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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Perspective
 To the editor
 Critique
 Costs
 Advertisers' index
 Philosophy
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00158
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: August 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00158
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
    Perspective
        Page 8
    To the editor
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Critique
        Page 13
    Costs
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Advertisers' index
        Page 16
    Philosophy
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
the florlba archect augusll 967




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.







University of Florlia Libraries
Gainesvile, Fla. 10
32601





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No form work, no delays. Generally a lower in-place
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from coast to coast. Even preferential insurance
AUGUST, 1967


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Esthetically, the colors and reflectivity of PPG environmental
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Functionally, PPG environmental control glass can reduce
air conditioning and heating loads to a considerable degree.
Certain of the glasses reduce solar heat gain and bright-
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Cutback Asphalt AC-6, AC-8, AC-15

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A subsidiary of BELCHER OIL CO.


Floridians Serving i


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4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Imaginative

concrete

floor design

cuts high rise apartment costs

The creative design of the Dolley Madison Apart-
ments couples maximum structural efficiency with an
interesting architectural effect. And does it at a most
economical in-place cost. The post-tensioned, short
span design reduced the thickness of the floors to 5"-
a saving of at least 1" per floor. This reduction in dead
load resulted in a saving in columns and caissons.
Post-tensioning also eliminated 790 lineal feet of ex-
pansion joints and all beams at openings.
With a rigid construction schedule and a minimum
amount of labor, the contractor constructed 13 floors
in 13 weeks and 1 day. To help maintain this schedule,
the contractor used concrete made with Lehigh Early
Strength Cement for completion of certain slabs to
permit post-tensioning the next day. All other concrete
for this project was made with Type 1 Lehigh Cement.
Lehigh Portland Cement Company, Allentown, Pa.
District Sales Office: Jacksonville, Fla. 32216.

Owner: Dolley Madison Associates, Arlington, Va.
Architect: Sheridan, Behm & Associates, Arlington, Va.
Structural Engineer: Horatio Allison Associates, Rockville, Md.
Builder: Dittmar Company, Inc., Arlington, Va.
Ready Mix Concrete: Virginia Concrete Co., Springfield, Va.

LEHIGH
CEMENTS

(Right) Floors are made with lightweight concrete. As concrete
reached 2000 PSI, stressing began with a pressure of 11,000 lbs.
After post-tensioning was completed for each floor, a closure
strip was placed to cover button heads around perimeter.


Spans between columns are 15' 4" x 17' 6". Post-tensioning the
393' length of this structure was done in three sections. The
center 209' 4" was placed and tensioned with jacking force at each
end. Then the two remaining outside 92' sections were placed,
tensioned, and tied to the already tensioned tendons of the center
section. Floors are also post-tensioned in a transverse direction.
AUGUST, 1967


The building has an offset "T" shape. It is 65' 4" wide and 393' 4" in
length. Offset T's extend 92' to front and rear and are also 65' 4" wide.


Diagram shows positioning
of tendons in 5" slab.




L= 17'-6" MAX































Ever notice how homes with gas
lights in front seem to attract a little
larger crowd of prospective home buy-
ers? It's like having an extra salesman
to sell your houses.
But gas equipment does more than catch
the eye. It offers you many ways to help close
the sale. For example, nothing makes a house-
wife happier than cooking on a gas range.
Growing families appreciate the economy of
modern gas heating, air conditioning and water
heating. And a gas grill in the backyard will please
any weekend chef.
Modern gas equipment goes a long way to help sell
your potential buyers. Incidentally, the money you'll
save installing gas equipment should make
you happy, too. For all the facts and figures,
W o talk to your local Natural Gas Utility repre-
sentative today. Check the Yellow Pages.





