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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 President's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Penetrometers... Choice for soil...
 Architecture for Florida living...
 Awards and honors for the Florida...
 This was the 1966 convention -...
 Calendar of events
 Architectural exhibit awards
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00149
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00149
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    President's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Penetrometers... Choice for soil exploration by Professor John Schmertmann, University of Florida
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Architecture for Florida living - A report on our annual edition
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Awards and honors for the Florida Architect magazine
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    This was the 1966 convention - A capsule of the FAAIA Convention in Miami Beach
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Calendar of events
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Architectural exhibit awards
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Advertisers' index
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text







T -V 717T1


the
florida
archilecl
november 1090



HONOR
I AWARDS


ISSUE









Challenge
(This Message was delivered by Hilliard Smith at the Awards Banquet of
the 52nd Annual FAAIA Convention, October 7, 1966, in Miami Beach.)


President Deen, Vice Presi-
dent Durham of the Institute,
Ladies, distinguished guests and
my fellow architects.
As I stand here tonight sym-
bolic of the leadership of this
association for the new year -
I feel that each of the team of
officers so elected stands in the
shadow of his predecessor. Each
looking to the past for guidance
in the future. Each maintaining
continuity so that no success of
past efforts will be lost. Each
knowing well that the brilliant
luster of past successes will be
tarnished if not matched by ra-
diant vitality in the future.
Thus, at once we recognize
with deep thanksgiving the ac-
complishments of those who
have gone before and accept
with humility and understanding
the challenge of the tasks before
us.
It is my desire in these few
words to light a candle of inter-
est which hopefully may be kin-
dled to a brilliance that will light
our way to further successes.
It is, therefore, incumbent on
me to discuss briefly with you
the philosophy which will guide
our association for the year 1967.
While we have had great suc-
cess informing the public that
we are living in ugly, disordered
communities and alarming them
to action in many quarters, we
have failed miserably in educat-
ing them that architects are the
difference between architecture
and buildings; beauty and ugli-
ness. This must be changed.
Only a comprehensive program
of public education through
good public relations can bring
about this change. We accept
the challenge.
Will each of you also accept
the challenge to broaden and
deepen your individual interests
in public affairs.
We have recognized in our
convention theme, in the semi-
nars of the last two days and in
the words of those participating,
that each architect must focus


his attention on his community,
if the profession is to catalyze
and guide the destiny of our vis-
ual environment. All too often
in the past, we have stayed aloof,
yes even uninterested in the
swirling revolution of our soci-
ety and environment. We can no
longer stand by and permit this
evolution to take place without
benefit of quality design, which
only our profession is capable of
providing.
We must move out into the
arena of public affairs and do
battle with every force not con-
sonant with beauty and order in
our visual environment. If the
architect is to accept the chal-
lenge of this role in the commun-
ity, he must be prepared. This
will require a more comprehen-
sive education of the student and
a vigorous program of continu-
ing education of the already


HILLIARD SMITH, AIA


THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


practicing architect. This chal-
lenge we also accept.
To complete our metamor-
phosis, we must turn our atten-
tion to the affairs of government
and legislation, for ours is a gov-
ernment of laws, not of men.
Our complex, dynamic and ex-
ploding society demands statu-
tory controls which mould a bet-
ter environment and become
tools for the design professions
to provide improved and expand-
ed public service.
Our interest in matters legisla-
tive cannot be limited to defen-
sively protecting professional stat-
us, but rather must be broadened
to provide leadership in creating
positive and equitable environ-
mental legislation. This chal-
lenge we also accept.
To sum all this into simple
words, I would like to quote
from President Nes's acceptance
speech at the 1966 A.I.A. con-
vention, wherein he said "Archi-
tects must be all they have been
in the past but still much more.
This is not a speech calling for
a new renaissance man. It de-
mands a new collective capabil-
ity and a new collective image
for a profession that performs
every function expected of it in
the mainstream of America's de-
velopment."
Synthesizing a program of
these dimensions will require
elements that must come from
all of us, namely:
Empathetic and active leader-
ship, thus the administra-
tration is challenged;
A strong, effective association,
thus the staff and commit-
tees are challenged;
A vigorous participation,
thus each of you is challeng-
ed. Truly this is a time of chal-
lenge. Finally, quoting the words
of the immortal John Ruskin
who said, "Life without indus-
try is guilt, Industry without art
is brutality," I pray that our year
will be industrious and that our
industry will be without brutal-
ity.













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NOVEMBER, 1966









lloraio
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arcihect







OFFICERS
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth, Florida
Herbert R. Savage, President Designate/Vice President
3250 S. W. 3rd Avenue, Miami, Florida
Myrl Hanes, Secretary
P. O. Box 609, Gainesville, Florida
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest e Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. States
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach o Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
Black-Baker-Burton / Photography Consultants
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables 34, Florida.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distributed with-
out charge to 4,669 registered architects, builders, contractors, de-
signers and members of allied fields throughout the state of Florida
-and to leading national architectural firms and journals.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. McMurray Printers.


PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Inside Front Cover

PENETROMETERS ...
Choice for Soil Exploration
by Professor John Schmertmann
University of Florida

4-6

ARCHITECTURE FOR FLORIDA LIVING
A Report on our Annual Edition

7

AWARDS & HONORS
for The Florida Architect Magazine

11

THIS WAS THE 1966 CONVENTION-
A Capsule Review of the FAAIA Convention
in Miami Beach

14-16

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

18


ARCHITECTURAL EXHIBIT AWARDS
as selected at the 52nd Annual FAAIA Convention

20-23

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

24



FRONT COVER--The New Law Center, University of
Florida -Category B Honor Award Winner among the
Architectural Exhibits at our 52nd Annual Convention. The
proposed Law Center, by Pancoast/Ferendino/Grafton &
Skeels, is pictured again with all the other award winners on
Pages 20-23.



