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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 President's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Perspective
 To the editor
 Philosophy
 F.A.A.I.A. Convention review
 Scan
 Feature
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00157
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: July 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00157
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    President's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Perspective
        Page 6
    To the editor
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Philosophy
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    F.A.A.I.A. Convention review
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Scan
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Feature
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE


HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR., AIA
HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR., AIA


The Florida Association of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, in coopera-
tion with the Florida Engineering Society,
was successful in the legislature to have
enacted a Statute of Limitations for both
design professions.
The members of the legislature are to
be commended for their foresight to cor-
rect a long-standing deficiency, that be-
ing to provide for a "time certain" for
the cause of action to have occurred and
commenced with substantial completion
as defined in the new Statute.
The FAAIA in its service to the mem-
bers has spent many man-hours through
its staff and general counsel to present
the true facts to the legislature. I cannot
overlook the tremendous response by the
membership, which certainly had an im-
pact.
This success points out the need for
joint coordinated action from both design
professions for the attainment of achieve-
ment.
For the information of architects and
engineers, the new Statute is presented
below:
"Be It Enacted by the Legislature of
the State of Florida:

Section 1. Section 95.11, Florida
Statutes, is amended by adding sub-
section (10) to read:
95.11 Limitations upon actions
other than real actions. Actions
other than those for the recovery of
real property can only be commenced
as follows:
(10) IN THE CASE OF ACTIONS
AGAINST PROFESSIONAL ENGI-
NEERS OR REGISTERED ARCHI-
TECTS.-In any action brought against
a professional engineer or registered
architect for bodily injury, wrongful
death or injury to property, including
actions for contribution or indemnity,
arising out of any deficiency in design
or planning or for any deficiency in
the design or planning of an improve-
ment to real property, the cause of
action shall be deemed to have ac-
crued, and the time limited shall com-


mence to run from the date of sub-
stantial completion of any such con-
struction, or upon the completion or
termination of the contract between
the professional engineer or registered
architect and his employer on the
project whichever occurs first; and said
action brought against a professional
engineer or registered architect can
only be brought within twelve (12)
years after substantial completion of
construction or termination of the
contract between the professional en-
gineer or registered architect and his
employer on the project, whichever
occurs first. For purposes of this act,
the date of substantial completion of
construction of an improvement to real
property, or part thereof, shall be de-
fined as any one of the following:
(a) Date of issuance of a certifi-
cate of occupancy by a public agency
empowered to issue same.
(b) Date of first actual occupancy
or first actual use by the owner, or by
others authorized in writing by the
owner, of the project in whole or in
part.
(c) One (1) month after issuance
of a notice of completion from the
registered architect or the professional
engineer to the owner, unless pro-
tested in writing by the owner.
(d) Date of final abandonment of
the construction project if it is not
completed.
As used in this subsection, the words,
'professional engineer' and 'registered
architect' shall mean engineers and arch-
itects licensed by the state to practice
their respective professions, and these
words shall include individuals, corpora-
tions, partnerships, business trusts and
unincorporated associations and their
employees and agents. Nothing in this
act shall affect the limitation of actions
by an owner or tenant in possession but
shall apply only to third parties.
Section 2. This act shall take effect
September 1, 1967."




























































Striking Example of ARCHITECTURAL INGENUITY

FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA, DURHAM, N.C.


The recently completed home of First Union National Bank of North Carolina
utilizes an imaginative blend of the latest construction materials and tech-
niques to create beauty, comfort and convenience for customers.
The eight story superstructure is of Solite lightweight concrete construction.
The design incorporates flat plate beams, which support concrete joists span-
ning up to 34 feet. This time and money saving long-span construction is just
one advantage of lightweight concrete's dead load reduction.
Solite lightweight structural concrete and Solite lightweight masonry units
were used throughout the building-in the superstructure, interior walls, floors
and roof deck. We are proud to be a part of First Union National Bank's im-
pressive new home.


Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202














II,

















penny "

pincher!
New homes and buildings equipped with natural gas
offer savings to builder and buyer alike. For the
builder there's economy in installation. For example,
gas heating is still the most economical to install.
For the buyer gas equipment costs less to
operate. And it's also the most dependable.
Throughout Florida, prospective home buyers are
finding out the big difference that natural gas makes.
Your local Natural Gas Utility representative
will be happy to give you all the details. He's listed in
the Yellow Pages.




