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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 President's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Hotel and restaurant commissio...
 Proposed legislative building
 Seminar this week
 Levison and the Kemper award
 Notes of interest
 Primitive architecture and the...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00153
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: March 1967
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00153
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    President's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Hotel and restaurant commission
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Proposed legislative building
        Page 6
    Seminar this week
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Levison and the Kemper award
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Notes of interest
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Primitive architecture and the Florida vernacular
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
































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THE FUTURE' IS TODAY! .


HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR., AIA


THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


Disney Productions has an-
nounced intentions to build an
Experimental Prototype City of
Tomorrow as part of its devel-
opment near Orlando.
Florida will thereby be host to
this most advanced study in
urban development of our times.
The eyes of world planners and
others involved in the study of
human development will be
upon this experiment. Evalua-
tions of the effects of this hercu-
lean experiment may well write
the handbook on design of our
future cities.
However, we hasten to point
out that controlled physical en-
vironment, the EPCOT goal, is
only a part of the total climate
needed for a successful living at-
mosphere. As our population be-
comes more urbanized and con-
centrated, more controls or laws
are needed, more publicly sup-
ported services are required. We
live more by regulation, and the
quality and wisdom of these reg-
ulations and laws becomes in-
creasingly more important. As
our laws and the need for them
become more complex, so the
cost of government rises. The
efficiency of our tax dollar re-
quires ever closer scrutiny.
By strange paradox, at the
same time Disney was announc-
ing this great experiment in the
city of tomorrow, Florida was,
through a combination of cir-
cumstances, being given an op-
portunity to reorganize its opera-
tion into a model government.
Witness the conditions extant:
A new governor, admitted-
ly unconventional and
without political back-
ground, calling for a ren-
aissance of the free enter-
prise system by stating
"government never built
anything but empires; free
enterprise builds govern-
ment."
A court decision requiring
absolute "one man one
vote" elections.
A new legislature which
will, for the first time in
history, be elected by the
urban population.
A completely new consti-
tution pending action by


the legislature and the
electorate.
In other words -
No longer can representa-
tives of the urban majority
population blame the
stranglehold of the minor-
ity block "pork choppers"
for their lawmaking.
No longer should the gov-
ernor have to be beholden
to vested interests for his
political life.
No longer can the elec-
torate majority blame mal-
apportionment for its lack-
adaisical attitude at the
polls.
The people of Florida now
have the fate of their state at their
fingertips-in the polling booth.
They have the privilege of grind-
ing out the course of destiny.
We now have all the ingredi-
ents to produce a state govern-
ment that would be the envy of
our nation a true prototype
state of tomorrow, ready to cope
with all the confusions which
can be expected to grow out of
the population shifts and explo-
sions created by a dynamic new
world.
Are we going to get to work
and plan it properly? Or sit idly
by and just let it happen?
For starters, why not create a
statewide planning agency with
broad responsibilities to look into
every phase of our physical en-
vironment. To coordinate the
growth of our communities. To
advise the Road Department on
future growth areas and road
needs. To establish building
standards. In general to improve
the appearance of our state and
make tax dollars more efficient.
To head this operation, we
will suggest that the legislature,
in the new constitution, create
a cabinet level post to be known
as the Secretary of Urban Af-
fairs. lThe legislature should also
require this office be held bv bne
who by nature, education and ex-
perience is schooled in the plan-
ning of human environment.
This would only be a begin-
ning, but it would be a giant
stride in the direction of creating
an orderly planned state, in
which we can all enjoy living.




















