construction industry repre-
sentatives, and legal insurance counsel
since publication of the former Septem-
ber 1966 edition.
The AIA and AGC Executive Commit-
tees met during June and approved the
modifications contained in this 1967 edi-
tion. The Institute as well as the AGC
Executive Committee recommends that
this revised Document be used by archi-
tects and AGC Chapter members.
It could be noted that there will be no
change in the text of A-201; therefore,
existing copies can be used by simply
deleting the phrase, "10th Edition 1966"
on page 1, and in the footnote at the
bottom of each page of A-101 (Owner
Contractor Agreement Form Stipulated
Sum) to 1967.
AIA Documents B-231 and B-331,
Owner-Architect Agreement, have been
revised and are now available. The
FAAIA has a supply of the new A-201,
and B-231 and B-331. Members and
others in the construction industry may
send the old Documents to the Associa-
tion office on an exchange basis for the
new editions.
The Institute has eliminated AIA
Document A-41 1, Letter of Acceptance
of Subcontractor Proposal, September
1963 edition.


CSI ELECTS
OFFICERS IN
PALM BEACH,
MIAMI
Rudolph M. Arsenicos, AIA, North
Palm Beach architect, was installed as
President of the Palm Beach Chapter of
the Construction Specifications Institute.
Others installed were Donald R. Edge,
AIA, First Vice President; Ben Thomson,
Second Vice President; Robert Strick-
faden, Secretary; Morgan Bannister,
Treasurer. The Charter was presented by
D. B. Morrison, Nashville, Tenn., Insti-
tute Vice President.
Charles S. Broward, Jr., AIA, of Mi-
ami, was recently installed as President
of the Miami Chapter, CSI.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






U. OF FLORIDA
STUDENT AWARDED
AIA SCHOLARSHIP
GAINESVILLE, July Sergio J. Rod-
riguez, a fifth year architecture student
at the University of Florida, has been
named recipient of the $750 Langley
Scholarship awarded annually by the
American Institute of Architects.
The scholarship, which varies as to
amount, is presented for excellence in
architecture studies and the student's po-
tential to the profession. Students are
nominated by architecture s c h o o I s
throughout the nation and selection is
made by the AIA.
Rodriguez, a Cuban who is a transfer
student from the University of Puerto
Rico, was selected by the University's
College of Architcture and Fine Arts.
The Langley Scholarship is named for
Edward Langley, a distinguished Pennsyl-
vania architect, whose will provided an
endowment fund to aid architectural stu-
dents.


nOTICE OF

FAIR

nnnuRn

mEETinG

OCTOBER 4-8, DIPLOMAT HOTEL, HOLLYWOOD


Notice of regular Annual meeting of
the Florida Association of Architects,
Inc:, and of proposed amendments to the
Bylaws to be presented.
Members and associate members of
the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects, Inc., a corpora-
tion not for profit, organized and exist-
ing under the laws of the State of Florida,
are hereby notified that:
1. The regular annual meeting of The
Florida Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects, Inc., will be held


4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, October 1967 at the
Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood-by-the-Sea,
Florida.
2. At said regular meeting, proposed
amendments to the Bylaws if any will be
presented for action thereupon by mem-
bers of the corporation. A concurring
vote of not less than two-thirds (2/3)
of the total number of delegate votes
present at the meeting, together with
approval by the American Institute of
Architects, is necessary for the effective
adoption of the amendments.


COmmITTEE on

RESDOUTIODS GUIDES

conVEnTion

BusinESS


The following three men have been
named as a Resolutions Committee:
H. Samuel Kruse, AIA, Chairman; Hugh
Leitch, AIA, and Tollyn Twitchell.
As a matter of helpful information, we
are re-printing here the Convention
Rules for resolutions and new business.
Resolutions and new business shall be
placed before the Convention and actions
shall be taken only in the following man-
ner, and at the following times:
1 . All resolutions or discussions
concerning matters contained in the
Board's Report shall be in order and
may be placed before the Convention
only if the relevant section has been
read and is still under consideration.
Resolutions concerned with matter
contained in the Board's Report shall
not be considered by the Committee
on Resolutions.
2 . All resolutions offered by the
Board will be printed in the Board's
Report and action taken thereon at the
time the relevant sections are placed
before the Convention. Amendments
to these resolutions or supplemental
resolutions and statements concerning
the section under consideration shall
be in order only while the relevant
section is before the Convention.
3 . All resolutions concerning
matters not contained in the Board's
Report and all matters of new business
shall be presented to the Committee
on Resolutions before a time set by
the Board and report to the Conven-
tion.