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Serving all of Florida
through your local Natural
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































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JULY, 1967


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CREDITS: Architect: Roger Lee Associates. Stucco supplied by California Stucco Products Co., San Francisco. John Catanesi. Plastering Contractor, Richmond, Cal.

A PRODUCT OF GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
Offices: Chicago Dallas Houston Tampa Miami Chattanooga FortWayne Kansas City. Kan Fredonia. Kan. Oklahoma City Los Angeles

4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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OFFICERS
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President,
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth,
Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Desig-
nate/Vice President, 3250 S.W. 3rd
Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary, P.O. Box 609,
Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer, Citizens
Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin
St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County: Charles R. Kerley,
Robert E. Todd. Daytona Beach:
David A. Leete, Tom Jannetides.
Florida Central: J. A. Wohlberg, Ted
Fasnacht, James J. Jennewein. Florida
Gulf Coast: Frank Folsom Smith,
Jack West. Florida North: F. Blair
Reeves, William C. Grobe. Florida
North Central: Forrest R. Coxen.
Florida Northwest: Ellis W. Bullock,
Jr., Thomas H. Daniels. Florida
South: Robert J. Boerema, James E.
Ferguson, Jr., Francis E. Telesca.
Jacksonville: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., John Pierce Ste-
vens. Mid-Florida: Wythe D. Sims,
II, Joseph M. Shifalo. Palm Beach:
Jack Willson, Jr., John B. Marion,
Richard E. Pryor. Director: Florida
Region, American Institute of Archi-
tects, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600
N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami. Execu-
tive Director: Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects,
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Donald Singer, Milton C. Harry,
Lowell L. Lotspeich.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos, Editor; Donald
Singer, Assistant Editor; Black-Baker-
Burton, Photography Consultants; M.
Elaine Mead, Circulation Manager.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Offi-
cial Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects,
Inc., is owned and published by the As-
sociation, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the
Executive Office of the Association,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: dis-
tributed without charge of 4,669 regis-
tered architects, builders, contractors,
designers, engineers and members of
allied fields throughout the state of
Florida-and to leading financial insti-
tutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publica-
tions, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents;
subscription, $5.00 per year. February
Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray
Printers.


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DEPARTMENTS

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE Inside Front Cover

PERSPECTIVE . . 6

TO THE EDITOR . . 7

PHILOSOPHY . . . 8
By Frank McLane, Jr.


FEATURES

FAAIA CONVENTION PREVIEW 12

SCAN
An Up To Date System To Assist Bidding Processes 14

FEATURE
Plymouth Harbor Coon Key, Sarasota.
Frank Folsom Smith A.I.A. Architect .... 1 6


ADVERTISERS' INDEX ........ 22


FRONT COVER: The 53rd annual F.A.A.I.A. convention to be
held in Hollywod on October 5-8 will bring Architect-Scholar
Louis I. Kahn of Philadelphia to the speakers chair. Shown on the
cover of this month's Florida Architect is a photo of an early
model of Kahn's contribution to Interama which will be his first
work in the state of Florida. See page 12 for more convention
information.


VOLUME 17 N NUMBER 7 i JULY 1967


JULY, 1967








RSPECTIVE csI AWARD
TO IVAN SMITH


ida student chapter of the American
Institute of Architects) and the top
award winner in his graduating class.
Amanzio was presented the Florida As-
sociation of Architects' bronze medal as
the student "who has made the most
meritorious contribution in leadership and
service among his fellows."
( Also given distinguished honors during
the annual awards ceremony of the Uni-
versity's College of Architecture and Fine
Arts were two outstanding students who
graduated last August.
George Shepherd, a Hungarian refu-
gee from Venezuela, received the A.I.A.
silver school medal for outstanding schol-
arly standing and character.
Richard Stipe, Falls Church, Va., now
on a teaching exchange at Manchester
University in England, was recipient of
the bronze medal of Alpha Rho Chi, na-
tional social fraternity of architecture,
for leadership, service and promise of
professional merit.
Other awards and winners were:
Reynolds, Smith and Hills, scholar-
ships; Jonathan Richard Toppe, Daytona
Beach, and John Granville Sims III,
Gainesville.
Solite Company, Jacksonville, awards:
GAINESVILLE Joseph Amanzio of structural design--John F. Youland,
Miami Beach stands tall enough to be a Pensacola; Stephen K. Swaney, Falls
basketball player, (6 feet 4/2) has the Church, Va.; construction -Jonathan
beard to match the artist and the drive R. Toppe, Daytona Beach; Johnnie O.
and personality to be a leader. Crosby, .Jr., Orlando, architectural delin-
While he doesn't play basketball, he eation--Octavio Figueroa, San Juan,
is both an artist (architect) and a leader Puerto Rico, and Robert A. Raachman,
(past president of the University of Flor- Coral Gables.