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OFFICERS

Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth, Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Designate/Vice President
3250 S. W. 3rd Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary
P. O. Box 609, Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Broward County Charles R. Kerley Robert E. Todd
Daytona Beach David A. Leete / Tom Jannetides
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / Ted Fasnacht
James J. Jennewein
Florida Gulf Coast e Frank Folsom Smith / Jack West
Florida North F. Blair Reeves / William C. Grobe
Florida North Central ForreS R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., / Thomas H. Daniels
Florida South Robert J. Boerema / James E. Ferguson, Jr.
Francis E. Telesca
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
John Pierce Stevens
Mid-Florida Wythe D. Sims, II / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / John B. Marion
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Ad., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Donald Singer / Milton C. Harry / Lowell L. Lotspeich

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
Black-Baker-Burton / Photography Consultants
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Florida 33134.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distributed with-
out charge to 4,669 registered architects, builders, contractors, de-
signers, engineers and members of allied fields throughout the state
of Florida-and to leading financial institutions, national acrhitec-
tural firms and journals.,
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. Controlled circulation postage
paid at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. February Roster Issue, $2.00 McMurray Printers.
MARCH, 1967


PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Inside Front Cover


HOTEL and RESTAURANT COMMISSION

4


PROPOSED LEGISLATIVE BUILDING

6


SEMINAR THIS, WEEK

7


LEVISON and the KEMPER AWARD

9


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

9


NOTES of INTEREST

12


PRIMITIVE ARCHITECTURE and the
FLORIDA VERNACULAR
A Photographic Essay

14-18
and Back Cover





FRONT COVER Introduction to a photographic essay
of the evolution and form of the Early Florida House, which
begins on page 14. Top photo is a one-cell with fireplace,
3 sides, porch Log House 1830. Also on front cover is
the plan of this house.


VOLUME 17 NUMBER 3 1967






FLORIDA HOTEL AND RESTAURANT COMMISSION
Tallahassee

BOARD OF SUPERVISING ARCHITECTS

Effective March 1, 1967


District No. 1
William R. Bean
513 East Fairfield Drive
Pensacola Ph. 483-5634
District No. 2
Joseph N. Clemons
Vice-Chairman, Board of
Supervising Architects
P. O. Box 1356, Tallahassee
Ph. 224-5810
District No. 2-A
James Graham Chapman
P. O. Box 1056, Panama City
Ph. 234-2771
District No. 3
Herbert Coons, Jr.
Chairman, Board of
Supervising Architects
850 May Street, Jacksonville
Ph. 356-0284
District No. 4
Edwin M. Snead
414 North Halifax Avenue
Daytona Beach
Ph. 252-4848
District No. 5
Donald R. Hampton
1420 Gene Street
Winter Park, Ph. 644-2606
District No. 6
Kenardon M. Spina
249 Peruvian Avenue
Palm Beach Ph. 832-3832
District No. 7
C. Cranford Sproul
3 S. E. 22nd Avenue
Pompano Beach Ph. 941-1179
District No. 8
Robert M. Shrum
1001 N. E. 125th Street
North Miami Ph. 751-5524
District No. 8-A
Jerry P. Simmons
1777 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami Ph. 379-2104
District No. 9
Alfred T. Drake
4930 Park Boulevard
Pinellas Park Ph. 544-7535
District No. 10
A. Reese Harvey
10301 North Dale Mabry
Tampa Ph. 935-5249
District No. 11
Walter L. Keller
5 Beach Patio Naples
Ph. 642-5527
District No. 12
Richard G. Stebbins
133 South Second Street
Ft: Pierce Ph. 464-3122


Counties
Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa



Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin, Leon, Wakulla,
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton,
Suwannee, Lafayette, Dixie



Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton,
Washington, Holmes


Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Clay, Columbia,
Duval, Flagler, Gilchrist, Levy, Marion,
Nassau, Putnam, St. Johns, Union



Volusia, Seminole




Lake, Orange, Sumter, Osceola, Polk, Hardee,
DeSoto, Highlands


Palm Beach, Okeechobee



Broward



That portion of Dade County lying north of
N. W. 36th Street from the east boundary to
the west boundary line of Dade County

That portion of Dade County lying south of
N. W. 36th Street from the east to the west
boundary lines and all of Monroe County