GAS
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Serving all of Florida
through your local Natural
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A:1
Q.1. ':`":







OFFICERS
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., Piesident,
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth,
Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Desig-
natc/Vice President, 3250 S.W. 3rd
Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary, P.O. Box 609,
Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Trcasurer, Citizens
Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin
St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County: Charles R. Kcrley,
Robert E. Todd. Daytona Beach:
David A. Leete, Tom Jannetides.
Florida Central: J. A. Wohlberg, Ted
Fasnacht, James J. Jennewein. Florida
Gulf Coast: Frank Folsom Smith,
Jack West. Florida North: F. Blair
Reeves, William C. Grobe. Florida
North Central: Forrest R. Coxen.
Florida Northwest: Ellis W. Bullock,
Jr., Thomas H. Daniels. Florida
South: Robert J. Boerema, James E.
Ferguson, Jr., Francis E. Telesca.
Jacksonville: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., John Pierce Ste-
vens. Mid-Florida: Wythe D. Sims,
II, Joseph M. Shifalo. Palm Beach:
Jack Willson, Jr., John B. Marion,
Richard E. Pryor. Director: Florida
Region, American Institute of Archi-
tects, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600
N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami. Execu-
tive Director: Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects,
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Donald Singer, Milton C. Harry,
Lowell L. Lotspeich.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos, Editor; Donald
Singer, Assistant Editor; Black-Baker-
Burton, Photography Consultants; M.
Elaine Mead, Circulation Manager.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray
Printers.


lhe

florida

archileclt
olicial journal
ol le llorioa
association
of ihe american

archilecls


DEPARTMENTS

PERSPECTIVE .....

TO THE EDITOR...

PHILOSOPHY .....
By Frank McLane, Jr.


FEATURES

COSTS


A Study of Architectural Offices
Throughout the Country ..

CRITIQUE
Sands Motor Inn Pompano Beach
Paul Robin John AIA, Architect
By Oscar Handle, Jr. AIA . .


ADVERTISERS' INDEX ..


. 14


. 12


. 16


FRONT COVER: Our cover design this month shows a disappear-
ing dollar. Readers are asked to draw their own conclusions as
to the significance relative to their own personal affairs. For some
eye opening facts on the comparison of office costs to office income
see page 14. Go ahead, be brave!


VOLUME 17 K NUMBER 8 K AUGUST 1967


AUGUST, 1967








PERSPECTIVE

DR. TAYLOR CALLS FOR EDUCATION IN
ENVIRONMENTAL UNDERSTANDING


A noted educator said at the AIA Con-
vention in New York City that because
American schools treat the creative arts,
including design and architecture, "as
something you do after school or in the
evenings," the general public is unpre-
pared and unable to judge what is good
and what is bad in its environment.
"The problem," Dr. Harold Taylor told
the convention "consists in developing
the sensibility of the young, and of every-
one not young, toward visual experience,
teaching people how to see."
As author as well as an educator,
Doctor Taylor said that the American
public school curriculum is "a process of
slow attrition of the sensibility and the
substitution of categories of fact-gather-
ing, conceptualizing and memorizing in
place of the development of the creative
faculties the faculty to think inde-
pendently, to form one's own taste, con-
clusions and opinions."
He said, "The hidden secret of Ameri-
can education is the fact that the crea-
tive arts, including design and architect-
ure, when placed in a central position in
the life of the school or college, have an
enlivening effect on the entire environ-
ment This means, of course, an edu-
cational revolution.
"If we are raising a population of vis-
ual illiterates," Doctor Taylor said, "we
are also raising a population of children
who are for the most part deprived of
esthetic experiences by the circumstances
of their education."
Doctor Taylor, who was president of
Sarah Lawrence College at the age of 30,
and who has written several books on
education, is now vice chairman of the
National Committee for Support of the
Public Schools.