MARSHAL McLUHAN DELIVERS
PURVES MEMORIAL LECTURE


Dr. Marshal McLuhan, philosopher and
social historian, said, speaking at the Na-
tional A.I.A. Convention, that electronic
communication is forcing the Western
world to separate itself from a "2500
year devotion to visual space" and redis-
cover "the characteristics of the spaces
generated by the other senses."
Doctor McLuhan said the character-
istic form of an electronic culture is
"auditory space" which "has no center
and no margins since we hear from all
directions simultaneously."
The author of many books, including
the well-known "Understanding Media,"
Doctor McLuhan is director of the Center
for Culture and Technology at the Uni-
versity of Toronto, Canada. He delivered
the third annual Purves Memorial Lecture
at the A.I.A. convention which was at-
tended by about 4,000 architects and
guests.
Doctor McLuhan said that, in contrast
to the recent past when visual or written
transmission of information created a
"devotion" to visual space, the instant
movement of information that takes place
by electronic means "creates a configura-
tion of space-time in which no point of
view is possible, and no single plane per-
ceptible. All at onceness abolishes uni-
formity and continuity, and it also de-
mands that the environment will be
considered as an art form."


Noting that "any environment has the
property of being mainly invisible," he
said people should become more aware
of the environments they create. "Per-
ceptually, any environment whatever is
a teaching machine in so far as it adjusts
our sensory levels until they are accom-
modated to that environment," he said.
Doctor McLuhan warned that the
"electronic age, if given its own unheed-
ed leeway, will drift quite naturally into
'Oriental' modes of cosmic humanism and
total involvement of everybody in every-
body and of all spaces and all cultures
converged into a kind of mosaic without
walls."
Doctor McLuhan said that "in the
older, fragmented and mechanized world
of specialisms", most people tended to
use only a part of their facilities at any
one time, and this was called work. But
when people use all their faculties, they
"are recognized to be playing, and are at
leisure."
"The electronic information environ-
ment tends to create this new configura-
tion of leisure via total involvement," he
declared. "Looked at in the rear-view
mirror, this leisure takes on the illusory
form of unemployment and joblessness
and vacancy. In point of fact, leisure is
a space-time dimension which must be
shaped and created by the individual user.


Ivan H. Smith, AIA, Jacksonville ar-
chitect and president of Reynolds, Smith
& Hills, was honored at the annual La-
dies Night meeting of the Jacksonville
Chapter, The Construction Specifications
Institute "for significant service rendered
to the construction industry" since 1935.
A framed certificate of appreciation and
citation was presented by chapter presi-
dent Fred W. Bucky, Jr., A.I.A.
During this period, Smith has been
president of both the Jacksonville and
Florida North Chapters of A.I.A., Direc-
tor of the Florida Association of Archi-
tects, secretary of the Jacksonville
Building Code Advisory Board, a trustee
of the Electrical Joint Apprenticeship
Trust Fund, chairman of the Florida
Building Code & Hurricane Studies Com-
mission, member of the National Com-
mittee on Building Codes and member of
the Duval County Local Government
Study Commission.


