• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Perspective
 Report from the state board of...
 President's message
 School construction seminar
 Advertising
 Editorial -- Focus: the archit...
 Workshop on church architectur...
 Calendar of events
 Advertising
 12th annual salute to advertis...
 Advertising
 Message from Charles M. Nes Jr.,...
 The exciting convention story
 Convention schedule of events
 Nationally-known speakers
 Annual awards banquet
 Keynote address on craftsmansh...
 Florida's craftsman of the...
 Building product exhibitors
 Advertising
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00148
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00148
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Perspective
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Report from the state board of architecture
        Page 5
    President's message
        Page 6
    School construction seminar
        Page 7
    Advertising
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Editorial -- Focus: the architect
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Workshop on church architecture
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Calendar of events
        Page 19
    Advertising
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    12th annual salute to advertisers
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Advertising
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Message from Charles M. Nes Jr., FAIA
        Page 36
    The exciting convention story
        Page 37
    Convention schedule of events
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Nationally-known speakers
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Annual awards banquet
        Page 42
    Keynote address on craftsmanship
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Florida's craftsman of the year
        Page 46
    Building product exhibitors
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Advertising
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Advertisers' index
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Page 57
        Page 58
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.
















PROCLAMATION


rchilec

her! 1066,
* ~~~~-- -


-/D. J 1 ajuu

,bert I. Honchell
ayor, Boca Raton






C. L. Dressel
Mayor, City of Coral Gables






erman S. Winn
ayor, City of North Miami


tilalr of hri rti b
i.\rrFiilltr DT irtrlltrll






WHEREAS, the members of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects have contributed greatly
to the advancement of architecture in its many broad phases,
and

WHEREAS, the members of the Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects have strongly encouraged
the development of allied arts and expressed the aspirations
of our people, bringing into their lives inspiration, beauty,
safety and comfort, and

WHEREAS, the members of the Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects are men of the arts,
men who design -- then build, men of exacting skill and
vital awareness, men who have focused their attention on the
pulse of their community -- its urban planning, educational
opportunities, and government, and

WHEREAS, during this time of their 52nd Annual
Convention, these members of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of architects rdeedicate themselves to
the high ideals and objectives of the profession and pledge
themselves anew to continue their work to the improvement
of our people's environment and to achieve a happier and
better world for all mankind;

NOW, :- I, Haydon Burns, by virtue of the
authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Florida,
do hereby proclaim the week of October 2 8, 16oo, as


FLORIDA ARCHITECTS WEEK


ond urge all our citizens to honor our architects through
appropriate and fitting ceremonies.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
SS hereunto set my hand and
caused the Great Seal of
the State of Florida to
be affixed at Tallahassee,
the Capital, this Ist day
of Dugust, 1


ATTEST:


______ t


Robert King High
Mayor, City of Miami




J. W. Silcox, Jr.
Mayor, Panama City





Nick Nuccio
Mayor, City of Tampa





Arthur I. Snyder
Mayor, North Miami Beach






James G. Richardson
Mayor-Commissioner, Gainesville





Louis H. Ritter
Mayor-Commissioner, Jacksonvilli






Clyde M. Taylor
Mayor, South Miami


C. Harold Earnest
Mayor, West Palm Beach





Adger Smith
Mayor, City of Eau Gallie


12o.4
A e-/ ?1 J


1 806 Lc. 82n
iuck Hall
ayor, Metropolitan Dade County




Herman W. Goldner
Mayor, St. Petersburg





Elliott Roosevelt
Mayor, Miami Beach





D. Bailey
r-Commissioner, Saint Augustine


.r ct~


~





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OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central Forrest R. Cozen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Stames
Jacksonville e A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
Black-Baker-Burton / Photography Consultants
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not fos
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables 34, Florida.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distributed with-
out charge to 4,669 registered architects, builders, contractors, de-
signers and members of allied fields throughout the state of Florida
-and to leading national architectural firms and journals.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. ... Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials an
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $.00
per year. March Roster Issue. $2.00. McMurray Printers.


PERSPECTIVE
3
REPORT FROM THE
STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE
5
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
6
SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR
7
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SAYS ..