He addressed the first "Theme Sem-
inar" of the AIA Convention which was
being attended by about 4,000 members
and guests.
Doctor Taylor said that school teachers
by and large have not had direct experi-
ence with art forms and "as a result,
the taste of teachers in the field of the
arts, visual or otherwise, is about that of
the rest of the population In the
absence of such resources in the schools,
the public is the victim of the taste of
the manipulators of the mass media and
the standards of a mass culture."
"I would argue that once we introduce
theater, music, dance, poetry, painting,
sculpture, and design into the school and
college curriculum as full-fledged sub-
jects, in equal status to the respectable
"hard" subjects, we will be preparing
people to pay attention to the ugliness
or beauty of what surrounds them," he
said. "We would be well advised to teach
children to look at the cities, towns and
villages in which they live as examples
of what man has done to his environment,
and to include that form of direct experi-
ence among the items in the school
syllabus."
Doctor Taylor said that the architect
at his best is "a delicately balanced com-
bination of artist, engineer, humanist,
educator, and planner, a man in love
with shapes, colors, forms, structures,
nature and mankind, for whom he creates
generously a new environment." He sug-
gested that architectural education make
adequate provision for "the social imag-
ination, the visual imagination, the con-
cern for human shelter and the human
condition, the social problems raised by
the clash of technology, politics and eco-
nomics."


GALLERY EXHIBITS
A collection of 24 "New Image" paint-
ings by contemporary artists is on display
at the University of Miami's Joe and
Emily Lowe Art Gallery.
Called "The California Group and its
Influence," the exhibition is in part com-
posed of paintings by contemporary Cali-
fornia artists on loan for three to five
years from the Staempfli Gallery of New
York and in part from paintings in the
Lowe Gallery's collection.
The collection may be viewed through
the summer until October 1, with the
exception of the month of August when
the gallery will be closed.

The Fort Lauderdale Museum of the Arts
is currently showing, until August 4,
1967, an exhibit of the work of Japanese
architect, Kenzo Tange. The exhibit in-
cludes photographs and drawings.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







CONVENTION SPEAKER TO THE EDITOR
GOLDMAN EDITS NEW
MAGAZINE ON ARTS
Cultural Affairs, a new magazine con-
taining views, reports, and practical in-
formation on the arts, was published this
month by Associated Councils of the Arts,
1564 Broadway, New York. The journal
will be the first to present a complete
picture of the activities of arts councils
at the state and local levels as well as
a current view of the arts vis-a-vis edu-
cation, legislation, and foundation sup-
port of cultural activities. The first issue
will be given nationwide distribution pri-
marily through the state arts councils.
In an introductory statement to Volume
One of Cultural Affairs, W. Howard
Adams, associate director of ACA and
chairman of the journal's advisory board,
writes: "We have entered a new phase
of public awareness in this country re-
garding the role and place of the arts in
our community life. We hope to have in
each issue articles that reflect general
developments in the arts, views encom-
passing individual experiences in specific
institutions that have wide implications,
and reports on the arts from a community
or regional standpoint."
Albert Goldman, critic, editor, and As-
sistant Professor of English and Com-
parative Literature at Columbia Univer-
sity, and Joan Meyers, an editor at Har-
court Brace and World, were respectively
editor in chief and managing editor for
the first issue of Cultural Affairs. Dr.
Goldman is to be a guest speaker at the
FAAIA Convention in Hollywood on Oc-
tober 6th.




ChUTTER ChUTTER EUERUWHERE!

Welcome to our city. This scene of clutter
and urban ugliness is unfortunately typi-
cal of the approaches to thousands of p u
American communities today, says The !T
American Institute of Architects. The in-
gredients, as this UPI photo shows, are
standing signs, elevated signs, projecting
store signs-nearly all sized to be read
quickly from passing automobiles-light-
ing standards, and closely spaced utility
poles, The result is visual confusion in
which no one's message stands out, and
a grim kind of ugliness that springs, not
from poverty, but from indifference. The
cure, says AIA, lies in creation of a com- .
munity design plan that establishes proper
land uses; in better local ordinance con-
trol of signs, wires, and land uses; most
of all, in public demand for a more I;ve- A Al
able and beautiful environment. .


AUGUST, 1967


;!arirli~r~qgggPI/~




Everybody talks about the weather
but nobody does anything about it.


Not so
today,
Mr. Mark
Twain!
We do-
indoors!


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Reverse-cycle electric air conditioning

cools in summer; warms in winter

does both jobs cleaner, safer, cheaper, flamelessly!