AWARD
Dr. Bernard E. Donovan, Superintend-
ent of the New York Board of Education,
announced in New York City that the
Miami firm of Pancoast, Ferendino, and
Grafton was awarded second prize in the
$2,000,000.00 National Architectural
Design competition for the conversion of
Joseph H. Wade Junior High School,
Bronx, New York, to house an innovative
educational concept.
Entries were submitted by 68 architec-
tural firms from all over the United
States, with one entry from England.
First prize of $5,000.00 went to Fred-
erick Frost, Jr., architect of New York
City.
Two third prizes of $1,000.00 went to
George Cavaglievi, New York City archi-
tect, and Richard Kaplan, New York City.
Paul Sun of Cambridge, Mass., receiv-
ed an honorable mention.
This competition presented an oppor-
tunity for architects to join with educa-
tors in developing creative solutions to
the problem of the out-moded school
plant.
The New York competition was the
third in a series of national events in the
great cities of the United States to help
give "new life to old schools." The funds
to sponsor the competition were made
available from the Research Council of
the Great Cities Program for School Im-
provement, 5400 North St. Louis Avenue,
Chicago, Illinois, under a grant from the
Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc.
The competition was designed to intro-
duce into a schoolhouse built for a tradi-
tional pattern of education the space and
flexibility required to accommodate new
concepts of the learning process which
have been developed for the intermediate
school by the superintendent, his deputies
and staff. The program emphasized indi-
vidual study as well as group learning,
flexible scheduling, cooperative teaching,
and improved human relations.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







TO THE EDITOR

Editor:
I would like to commend you and your
staff on the excellent job you are doing
in publishing this magazine. Not only has
the design work presented been of out-
standing quality, but the presentation and
layout of such work has been equally
stimulating.
The philosophical content and state-
ment of personal ideals is of a high in-
tellectual caliber and merits the attention
of every architect in our state who truly
strives to make a reality of his own per-
sonal ideals.
Robert McDonald, architect
Fort Lauderdale


The jury for the annual N.I.A.E. com-
petition sponsored by Pittsburgh Plate
Glass Industries met last month on Miami
Beach to peruse the more than ninety
entries from eleven schools and thirteen
states.
This year's competition was the design
of a 300 bed nursing home to be located
ten minutes away from a General Hospi-
tal. The program was written by architect
Caleb Hornbostel, Director of Education
for the National Institute for Architec-
tural Education.
The University of Miami was one of
the schools of architecture participating
in the program and Robert Craig Wade,
a student in the Miami curriculum was
among the recipients of twelve merit
awards.
First prize went to Thomas E. Fanning
of Honolulu, Hawaii; second prize to Gary
F. Rogowski, a student of California State
Polytechnic College. A drawing from the
third prize-winning entry of Robert H.
Morlin of the University of Notre Dame
is shown at the right.
Members of the jury were: Caleb
Hornbostel, A.I.A., Director of Education,
NIAE; Sidney L. Katz, F.A.I.A., Chair-
man of the Board of Trustees, NIAE. Dr.
Francis J. O'Neill, M.D., Director, State
of New York Department of Mental Hy-
giene, Central Islip State Hospital, N. Y.
Miss Henrietta Harney, Senior Architect,
Hospitals Bureau of Building Construc-
tion, Department of Public Works, N. Y.
C. Andrew J. Ferendino, F.A.I.A., Miami,
Committee on School and College Archi-
tecture, A.I.A. Clinton Gamble, F.A.I.A.,
Fort Lauderdale. Paul Robin John, A.I.A.,
President, Broward Chapter, F.A.I.A.,
Pompano Beach. Verner Johnson, A.I.A.,
Miami. Fotis N. Karousatos, Executive
Director, Florida Association of Archit-
tects. Robert M. Little, F.A.I.A., Miami.
George F. Reed, A.I.A., President, Flor-
ida South Chapter, A.I.A. T. Trip Rus-
sell, A.I.A., Committee on Scholarships,
A.I.A. Gordon M. Severud, A.I.A., Miami.
Paul Buisson, Assistant Professor, Uni-
versity of Miami. Russell T. Pancoast,
F.A.I.A., Miami.
JULY, 1967


Editor's note:
Response to Architect William Parrish
Plumb's "Archipuzzle" in the May issue
of F/A was quite enthusiastic. Several
persons correctly analyzed the anacrostic
as follows: "If an architect finds within
himself an idea for a different expression
in which be believes profoundly, the re-
sult cannot help but be original."
The speedy response left us no alter-
native but to award two first prizes on
the basis of a tie. David Boyer, A.I.A., of
Boyer, Boyer and Legate, Jacksonville,
had his answer end in a dead heat at the
F.A.A.I.A. door with that of Hugh Leitch,
A.I.A., of Pensacola.
Thanks to all who tried, and especially
to Bill Plumb.