12
WORKSHOP ON CHURCH ARCHITECTURE
16
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
19
12th ANNUAL SALUTE TO ADVERTISERS
24-25
1966 FAAIA CONVENTION PREVIEW
MESSAGE FROM CHARLES M. NES JR., FAIA
36
THE EXCITING CONVENTION STORY
37
CONVENTION SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
38.39
NATIONALLY-KNOWN SPEAKERS
40-41
ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET
42
KEYNOTE ADDRESS ON CRAFTSMANSHIP
by Arthur Phillips, Professor
43-45
FLORIDA'S CRAFTSMAN OF THE YEAR
46
BUILDING PRODUCT EXHIBITORS
47-50
ADVERTISERS' INDEX
56
FRONT COVER- FLORIDA ARCHITECTS WEEK, as
proclaimed by Governor Haydon Burs and scores of mayors
throughout the state. Proud recognition for our profession, its
accomplishments, and its aims.

VOLUME 16 N NUMBER 10 U 1966
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







PERSPECTIVE


Rockrise Named HUD

Adviser On Design


\\WA I II \ I )N, 1). C George T. Rockrise FAIA,
of San Francisco, Calif., nationally recognized architect
and planner, has been appointed Adviser on Design to
the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban
Development.
Secretary Robert C. Weaver announced the appoint-
ment at a press conference held at The Octagon, head-
quarters of The American Institute of Architects.
Rockrise's primary assignment, said Weaver, will be
to spearhead the HUD's drive to raise the quality of de-
sign throughout all of its programs. He will strengthen
working relationships with such design groups as the AIA
and the American Society of Landscape Architects.
The new adviser will also serve as HUD's liaison with
professional associations of builders and developers, and
with universities, research and development firms and
private groups on matters relating to design and esthetics.
Rockrise will provide professional and technical de-
sign assistance for such specific HUD programs as urban
renewal, neighborhood facilities, historic site preservation,
urban mass transit and low-cost housing. Rockrise also
will also direct the HUD Design Awards program.
M IIAlI-Two June recipients of the Bachelor of
Architecture degree from the University of Miami have
been awarded prizes for their work in the University's
department of architecture.
Melvin B. McCorrison of Unity, Maine, has received
the American Institute of Architects medal for excellence
in architecture. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
McCorrison of Unity, and is a member of the AIA stu-
dent chapter at the University.
Thomas F. Rochon of Detroit received the Depart-
mental Award for outstanding leadership, and was ac-
corded second prize in the AIA competition. The son
of Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Rochon of 13052 Corbett, De-
troit, Rochon was president of the AIA student chapter.
GAI\I SVI ,I, -Two University of Florida stu-
dents have been selected by the American Institute of
Architects (AIA) for 1966 scholarship awards.
Richard Howard Stipe will receive the AIA's $1,000
Louis Sullivan Fund Award for graduate studies. A senior
architecture student, Stipe also has been chosen to take
part in an exchange teaching program with the University
of Manchester in England where he will study and teach
next fall.
John Granville Sims receives a $250 tuition awards
from the AIA's Edward Lingley Fund. He is a junior in
the Department of Architecture.
C:( I( \L (;\ 11 I S-Service is the keynote for the
Building Products Information Center, second major de-
velopment at Douglas Village in Coral Gables, according
to James Deen, A.IA., Corporation President.
The Center, under direction of Herbert R. Savage,
A.I.A., is planned to be a vast clearing-house for informa-
tion on products relating to the building industry. In
addition, it will house office and desk space areas now
available to manufacturers of building materials, their rep-
resentatives or agents.
OCTOBER, 1966


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See Panelfold on display at the Galerie of Building Products, Douglas Village.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







CHANGE
During the past 200
days it has been my privi-
lege to serve as President
of the Florida State Board
of Architecture a trust
extended to me by the
other members of the
Board.
In this short length of
time many organizational
tenets and traditional doc-
trines in the operational
procedure of the Board
have been either changed
or abandoned. New guide-
HARRY I. BURNS, JR. lines have been delineated.
Believing that results are the gauge of the spirit of a
group, I offer for review the Board's accomplishments:
(1) For the first time in the fifty-one year history of
the Board, the June written examinations for registration
were held in the drafting rooms of the College of Archi-
tecture at the Uni ersit E of Florida in Gainesville. It is
planned to continue this procedure.
(2) Last April, also for the first time in its history,
the Board met on the campus at the University of Miami
with students and faculty of the College of Architecture.
After this visit, having observed the excellent teaching
facilities and the high quality of student exhibits, the
Board recommended to the National Council early accredi-
tation of the Architectural School at this institution.
(3) Last week the Board met with Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz, President of the University of Florida, to reiterate
its desire to see an architect selected to fill the vacant
deanship of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts at
that Institution. Comments made by Dr. Reitz were most
gratifying. The appointment of an outstanding architect
to this post is expected soon.
(4) The Board has met on several occasions recently
with members of the Florida State Board of Enginecring
Examiners to discuss mutual problems involving the pro-
fessions. Both Boards ratified by resolution a "Guide for
Professional Collaboration in Environmental Design".