The Committee on Resolutions will
take one of the following actions and re-
port such action to the Convention on
each resolution and item of new business
received by it:
1 . Deem the resolution a matter
dealt with in the Board's Report and
return it promptly to its sponsor with
advice to present it when the relevant
section of the Board's Report is before
the Convention. The Committee shall
consult with the Secretary as necessary
in making the above ruling.
2 . Deem the resolution inappro-
priate to come before the Convention
and return it promptly to the sponsor,
with notice that it may be placed di-
rectly before the Convention at the
time the report of the Committee on
Resolutions is made, provided the con-
sent of the Convention can be ob-
tained by a two-thirds vote of the
delegates present at the sessions.
3 . Modify the resolution or
combine it with other resolutions, pre-
ferably with the consent of its sponsor.
4 . Refer the resolution to the
Board for consideration with the con-
sent of its sponsor, and so report to
the Convention.
5 . Report the resolution to the
Convention with recommendation to
disapprove.
6 . Report the resolution to the
Convention without recommendation.
7 . Report the resolution to the
Convention with recommendation to
approve, and move its adoption.


SEPTEMBER, 1967







COngEnTIon InUITATIOn


FAAIA CONVENTION: THE SWINGING 53rd!
It has, perhaps, become traditional for a host chapter presi-
dent to send warm personal invitations to each member at
convention time. But somehow I get the distinct feeling that
nobody reads them; thus the following:
Now . maybe you have been to a convention or two, and
feel that "ya seen one yav seen 'em all" routine . or maybe
you have never made to one because you just don't have the
time . or . well, I don't mean to knock any of our pre-
vious conclaves, but . THIS ONE IS GOING TO BE A
B-L-A-S-T ! !
Working on the basic premise that (A) we are all desper-
ately concerned with the status of the profession of architecture
in this chaotic age, and (B) there is no question that we need
to further our education by any means available (such as con-
ventions), and (C) that any and all tax deductions we can get
we can use, we have decided by unanimous vote of the chapter,
and in spite of all the advantages listed above, to make this
convention FUN!
Check this:
We start off the very first night with the HOST HAPPEN-
ING. In a wayout, deserted pad we offer the swingingest group
on the Fort Lauderdale scene. Go-Go girls too. Dad, if you can't
dance, you can watch! A psychedelic adventure without the
perils of LSD. And hold on to your hats . IT'S ON THE
HOUSE. Like FREE man! Booze and all.
If you survive that one, get ready for a real change of pace.
A private, architect's and guests only, performance, by a Broad-
way road company, of one of Tennessee Williams' most sophisti-
cated dramatic comedies. We have booked the entire house in
advance for a dinner-theater party and if you don't come we
may have to declare bankruptcy!
But that's not all . for those of you who can still struggle


nomInRTions OFFICE


into your finery, we will swing to some cool sounds at the ban-
quet . long on great dance music . Glenn Miller style,
and very short on speeches.
You may think that this sounds like a frivolous convention.
Well, if you have read this far, I must admit a flaw in my
schedule of events; our convention chairman, Don Singer,
insists that we provide some time for a few seminars. He says
he has somebody named Lou Kahn lined up along with a few
others. Oh well, you can't win 'em all! But don't despair, plan
to GO-GO October 4th!
Paul Robin John AIA
President, Broward Chapter

When the Broward Chapter was asked to host the 1967
FAAIA Convention, the active members felt that the meeting
would be an excellent opportunity to extend the spirit of vitality
and enthusiasm evidenced on our own local level to the entire
state membership.
We feel strongly that if proper goals are set and worked
toward, the organization and its functions can be extremely
rewarding and worthwhile to architects and most especially to
architecture. It is toward this end that the planning of the
1967 FAAIA convention has moved.
One cannot escape the fact that we live in an era of fan-
tastic flux, extending even to the cultures of entire nations.
In an age when all is possible, the discipline that has been
traditional in architecture has given way to anarchy. The air
is charged with the anticipation of change.
It would seem, therefore, that the very first topic to be
discussed should be the primary issues after the fact of exist-
ence itself; Why do we function at all? Do we do so of our own
volition? Is the acceptance of logic and reason into our daily
lives essential to mental and cultural well being or are they,