Editor's note:
Apologies to Bruce Blackman, Archi-
tect, of Winter Park, whose name was
inadvertently omitted from the critique
which he so abily authored for our June
issue.







II PHIbOSOPHU
By FRANK McLANE, JR., AIA

Believing that much of Today's Design fails to satisfy basic human emotional needs,
I want my design to reveal a warmth and masculine character.
I believe in what might be called the Design Integrity Creed that meaningful design
today, as in any time, is simply Man building the best he knows how in an honest
manner and honest expression in order to shelter the particular needs of his own time
with materials, methods and best knowledge of his own time within attainable budgets
( and of course, since the industrial revolution this specifically does not mean the aping
of previous 'styles'). However, I feel we should profit from the experiences of the past
both practically and emotionally. And we must not be willing to abandon our heritage
over into the hands of the New Eclectics who are glib in Mansard Mannerism, Behamian
Baroque and Colonial Columnism.
When I say I want my design to reveal a warm and masculine character, it is be-
cause I and my clients and the citizenry of our time are entitled to the satisfaction they
instinctively associate with good work of the past. I feel mankind today has subconscious
needs for a Sense of Roots even though he lives in this strange society of ours which is
perhaps itself best symbolized by A Wheel. I feel Man has emotional need for a
stronger masculine leadership in the home and in the barbershops and in architecture.
S N : F y w R Man needs a sense of heritage in at least one important thing. He is in subconcious
EDITOR'S NOTE: Formerly with McLane, Ranon,
Mcintosh and Bernardo, Architects for the rebellion against the impermanent character found in what has been called our Use-em-
project shown at the left, Mr. McLane now up-throw-em-away-Kleenex Society. It is Man for whom we are creating these buildings
Arch i Tampa as Frank MLane Jr and this environment and I acknowledge he is important and that his hidden responses
should be important to the designer. I think believing this makes it a responsibility of
mine to act upon it.
I intend to try even more to avoid the scornful sterility and coldness of much of what
is considered merely fine modern design. I believe good design can be warm and human.
As an architect I must attempt to resist the fad of moment and seek something more
basic. I feel it necessary to seek design solutions oriented to human emotional needs
instead of being swept along through the good and bad fads of our own time which
history may well label Sterility Phase I I's overlapping of Grotesque Period I.
The only way an architect is going to get down to such basics is to begin thinking
about them and to avoid being trapped into always designing with an eye cocked towards
such extreme uniqueness that will attract magazines which thrive upon extreme unique-
ness. If we Design Integrity Creed architects don't begin considering people, we may
win some battles in the great Architectural Revolution but lose sight that the New
Eclectics may be winning the war.
Already today officials high in political circles are showing signs of becoming
Champions of Eclecticism. One muddled advisor holding the ear of the right public
official can mischievously influence the quality of architecture unbelievably in spite of
the fact that such thinking is counter to the thinking of an overwhelming majority of
architects. Who is to blame? A politician who responds to his own inclinations and to
what he feels is the feeling of the people? Can he be blamed? Can he be educated?
Indeed, it is really possible to educate the people?
Instead, perhaps we'd best ask a question of ourselves. Is something wrong with what
we're doing? I think there is. But for another to answer this, it is necessary figuratively
to get out of his own architectural skin and to try to sense below the surface what
motivates today's man and woman to turn to the 'traditional forms' which, the New
Eclectics are so quick again to employ. What basic lessons were evolved into the best
of these forms? Can we, within the limitations of the Design Integrity Creed, apply
these lessons? I think I can and must.
I acknowledge the pitfalls of oversimplifications and semantics and of labels, but
hold such are necessary to put thoughts and words upon the table as a basic ingredient
upon which to begin argument. In doing so, some of the things we might discover
missing in 'successful architecture today' include some old traditional words as Scale,
Proportion, Balance, Rhythm, Dominance and Subordination, etc. To these I believe I
must add less traditional ones such as Dignity, Rightness of Form, Importance of the
Human Individual.
I am fond of our 'way-out magazine design leaders' but they best go their own route
indeed, they have no choice. But, as a grass-roots architect, I for one, strive not to
abandon our heritage to the New Eclectics. I seek basics with which Man can identify.