Pinellas



Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, Pasco,
Hernando, Citrus


Collier, Charlotte, Glades, Hendry, Lee



Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucit, Martin


constructive ideas

begin
with

GAS

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
YOUR NATURAL GAS UTILITY
Apopka, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Bartow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Blountstown, City of Blountstown
Boca Raton, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Boynton Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahoochee, Town of Chattahoochee
Chipley, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
Cocoa Beach, City Gas Co.
Coral Gables, City Gas Co.
Crescent City, City of Crescent City
Cutler Ridge, City Gas Co.
Daytona Beach, Florida Gas Co.
DeLand, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delray Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Eau Gallie, City Gas Co.
Eustis, Florida Gas Co.
Fort Lauderdale, Peoples Gas System
Fort Meade, City of Fort Meade
Fort Pierce, City of Fort Pierce
Gainesville, Gainesville Gas Co.
Geneva, Alabama, Geneva County Gas
District
Haines City, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Hialeah, City Gas Co.
Hollywood, Peoples Gas System
Jacksonville, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake Alfred, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake City, City of Lake City
Lakeland, Florida Gas Co.
Lake Wales, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Leesburg, City of Leesburg
Live Oak, City of Live Oak
Madison, City of Madison
Marianna, City of Marianna
Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
Mount Dora, Florida Gas Co.
New Smyrna Beach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
North Miami, Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Opa Locka, City Gas Co.
Orlando, Florida Gas Co.
Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach,-Florida Public Utilities Co.
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
Palm Beach Gardens
Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Pensacola, City of Pensacola
Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
Port St Joe, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
Rockledge, City Gas Co.
St. Petersburg, United Gas Co.
Sanford, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Sarasota, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Starke, City of Starke
Tallahassee, City of Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Tavares, Florida Gas Co.
Titusville, City Gas Co.
Umatilla, Florida Gas Co.
Valparaiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park, Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











instructive i eas



be hpin


,with
u,~A


-_-~~
~~t I I I
7rV


Florida Times-Union


:.'

S ~
.--


ever major construc-
tion is o, on in Fonrda
.. you'll find GAS.
Take Jacksonville. From a
modern addition to a major,
national retail chain .
to a complex of uniquely-
designed garden apart-
ments from soon-to-
be Florida's t office
building to one of the
largest newspapers in the
state GAS is and* i i be
serving them in versatile
ways. Heating and air con-
ditioning. Water heating
and clothes drying. Cook-
ng. Even the lead melting
pots in the newspaper's
composing rooms. Clean,
dependable NATURAL
GAS does the BIG JOBS
BEST ( ones, too), It's
more economical.
Have a constructive iden?
Begin with GAS!


Driftwood Apartments


WINTER PARK / FLORIDA )


Florida's Pipeline to the Future ...
serving 35 Natural Gas Distribution
Companies in over 100 communities
throughout the state.


MARCH, 1967


Montgomery-Ward


E~r~~'77








PROPOSED LEGISLATIVE BUILDING


The proposed Legislative Building
has created considerable controversy
in recent months among legislators,
professionals and other groups. The
building is planned to be built on the
...... north side of the Capitol in Tallahas-
Ssee. Since a full-size photo of the pro-
posed Legislative Building has not
FF e'l 1 yet been made available, "The Florida
Ir III F, Architect" is printing this photo of
the model for your information.
Comments from all of our readers will
be appreciated.


CLEARWATER
DUVAL COUNTY
GAINESVILLE
JACKSONVILLE
LEON COUNTY
OCALA
ORLANDO
ST. PETERSBURG
SARASOTA
TALLAHASSEE
TAMPA


OIL
$ 3.48


GAS
$ 5.72
$ 4.79
$ 5.00
$ 5.28
$ 4.10
$ 4.83
$ 6.79
$ 6.60
$ 6.99
$ 3.77
$ 6.78


ELECTRICITY
$11.65
$ 9.60
$ 9.60
$ 9.09
$11.66
$ 9.00
$ 9.90
$ 9.90
$ 9.72
$10.69
$10.94


These figures were compiled by an independent engi- three major fuels: oil, gas and electricity.
neering research corporation. They represent the How much do you pay for hot water? Wherever you
average monthly cost of heating all the hot water live in Florida, oil-heated water costs less!
required by the average Florida family using the

OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA l0HlA
YOU CAN DEPEND ON IT

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


How much doescl


hot wter cst yo










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The FAAIA has coordinated the
DESIGN ACCOMPLISHMENT
SEMINAR as part of your "continu-
"' ing education program.'