RS


VICE PRESIDENT


SECRETARY SECRETARY
,,": '- ~ r


H. LESLIE WALKER, Tampa, Florida
- Since 1960, he has served at various
times as President of the Greater Tampa
Association of Architects; secretary and
president of Florida Central Chapter of
the AIA; secretary of the FAAIA. He is a
member of the Greater Tampa Chamber
of Commerce, Exchange Club of Tampa,
Commerce Club of Tampa, and the Timu-
quanian Society. Has had own firm since
1960 in Tampa, Florida. Is affiliated with
the Construction Specifications Institute.


JEFFERSON N. POWELL, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1950. Palm
Beach Chapter: Director, eight years;
Secretary, one year; Vice President, two
years; President, one year . FAAIA:
Secretary, one year; Director, five years.
FAAIA Committees: Membership, two
years, chairman, one; Uniform Building
Code, one year; Public Relations, one
year; By-laws Revision, chairman, three
years; Commissioner of Professional Soci-
ety, one year . National AIA: S/A
Regional Council, two years; Regional
Judiciary Committee, (Florida Region)
two years, chairman, one.


HARRY E. BURNS, JR., AIA. is a
graduate of Tulane University and the
University of Florida. He established his
own practice of architecture in 1953. A
member of the Florida State Board of
Architecture since 1963, he served as
president of the Board in 1965-66. He
has served as Secretary of the Florida
North Chapter and Director of the Jack-
sonville Chapter, Commissioner of Educa-
tion and Research, and Commissioner of
Public Affairs.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










as it is charged today by so many, "bromides for the un-cool"?
We have asked Dr. Albert Goldman to discuss this matter
and others which he may feel pertinent to the present and
future status of our culture. Dr. Goldman is the Editor of the
magazine Cultural Affairs which is published by the Associated
Councils of the Arts. As architects we are directly involved with
these problems as we continually face absurdities in our physi-
cal surroundings and see them compounded by accumulations
of refusals to solve problems of environment in an orderly way.
I use orderly here to include "thoughtful" and "progressive".
To discuss the problem of applying this highly focused
acceptance of order to the building process, we have asked
Mr. Louis I. Kahn FAIA, of Philadelphia, to be one of our
speakers. He has consented. His talk will center on the creative
process of architecture and its dependence on a base of order
and logic.
Our third speaker will be Dr. Humphrey Osmond, a psy-
chiatrist who has done extensixe work with architects and archi-
tectural problems. We have asked Dr. Osmond to appraise for
us the effect that architectural spaces, based on a culture of
reason and conceived in a spirit of logic, will have on the
people who use them. In other words, is an ill-conceived space
detrimental to the mental well-being of its occupants, and why.
This then is the concept of our convention theme, Philoso-
phy-Design-Life; a weighty subject of course, but of prime
importance to the future of architecture. In any period of
great change or anticipation of great change, it is necessary
to re-examine the premises upon which ones thought and work
is based.
I hope that you will see fit to attend our seminars and our
convention.
DONALD SINGER AIA
Convention Chairman








TREASURER REGIONAL













Wi





MYRL HANES, Gainesville, Florida 3 YE
Has had own architectural office since JAMES E. FE
1950. Past president Florida North Chap- partner in the fi
ter, AIA; served on various chapter and partner in the fi
state committees: member and past presi- Associates, Mia
dent Gainesville Exchange Club; member practice for the
Gainesville City Commission 1955-60; a past president
presently member Board of Directors Chapter and a pa
Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce. A raduat of Ge
In 1954, received Outstanding Design membr o the
Award, Southeastern District Convention Zoning Board thi
of AIA. In 1959, received "Young Man tons institute
of the Year" award from Gainesville Jun- Counc
ior Chamber of Commerce.