Pace setter for Florida comfort ...
the magic year 'round weather maker.
* Costs less to buy Costs less to install
* Costs less to maintain a Costs less to operate
Flameless-clean. Flameless-safe. Eliminates big-
expense items like boiler rooms, fuel storage
facilities, flues and vents.
Builders of modern homes and apartment units
know Reverse-Cycle Electric Air Conditioning
boosts sales and rentals.
In air conditioned stores, customers shop longer,
buy more.
In offices and industrial plants, employees are more
comfortable, more efficient.
Consult your electric utility company for more
money-saving facts, without obligation.


Florida's Electric Companies...


Investor-owned


AUGUST, 1967 11


j'






































































Ff~:r, h r ii,
-
rL
11. -""


12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








CRITIqUE


There is no question but that this
building is a most interesting solution to
the usual uninteresting result of so many
buildings of this type in this area. It is
an expressive and handsome building and
is indicative of the study the designer
must have made to obtain the pleasing
solution.
It is a pleasant and exciting task to
critique a notable design, a design which
displays a clever manipulation of volumes,
the various changes in levels and an in-
teresting relationship of materials. The
use of naturally finished wood for doors,
jambs, mullions and jalousies in conjunc-
tion with Chattahoochee aggregate stucco
and copper as a fascia and accent material
is harmonious and through this relation-
ship the character is established. The use
of wood shingles on the face of the bal-
conies and fascias not only accomplishes
an interesting texture and feeling of
warmth but a low maintenance material
as well. The continuity of materials
throughout the building is cleverly dis-
played and again the consciousness of the
designer is apparent.
The character created is certainly
South Florida in feeling and the apparent
informality is conducive to relaxation and
vacationing. One of the most outstanding
and pleasing aspects of the project one
realizes is that the solution truly repre-
sents an honest endeavor to design a
building expressive of our climate and
area. A solution that by its openess util-
izes the breezes in all areas and is well
related to the water.
The magnificent view in all directions
is not only exploited from the dining
area, cocktail lounge and each hotel room
but from one of the least expected areas,
the open corridor. One end of the corridor
opens to the Atlantic while the other
opens to the Intracoastal Waterway. Even
while waiting for the elevator an interest-
ing panoramic view to the North of both
Ocean and Intracoastal is realized. It is
in this area, however, that I find an un-
desirable situation, which is an open ele-
vator lobby to the North. During a North-
east driving rain the guests must find
this unprotected area undesirable.
The alternating combination of hotel


rooms and efficiencies with connecting
doors between each unit on each typical
floor provides the flexibility desired for
this type of operation.
The use of wood and openess at every
opportunity creates a feeling of warmth
and intimacy rather than the usual cold
commercial solution utilizing large glass
areas and aluminum.
The approach to the building is through
an interesting landscaped area under a
covered walk and is a preview of what
lies ahead. The lanai connecting the hotel
room wing to the dining-administrative
wing is most successful in not only the
openess and intimate scale but completely
utilizes to the fullest one of our most
important assets-the prevailing breeze.
Not to air condition in this day and age
is unheard of but to visit this project on
a hot day in June and enjoy the pleasant
cool breeze is indicative of the success
of this utilization.
The challenge of designing a project
to better utilize valuable property which
had 20 units originally is realized through
accomplishing 62 units with complete
dining facilities in a most interesting and
satisfying way. The solution encompasses
an existing building which is the office
area and is certainly not apparent in the
end result.
The pleasant relationship to the water
is important in that the 1 50 berth marina
and this facility are integrated and to-
gether become a pleasant entity.
The shape of the swimming pool is un-
fortunate and not at all in keeping with
the overall design.
The building is interesting from each
direction and the composition of masses
of the stair towers and elevator towers is
successfully displayed.
In summarizing, it is gratifying to see
a building of this caliber which cannot
merely be entitled a building, but archi-
tecture. It is an exhilarating and reward-
ing experience to visit projects of other
architects with the idea of analyzing the
design; an experience in which more of
us should participate.
Oscar A. Handle, Jr., AIA
Fort Lauderdale


Sands Motor Inn, Pompano
Beach, Florida
Paul Robin John, AI.A., Architect
Walter Harry, Structural Engineer
Paul Davis, Mechanical Engineer