The intent of this educational semi-
S nar is to indicate the effort and corre-
lation between "Design" and "Ac-
complishment." To achieve this.
intent, the seminar will utilize the
Gulf Life Center, a 27-story tall build-
ing on a 12-acre St. John's River-front
site across from downtown Jackson-
ville. The building is also the tallest,
pre-cast, post-tensioned concrete struc-
S ture in the nation.

Presentations by the panelists will
place emphasis on design and how
S various offices and people resolved
the production of the design. There
will be no staging as such. Panelists
will "sit with" participants all on the
-* same level in a juxtaposition. A high-
light of the two-day seminar is a com-
S plete tour of the Gulf Life Center on
Saturday (buses provided).

Jan C. Rowan, editor of PRO-
GRESSIVE ARCHITECTURE, will
be the seminar moderator.

S All participants are urged to be
present both days of the seminar and
to attend all sessions. The registration
fee of $17.00 includes two lunches
and the dinner. Table-top exhibits by
S Producer Council members and other
invited guests also will be featured.

Your place on March 10 and 11 is
in Jacksonville at the Thunderbird
Motor Hotel (5865 Arlington Express-
way). Room reservations should be
made directly with the hotel.
-
Registration forms to-FAAIA mem-
bers have been mailed.
MARCH, 1967


SEMINAR SCHEDULE

FRIDAY -MARCH 10, 1967
8:00 AM Registration / Coffee / Visit Exhibits
9:30 AM Prologue: Introductions
9:45 AM CLIENT: Approach, Method, Problems
Henry M. Schley, Vice President-Building,
Gulf Life Insurance Company
10:15 AM Audience Discusison / Jan C. Rowan, Moderator
10:45 AM Coffee Break / Visit Exhibits
11:15 AM ARCHITECT: The Design and Concept Story
George S. Hammond, Project Architect,
Welton Becket & Associates
12:15 PM Audience Discussion
12:45 PM Cocktails (Cash Bar) / Buffet Lunch / Visit Exhibits
2:00 PM ENGINEER: Structural- Mechanical Innovations
Richard Bradshaw & Associates
3:00 PM Audience Discussion
3:30 PM ARCHITECT: Production & Administration
George S. Hammond, Project Architect,
Welton Becket & Associates
4:30 PM Audience Discussion
5:00 PM Seminar Recesses .
6:00 PM Cocktails (Cash Bar) / Visit Exhibits
7:30 PM Dinner
8:30 PM Group Discussion with Panelists.

SATURDAY MARCH 11, 1967
8:00 AM Coffee / Visit Exhibits
9:30 AM CONTRACTOR: Problems & Difficulties
Wilbur Glass, Vice President, The Auchter Company
10:00 AM Audience Discussion / Jan C. Rowan, Moderator
10:30 AM TOUR OF GULF LIFE CENTER
(Buses will be provided)
12:45 PM Cocktails (Cash Bar) / Buffet Lunch / Visit Exhibits
2:15 PM SUMMATION:
Client / Architect / Engineer / Contractor
3:00 PM Audience Discussion
3:30 PM EPILOGUE: Moderator, Jan C. Rowan
4:00 PM Adjournment


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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