JUDICIARY COMMITTEE


EAR TERM ALTERNATE
RGUSON, JR., AIA, a JAMES H. LOOK, AIA, has been a
rm of Ferguson-Glasgow partner with the firm of Look & Morrison,
mi, has been in private since May, 1957. He attended the Uni-
past thirteen years. He is versity of Florida School of Architecture,
t of the Florida South is a Past member, Florida State Board of
st director of the FAAIA. Architecture; president Florida Northwest
eorgia Tech, he is now a Chapter; member Pensacola Art Associa-
outh Miami Planning and tion, and Historical Society; member
e Construction Specifica- Pensacola Rotary International.
and the Florida Arts


SEPTEMBER, 1967

















OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA NHLHAI
YOU CAN DEPEND ON IT



PHIhOSOPHU DESIGN lIFE

53RD AnnURh
F. R. R. I. A. CORVERTIOn
OCTOBER 4-8
HOibhUWOOD, FbORIDA
DIPlOmAT HOTEL
NO REGISTRATION FEE


0 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


When you're figuring hot water
it's always the same answer:

































THE


"WINGED V"

at


Deerfield Beach,


George L. Bennett, A.I.A., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Architect
Walter C. Harry & Associates, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Engineers
Stinson Construction Company, Deerfield Beach, Florida, Contractors
Rinker Materials Corp., Boca Raton, Florida, Concrete Supplier

The River House Apartments at Deerfield Beach, Florida,
make a dramatic architectural statement in a state where pro-
gressive architecture is the rule.
Designed in a V-shape with flaring wings, the 50-foot deep
building has a frontage of 600 feet, 1000 running feet of in-
terior-and only two expansion joints.
The 6-story building is of reinforced concrete frame con-
struction, using Solite lightweight structural concrete for floors
and exterior walls. The use of Solite substantially reduced
dead load, thereby reducing column size and the number of
piles needed for foundation.
Dramatic and beautiful, River House is another outstand-
ing example of the interplay between gifted architect and
modern, versatile building materials.


RIVER HOUSE APARTMENTS, DEERFIELD BEACH, FLORIDA





Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202


SEPTEMBER, 1967







The
finishing
touch
- 4.V.. ,


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


i'
"
I





































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of modern living-opens up new vistas for homeowners
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Every home or apartment certified for the Gold
Medallion, regardless of size, price or location, accen-
tuates the comforts and conveniences that Floridians
want. It has reverse-cycle electric air conditioning
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electric kitchen and laundry. It has ample Light for
Living . a lighting system designed for comfort,
safety and decorative beauty. And finally, it includes
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SEPTEMBER, 1967




































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT PRESENTS A PORTFOLIO OF THE WORK OF FOUR
YOUNG ARCHITECTS FROM DIFFERENT AREAS OF THE STATE IN PRACTICE FOR
A SHORT TIME BUT WITH MUCH TO SAY ABOUT THE FUTURE OF ARCHITEC-
TURE IN FLORIDA.
SEPTEMBER, 1967 15






















Herschel E. Shepard, Jr., AIA, 1932 Landon
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, was graduated from
the School of Architecture at Princeton University
in 1953, received a travel grant to Greece, and was
appointed to the British School at Athens for arche-
ological work at Mycenae. He returned to Princeton
and was awarded at Master's Degree in 1956. After
an apprenticeship with Boardman, Ewart and Mee-
han, Architects; Herbert Coons, Jr., AIA; and
Robert C. Broward, AIA, he began private practice
in 1967. He has recently received special awards
from the FAAIA for his work in the partial restora-
tion of Fort Clinch and the preservation and res-
toration of the ruins of Bulow Plantation. He is
currently Secretary of the Jacksonville Chapter,
AIA.









I


I "



SKETCH PLAN



SECTION A-A
".. ........