VOLUME 16 E NUMBER 11 1966
V THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Is your client


getting only


HALF A


BUILDING


He is... unless it's all-electric!


Aulahua
Bartow
Blountswn
Buhnell
Chattahoocee
Cnewlsto a
Ft. Meade
Ft. Pierce
Gaineswile
GreOn com Springs
Hbeaslead
Jacksonville
Jackwille Beeach
Key West
Ialsdase
Law Helm

19M


Lakeland
Lake Worth
Leesburg
Moore Haven
ML Dora
Newbeny
New Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Quincy
St. Cloud
Sebring
Starke
Tallahassee
Vem Beach
Wauchula
Wiliston


Only electricity can provide power for heating, lighting, air conditioning
and ventilating. The Integration of all these essential services into a single
system provided by a single power source is called electrical space
conditioning.

Why pay more to add boilers, stacks, fuel storage tanks, insulated piping,
circulating pumps, high-pressure valves, etc. for fossil fuels? By eliminating
the conventional mechanical equipment area you get more usable space;
and this means added income for your client.

A combined electrical space conditioning system utilizes each component
to its maximum potential, too. For greater client satisfaction more engineers,
architects and builders are turning to the all-electric concept to do the
whole job.


SFlorida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME


NOVEMBER, 1966 3


I







PENETRC


By
JOHN H. SCHMERTMANN, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor of Civil Engineering
University of Florida, Gainesville
As most architects are quick to ap-
preciate, their buildings must rest on
adequate foundations. This means the
sub-surface soil conditions must be
explored and evaluated. The architect
desires that this be done accurately
and economically and that the recom-
mended foundation designs be as
economical as possible-after all, he
wants the maximum funds available
for the part of his building that
people see and live and work in.
Although he may employ engineering
S consultants, he is ultimately responsi-
ble for the appearance, safety and
economy of his building. It is to his
advantage to be acquainted with
recent developments in soil engineer-
ing exploration techniques so that he
is aware of, and can request, the best.
01Ce The purpose of this article is to
acquaint the architect and engineer
with an important and new soil engi-
neering exploration method the
static friction -cone penetrometers.
Static (slowly pushed rather than
For hammer driven) penetrometers are
F r not new-they have a long history
of use in Europe. However, until
recently they only measured bearing
capacity. What is new is a recent
development in cone design which
Soil permits this instrument to also iden-
So tify the soil types penetrated via an
additional measurement of soil fric-
tion.
RESEARCH AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
tion Every civil engineering student is
now taught that adequate soil explo-
ration is an essential part of good
construction engineering. But, what
constitutes adequate exploration? This
decision is normally left to the archi-
tect's or engineer's judgment. Each is
limited by the money that he or
someone else feels can reasonably be
allotted for this purpose and, also
very important, by the selection of
exploration methods available. In the
majority of cases the "choice" is the
Standard Penetration Test (SPT)
method. However, there is really little
choice because there have been no
suitable alternatives, in Florida, to
the SPT method for ordinary soil
exploration and design problems.
There is at present an active research
program in the Department of Civil
Engineering at the University of Flor-


CONE ONLY ADVANCES
FOR BEARING CAPAC11Y
CONE JACKET SOTH ADVANCE
FOM HEARING CAPACITY
FRICTON
Action of Friction Jacket Cone


The Dutch Friction-Cone


_J
Typical results from Friction-
Cone Penetrometer sounding
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


* *0


Ch


Explora








JIETERS


. 0 0


Dutch Penetrometer in action


Mounted Dutch Penetrometer


Swedish self-recording
Penetrometer in operation
in Tampa


ida with a prime objective to develop
and introduce alternative methods
into Florida.
As an engineer specializing in this
field, the need for alternative methods
seems clear. Many architects also
sense this need. The SPT method
involves driving a sampler pipe into
the soil at the bottom of a previously
cleaned-out hole by means of a drop
hammer delivering a standard blow.
A complete soil sample is recovered
for visual inspection. A count of the
number of hammer blows to pene-
trate the sampler 12 inches, known
as the "blow-count" or "N-value,"
provides a crude dynamic measure of
the soil's shear strength. The N-values
are then introduced into empirical
design charts to provide foundation
design pressures. The SPT method
was a definite improvement over the
wash boring techniques in prior use.
However, the SPT method has many
limitations.' Its continued use for
design is a matter of great controversy
among soil engineers and many only
tolerate it because of a lack of an
economical alternative. It is the opin-
ion of many, including the writer,
that the limitations of the SPT
method often force foundation de-
signs to be overly conservative and
expensive.
A likely alternative method for soil
exploration is the static cone pene-
tration test. This method has a history
of development in Europe, particu-
larly The Netherlands and Sweden,
about equal in length to the thirty-five
to forty years for the SPT. The Civil
Engineering Department of the Uni-
versity of Florida has purchased what
it believes to be the first cone pen-
etration system of the modern Dutch
and Swedish types to be bought in
the United States. Approximately 12
months research with this equipment
in Florida has demonstrated that it
may be of great value and deserves
the serious consideration of the build-
ing professions.