(5) The Board, as a charter member in the Southern
Conference, vigorously supports the Regional and the
National Councils of Architectural Registration Boards.
Three Board members hold current appointments on
national committee and one member was elected a director
on the Regional Council. This year, another first time in
the Board's history, all members attended the annual
convention of the National Council.
(6) Plans are now being formulated by the Board
and the University faculty to hold the January written
examinations for registration at the Architectural College
on the University of Miami campus. It is hoped that ex-
aminations in the future may be given alternately, at six
month intervals, on the University of Miami and University
of Florida campuses.
These worthy results have been realized because of the
complete cooperation of the present Board member-archi-
tects with whom I am pleased to serve. They are: Messrs.
I lerbert Anson of Ft. Lauderdale, Pearce Barrett of Talla-
hassee, Archie Parish of St. Petersburg, and William
Webber of Tampa. Each is a leader who subordinates
human feelings not to his own ambition, but to the neces-
sities of architecture and his duty to the profession.
HARRY E. BURNs, JR., AIA
President
Florida State Board of Architecture
OCTOBER, 1966


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The Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
will convene in Miami Beach
and you will be introduced to
the new officers, commissioners
and committee chairmen. I will
turn the post-convention board
meeting over to Hilliard Smith,
the Association's President for
1967. His will be the new task
of leadership . and this is the
last message I will transcribe as
your President.

It is appropriate and fitting
that I commend those officers,
commissioners, chairmen and di-
rectors who have aided me to a
fruitful year. The list of names is
long and space is too short. But
I do extend my personal thanks
to each and every one. Our ef-
forts are chronicled in the Board
Report. Read it and you will un-
derstand my comments. Our rec-
ord is a good one.

At this change of the tide and
this pause in the programs and
activities of the Association. I
would like to say a few words
about the past and a future -
to say farewell.


October 1966

We leave behind many tasks
yet to be completed. Some
should perhaps be held until we
are attuned to the changes. Oth-
ers must be continued to the
eventual benefit of the Associa-


JAMES DEEN, AIA


THE
PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


tion. Leaders of the Association
are frustrated in their continuing
efforts to implement the de-
mands of the membership. We
have members whose interest is
only to belong but not to offer
participation for usefulness. We
have members whose quick criti-
cisms show an unwillingness to
comprehend the demands of the
organization. These frustrations
concern those who, in all sin-
cerity, offer themselves for lead-
ership through your vote at
convention.

The FAAIA has others who
accept and dedicate themselves
to usefulness. This organization
will be beneficial to its members
and the professions. New offi-
cers, commissioners and com-
mittee chairmen will make it so.
1967 needs a full participation
by the membership to accom-
plish these benefits.

We must rededicate our ef-
forts to this task. To offer your-
self for leadership and serve is an
honor. To help those selected to
achieve desired goals is a duty.

Thank you for this honor.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






New Ideas

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School Construction

A SEMINAR

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A nationwide caravan is coming your way -

bringing a seminar designed to provide
a forum for
the architect
the engineer
the school administrator
the building product manufacturer

to discuss:
educational facilities, their
structure, environment,
flexibility, and maintenance
educational trends today's and
tomorrow's and their
their structural needs;
the problems faced by the school designer
and the products and systems that may
help him solve them.


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and a panel of building product
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through the traveling exhibit of school
building products and systems.
Announcement of the appearance of the School Construc-
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of the Producers' Council, will reach you very soon.
Watch for it and plan to attend.
OCTOBER, 1966


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Tempered Safety Glass sections

this big
could have only one label.




BY permaglass
You get a clear view of the action ... with safety and
comfort... in the impressive new Race Track Pavilion at
Pompano Beach, Florida. Spectators are shielded from
wind and rain-yet visibility is unimpaired-behind the
broad expand of 8 ft. x 10 ft. sections of H clear Safeglaze
Tempered Safety Glass. Only Permaglass can provide tem-
pered safety glass in such large sizes.
Extra safety. Permaglass Safeglaze has 5 to 8 times
greater strength than ordiry sheet or plate ... and fail-
safe breakage characteristics. Greater protection against
human accidents, flying objects and high winds. Safeglaze
is produced totolerances previously unavailable. It is flat
and distortion-free. Fully meets local and federal codes
alling for safety glass.
Leading la distributors and contract glaziers supply
Safeglaze in ear sheet, clear plate, gray sheet, gray plate,
bronze plate, heat absorbing plate, or patterned glass. See
our catalog in Sweet's or write for further details.


) permaglass, inc.