MANHATTAN AVENUE METHODIST CHURCH, TAMPA. PHOTO BY SIGURD FISCHER
JULY, 1967 9









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10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















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These are good reasons why reverse-cycle electric air conditioning is
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Many models, sizes and styles available to meet every demand of
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JULY, 1967 11






53RD Annubh F. A. A. I. A. conUEnTionA

KAHN, OSMOND,
Ai, I S A GOLDMAN TO SPEAK
ENTRY 1 13 IN HOLLYWOOD
A SCREEN
1 \ A BREUEFF ENTS A On the 5 8 of October, the Broward
A A Chapter will be host to the 53rd annual
Al E2, 23 convention of the Florida Association of

S REF.RESHMENTS the American Institute of Architects. The
BUFFET S.TAGE REFRESHMENTS 1 convention is to be held at the oceanfront
Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood.
41 This convention holds promise as the
A REFRESHMENS A Mmost significant gathering of its kind in
BUFFET Ai many years.
IVE lA The convention theme--PHILOSO-
S s 6o n2 6 4 6 A 6n t PHY, DESIGN, LIFE--has been con-
ssoa 1tceived to explore the very basis of the
ALLBOOTHS-8.0 existence, function, and result of archi-
BOOTH RENTAL 500 LADE tecture. At a time when our culture is
flooded with anti-reason, anti-man, and
MN anti-life, it will be the intention of this
gathering to explore the area of existence
forgotten in this headlong rush, the rea-
son and order which should guide our
actions.
To present this thought and to expand
it into a meaningful thesis, the F.A.A.I.A.
has acquired the services of three men of
outstanding insight and accomplishment
Louis I. Kahn, Architect, teacher and
philosopher, one of the truly great minds
of our time; Dr. Albert Goldman, Assist-
ant Professor of Literature at Columbia
University and host of a New York Edu-
cational Television weekly cultural review
and Dr. Humphrey Osmond, Director of
the New Jersey Neuro-Psychiatric Insti-
tute, and internationally recognized con-
sultant to architectural firms on the
psychiatric implications of architectural
space.
This series of lectures will no doubt be
an event that no one concerned with
architecture can afford to miss.
To act as counterpoint to the sobriety
of the seminars, the Broward Chapter has
plans to make the entire four days of the
convention a continuously entertaining
event. To take better advantage of the
displays that will be set up by the many
manufacturers who attend our convention,
the exhibit hall will be used as the main
center for entertainment during the entire
four days. As can be seen on the exhibit
hall layout, we intend to limit the number
the number of exhibit booths to give
additional space in the room for social
events and better advantage to the
usually cramped booths.
Another asset gained this year will be
that the seminars will not be held in a
section of the exhibit hall, but rather in
an adjoining theater especially established
for meetings of this type.
As details are worked out, more in-
formation will become available and will
be disseminated, but make a note on your
calendar right now October 5 8 .
Hollywood Diplomat F.A.A.I.A.
Convention. It is planned to be a worth-
while gathering.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























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GOLDMAN


KAHN


JULY, 1967








SCAN
A MODERN SYSTEM ASSISTING PRESENT BIDDING PROCEDURES


SCAN Projection T a b I e One of
4,000 in use by manufacturers, their
representatives and subcontractors who
no longer need to leave their offices to
complete most of their take-offs for
bidding.




(The architects who attended the re-
cent AIA Convention received the op-
portunity to become familiar with the
system of SCAN by means of F. W.
Dodge/Photronix's product ex h i b i t.
SCAN has now come to Florida, the 29th
state to have this system introduced.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT brings to its
readers this article, which provides the
basic details of what is SCAN, how the
system operates and what it can and has
done for the construction industry.-
Editor)