AUGUST, 1967







FEATURE


A management consultant firm conducting a study of the
cost of architectural services reported at the recent annual con-
vention of The American Institute of Architects, that (1) the
cost of such services has gone up sharply, (2) the profits of
architectural firms have dropped sharply, and (3) clients of
architectural firms are demanding "much more complicated and
sophisticated service." The study, entitled "Comprehensive
Study of the Cost of Architectural Services," is being performed
by Case and Company for the AIA.
The study involved collecting and analyzing confidential
cost and profit information from 223 architectural firms in 47
states, as well as cost and profit details for 1,150 projects
recently completed by these firms.
The preliminary findings included the following:
1. There was a sharp increase in the direct costs of performing
architectural services from 1960 to 1966, and there was a
steady rise in the cost of outside consulting services from 1950
until 1966. Overhead has been maintained at a relatively stable
level despite significant increases in the pay scales of employees
in the architect's office.
2. The pretax income or profit of the average architectural
firm has declined from 22.6 per cent of total gross receipts
in 1950, to 17.8 per cent in 1955, to 15.8 per cent in 1960,
to 9.2 per cent in 1966.


3. Last year, one architectural firm out of 12 suffered a loss
for the year's work-a loss averaging about five per cent of
annual gross income. And on the average, architects are cur-
rently losing money on one project out of four.
4. Despite recognized disadvantages involved in using con-
struction cost as the basis for compensating architects for pro-
fessional services, this method was used in 84 per cent of the
projects analyzed.
5. By comparing the Engineering News-Record building cost
index with pay rates for direct and indirect services of archi-
tectural firm employees, it was found that the building cost
index has risen 13 per cent since 1960, but pay rates have gone
up 25-44 per cent. Case and Company called this an "excellent
example of the price-cost squeeze which is plaguing the archi-
tect."
6. Nine out of 10 architects say their clients now demand
much more complicated and sophisticated service than they did
10 years ago. These demands include increased risks, increased
liability, increased programming, and increased engineering.
Today's architects thus face a serious dilemma, and are ask-
ing such questions as:
How can I provide clients with attractive, functional and
sound buildings within their budget limitations? How can I
maintain a high quality of design in spite of constantly rising


CASE AND COMPANY STUDY
FINDS THAT ARCHITECTS
PRODUCTION EXPENSES HAVE
RISEN FAR MORE PROPORTIONATELY
THAN THE FEES THEY CHARGE
THEIR CLIENTS


COST AND INCOME TRENDS IN ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE
FOR THE YEARS 1950,1955,1960 & 1966
(DataJfim .itnanciaStatrcnent)


Direct architectural costs, outside consulting costs, indirect expenses
and pre-tax income as percentages of gross receipts


Pre-tax
Income



Indirect
Expenses


Outside
Consulting -
Costs


17.8%



28.4



1& 2


15.8%



29.9




16.4


1950 1955 1960


--o O100%
9.2% --Pre-tax
--I Income


Indirect
Expenses


Outside
17.7 --Consulting
Costs


146





1966


Direct
\.-rTS


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










costs for services and materials? How can I manage my practice
so that my monetary return is proportionate to my investment
of time, money and effort-plus the value to my client of my
skill and knowledge.?
It was noted that there are no quick or easy answers to these
questions, but it said that the survey has identified areas where
there is a need for remedial measures. These areas are:
1. Overcoming the pressures of the profit squeeze-budgeting
job time, controlling costs and expenses, pricing services, and
using technical manpower effectively.
2. Determining better and more equitable methods of compen-
sation for architectural services.
3. Deciding to what extent architects should provide some or
all of the services for which they now engage outside consulting
services.
4. Planning "profit" into architectural practice into each
project and every year's operations.
5. Educating clients and the public in what architects do, how
they do it, and how they earn their fees.
6. Devising an "information bank" where architects can quickly
obtain up-to-date facts, figures and trends pertinent to "running
the office," such as costs, policies, employee benefits, methods
and techniques.
Further details on this study will be made available at a
later date by Case and Company.