DUTCH CONE
PENETRATION METHOD
A brief explanation of the Dutch
cone sounding method follows: a
hardened steel cone is forced verti-
cally into the soil by a static thrust.
This thrust, required to cause a bear-
ing capacity failure of the point, is
measured and recorded. Such a meas-
urement is made every eight inches
(or four if more detail is desirable) of
sounding depth, thus providing con-
siderable detail for a bearing capacity


profile, and hence a shear strength
profile, of the soils encountered at
the sounding location. The cone point
is specially designed to prevent soil
contamination of the cone mecha-
nism. It is advanced with a 2-rod
system: the outer rod or casing to
provide structural strength and protect
the inner rod from soil friction and
buckling; the protected inner rod, or
push-rod, is used to advance the point
during a thrust measurement. The
thrust is measured by reading a Bour-
don gage.
A new type of cone, called the
friction-cone, has recently become
available and its use greatly enhances
the amount of information that can
be obtained from cone penetration
testing. The action of this cone is
illustrated in Figure 1 and a photo-
graph is shown in Figure 2. A special
friction sleeve is attached above the
point and this permits the additional
determination of static soil friction
against the steel sleeve. The ratio of
(unit sleeve friction/unit point bear-
ing) is an indicator of the soil type
penetrated. For example, ratios of 0-
Vz% ordinarily indicate soft rock and
/or shells, V-2% ordinarily indi-
cates sand, clays are over 5% and
clay-sand mixtures and silts fall be-
tween 2-5%. In this way the "fric-
tion-ratio" permits approximate inter-
pretation of the soil type penerated
even though no samples are obtained.
The experience in Florida to date
indicates that the prediction of the
type of soil penetrated is reasonably
accurate when made in this manner.
By means of such interpretations,
using the friction-cone, it is possible
to accurately locate soil layers and
thereby reduce the amount of soil
sampling required. With local expe-
rience it should be possible to elim-
inate sampling entirely on some types
of jobs.
The plotted results from a typical
sounding record are illustrated in
Figure 3. The friction ratio is also
plotted and an interpretation of soil
type is indicated. A parallel SPT bor-
ing generally confirmed this inter-
pretation.
METHOD OF
PRACTICAL VALUE
The design value of the informa-
tion obtained from a friction-cone
penetration test is quite impressive.
Each point represents a static bear-
ing capacity test and as such can
be extrapolated to bearing capacity
values for larger sized foundations.


NOVEMBER, 1966 5






The friction of the soil against the
steel sleeve is a measure of the friction
to be expected against deeper foun-
dations, for example, piles. In fact,
the penetrometer can be considered
a model displacement pile. The design
of pile foundations is simplified if
cone penetration soundings are avail-
able. In The Netherlands pile foun-
dations are designed almost exclu-
sively from the results of cone sound-
ings.
As explained above, the soil type
can be estimated from the friction
ration. The detail of a log with data
every eight inches in depth permits
an accurate visual appraisal of the
strength profile of the soils at a par-
ticular location. When in clays, the
shear strength can be computed from
bearing capacity theory. When in
sands the relative density and/or the
angle of internal friction can be esti-
mated from the magnitude of both
the cone bearing and friction ratio
values. It is apparent that a significant
amount of direct use in foundation
design can be obtained from such a
friction-cone penetration test.
The economy of this method of
exploration is quite comparable to
standard penetration test borings. The
equipment to insert the cone into the
soil is rather small compared to con-
ventional boring rigs and can easily
be transported. The photograph in
Figure 4 shows the equipment in use
with the transporting vehicle used by
the University of Florida in the back-
ground. When used as shown here
the unit must be anchored separately
for each sounding, and has a thrust
capacity of 12 tons, or 600 tons/sq.
ft. pressure on the point. The present
contract cost of such exploration
would probably be about $3.50 to
$4.00 per foot.' The equipment can
also be mounted on vehicles made
heavy enough to supply the desired
reaction. For example, the photo-
graph of Figure 5 shows the equip-
ment mounted on a flat bed suffi-
ently weighted down to provide a


satisfactorily stable three ton reaction;
which was adequate for the shallow
exploration purposes of this project.
With this set-up, when operating at
maximum efficiency it was possible
to make five soundings per hour, each
between 10 and 15 feet in depth and
about 50 feet apart. When such a
rigging can be used, the exploration
price would probably be around $2.75
per foot.' Prices such as these would
be competitive with the SPT method
of exploration and permit the engi-
neer or architect to choose a method
based on the design value of the
information obtained. Using both
methods, each to supplement the
other, could sometimes lead to the
best results.

LIGHTER SWEDISH CONE
The University has also been work-
ing with a lighter, portable, hand-
operated and more economical cone
penetration system of Swedish design.
The Dutch equipment has a static
thrust capability of 12 tons and can
penetrate soil with an N-value of
over 100 blows. The present Swedish
equipment has a thrust capability of
two tons and its penetration ability
is limited to about 25-blow soil. How-
ever, within this penetration range it
can be used effectively and has a
number of special advantages. The
manufacturers plan to significantly
increase this thrust capability.
Figure 6 shows a photograph of
two men operating this penetrometer.
They can easily carry it around a site
and transport it, partly dismantled,
in a station wagon or ordinary car
trunk. The penetrometer log is auto-
matically recorded and it is not nec-
essary to take and reduce field data.
With suitable conditions production
is about 300 ft./day by two men
and contract costs would be about
$1.00/ft.
SThis penetrometer does not have
the friction and friction-ratio meas-
urement capability and is therefore
less useful for design. But it does