EXECUTIVE OFFICES: ARCHITECTURAL SALES OFFICES: PLANTS:
Woodville, Ohio 43469 Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Torrance. Calif Payne. Genoa and M.ib, ry. Oho
3060 S. W. 2nd Avenue 20008 South Normandie Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Phone: 305-525-3481 Phone 213-327-3269 Torrance. California
A/ax. Ontario. Canada


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I
8














































New Palm Beach Internatioeal Airport Terminal
Paln Beach Conty Enginer: Geerge Frost, P.E.
Architects and Engineers: Hetcheen-Miarlie-Bnett, Palm Beec, Fla.
Coordinator: John Marien, A. I. A., Palm Beech, Fla.
General Contractor: Arnold Constructln Company ef Palm Beec
Precast Concrete Waffle Sections: Hoedaille-Devel-Wright Ce.,
Fr. Larderdale
Casting Concrete Weffle Sectuis for Reef

Precast Concrete Adds the Crowning Touch

The architect wanted the effect that the inverted waffle design could
give. Concrete is the only material that would do the desired job
effectively.
Problem: the 35-foot high walls of the main terminal building pre-
vented normal poured-in-place forming.
Solution: the Houdaille-Duval-Wright Company of Fort Lauderdale
"invented" a method of manufacturing precast sections. This allowed
installation by crane at construction site. Each section is 20 feet long,
6 feet wide, 14 inches deep, and weighs 4 tons.
Not only is it a first for this concrete application, but the precast
sections give a more "finished" look than poured-in-place forming
would have allowed. Not evident in the photograph is the handsome,
sculptured exterior columns of this impressive public works project.

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION

Keep Florida Prosperous
Buy Florida Manfoctred Products! General Portland Cement Company
Specify and Use Florid Cements! PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI
OCTOBER, 1966 G












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Look what's happened

to the old steel door!


It used to be the ugly duckling of the
construction industry. Now it poises,
now swings with stately grace,
proudly at the beck and call of the
sophisticated architect.
What we're saying is that Ceco
"Colorstyle" Decor Doors live up to
a reputation. Used by you, they take
on the luster of your artistry. They are
worth considering in this light.
For instance, you can shop for
what you want through countless
variations. The doors come smooth
or embossed, and in the most ap-
pealing colors.
To keep the doors pristine, we ship
them in polyethylene bags inside
cartons. Your contractor erects them
bagged and keeps them bagged. He
puts the hardware on right through
the polyethylene. The bags stay on
till clean-up time.


Ask for catalog 2063-B, or better
still, ask for a Ceco man to bring
samples to your office. The Ceco
Corporation, general offices: 5601
West 26th Street, Chicago, Illinois
60650. Sales offices and plants in
principal cities from coast to coast.

CONTACT YOUR AREA
SALES OFFICE:

Jacksonville, Fla. 32205 441 Lane Ave., N.
Miami (Miami Springs), Fla. 33166 5901 N. W. 74th Ave.
St. Petersburg, Fla. 33733 300 31st Street, N.


CECO I

COLORSTYLE STEEL DOORS







When it rains


it drains


.4This is high school "x". Three days after the rains stopped,
people under its roof were still "up to their ears in leaks."
'VBut it stayed dry as the desert under the roof of high
school "y" (same city), rain or no rain. Zonolite Vermiculite
concrete made the difference.


Zonolite Vermiculite concrete is
the cast-in-place insulation that
a. Provides proper slopes for drainage

ZONOLITE CONCRETE
EXISTING DECK

b.in a seamless, monolithic structure
C with high insulating values that are
d. leak-proof for the life of the building
ZONOLITEO


Zonolite Division of W. R. Grace & Co.,
135 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois 60603


An Editorial


FOCUS:

THE

ARCHITECT

When we convene in Miami
Beach this month, the spotlight of
the state of Florida will be on the
Architect! For the past few months,
we have initiated a campaign to
acquaint and educate the public
about our role in the community.
The Governor of Florida, Haydon
Bums, has issued a proclamation
proclaiming the first week in Octo-
ber as FLORIDA ARCHITECTS
WEEK. Mayors throughout the
state are issuing a similar proclama-
tion making the people more
aware of the architect's work, and
also allowing our architects to be in
personal contact with their mayors
when they collected these proclama-
tions. The Miami Herald will issue
a special Architectural Edition to
salute our profession and our ses-
sion. Local, state and national pub-
lications will be sending their press
representatives to give our assembly
in Miami Beach better coverage
than any other meeting we've ever
had. Associated Press and United
Press have already made arrange-
ments to be at our 52nd Annual
Convention. The spotlight is really
on us so let's make this the best-
attended, most productive conven-
tion ever!