LEVISON TO RECEIVE KEMPER AWARD

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 24, 1967-Robert H. Levison
FAIA of Clearwater, Fla., has been named recipient of The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects' 1967 Edward C. Kemper Award for his
"significant contribution to the Institute and to the profession of
architecture."
The award, voted by the AIA Board of Directors, will be presented
at the national convention in New York City May 14-18. It is given
in memory of the late Edward C. Kemper, who was executive director
of the Institute from 1914 to 1948.
Levison will also participate in the Investiture of Fellows, a cere-
mony which takes place on the final evening of the annual conven-
tion. He will be formally received into the College of Fellows, a life-
time honor which accompanies bestowal of the Kemper Award.
Levison is a partner in the architectural firm of Wakeling, Levi-
son & Williams of Clearwater. Last July he completed a three-year
term on the AIA Board of Directors as director of the Institute's
Florida Region. He is serving this year as chairman of AIA's national
Committee on Chapter Affairs. He has been chairman of the Insti- -*
tute's national Commission on the Professional Society, and a mem-
ber of its Professional Practice and Resolutions Committees.
He is a former president of the Florida Association of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects and the Florida Central Chapter of AIA.
He is also a member and past president of the Architects League of
Clearwater.
Long active in public service in Florida, Levison has been on plan-
ning and zoning boards of Clearwater and Pinellas County. He has
served as chairman of the Clearwater Contractor's Examining Board,
the Board of Adjustment and Appeals on Zoning, and the Replanning
of the City Fire Zones. He is in his sixth year as chairman of the Pin-
ellas County Contractor's Examining Board, and he is also serving as
president of the Pinellas United Community Fund and as president of
the Clearwater Chamber of Commerce.


4LOUS/E POOR












LOUVER .oa


NARO-SMLEDCO



yer'rs of
service

Superior"
perf/or/ocue


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Cline Aluminum Products, Inc. *
9

Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover

Florida Gas Transmission Co.
4-5

Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
10-11

Georgia-Pacific Corporation
1-2

Oil Fuel Institute of Florida
6

Solite Corporation
13

Trinity White General Portland
Cement Co.
8

F. Graham Williams Co.
12


A DOORS


FL WA'OOOR
J.


//







/I1-.5 712Ed"POOR


aluminum doors
112- 32nd Avenue West, Bradenton, Florida


MARCH, 1967.


:ibr







In modernizing
or remodeling.




The

All-Electric

Concept

is

"in step

with the

future"


It will save money...
cut maintenance expenses...
gain usable space ...
reduce redecorating costs...
increase the resale value.


TOTAL-ELECTRIC offers the perfect solu- ,
tion to conversion or remodeling situations.
Commercial. Industrial. Institutional. Rec-
reational. Residential. The advantages of
using flameless electricity as a single
source of energy for air conditioning,
heating, lighting and water heating are
multifold.
ELECTRIC COOLING / HEATING.
Compact electric reverse-cycle air con-
ditioning systems are designed to meet
any remodeling requirement and to give
year-round temperature comfort. Flame-
less, clean, safe and quief in operation. No
combustion by-products. Eliminates the
need for boiler room or fuel storage facilities.
LA
ELECTRIC WATER HEATING.
Electric water heaters can be installed just
about anywhere and assure a never-ending
supply of hot water. No vents or flues are
required. Flexible placement avoids long *
pipe runs and the consequent waste of ,
heat due to water cooling in the pipes.
Operation is clean, safe, quiet and eco-
nomical. Automatic and maintenance-
free. Their lifetime is far longer than other
types of heaters.
ELECTRIC KITCHENS.
Modernization lets you take advantage of
the latest worksaving appliances and-
conveniences, for commercial or residen-
tial use. Electric cooking saves hours of
cleaning and scouring; saves on repaint-
ing costs; because flameless electric makes
no smoke or soot.
When involved in new construction or
modernization, be sure to look into the
benefits of flameless electric. Your elec-
tric utility company will be happy to work
with you.