As a freshman in college I intended to major
in physics, mechanical engineering, or any other
scientific discipline that I found interesting. Elec-
tives in the.arts and humanities soon changed that,
as did the growing awareness that I would like to
have some control of my life. By this I mean that
the future of the sciences seemed unalterably wed
to corporations, universities, and/or government,
and I was interested in living where and as I
pleased, if at all possible.
Thus architecture became my major not be-
cause of intense interest in design, social reform,
monetary profit, status, and so forth, but simply
because the profession seemed to combine the arts
and sciences and offer a reasonable degree of per-
sonal freedom.
Five years of practice have shown me that my
choice was the right one. I have slowly come to
realize that private practice is a great privilege
regardless of the innumerable agonies. It is a privi-
lege because society grudgingly tolerates and sup-
ports the architect even though the architect is
often intolerant of society. This paradoxical rela-
tionship, which allows one to exist as an individual
and yet change his environment is, to me, the
greatest strength of this nation.
My practice remains small, but my office has
seen a wide range of projects, ranging from large
apartment complexes to vacation houses, military
chapels to church pulpits, restoration projects to a
very small museum. Each project has shown me a
different aspect of the creative process. Architec-
ture involves far more than the architect, science,
or art. I have learned not to overestimate my own
imagination nor underestimate that of the client.
Most clients not only provide the problem, but also
the solution; I have a growing suspicion that pur-
suit of the solution through the mind and emotions
of the client often leads to truly creative and imagi-
native design, not only in schematic terms but in
terms of realized space and form. Furthermore, the
irrational, intuitive, .accidental sources of inspira-
tion continually intrigue me, as does the symbolic,
ambiguous communicative nature of much of the
architect's work. Are we truly in command of our
designs, or are we to a large degree unconscious
instruments of our time and our society?
The future of my practice is as unpredictable
to me as the future of architecture. All of the
"oughts" of tomorrow are predicated by the dimly
understood knowns of today. It seems that the
future of architecture is becoming closely tied to
the corporation, university and/government. I trust
I can remain relatively independent tomorrow and
the day after; next week even my idea of inde-
pendence may have altered drastically. The most
anyone can do is plan with optimism over a limited
time and be prepared for the unexpected.


FRONT ELEVATION
8CAI "-;s,,"10' ,.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Credits: Opposite page: Drawing of pro-
posed restoration of model 1861 Rodman
Gun Carriage at Fort Clinch; Photo of
Mr. Shepard by Judith Gefter. This Page:
Apartment Complex, Gainesville, Florida,
photo by G. Wade Swicord; Drawing of
proposal for St. Peter's Chapel, Jackson-
ville.


SEPTEMBER, 1967


- I


















Lowell Lotspeich, 250 Park Avenue North, Winter Park,
Florida, was graduated from the School of Architecture at the
University of Florida in the spring of 1960. After a six-month
exploration of Europe he returned to the U.S. to apprentice with
Percival Goodman, FAIA, in New York City and then with
Nils Schweizer, AIA, in Winter Park. Currently in private
practice in Winter Park, he is a Professional Associate member
of the Mid-Florida Chapter, AIA. In addition to his accom-
plishments in architecture, many mid-Florida art collectors
are proud owners of very fine oil paintings bearing the signa-
ture . Lotspeich.
After only four years in my own practice, I am more con-
vinced than ever that Architecture is the most limitless, signi-
ficant, medium of expression known to man. No other area
of creativity offers the artist such a breadth of challenge, on
such a large scale. When one approaches each new commission
as a new piece of sculpture to excecute or a mural to paint, the
excitement increases as all the infinite possibilities begin to
reveal themselves. Probably the most frustrating thing is the
limitless nature of each problem. As with the painter facing
the new, white canvas, or the sculptor pondering the infinite
forms buried within a block of marble, I am first overwhelmed
by the potential before me. Then as my understanding of all
the conditions of the problem increases I begin to focus in on
a direction, guided by my own philosophy, and based on my
experience.
Of all the things a piece of architecture must be, I think
it must first be good sculpture. If a building is sculpturally
unsound, then all the beautiful materials, the good traffic pat-
terns, the sound structure and the leak-proof roof are insigni-
ficant, if one is in search of great Architecture. Unless it is
good sculpture a building has no chance of becoming Archi-
tecture. I think this has always been true and is even more
important today. Obviously our criteria for "good sculpture"
changes as our civilization changes. Today, with the absolute
freedom enjoyed by most artists, the architect (as sculptor)
must expand his own sense of freedom and let his buildings
become as good sculpture as he possibly can make them.
Assuming that the Architect is truly free, I think there is a
good solution to every good problem. It is up to us to avoid
bad problems.

t./A


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




.. ..... ....-. .