Forns KAROUSATOS
Executive Director


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










ITS NATURAL GAS "TOTAL. ENERGY" FOR GIANT JACKSONVILLE PLAZA! New Regency Shopping
Plaza, with enclosed, air conditioned mall, will be completely independent of electric utility service,
drawing all its energy from natural gas. Installation served by Florida Gas will include nine 450-kilowatt :'
electric generators, one 650-ton centrifugal engine-driven refrigeration machine, one 1000-ton absorp-
tion air-conditioning unit, six million BTU boiler capacity, as well as all-gas service in several
restaurants!

EXPANDED PIPELINE FACIU-l TIES BOOST CAPACITY 23%. Construction of new pipeline facilities
for delivery of ar additional 8~n-illion cubic feet of gas per day, an increase of 23% over present .
capacity is essentially:coo plete. The expanded facilities, placed in service in July, reflect Florida
Gas Transmission Company policy of planned expansion to assure natural gas for Florida's. con-
tinually growing demands. Company i optimistic that Federal Power Commission will grant approval
later this year for further pipeline expansion estimated at some $93 million.
-; ", . ..
ASARhILLECD HOT D1OGSS DRAW 4,500 TO TAMPA MODEL HOMES. When Tampa's new
College il.lagie opened its six model Blue-Star homes, 150 pounds of hot dogs furnished.':
the "come-on" ... but the 4,500 prospects remained to marvel at the allgas built-in ovens:
and surface units, central gas heating and water heaters, gaslights and patio grills. Skyline .
Homes contemplates a total of 300 such homes in the next three years, and PeoplesGas
System has promised an "encore" on the frankfurter feast.

STILL THE "BIG NAMES" GO WITH GAS! Trust the big corporations to check all the angles -
economy, dependability, maintenance, safety, everything. That'swhy it's so significant when so many
of them go gas. For example Montgomery Ward new Jax Retail Store: 350-ton absorption air con-
ditioning, 7000,000 BTlU boiler, restaurant and coffee shop- New Howard Johnson Restaurant in
downtown Miami: alls cooking and water heating Seventeen-unit Sears Town, Ocala: original
plans for heat pumps and stripheating revised to a -gas heat new 5-story IBM office building, Miami:
gas for centrall heat an. reheat on air conditioning. And so it goes on and on!

"CONVERSIONS" ADD BIG NEW BATCH OF "DECISIONS FOR GAS." Miami-central water heating
in 12story Alcazar Hotel from oil to natural gas. Panama City Florida Asphalt Paving Company's
big aggate dryer and hot oil heater from No. 5 fuel oil to natural gas. Miami Miami Menstogs
and Evegreen Apartments from .No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas, etc. etc. etc. Preliminary check shows
over 100: major conversions, statewide, during July alone.

GASLIGHTS ADD GLAMOR, BOOST SALES, DISCOURAGE PROWLERS. New Smyrna's South Florida
Natural Gas reports Skyline Restaurant packing 'em in with interior gaslights, Oceanview Restaurant
controlling yard lights with photo cell. Swank Palm Bay Club in Miami installed 29 gaslights on docks
in mammoth marina, burns them all night for beauty, and security.

GAS SERVICE "LOOKING UP" IN JACKSONVILLE SKYSCRAPERS! In Gulf Life's tower-
restaurant kitchens. In Cathedral Towers, new Episcopal Hi-Rise Retirement Center: two
fT boilers rated at 7,000,000 BTU, plus gas waste incineration. In Florida Publishing's new
V multi-story plant: two 6,600,000 BTU boilers for heating, hot water and processing. Florida
Gas stressed economy and air pollution control in successful "selling" job.

MARTIN-MARIETTA ORLANDO EXPANSION GOING WITH GASI The Martin Company, a division of
Martin-Marietta Corp., has chosen natural gas for heating, water heating and employee's cafeteria in
its big new four-building complex in Orlando Industrial Park. Other Central Florida headlines: natural
gas scored a clean sweep in the area's 3 Holiday Inns for cooking, heating and hot water systems; and
Orlando Quality Court liked gas water heating in present 180-room unit so well that new 60-room addi-
tion will go same route.

TREND TO GAS FOR AIR CONDITIONING BECOMING A STAMPEDE! Roll call of new natgas air con-
ditioning installations- MIAMI: Miami Review, newspaper; Pan American Exterminating, offices. NEW
SMYRNA BEACH: Hobo Fried Chicken Restaurant. TAMPA: Alessi Bros. Bakery; Dr. Reginald Wayne
Pitts, chiropractic physician. MIAMI BEACH: Miami Beach Pharmacy. BAL HARBOUR: Bal Harbour
Club. NORTH MIAMI BEACH: Ice Cream Luau; Alson Mfg. Co., fluorescent lighting fixtures. HOLLY-
WOOD: Southern Photo Service, photo finishers, offices. DANIA: Jimmy's Italian Restaurant. FORT
LAUDERDALE: Florida State Vision Service, Drake College.