offer an economical method of
searching for weak and potentially
troublesome soil layers near the
ground surface and gives a good
measure of their strength.
THE FUTURE
Predicting the future is at best a
risky business which, in this case,
involves considerable personal opin-
ion. However, our research and this
paper are aimed at influencing the
future and it is only fair that the
reader know what we have in mind.
Our experience shows that soil con-
ditions in Florida are generally suit-
able for using penetrometer explora-
tion methods. In many instances
using these methods will result in sub-
surface soil data much more detailed
and accurate than previously available
with SPT methods and also more
suitable for direct application to de-
sign. When using such penetrometer
exploration, perhaps at first as a
supplement to current SPT methods,
the services of soil testing companies
will become more valuable to archi-
tects and other civil engineers be-
cause they will be able to provide
superior data for design.
With the prospect of more eco-
nomical foundation designs, architects
should encourage engineers to explore
these new (to Florida) exploration
and design methods. An easy and ef-
fective way of doing this is to include
static cone penetrometer exploration
as an acceptable alternative, or supple-
ment, to the SPT in their specifica-
tions for soil exploration work3. Ini-
tially, this will only serve to encourage
the progressive testing companies to
purchase the new equipment needed.
Once this critical practical step has
been taken and the equipment is used
in practice, the technical advantages
will soon be obvious to all concerned.
Other companies will follow and the
new will eventually become the rou-
tine. This has happened in other
countries and Florida should follow
the pattern.


1-The reader wishing to follow this subject is referred to a recent paper by Gordon F. Fletcher titled "Standard Penetration Test: Its Uses and
Abuses" found in the Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundation Division, ASCE, July, 1965, p. 67. Especially informative are the numerous
discussions of this paper in subsequent issues of this Journal. These discussions are still being submitted.
2-These cost estimates include assembling the exploration data in report form. Because of the much greater volume of data obtained with friction-
con penetrometer sounding (15 measurements every five feet) data reduction and plotting is a greater percentage of the cost than with SPT
exploration. They are estimates only. Naturally, the contract costs on any one job could depend greatly on the local circumstances for that job.
This is also true for SPT exploration.
3-A statement similar to the following may suffice:
As an alternate, or a supplement, to standard penetration test exploration it is permissible to use static cone penetrometer exploration. Such
a cone must have a horizontally projected end area not less than 10 sq cm (1.55 sq in) b designed so that a cone bearing measurement excludes
any soil friction against the rods used to advance the cone; and be advanced by equipment with the necessary control and anchorage stability to
provide a uniform rate of cone penetration between 1 and 10 ft./min. The depth interval between cone bearing readings shall ordinarily not be
greater than 8 inches.
When using a friction-cone, its design must be the same, or equivalent in performance, to that manufactured by the Goudsche Machine-
fabriek, Gouda, The Netherlands.
All exploration location and depth requirements are the same and report requirements are the same with appropriate modifications to best
present penetrometer testing data.
6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






An Editorial and Progress Report


"Architecture For Florida Living"


"Architecture for Florida Living" newest addition
to the FAAIA program is certainly not news to you.
We've written about it in several Newsletters and have
asked for cooperation from architects throughout the state.
Articles about our Annual Edition have appeared in news-
papers from one end of Florida to the other.
However, this is certainly a good time to bring you
up-to-date on all the exciting developments in producing
this 200-page publications. There's a lot to report!
As we've previously stated, .
"ARCHITECTURE FOR FLORIDA LIVING, pub-
lished by The Florida Association of the American Insti-
tute of Architects, will be issued early next year. For the
first time, the real, complete, exciting narrative of Florida
living will be presented -and in handsome, dramatic
photographs, with concise, easy-to-read copy. Many of the
state's leading citizens will contribute stories and editorial
material to be included in the approximately-200-page
edition. An introduction by the Governor will be our edi-
torial "kick-off".

For the first time, every section of Florida will receive
its proper attention. And for the first time, the interesting
story of our state will be told in is entirety. Our residential
section, for example, will include every type of home-
ranging from eondominum apartments, inexpensive vaca-
tion havens and $20,000 residences to $35,000-$65,000
showplaces and luxury mansions over $100,000. We'll also
devote our attention to industries, churches, schools, ur-
ban planning, and much more. Whatever the field of inter-
est, and whatever the price tag involved, every structure
featured in ARCHITECTURE FOR FLORIDA LIVING will
be a prime example of fine architecture. Our annual edi-
tion will also have a special section that akes a look into
Florida's amazing future."

Here's where we stand today. Our Selection Commit-
tee has held many meetings to thoroughly evaluate the
hundreds of entries we received for consiedration. We've
written and called many places and many architects to
encourage further submissions of buildings our Committee
felt should be considered. This Committee has reviewed
examples of architecture in every corner of this state--
and final selection will be made this week for the build-
ings which will be featured in our first Annual Edition.

Works which cannot be used in this issue will be re-
turned to their sources.

Then, work will proceed at top speed. Photographers
are waiting for their first assignments. Although sore of
the buildings chosen have already been professionally
photographed in highest quality, many others have to be
NOVEMBER, 1966


photographed for us. Only the finest architecture, pic-
torial and editorial coverage will appear in "Architecture
for Florida Living."
We're already soliciting editorial material from ex-
perts in the various fields educational, historic, religion,
etc. which will serve as background for our copy.
We're considering several special sections which will
become an integral part of our issue--interior design,
historical, Florida's major products, a look into the future,
etc.
We've been in contact with hundreds of possible ad-
vertisers-through letters and though personal contact.
Several have signed advertiisng contracts already and
many more are in the process.