Over 8,000 architects in 28 other states and virtually all
federal and state releasing agencies, are already releasing bid-
ding documents through a new distribution medium called
"SCAN", with apparent benefits to all engaged in the building
industry. Prices tend to be reduced and the frustrations of
some bidders in getting plans at the right time and place are
greatly diminished.
There is no cost to architects or owners, but representa-
tives of SCAN must either see some 400 to 500 architectural
firms in Florida, or receive responses from this article, to be
sure of their understanding and participation prior to establish-
ing an early opening date in Florida.
The company directing the phenomenal growth of SCAN
the last two years and a half is called F. W. Dodge/Photronix.
As implied by that name, the company is closely associated
with the Dodge Company of Dodge Reports, Sweets Catalog,
etc., but there is a separate and coordinating management. The
first filming center will be placed in Miami, possibly in the
growing architecture and building products center at Douglas
Village within the next 30-60 days.
WHAT SCAN DOES
SCAN gives sub-contractors and material suppliers a capa-
bility to do their take-offs right from their own offices instead
of going to any plans rooms or other sources. A patented SCAN
Projection Table that looks just like a drawing board table,
projects 35 mm. microfilm back to a full size (30"x42") and
in reliable scale. No other equipment has even been introduced
that can accomplish this to scale. With the boss or specialists
available, accuracy is improved and pricing tends to be
lowered.
General contractors are not involved other than to receive
bids more quickly with less bother. The architect selects those
generals he desires, as usual, and continues to work with them
with paper plans. SCAN is simply a communications medium to
help speed up and reduce bids. SCAN does not interpret, does
not do quantity take-offs, or anything to alter present bidding
policies and responsibilities.
The usefulness and contributions of SCAN are reported in
a study backed by the American Institute of Architects. The
looking-ahead viewpoints of this sponsored university research
project, Emerging Techniques of Architectural Practices, are
being discussed in architectural groups over the country.
Professor C. Herbert Wheeler, AIA, at Penn State University is
Director of this AIA grant.
14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








































Each architect or releasing agency receives a free micro-
film of the project. It is complete with all specifications.
When SCAN was seeking architectural advice for the creation
of this modern service, they were advised to guard against any
subscriber having only "his portion" of the bidding documents.
Consequently, all subscribers get the same complete film sent
the architect.
Major manufacturers are the largest group of subscribers
for any one area. The larger subcontractors can extend their
activities without a commensurate increase in cost to do their
bidding. SCAN's monthly filming list contains approximately
2,500 architectural projects. About 4,000 firms now have a
SCAN Projection Table in their own offices. In one major city,
300 or more of these private "plan rooms" have been installed.
Many of the users spend less money than with former methods
of sending around the town or country for plans. In addition
they bid jobs-they would have missed. If they are low bidder,
they have been awarded a job they would have lost, and the
owner has obviously received a lower bid than he would if
SCAN had not existed.
On public projects Dodge/Photronix believes that the ex-
tension of bidding alone within the SCAN system is in the
public interest. The General Services Administration, and most
other federal agencies, have recognized this fact by formal
approval of the use of SCAN. State, county, and city govern-
ments have done the same. East Coast offices are in Boston,
New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Atlanta. The West
Coast has Los Angeles and San Francisco, with a current
opening in Seattle. The home office and branch is in St. Louis.

SCAN OPERATION SUMMARIZED
1. A SCAN bonded messenger picks up prints and specifica-
tions as soon as job is "out for bids."
2. The complete job is filmed on latest microfilm equipment,
quickly processed, copied, and sent to subscribers as deter-
mined by their earlier selective instructions, or from lists
sent them each week.
3. Plans are released for immediate return to the architect, A
free film is sent the architect or releasing agency in a day
or two.
4. All addenda are filmed upon receipt from the architect and
sent out same day or night.
5. Take-offs are made on SCAN Projection Table in sub-
scriber's own office, day or night, and bids sent to proper
General Contractor or any other place specified.

JULY, 1967


WHAT SCAN WOULD LIKE TO DO FOR YOU
SCAN must be able to tell prospective subscribers (sub-
contractors and suppliers) that Florida will be like all other
states to date that the bulk of public and private jobs of
$100,000 evaluation and over will be available through SCAN.
Single family dwellings are not included. They must know this
before final plans are completed to open the filming center.
Although efforts will be made to see architects at AIA
Chapter meetings and in their offices, the Florida expansion
will be greatly accelerated if architectural firms reply with the
following coupon or telephone the local F. W. Dodge
office and leave word you want to be included in the SCAN
service. There is no contract for the architect to sign, only
your desire to participate. Representatives of SCAN will write
you details on how and when the system will actually start, and
answer any further questions you may have.
(Clip Out Coupon)
.,,,,,,,,,S.....................ummUmmW..................
SCAN
F. W. Dodge/Photronix
2100 NW 7 Street
Miami, Florida 33125

We are ready to participate with SCAN, on a revocable basis,
when you start in Florida. If you find your daily operations will
include the desirability to film plans already in a Dodge Plans
Room without borrowing a second set, that will be satisfactory.
We understand you will write us the details of how to get
started.
We understand there is no cost to us or owners.