Reproduction of Information contained In this advertisement is authorized without reatric-
tion by the Florida Natural Gas Association, S. Dixie & Fern St., West Palm Beach, Florida.















INTERIORS


"RP", as nearly everyone knows, stands for
Richard Plumer ... a name made famous by
architects and their clients whom we've pleased for over
forty years. A major bank, an office building, your new home or
boat, as well as redesigning and refurbishing are all in the scope of our
complete interior design services. You will not only enjoy working with our
staff, but will be delighted with the results. So, when you think of fine interiors, think of


155 NORTHEAST 40th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 33137


Telephone 751-9775
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










R
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PHOTOGRAPHY
I
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C
T
T M

r iTpu, .NOMUN
A :379 rLAINO DoR.
MIAMI *EACH. rFLA.
L [31OS JE K -4 3RD 4



ARCHITECTURAL AND
RELATED PHOTOGRAPHY
FOR THE DISCRIMINATING
PERSON OR FIRM



EXTERIORS

INTERIORS

SCALE MODELS

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL

LANDSCAPE

BLDG. PRODUCTS

FURNITURE

DISPLAYS



PORTFOLIOS

BROCHURES

POSTCARDS



PHOTO MURALS
BLK & WH COLOR
LARGE SIZE DISPLAY
TRANSPARENCIES
CUSTOM CROPPING
AND PRINTING



BLACK & WHITE

COLOR

PRINTS

TRANSPARENCIES




SEE THIS AND OTHER PHOTOS
AT DOUGLAS VILLAGE IN THE
GALERIE OF BUILDING
PRODUCTS.

GET FURTHER INFORMATION AT
THE RECEPTION DESK OR CALL
ME COLLECT AT 305/538-4380






Workshop on Church Architecture


Sacred Space


An intensive workshop on church architecture will be held November
8-10 at 3000 S. Ocean Boulevard, Boca Raton.


The seminar, which is entitled "Sacred Space: Place and Cult," is
being sponsored by the Palm Beach Chapter of the AIA, the World
Center for Liturgical Studies Inc., and the Commission on Church Archi-
tecture and Allied Arts of the (Episcopal) Diocese of South Florida.


This workshop, designed primarily for Florida architects, clergy,
building committees and interested laity, will have three national
speakers:


Patrick J. Quinn, A.R.I.B.A., associate professor of architecture,
University of California. Mr. Quinn is an architect, writer and lecturer of
international reputation. His work in the United States, Ireland and
Italy includes churches, schools, hotels, etc.


Reverend Aidan Kavanagh, O.S.B., S.T.D. a Benedictine monk of
St. Meinrad's Archabby in Indiana, and professor of sacramental theology
and liturgy. Fr. Aidan is Vice-President Board of Directors of the World
Center for Liturgical Studies in Boca Raton, and is consulting editor of
liturgical publications, Benziger Bros., N.Y.


Odele Prather, artist, sculptor and designer. Mrs. Prather, a resident
of Pennsylvania, is a noted specialist in the liturgical arts, designing
stained glass, slab glass and mosaics for churches. She recently completed
all the slab glass windows in the Dwight D. Eisenhower Chapel at
Abilene, Kansas.


The workshop, which will allow limited attendance, will convene at
4 p.m. on November 8 and conclude at 3 p.m. on November 10. Fee is
$30, inclusive of room and meals.








t


tempting eas


begh


GAS

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
YOUR NATURAL GAS UTILITY

Apkpa, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
iarts, Central Florida Gas Corp.
mlesmtatsl, City of Blountstown
Bec RIM Florida Public Utilities Co.
lntaM Buck, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Iradee Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Coattam e. Town of Chattahoochee
Chile,. City of Chipley
Clanater, City of Clearwater
Cenuet Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocai, City Gas Co.
Cocaa leok. City Gas Co.
Cerail Gaes City Gas Co.
Cm t Ciy City o@ Crescent City
Cter lidge, City Gas Co.
oaylta kb Florida Gas Co.
DeLamd, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delay lacb, Florida Public Utilities Co.
EaMu alte City Gas Co.
Eets, Florida Gas Co.
Fort Ladardals. Peoples Gas System
Frt Meads, City of Fort Meade
Fat Plce, City of Fort Pierce
Galatess a, Gainesville Gas Co.
Seeva Alabama, Geneva County Gas
District
l bes City, Central Florida Gas Corp.
NMlm City Gas Co.
MHlluoed, Peoples Gas System
Jadckm llle Florida Gas Co.