.



































































Residence for Mr. and Mrs. Thompson Cassel, Orlando, Florida.
Exposed concrete block walls with formed and poured concrete
tie beam. Steel joist roof framing with rigid insulating deck.
Lowell Lotspeich, architect; Allen Trovillion, contractor; Flam-
beau Interiors, interior designer.


SEPTEMBER, 1967


















James Padgett, AIA, 2051 Main Street, Sara-
sota, Florida, a 1960 graduate of the School of
Architecture at Gainesville, has twice toured the
European Continent since leaving, the University.
After a Sarasota apprenticeship he entered private
practice in 1964 and is now a Corporate member
of the Gulf Coast Chapter, AIA.


"C
sign.


li ients
This


appreciate good de-
is a simple fact which


keeps manifesting itself
out my practice. The cl
the architect's mutual
however, is to achieve tl
design goals within set
limits. Recognizing th
always a sense of urger


to create a
the client'.
Design for
process. 0
ploring, se
under the
quirements


tions,
seems


to
to


the
ord


: through-
ient's and


problem,
he desired
economic
is, I feel
ncy to try


Good building witi
s program and budg
me is an explorat
ften I find myself i
veral design schen
light of program
, and budget limit
Find that one sche
dominate because


point
er in


products


they


is th
archite


of


are


/I


gained


effort on the part
architect."


"My city


which
opport
design
ity, du
lished
growth


hin
let.
ion
ex-
nes
rel
ta-
me
of


Saras


the archit
unity to coi
standards i
te to the p
in the eai
i. I feel it


obligation of an
strive for high d
in any community


"In


planning


F


I

























































Credits: Top photo, Law offices for Nel-
son, Stinnett, Surfus, Korp, & Payne,
Sarasota, Florida; Middle photo, Evans
residence, Sarasota; Lower photo, Ber-
ecky residence, Sarasota.


SEPTEMBER, 1967






Page 22
missing
from
original




Left, Robert
Greenberg res.,
Miami, photo
Peter Bromer.
Below, design of
component bldg.
system. Right,
model, private
residence, Mi-


The motivation of my work is in the explora-
tion of new ideas and thoughts relative to the
building process and the shelter of man and his
endeavors.
I see the contemporary idea of building; origi-
nated by a client, designed by an architect, price
guessed and built by a contractor who employs
workmen to cut, mold and assemble thousands of
bits and pieces on an individual building site,
under assault today as it never has been. The labor
market is forcing the hand of the ingenious people
who generate technological progress.
We are about to enter a period of adjustment
between the bits and pieces people and the sys-
tems people. When the dust clears, we will be left
with new standards of spiritual fulfillment as well
as physical accomplishment.
Unless we are stymied by the inability to under-
go the ordeal of change, we will emerge with a
new concept of bauty, not as a contrived ideal,
but as the qualitative result of a purposeful effort.
The manufacturing process-building system will
necessarily change the focus of "purposeful effort"
from the semi-handicraft, job labor, single build-
ing of the present to a systems produced prefabri-
cated unit-development.
I would say that the time is not very far away.
Our society is demanding the kind of flexibility
which would be complimented by this type of
building. Change is occurring at such a rapid rate
in all aspects of life that flexibility and adapta-
bility become important factors in the building
program.
Architecture must change as does man, for
architecture is not taste, it is idea; it is not whim,
it is reason; it is not mere decoration of function,
it is anticipation of life.


Donald Singer,
AIA, 1301 SE 2nd
Court, Fort Lauder-
dale, Florida is also
a 1960 graduate of
the University of
Florida. After a pe-
riod of work in New
York City and a
Master's Degree
from Columbia Uni-
versity, he returned
to South Florida. In
private practice
since February 1964,
he received an
Honor Award for Ex-
cellence in Design
from the FAAIA in
1965. He is current-
ly serving as Treas-
urer of the Broward
Chapter, AIA, and
Chairman of the
1967 FAAIA Con-
vention.


SEPTEMBER, 1967


mo A








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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F. R. A. I. A. COnUEnTion
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