Distribution is a matter of vital concern, of course.
We have an exclusive listing of every newsstand and news-
dealer in the country. We will have "Architecture for Flor-
ida Living" in most major airports and have already
arranged for display in the New York and Miami air ter-
minals. We're working with two major airlines to arrafng
for copies of our edition to be made available on the
planes. Major book stores throughout the country will also
have our Annual Edition available.

We're exploring the cost and economic feasibility of
translating our edition into Spanish, for increased sales
and advertising acceptance in South and Central America.

We have arranged and are awaiting final verification
for displaying of "Architecture for Florida Living" in the
Florida Showcase, Rockefeller Center, New York City.
This display would be throughout the month of May,
1967, which coincides with the national American Insti-
tute of Architects convention in New York. This exhibit
would feature full copies of the book, some models, and
huge blow-ups of color and black-and-white photographs
which appear in the magazine. We would be the featured
exhibit that month and would coordinate local and na-
tional publicity to tie-in-with this showing. To comple-
ment this New York exhibit, we have already arranged for
several architects to appear on the Mike Douglas Show,
which is nationally-syndicated on NBC. We would invite
representatives of the leading architectural publications and
general-interest publications, which are headquartered in
New York, to view the exhibit and give it nationwide press.

In short, many people are hard at work on many
assignments which insure the success of our new publica-
tion and which will make it an endeavor of pride for the
Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
It will showcase our state and our profession as they have
never before been spotlighted!


























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NOVEMB&ER, 1966 9








BUILDING WITH"BUILT-IN BONUSES'









Terminal Building, Columbia Metropolitan Airport, West Columbia, S.C.; Upshur, Riley and Bultman, A.I.A., Columbia, S.C., Architects;
Julian Shand, Columbia, S.C., Engineer; Harlee-Quattlebaum Construction Co., Florence, S. C., General Contractors.


The handsome new airport terminal in
Columbia, S.C., is a fitting showcase for
the use of Solite lightweight masonry
units.
Used for interior and exterior walls, as
well as foundations, Solite "builds in"
a number of important advantages.
Left exposed for interior walls, these
units provide sound absorbency (up to
50%); self-insulation (holds down heat-
ing and cooling costs) and a beautiful,
even texture that is easily painted, holds
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weather.


In addition, they are lighter in weight-
1/3 lighter than ordinary masonry units.
Which means easier handling, faster
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money. Solite-the masonry units with
the built-in bonuses.





Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













AWARDS HONORS






ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA August, 1966 -Florida Magazine Association convention names "The Florida
Architect" winner of the Best Feature Story of the Year award. The prize-winning feature was The Douglas Village
Story which appeared in the March, 1966, issue of the magazine. Judges' comments were "Penetrates the imagina-
tion and pierces the peculiar. Good choice of words. Rates high for human interest and color. Skillful tie between opening
and conclusion." In addition, the FMA awarded Second Place Award to "The Florida Architect" for Best Two Color
Cover. Two covers were given this honor our March cover, depicting the Bulow Plantation, and our November 1965
convention cover. General comments by judges about the magazine included .". A very slick job Within
spatial limits, the variety of stories is very good headline type fair to good body type excellent Use of
second color on "Viewpoint" is excellent Section on Douglas Village is very good."

WASHINGTON, D.C. Sepetmber 7-9, 1966- Telegram from the American Institute of Architects is sent to "The
Florida Architect": "Your Magazine was selected as best of 24 component publications in editorial value to the profession
. .Details by letter next week. Congratulations." The detailed letter added that 24 publications from throughout the
nation competed in the AIA's judging. Five graphics and five editorial experts judged each publication. "The Florida
Architect," in addition to its Best in the Nation for Editorial Value to the Profession, also received the following
edtiorial critique:

AIA Editor's Conference, Sept. 7, 8, 9, 1966

EDITORIAL CRITIQUE
Publication: THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Critique by: Ernest Mickel
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT excels in writing style and presentation of feature
material. It was the best written magazine of the five reviewed.
The President's message page is particularly well done, serving as an excellent lead-in
to the book. The reprints are stimulating and informative. They do not give an im-
pression of being "fillers" as reprints so often do. The treatment of special material,
such as the Douglas Village feature, is outstanding, and carries a creditable appeal to
the non-architect reader.
FA covers a fairly broad range of architectural interests within the space limitations
common to all these regional publications. It could be more valuable to its readers
with a greater emphasis on new technological developments, but I realize these pub-
lications are not meant to be "work books" in that sense. Nevertheless I think the
book could be improved with some specific attention to new materials and methods
to go along with its excellent presentation of professional activity information. I imagine
readers would welcome more features such as "New Buildings Around the State" with
even more detail on plan and design.
FA gave the best over-all editorial impression of the five magazines reviewed.

MIAMI, FLORIDA-October, 1966-Art Directors Club of Greater Miami, holding its 14th annual exhibition of
Advertising and Editorial Art & Design, presents four awards to the Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects- for recently-completed brochures, FAAIA letterhead and the 1966 annual Board Report.
NOVEMBER, 1966 11








































This special distinction goes to Bertram "for outstanding contribution to the
advancement of the Total Electric concept as exemplified by the electrically
equipped BERTRAM 37 SALON CRUISER."
Flameless electricity is everywhere for cleaner, safer, smoother performance.
The galley, for instance, has an electric range with oven and rotisserie. Also an
electric refrigerator. Electric water heating. Ample lighting. Plenty of handy
switches and outlets. All the comforts and conveniences of home-electrically-
underway as well as dockside I


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































The building Award of Merit for Electrical Excellence signifies that the Bertram
plant in Miami, Florida, has been planned to meet ALL-ELECTRIC standards.
Bertram's use of electricity as the sole power source means more efficient
and lower cost operation. Total-electric is cheaper than in combination with
flame-type fuels.
And in a plant designed for fiberglass fabrication in proximity to volatile
resins-Flameless Electric is Safer too!