FIRM NAME


ADDRESS


CITY


STATE


ZIP CODE


PHONE


(Signature)









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1-44

fir LFV l lll wI. M P W


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14".

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FEATURE I


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







PLYMOUTH HARBOR
COON KEY,
SARASOTA, FLORIDA

ARCHITECTS:
Frank Folsom Smith, AIA, Architect,
1301 Main Street, Sarasota, Florida.
Louis F. Schneider, A.I.A.,
Associate Architect.
William J. McGraw,
Structural Engineer.
Emil L. Tiona, Mechanical Engineer.
Smalley, Wellford & Nalven,
Civil Engineers.
Terry L. Rowe,
Interior Design Consultant.
CONTRACTOR:
Robert Chuckrow Construction
Company.

PROGRAM:
Plymouth Harbor's 16 acre site on
Coon Key is one of the most beautiful lo-
cations in America. It is wooded with
Casuarinas, Sabal Palms and other native
Florida foliage. The southeast point bor-
ders a deep water channel with unob-
structed passage to the Gulf of Mexico.
A few floors above the ground a magnifi-
cent panorama of Sarasota Bay, the Gulf
of Mexico, and tropical keys emerges.
After a flight over the site, the archi-
tects determined that a tower form could
best command this view and preserve the
beauty of the site. Many of the trees
could be saved and a park-like atmos-
phere developed throughout the property.
A single high-rise structure would be less
massive than the more conventional
medium height blocks and thus comprise
a building that would be a better neigh-
bor to the fine residential areas on
nearby St. Armand's and Bird Keys.
Feasibility studies indicated that to
properly utilize the site and to provide
maximum facilities and service for resi-
dents, about 350 apartments were need-
ed. Realizing that smaller, congenial
groupings were necessary for the social
atmosphere desirable, the architects de-
velopd a "colony" system unique with
Plymouth Harbor. The premise is that the
abolition of corridors would eliminate the
impersonal character usually associated
with apartment buildings. These apart-
ments are entered from interior galleries
grouped around attractively furnished
lounges three floors high, and provide
their own neighborhood atmosphere not
unlike the courtyard apartments of the
Mediterranean countries. In addition to
the interior "courtyard" lounge, each col-
ony has another gathering space with a
kitchenette and generous balcony over-
looking the Gulf. The community subdi-
vision principle has been in use in many
retirement projects, but Plymouth Harbor
is the first high rise apartment to break
vertical barriers and encompass several
floors. It is felt that the arrangements of
apartments will overcome the beehive
feeling sometimes experienced when
one's apartment is accessible only through
a series of horizontal and vertical pas-
sageways. Throughout the project, the
"care concept" was utmost in the minds
of the sponsors and architects.
JULY, 1967








JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


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10247 Colonial Court North

Jacksonville, Florida 32211 Telephone: (904) 724-7958


THE
BEN
MEADOWS
COMPANY
553 AMSTERDAM AVE., N.E.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30306


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


IF YOU'RE MOVING,
please send us your old
and new address. Don't
miss a single issue of
THE FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT! Just drop a note
or card with your correct
mailing address to The
Florida Association of
the American Institute
of Architects, 1000
Ponce de Leon Boule-
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Vigilar
1. Product description. Vigilar is
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2. Uses. Weldwood Vigilar doors are
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Availability and technical service


Interior Doors
Permacolor
1. Product description. Permacolor
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Permagard*
1. Product description. Permagard
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JULY, 1967 21









































ADVERTISERS' IRDEX

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Inside Back Cover


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OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA . .

SOLITE CORPORATION .. .

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THE FLORIDA


p. 2


p. 10-11


p. 16

p. 22

p. 1

p. 4


p. 19-20

p. 18
ARCHITECT


p. 21

p. 3





- -


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1LI*)l ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ .. 4ri~.I~~* L~~~ImC


Ornamental

Barandas

These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay we
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They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
Those from Panama
But they have the same
sort of slight color
varilalOns ard occasional
Skin marking; that
Make for a really
. beautiful texture in
the fniished wall


VISIT OUR EXHIBIT
AT THE GALERIE
OF BUILDING PRODUCTS,
DOUGLAS VILLAGE, MIAMI


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