Iy. Town of Jay
Lake h d, Central Florida Gas Corp.
LCae l City of Lake City
Labeiad, Florida Gas Co.
LoA Wales. Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lab Weoa Florida Public Utilities Co.
Leliarg. City of Leesburg
Lia 0a City or Live Oak
Madllas City of Madison
Muerimo, City of Mariann
lim.. e, City Gas Co.
M i, Florida Gas Co.
Mii lack, Peoples Gas System
Meat Dm, Florida Gas Co.
New S u leach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
Nrt Miam Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gult Natural Gas Corp.
Op Lcka, City Gas Co.
Oreids, Florida Gas Co.
Pa a Palatka Gas Authority
Palm leM., Florida Public Utilities Co.
Palm labk Sases. City O@
Palm Beach Gardens
PsmaM City. Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
P ala City Of Pensacola
Pery, City o Perry
Plat City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
PFrt St. le, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
Rlecedge, City Gas Co.
St PetablK United Gas Co.
Seafed, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Saraest Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Sturb, City of Stark
Tallaaasee, City ol Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Tvares, Florida Gas Co.
Tiuseille, City Gas Co.
Umatila, Florida Gas Co.
Valparaiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Bech. Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williast City of Williston
Winter Carde, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Have, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Pari, Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








tempting ideas

begin

with

GAS
TAMPA GOURMETS AGREE...NOTHING COOKS LIKE A FLAME!




Four of Tampa's outstanding restaurants have been
tempting gourmet tastes for years with delightful
cuisine prepared by talented chefs and cooked with
NATURAL GAS. Nothing compares with NATURAL GAS
for versatility, economy and complete temperature
control. It's no wonder 90% of America's restaurants
cook with GAS.
You, too will find NATURAL GAS the perfect servant for
all commercial, industrial and residential needs. Call
your local NATURAL GAS Utility today... let him tempt
you with some profitable ideas now!




Served by Peoples Gas System
Florida's Pipeline to the Future...
serving 35 Natural Gas Distribution
Companies in over 100 communities
G AS throughout the state.
WINTER PARK / FLORIDA
OCTOBER, 1966













































Ramo #2 in solid 3/4 North American Walnut with Sapwood.





V 4 j /ll ~presents a collection of ARCHITECTURAL
CARVED WOOD GRILLES specifically for the
Architect's and Designer's use in controlling
flowing space in the contemporary environment.


See our exhibit at the
FAAIA Convention, Booth 91,
Deauville Ilotel.

Telephone ( 505) 344-1691
'l~U(t ~MANUFACTURING COMPANY 3620 High Street, N.E. Albuquerque, New Mexico
18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













CALENDAR
October 5
Annual Meeting of Board of Di-
rectors, Pre-Convention 10
a.m., Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach, Fla.
October 5 -8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.
October 8
Meeting of Board of Directors,
Post-Convention--10 a.m., Deau-
ville Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.
October 12
Seminar-New Ideas for School
Construction-International Inn,
Tampa (Crystal Room) 1:30
p.m. Sponsored by the Producers'
Council, West Coast Chapter, and
the College of Education, Uni-
versity of South Florida. Cock-
tails and Dinner following.
October 20
Seminar-New Ideas for School
Construction 1:00 P.M.,
Assembly Room, Dupont Plaza
Hotel, Miami. Sponsored by the
Producers' Council, South Florida
Chapter. Cocktails and Dinner
following.
October 26
Seminar-New Ideas for School
Construction George Washing-
ton Hotel, Jacksonville 1:00
p.m. Sponsored by the Producers'
Council, Jacksonville Chapter.
Cocktails and Dinner following.
November 8- 10
Workshop on Church Architec-
ture, 3000 S. Ocean Blvd., Boca
Raton. Seminar sponsored by
Palm Beach Chapter, AIA; World
Center for Liturgical Studies, Inc.;
with Commission on Church Ar-
chitecture and Allied Arts of the
Episcopal Diocese of South Flor-
ida.

OCTOBER, 1966


this is





... a colorful and textured finish

for all fresh concrete floor surfaces
Developed in Lambert's Florida Laboratories, KEESTONE is a specially formulated
powder, containing properly graded aggregates, in a ready-to-use form. Applied to freshly
poured concrete floor slabs, by dust-on or broadcast method, KEESTONE is floated and
troweled into the surface to simulate the natural keystone. The entire operation is completed
while concrete is in a plastic state. U A KEESTONE finish assures you of a colorful and
textured surface that is slip-proof and glare-proof with uniformity of color over any size
area. The finish is permanently "fused" to become a monolithic part of the concrete floor.