Florida's Electric Companies... Taxpaying, Investor-Owned



NOVEMBER, 1966 1








CONVENTION: 1966


This convention will long be noted for its outstanding
speakers and their piercing look at the architectural pro-
fession. If you didn't attend the convention, tlen here is a
capsule review of some of the comments and challenges
offered by several of the nation's leading authorities if
you were at the convention, these remarks are still worth
repeating. Many you will not have heard in the Seminar
sessions because these quotes were made in private conversa-
tions or in special interviews.

DOUG HASKELL: ". highway billh- I are here to
stay. The only way we can clear blatant signs away from top
scenic spots is to offer the outdoor advertising industry a
deal. We'll have to provide some choice locations in ex-
change advertising is too important in our economy for
us to think it will disappear Most people are blind to
their surroundings supermarkets and junk yards will Jim Deen and H. Leslie Walker c
continue to come in where they don't belong, regardless of King High before his luncheon ad
zoning battles, until the public opens its eyes.

". .. schools fail to educate their pupils in art. It's just
not taugh .yet every child learns the music scales and how
to sing a song.

ROBERT L. DURHAM, FAIA: ". The most significant
thing about the age in which we live is change. Even more
impressive is the rate of change itself. I come from a high-rise
fishing village on the opposite corner of forty-eight states.
The small ship that brought our pioneers a little over 100
years ago has given way to jet planes that soon will carry 300
people to Paris in two hours. A few weeks ago one of my
neighbors, a project architect for a queer space-contraption,
shipped his creation down to Florida for propulsion to the
moon. Suddenly after five thousand years of our contempla- E
tion of the man in the moon, we are viewing photographs
in great detail .

"As designers, we are also facing change. Try to find the High's Republican opponent for
was a breakfast speaker.
draftsman who can without exhaustive research draw the
most elemental gothic or colonial mouldings! As architects,
we search for new solutions and for quality in design. But in
more depth we are beginning to realize that we can no
longer be satisfied with the design of one building at a time.
It has been suggested that nothing would be quite so horrible
as a whole community of honor award winners! .

"Our profession is not growing nearly as fast as the need
for our services .

"There has never been a better age for architects. We
will have to stretch ourselves in every way, immerse ourselves
in the social, political and economic life of our communities
and sharpen our skills. While we do this we must lose our
most precious heritage our skill as designers. Most of us
will have to work very, very hard. There is very little doubt
about it given adequate information and a large measure
of leadership we can have a golden age in urban design. The
architectural profession can fashion the key to it. In our
hands we may yet open the door to a new America." so esll nd Phitlee at our
Haskell and Philip Hiss,


hat with Mayor Robert
dress.


governor Claude Kirk,


convention: Douglas


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FOCUS: COMMUNITY


RICHARD HATCH: "... It is wonderful to think that 600
years ago the nature of the columns on the exterior of the
Duomo in Florence was such a hot public issue that it could
only be decided by referendum. It is sad to think that al-
though most of us live in urban areas in 1966, the pervasive
ugliness of our cities is of little public concern and that
people all over the country regularly vote down programs to
improve their environment .

"Architects have cried out against ugliness and squalor
-and we cry out in a wilderness of high tension wires,
parking lots and slums but few are there to Itisen We
have deplored the present situation, but we have not yet
learned to think strategically. We do have a hazy idea of
what we want. We must learn to ask why we do not get
anything that approaches it, and how with our limited energy
and influence we can have the greatest impact on the en- Architectural Exhibit display was cel
vironment .

".. Civil rights legislation had no impact in Harlem ..
they had those legal right This sort of wave of despair
and resignation has hit Harlem before. The parents wind up
being conservative, church-going, not at all violent people by
and large. But if jobs become scarcer and scarcer, and money
harder to make, it will blow up.

". .. cities are getting worse and worse, not better and
better .This is an extremely wealthy country. We have the
power and the wherewithal. We're just not hurting enough
yet.

"... We will need more federal money, much more
federal money, to improve the physical plants of our cities.
We will get it only when we have created sufficient political
pressure for it. Need is not enough--that is abundantly Architectural Exhibit Jury holding ro
clear. We have been isolated visionaries, a single profes- Richard Hatch, George Rockrise, Bob
sional group talking to itself through our professional asso- man Bob Eberhart looks on. Not
Haskell
ciations and professional journals. If we are to create a
responsive, beautiful environment in our cities, however, we
must seek allies.

"... In this country most public programs have tradi-
tionally served the middle class people like ourselves -
for obvious reasons. We vote. We elect the public officials ,
and they come, by and large, from backgrounds not dissimilar
to our own. They are automatically sensitive to the needs of
the large middle class electorate again, people not unlike
us. And this huge political force is not yet convinced that the
problems of -our cities are worth solving. They do not share
our demand for order, clarity and purpose. WVhere we see
sprawl, they see growth. Where we see congestion, they see
affluence and healthy economic activity.