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1E AWA I
II .


rFlorida's Electric Companies- Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


1









DAVIS ISLAND TOWERS, TAMPA, FLORIDA
IN, rr rr r "Four years ago, when we decided to remodel one of
-11.1 I- -ll i w Tampa's finest hotels and convert it into a distinctive
S r apartment building, we made two decisions. First, that
i t I e b- rthe new Davis Island Towers would truly be an exclusive
SubI p address, featuring the very finest conveniences for mod-
S 1 ti .I ern living. Secondly, we chose to go all-electric because
IF 1 !f g g electric living is the modern, convenient way of life."
-Mrs. C. E. Burnham
Manager, Davis Island Towers



--
GULF BEACH CONVALESCENT HOTEL
ST. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORIDA
"Changing over from a large fuel-fired water heater
.fr and storage tank to a 120-gallon flameless electric unit
has given us much-needed extra space which was for-
merly wasted. It also eliminated the dirt and heat prob-
lem-by-products of our old fuel-fired water heater. In
our 100% electric kitchen, the cooking equipment is
easier to keep clean and much safer to use. Yes, we are
SB sold on an all-electric operation."
-Milton Spector
Administrator, Gulf Beach Convalescent Hotel






PATTON OFFICE BUILDING
FORT WALTON BEACH, FLORIDA

pAtTY _turl kIB "I'm thoroughly satisfied with the conversion to the











=-A" s l THE TOTAL-ELECTRIC GOLD MEDALLION
S "Thyear-round electric an happiness of our c children always








K*' 1' I eliminated the hazard of flame-type appliances and in-
Y -.... "in stalled n my offelectric water heater, an 1965.electric clothes dryer,
been pra ectically reverse-cycgligible air conditioning. There hno more
I. is complaints able the poor hea t distribution from my clean because
-Wayn refrigerator and clothes washer Now we're Patton, Owntal-electric
REMODELED FORT MYERS HOME AWARDED
THE TOTAL-ELECTRIC GOLD MEDALLION



eliminated the hazard of flame-type appliances and in-




staMARCH,ed an electric water heater, an electric clothes dryer,
and electric reverse-cycle air conditioning. The house
is comfortable the year-rbund and stays clean because
the air is filter-pure. We already had an electric range,
refrigerator and clothes washer. Now we're total-electric
and proud of our Gold Medallion Home Award."







MARCH, 1967









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043







FACE BRICK


HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North


Jacksonville, Florida 32211


Telephone: (904) 724-7958


ATLANTA

GA.


New AIA Administrator
Named
WASHINGTON, D. C., January
27, 1967-Frank L. Codella AIA, an
associate partner in the architectural
and engineering firm of A. M. Kin-
ney Associates, Cincinnati, Ohio, has
been appointed administrator of the
Department of Professional Services
of The American Institute of Archi-
tects, effective February 6, 1967.
------- o oC ---

Gold Medalist Named
WASHINGTON, D. C., January
27, 1967 Internationally- known
Architect Wallace K. Harrison FAIA,
of New York City, has been selected
by The American Institute of Archi-
tects to receive the 1967 Gold Medal,
highest honor accorded by the pro-
fessional architectural association.
Charles M. Nes Jr. FAIA, presi-
dent of the Institute, announced the
selection of the 71-year-old architect,
whose noted projects include Rocke-
feller Center (with three other firms),
the United Nations (as Director of
Planning) and the new Metropolitan
Opera at Lincoln Center.

Little to Architectural
Advisory Panel
MIAMI- Mr. Robert M. Little,
FAIA, has been appointed to serve as
one of the ten architects on the Na-
tional Public Advisory Panel on Arch-
itectural Services for the General Serv-
ices Administration for a term ending
December, 1968.

Emeritus Members
Two members have been given
Emeritus standing by the AIA Board
of Directors, effective February 3,
1967: Edgar S. Wortman, AIA, Palm
Beach Chapter; and Elliott B. Had-
ley, AIA, Florida Central Chapter.