COST OF DIRECT PROFESSIONAL SERVICES COST OF INDIRECT SERVICES
COMPARED WITH BUILDING COSTS COMPARED WITH BUILDING COSTS
For Years 1950-1955-1960-1966 ForYears 1950-1955-1960-1966
% 1960 = 100% 1960= 100%


1950 1955 1960 1966


AUGUST, 1967











































ADVERTISERS' InDEX

BELCHER OIL COMPANY ..

DANTZLER LUMBER & EXPORT CO., INC.. .

FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS . .. .

FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WORKS .

FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION CO ....

FLORIDA INVESTOR OWNED ELECTRIC UTILITIES CO.

FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION .

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION ..

LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY ..

OIL FUEL INSTITUTE .

PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO .

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO ......
16


.p. 4

p. 1

INSIDE BACK COVER

p. 18

p. 6

S. p. 10-11

. p. 19


p.

.< p.


Sp. 16


THE FLORIDA


p. 2- 3

p. 18
ARCHITECT







PHILOSOPHY





































By LESTER PANCOAST, AIA
MIAMI

I believe Architecture is a fundamental
way to make meaning and sense, to cause
richness of experience, to celebrate what
nature does and what man can do.
Some use the word "Architecture" as
an award for what they think are worth-
while buildings. I believe that Architect-
A ure encompasses any physical phenome-
non, consciously or unconsciously caused,
which creates the conditions to which we
creatures respond.
For man, Architecture is a language
which reveals his successes and failings
as a rational animal who has the capacity
to express an individual and collective
philosophy.
He who speaks well in the language
of Architecture must be involved in all
S wharts and sciences. He must synthesize.
As self-critical perfectionist and imper-
fect creator he will range between bliss
and deep frustration.
I would not build myself as an archi-
tectural priest, holding myself precious
a and separate, or caught in a concocted
public relations image. I am not interested
in bags of tricks or borrowable manner-
isms. I believe that the commitment to
quality is greater than that to originality.
I want to become capable of causing vig-
orous, practical and complete statements
which speak of perception, imagination
and sensitivity.


AUGUST, 1967


AsL ,, 'A
/~i.~


I I









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
qaulity and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North


Jacksonville, Florida 32211


Telephone: (904) 724-7958


Custom-Cast


Plaques


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.


IF YOU'RE MOVING,
please send us your old
and new address. Don't
miss a single issue of
THE FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT! Just drop a note
or card with your correct
mailing address to The
Florida Association of
the American Institute
of Architects, 1000
Ponce de Leon Boule-
vard, Coral Gables, Flor-
ida 33134.











M R* ARCHITECT I* Most new arrivals in Florida had natural gas service "back
home." And we're reminding them of its speed, cleanliness, dependability and, above all,
economyin ads like this. They'll expect natural gas for these big jobs in the homes you design
for them. Better check into it:


DRIES TWICE AS FAST FOR HALF THE COST! SO VERY QUIET...CHEAPER, TOO! In natural
In actual side-by-side tests, home economists gas absorption-type air conditioning there's no
have started identical loads in gas and compet- noisy, high-speed compressor. The cooling
itive type dryers...finished, removed and folded "motor" is a silent flame-nothing to break down
the "gas" load ... then found the rival load still or wear out, no costly refrigerant, no special
too wet to remove. So end backbreaking lifting heavy-duty wiring needed. And the gas utility
and lugging. Straighten up and dry right itself is 100% responsible for service .with
with gas. Gas makes the big difference! special rates to assure you the lowest cost.


SPECTACULAR OUTDOOR MEALS IN MINUTES! MORE HOT WATER FASTER-FAR LESS COST.
A modern natural gas grill is practically an out- The competition's claims for "faster" and
door kitchen you can broil, bake, roast or "cheaper" water heating just don't stand up. A
fry. Fast, too perfect coals in seconds, no 30-gallon gas water heater recovers some 50
ashes, soot or smelly fuel. And gaslights add gallons of hot water per hour a comparable
glamor and status for spectacular entertaining, non-flame model less than 11! Pile dishwashing,
P.S.-while you're at it, a natural gas pool heater showers, shaves on top of cooking and laundry
doubles your fun at such moderate extra cost. needs only gas can keep you in hot water!