"... The state of our cities demonstrates that we have
not done well with our commitment to insure a good en-
vironment for all men. We must not continue to fail. The
measure of our commitment must be the degree to which
we put our important professional skills at the disposal of Prize-winning Building Product displ:
those who have been without them longest, can afford them fall by Navan, or educated value.
NOVEMBER,award was won by Georg1966Pacific.
NOVEMBER, 1966


undtable discussion:
Durham. Co-chair-
pictured is Doug


ay booth: Wonder-
Display excellence








least, and need them most. If we do not, we condemn our
poor, ourselves as architects, and our cities, to eclipse."

JAMES DEEN: ". We've had great success informing the
public that we are living in ugly, disordered communities and
alarming them to action in many quarters but we've
failed miserably in educating them that architects can make
the big difference ."

HILLIARD SMITH: "The next ten years could well turn
out to be the most important decade in architectural history
It's a time of double challenge. People must accept the
hard fact that there's a vast difference between architecture
and buildings, beauty and ugliness. That's the first challenge
to shape a better America out of the clutter of today .
Secondly, the challenge to architects is that we must realize
our profession--and only our profession--is capable of
providing the necessary leadership in each community."

CHARLES COLBERT: FAIA: ".. Joseph Woods Krutch
in the Measure of Man wryly says: "Perhaps Hamlet was
nearer right than Pavlov. Perhaps the explanation "How like
a God!" is actually more appropriate than "How like a dog!"
S. Perhaps we have been deluded by the fact that the
methods employed for the study of man have been for the
most part those originally devised for the study of machines
or the study of rats, and are capable, therefore, of detecting
and measuring only those characteristics which the three do
have in common."

". We have every right and the obligation to revitalize
our own deeper potentials. If possible, it is immoral not to
be different, not to be better. An adequate society should
demand it of us.

". .Learning, coupled with ego, is always the prime
mover of change. Alfred North Whitehead writes: 'The
ultimate motive power, alike in science, in morality, and in
religion, is the sense of value, the sense of importance. It
takes the various forms of wonder, of curiosity, of reverence,
of worship, of tumultuous desire for merging personality into
something beyond self.' This motive power cannot be applied
from without but must be generated from within. This is
the challenge to you and to education.

". .. Necessity is no longer the mother of invention, if
it ever was. Nor can it be induced through the interminable
inculcation of factual knowledge or the bait of financial gain,
or even the lure of the 'do-gooder.' Krutch again makes my
point for me when he says: 'Perhaps man si not, first of all,
a Reasoning Animal; perhaps something else that he does
with his mind is even more obviously unique than reasoning.
But whta, then, shall we call this aring: what is it that it is
hardest to imagine a machine doing for us? We might,
I suppose, call it 'WANTING.' Certainly even the stupidest
man is capable of desiring something, and the cleverest
machine, no matter how brilliantly it may solve differential
equations (quantitative problems), does not. The power of
'wanting' is the first cause of learning."


RIGNAARD A1GU A


Jack Wohlberg discusses upcoming seminar session with
Richard Hatch.


New president Hilliard Smith enjoys exhibitors' luncheon
with Pavlow representative.


BEnr? 1U
Presidents Reception receiving line finds Executive Direc-
tor Fotis Karousatos greeting Herb Savage.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

































Owner: Hillsborough County Board of Public Instruction. Architect: McLane-Ranon-McIntosh-Bernardo. Designing Architect: Rick Rados, Tampa,
Florida. Structural Engineer Consultant: Sidney L. Barker, Tampa, Florida. General Contractor: Ellis Construction Company, Tampa, Florida.


Imagination and concrete


turned into 24 classrooms


$1 n58* ci
$1 -58* per sq. ft.
(including air conditioning)


Williams Elementary School, Tampa, dramatizes the ability
of Florida architects to create schools of both design indi-
viduality and low cost.
Here, the architect capitalized handsomely on the versa-
tility of concrete. The design, embodying a concrete frame,
prestressed roof and concrete masonry walls, features an
unusual high-accessibility arrangement of air-conditioning
and mechanical systems.
Each classroom complex stands as two structural frames,
divided by a floor-to-roof mechanical chase through the center
of the building, providing ready access from both ends.
Absence of beams at the chase top permits the air-condi-
tioning feeder duct to fit snugly against the stem of the pre-
stressed double tee. Chase walls in the classrooms are utilized
for recessed bookcases, storage and duct outlets and returns.
Increasingly, architects as well as school boards are looking
to concrete-not for its design potential alone, but its fire
safety, insulating and acoustic values and life-long economy.


*Calculated per A.I.A. document D-101


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization of cement manufacturers to improve and
extend the uses of portland cement and concrete


NOVEMBER, 1966


MECHANICAL CHASE DETAIL


,ra




















CALENDAR



November 19
FAAIA Council of Commissioners
meeting, 10 a.m., Robert Meyer
Motor Inn, Orlando.



November 20 23
AIA Student Forum, Octagon,
Washington ,D. C.



November 22
Producers Council meeting, South
Florida Chapter, Coral Gables
Country Club. (Guest Speaker).



November 22 December 4
Palm Beach Chapter, AIA, Archi-
tectural Exhibit. Norton Art Gal-
lery, Palm Beach.



November 27 December 17
FAAIA Architectural Exhibits,
La Monte Art Gallery, University
of Tampa, Tampa.



December 10
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing, 10 a.m., George Washington
Hotel, Jacksonville.



December 17
Meeting of the AIA Florida Chap-
ter Presidents, 10 a.m., 1000
Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral
Gables.


SUPPORT

YOUR PUBLICATION


When writing to

manufacturers about new

products or advertisements

first seen here .


tell them you saw it in .