Kitchen Planning Workshop
A workshop on kitchen -planning,
outdated kitchens and 'financing will
be held March 7 and 8, sponsored by
the Florida Dietetic Association, Flor-
ida State Board of Health, Dade
County Health Department, and
Austin Hansen and Associates. The
March 7 session will be held at
Broward General Hospital in Ft.
Lauderdale. On March 8, the work-
shop will be held in Hillsborough
County Courthouse Auditorium in
Tampa (this is a new location and
corrects the location previously an-
nounced in "Contact.") Speakers will
be Mr. Clem Maham, of the Ameri-
can Hospital Supply Corporation, and
Joe Berghers, president of Fabrica-
tors, Inc., Dallas, Texas.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



























THERMAL RESISTANCE OF SOLITE LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE MASONRY


HEAT FLOW

REGULA V4m^wms


REGULAR


0O F I
Outside I
Temp. I
--!-
I


BTU/
BTU/Sq. Ft. HR. oF.






With regular units
this additional heat
must be removed by
air-conditioning.

WEIGHT 0.53


J Wih regular unis
this additional heat
must be provided by
the mechanical heat-
ing equipment.
-- 70* F. Room Temp.
54* F. (Solite)
Inside Wall Temp.
47 F. (Reg. Wt.)
Inside Wall Temp.


--g 8" Masonry Wall


Thermal resistance calculations are analogous to electrical
problems in that under a constant temperature differential
(voltage drop) a higher resistance will reduce the heat flow
(current).
This heat flow (summer and winter) must be paid for in
higher fuel costs and in larger heating and air-conditioning
mechanical equipment.

The increased insulation provided by Solite masonry units
substantially reduces the cost of heating and air-conditioning.
A secondary benefit of using Solite masonry is the warmer
inside wall temperatures that protect against cold, sweating
walls. Condensation starts when inside wall temperature drops
below the dew point of the interior air.









Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202


MATCH, 1967







Primitive Architecture

and the

Florida Vernacular
Despite meager resources, primitive
people have designed dwellings that
successfully meet severest climate
problems. These simple shelters often,
outperform today's structures.
In the building of his shelter, primitive man
faces one supreme and absolute limitation; the
impact of the environment in which he finds
himself must be met by the building materials
which that environment affords. The environ-
ment is scarcely ever genial, and the building
materials are often appallingly meager. The Es-
kimo has only snow and ice; the Sudanese, mud
and reeds; the Siberian herdsman, animal hides
and felted hair; the Melanesian, palm leaves
and bamboo. Yet primitive architecture reveals
a very high level of performance ,even when
judged in the light of modern technology. It
reflects a precise and detailed knowledge of
local climate conditions and a remarkable un-
derstanding of the performance characteristics
of building materials locally available.
Of course primitive architecture, like primi-
tive medicine or primitive agriculture, often has
a magice-religious rationale that is of interest
only to anthropologists. But its practice-that
is, how things are done, as distinct from the
reasons offered for doing them is apt to be
surprisingly sensible.
With the rapid industrialization and urban-
ization of the Western world, there is a grow-
ing tendency to minimize or ignore the im-
portance and complexity of the natural en-
vironment. Not only is the modern architect
quite removed from any direct experience with
climatic and geographic cause-and-effect; he is
also persuaded they "don't matter any more."
Yet the poor performance of most modern
buildings is impressive evidence to the contrary.
Thus Western man, for all his impressive
knowledge and technological apparatus, often
builds comparably less well than did his primi-
tive predecessor. A central reason for his failure
lies in consistent underestimation of the en-
vironmental forces that play upon his buildings
and cities, and consistent overestimation of his
own technological capacities. Still, the worst he
faces is a dissatisfied client. When the primitive
architect errs, he faces an unforgiving Nature.
A few definitions are perhaps in order. As
used here, the term "primitive" describes the
buildings of preliterate societies, whether his-
torical or current, whose general knowledge,
comes by word of mouth, whose training is by
apprenticeship, whose industry is handicraft and
whose tools are pre-Iron Age. Although the folk
architectures of modern civilization often dis-
play the same kind of pragmatic sagacity as the
primitive, they are of a qualitatively different
order. The iron tools and the measurement-sys-
tems of civilization immediately introduce fac-
tors such as modular building material and
repetitive structural systems which are anti-
thetical to the plasticity of primitive structure.
Literacy, on the other hand, introduces the dis-
concerting concept of a spectrum of building
styles an inconceivable 'situation to the
primitive architect, to whom it never occurred
there is more than one way to build. It is obvi-
ous that even primitive structures must have
evolved gradually over millennia, Bit the primi-
tive architect was spared this forgotten history
of styles.
The Florida pioneer was truly a primitive
architect. The following photographic essay will
show the evolution of typical Florida pioneer
structures over approximately 100 years.
Dan Paulk Branch, AIA