POSITIVE WARMTH TO GUARD HEALTH. It just
doesn't make sense to expect the ."reverse"
cycle of equipment designed to lower tempera-
tures by 15 degrees (say from 900 to 750) to
raise winter temperatures by 35 degrees (from
400 to 750) without costly supplementary re-
sistance heating. Natural gas supplies direct,
positive heat-exactly as much as you need-de-
pendably delivered underground in any weather!


9 OUT OF TEN PROFESSIONAL CHEFS COOK
WITH GAS they prefer its exact temperature
control, speed and cleanliness know how
flame brings out flavors. There's no slow warm
up, no hangover heat to raise kitchen tempera-
tures and tempers. Automatic controls make
matches passe, and gas burners are guaranteed
for life. So if you're only No. 10, better try
harder-with gas. You'll be so glad you did!


CLOSED-DOOR BROILING-COOLER KITCHENS.
With natural gas, no hot, greasy smoke or soot
pollutes kitchen air, soils curtains, walls and
ceilings. The clear gas flame burns it up you
broil with the oven door closed. Burns up spill-
overs, too keeps pots and pans clean, eases
dishwashing. No wonder cooks who use natural
gas as well as their kitchens stay cooler!


HUIIHN WAItR I-UK GLLANER DISHES. Gas
can supply you with enough hot water at 1800
or better to assure completely sanitary dish-
washing maximum health protection in the
kitchen and for all -.:.u.:l. n;,-,i needs. And
remember, with T,.:.i. rn li rjis as you
step up your use of gas, you step down the rate
you pay for it. So use it for all it's worth!





natural



gas


Gas Genie



Your local natural gas utility will work.with
you to give your clients what they want
...or contact FLORIDA NATURAL GAS
ASSOCIATION, P.O. Box 548, Valparaiso,
Florida 32580.


AUGUST, 1967










Florida Cements
MADE IN FLORIDA
FOR USE IN FLORIDA


Florida Cements and
Trinity White Cements
of uniformly high qual-
ity are manufactured in
Florida for use in Florida. With plants
in Tampa and Miami, Florida Portland
Cement provides superior service and
prompt deliveries to Florida's concrete
and concrete products industry.


In addition, Florida Portland Cement-
the state's first cement manufacturer-
adds millions of dollars to the state's
economy through plant investments,
payrolls, taxes, services and supplies.
When you specify and use Florida Ce-
ments, you contribute to the vitality
and growth of industry and the improve-
ment of Florida's economic climate.


SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA CEMENTS, MANUFACTURED IN FLORIDA FOR FORTY YEARS

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION
General Portland I PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI
Cement Company



2C0 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-- --------











INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS FOR CAT-BUILT EQUIPMENT
"


CAT POWER TURNS ON RADIO


...and keeps it on.


In times of emergency, listeners turn to radio. But
radios are only as reliable as the power that keeps
them on the air. That's why many radio stations are
using dependable Caterpillar electric sets to keep
them on when outside power fails.
Dependable power is a must for WKAT, the 5000
watt radio station on Miami Beach. This CBS affili-
ate station purchased a Cat D-320 Diesel electric
set last year for standby power in event of power
failure (especially during hurricanes).


The electric set is programmed to start automati-
cally five seconds after outside power fails.
Time is money for WKAT and their Caterpillar en-
gine hasn't failed them yet. It has kept them on
the air.
Do you have a job for dependable Caterpillar
power? Whether it's standby power, prime power,
or the many other capabilities, your Florida Cater-
pillar dealer can engineer them to fit your needs.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


JOS. L. ROZIER
MACHINERY CO.
ORLANDO TAMPA


w w
KELLY TRACTOR
CO.
MIAMI WEST PALM BEACH CLEWISTON n. MYERS


RING POWER
CORPORATION
JACKSONVILLE TALLAHASSEE OCALA


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.