The

FLORIDA

ARCHITECT


IF YOU'RE MOVING,

please send us your old

and new address. Don't

miss a single issue of

THE FLORIDA ARCHI-

TECT! Just drop a note

or card with your correct

mailing address to The

Florida Association of

the American Institute

of Architects, 1000

Ponce de Leon Boule-

vard, Coral Gables, Flor-

ida 33134.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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NOVEMBER, 1966 19







Architectural Exhibit Awards

Certainly a highlight of our 52nd Annual Convention in Miami Beach was the
display of architectural exhibits in the lobby of the Deauville. Our esteemed panel
of judges the architectural awards jury who shouldered the task of selecting
the winners were: Robert L. Durham, FAIA, first vice-president/president designate
of the AIA, Jury Chairman; Douglas Haskell, FAIA, architectural editor and writer,
C. Richard Hatch, AIA, executive director of Architects' Renewal Committee in
Harlem; and George T. Rockrise, FAIA, advisor to the Secretary of the Department
of Housing and Urban Affairs. Co-chairman of the jury was Robert C. Eberhart, AIA.



CATEGORY A-HONOR AWARD
Winner of the coveted Honor Award in this category for buildings completed in
January 1, 1963, was Plymouth Harbor, located in Sarasota, Florida. The jury
said .. "A straightforward, strong statement of how to organize a vertical com-
munity carefully sited on a relatively small piece of property. The jury was impressed
with the concept of a series of three-story neighborhood courts combined into a
high-rise building, so the whole building becomes a series of related neighborhoods."



PLYMOUTH HARBOR
Sarasota, Florida

ARCHITECTS:
FRANK FOLSOM SMITH and
LOUIS F. SCHNEIDER


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









MERIT AWARDS


INSTITUTE OF INFORMATION
SCIENCE BUILDING
University of Miami
Coral Gables, Florida

ARCHITECTS and ENGINEERS:
WATSON, DEUTSCHMAN
& KRUSE

"A well-organized, handsome struc-
tural expression The simple
concrete forms and deep shadows
produce an effective regional char-
acter."




HOUSE OF CHAN
Sarasota, Florida

ARCHITECTS:
FRANK FOLSOM SMITH
& ASSOCIATES

"Handsome, residential detailing
with good selection of materials well-
suited to the site. The dominant roof
form relates extremely well to the
simple geometry of a well-organized
plan."




COCONUT GROVE BRANCH LIBRARY
Coconut Grove, Florida

ARCHITECTS: T. TRIP RUSSELL & ASSOCIATES

"The architect took
greater pains than is
customary in taking
an old piece of work
and joining onto it in
sensitive fashion ..."


NOVEMBER, 1966





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
University of South Florida
Tampa, Florida
ARCHITECTS: H. LESLIE WALKER & ROBERT WIELAGE
"Well-articulated plan with dircrse uses of the building
ec.rpressing thetseles in handsome, composed facades ..."


N-^ii > *'(*^ir


CATEGORY B-HONOR AWARD
In this category, designated for proposed buildings which have reached the final
presentation stage and acceptance by the client, the Honor Award was presented
to the New Law Center at the University of Florida. ". .A single, powerful
architectural expression. A number of widely different elements both in use, size
and form have been brought together to form an effective urban statement ..."





NEW LAW CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
|I Gainesville, Florida


ARCHITECTS:
PANCOAST/FERENDINO/
GRAFTON & SKEELS


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






MERIT AWARD


BAY HOUSES CONDOMINIUM
Miami, Florida

ARCHITECTS:
PANCOAST/FERENDINO/
GRAFTON & SKEELS

"The basic concept of a well-ap-
pointed 'urban house' is well
handled in a 'middle rise' struc-
ture which lends great variety and
produces order ..."


STUDENT AWARDS


HOSPITAL, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
by Louis Vila

"The handling of inpatient and outpatient serv-
ices is properly separated and yet the centraliza-
tion of services shows clear understanding of
functions of a modern hospital "


RESEARCH BUILDING & LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
by William T. Nigro
"A careful and sensitive placement of well-com-
posed, strong building forms which bring order
to an existing topsy-like conglomeration of small-
er buildings of diverse style."


NOVEMBER, 1966











ADVERTISERS' INDEX


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pros. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pros.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover


Florida Gas Transmission Co.
18-19


Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
12-13


Florida Municipal
Utilities Association


Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing Inc.
8


Oil Fuel Heat Institute
8


Portland Cement Association
17


Reflectal/Borg-Warner Corporation
1


Solite Corporation
10


Trinity White -
Portland Cement Co.
9


F. Graham Williams Co.
24


*

ESTABLISHED 191S

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA

GA.


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
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BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North


Jacksonville, Florida 32211


Telephone: (904) 724-7958


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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I-


'a.~~


BRICK


Featherock introduces exciting newv
departures in archireclural, and
landscape design for the creative
architect. Weighing one eighth the
veighl of normal rock, Feathtrock
has a uniQue sliulure, ernibling
ease ol appli:alon, and mairmun
latitudes in ciealing decorative
arrangmmenl:. Used as wall facing .
Fealherock can be easily lormed
or Iilted o1 any size or shape by
Ihe simple use oi chisel, bil or
saw. Available in grey or charcoal,
Featheruck combines ilrength and
durability wilh a natural beauty.


I iim




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITE
1000 Ponce de Leon Bh
Coral Gables, Fla. 3313-
Accepted As Controlled Circu
Publication at Miami, Fl


John L. R. Grand, 1TA
College of Arc'itecture & Fine Arts
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. 1NC


Mim~b .N


_M11F* V71"
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