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



























- ._ *
'* *-



;Ii ii


Top: Elevation comparison,
house and buggy shed. Cen-
ter: Side view. Bottom: Bug-
gy shed, one-cell, porch space
replaced by cart parking.


-





























~< b tA' *'4.*

i'" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N *,rirrit

4 '4


'.4. 'r
#*.( 4<


-S


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*~
'y
'C~'
Inyl
Ij

?"i~~~l
"i .L
i ~hi


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Jt "-





Page 16
Top left: Two-cell with 2 fireplaces, 3 sides, porch. Cen-
ter: Detail of house. Bottom left: Three-cell with 2 fire-
places, 2-part house with center circulation, porches 2
sides front and rear. Top right: Plan of two-cell house
with two firepalces, 3 sides, porch. Bottom right: Plan of"
three-cell house with 2 fireplaces.

Page 17
Top left: Plan of four-cell with 2 fireplaces. Bottm left:
Plan of basic 4-part with center circulation. Top right:
Four-cell with 2 fireplaces, 2-part house with center cir-
culation. Top right: Four-cell with 2 fireplaces. 2-part
house with center circulation, addition of another room
at rear, porches 2 sides front and rear. Bottom right:
Basic four-part with center circulation.


.4,ryrr -.LrC 41C
'- ~k j?
~~~'g"1 'Ii,
~-I


K 1
Ism,





H f 0 1,
-., d **A-6 i. ^s-'t^W ^ ^ 9.-^W B*9


MARCH, 1967

























L i


Top left: Basic 2-part house with added


































component, open link. 2 cells with center
circulation, 2 porches and link to separ-
ated kitchen unit. Center 1eft: Elevation
of above. Bottom left: Details of above.













,.14 Top right: Plan of basic 2-part house.
ICenter right: Drawings of front elevation
and basic form of basic 2-part house.


P i
i
,r






presenting Virginia Log...


Meet Virginia Log a new texture with a harmonious array of
colors. As rugged as it is refreshing a three-dimensional effect
in autumn-sunset shades. Virginia Log is a panorama of texture
and color endless hues of gold, rose, cream, rust, light gray,
buff and pink that blend with natural surroundings and comple-
ment other building materials. Furnished in irregular-shaped pieces
to be set in a fieldstone pattern, sizes 1/2 to 6 S/F in content, 2-4"
thick. Liberally adorned by nature in a rustic mood. A prize .
from the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA TUXEDO 7-1525


Distributors in Florida:
Gainesville Concrete Block Company
924 S. Main Street
Gainesville
(904) 376-2423
Pinellas Lumber Company
1400 Central Avenue
St. Petersburg
(813) 894-7471
Pichard's, Inc.
P. 0. Box 708
Tallahassee
(904) 576-4121


I'iUME




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


*is jE**"^ I WSHSE
w- a




4 LA ->:'- r| V^
^_" -aSS *'- -~ l1


University of Florida Libraries
Gainesville, Fla.
32601


S. : ."
;. ._ d _-* -- ... ?= *- ? .*,


7 .

' ~ -i %I


. s :. ..."


Left, top to bottom: Basic 2-part house
with added component, enclosed linh
Front facade evolution, center circulation
enclosed with entrance off center, 2 wir*
dows; Center circulation, symmetrical
window treatment, rural version; Cente
circulation, symmetrical window treat
ment, town version. Top right: Elevation
of basic 2-part house with added comn
ponent, enclosed link.


-s-~rcJE*, -. U