N KEESTONE'S dramatic surface is ideal for concrete patios, swimming pool and deck
areas, showroom floors... in fact, for any exterior or interior concrete floor surface where
a decorative, natural stone effect is desired. Resistant to heavy traffic and adverse weather
conditions, KEESTONE is a lasting complement to architectural design and landscape. I
You will be assured of a durable and distinctive appearance when you specify all concrete
floor surfaces to be finished with KEESTONE. Write for AIA File Brochure.
LAMBERTCORPORATION of FLORIDA
Plant and offices: 2125 W. Central Blvd. P. 0. Box 2226 Orlando, Florida
Manufacturers of: Paints Lacquers e Waterproofings Architectural Coatings
Plants in: Orlando, Fla. Houston, Tex. Grand Rapids, Mich. 0 High Point, N.C.
A subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings, Inc.









FOR


GREATER


RETURN


ON CAPITAL


INVESTMENT


1 I I IfE I


..
~ixV


IlIllhlIfi


- T


...make your next building all-electric


I


Aleuutgmu
'-'EeL'

a -
Ft. Moako
Ft. Flor
Gahmlosui
Jakeuillo


iacbaeevillo Buad
K21 Wedl
Kusaimes
We Muo


Laoeluand
Lake Worth
Leoburg
Moor Haen
ML Dor
Newberry
Nwe Smyrna Beach
Ocali
Orlando
Quincr
St. Cloud
Sebring
Starke
Tallahas
Waurbula
Wilitdon


No wonder architects, engineers, builders and owners are SOLD on
"Total Electric" commercial construction. In Florida, an all-electric building
Is more economical to build, own, and operate than one designed in the
conventional manner.

LOWER INITIAL COST Savings on construction costs can be achieved
through the elimination of boilers, stacks, fuel storage tanks, insulated
piping, circulating pumps, high-pressure valves and other equipment.
LOWER ANNUAL OWNING COST All-electric construction means
simpler control and operation, requiring fewer and less-skilled operating
employees. Heating costs are kept to the minimum through the integrated
lighting/heating/cooling system "electrical space conditioning."


Florida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Owner: Hillsborough County Board of Public Instruction. Architect: McLane-Ranon-Mclntosh-Bernardo. Designing Architect: Rick Rados, Tampa,
Florida. Structural Engineer Consultant: Sidney L. Barker, Tampa, Florida. General Contractor: Ellis Construction Company, Tampa, Florida.


Imagination and concrete


turned into 24 classrooms

$Sf58*
-1 per sq. ft.
(including air conditioning)
Williams Elementary School, Tampa, dramatizes the ability
of Florida architects to create schools of both design indi-
viduality and low cost.
Here, the architect capitalized handsomely on the versa- -- ---
tility of concrete. The design, embodying a concrete frame,
prestressed roof and concrete masonry walls, features an L
unusual high-accessibility arrangement of air-conditioning
and mechanical systems. ME CH == T--
Each classroom complex stands as two structural frames, CHASE
divided by a floor-to-roof mechanical chase through the center
of the building, providing ready access from both ends.
Absence of beams at the chase top permits the air-condi-
tioning feeder duct to fit snugly against the stem of the pre-
stressed double tee. Chase walls in the classrooms are utilized
for recessed bookcases, storage and duct outlets and returns.
Increasingly, architects as well as school boards are looking
to concrete-not for its design potential alone, but its fire MECHANICAL CHASE DETAIL
safety, insulating and acoustic values and life-long economy.
mi PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
*Calculated per A.I.A. document D-101 1612 Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization of cement manufar 'rers to improve and
[ E extend the uses of portland cement and concrete
OCTOBER, 1966 21


















































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'building.
e right glasses
r comfort while
'y toe:ower heating and air
Caln him or write: Glass
services, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company,
.'Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222.


PPG MAKES THE GLASS THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
Smxai mark of the Ptttburgh Plate Glass Company




Alger-Sullivan Company
Century, Florida
WOOD PRESERVATIVE PROCESS
Agency- Dodson, Craddock and
Born Advertising, Inc.
PO Drawer A
Pensacola, Florida 32502
Architectural Research Corp.
12068 Woodbine
Detroit, Michigan 48239
PRE-CAST AGGREGATE PANELS
Agency Cloudman Oldham
19427 West McNichols
Detroit, Michigan
Behlen Manufacturing Company
Columbus, Nebraska
ROOF SYSTEMS AND LOAD-BEARING
CURTAIN WALLS
Agency Robert R. Sanford, Adv.
814 Argyle Bldg.
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Bird A Son Inc.
Charleston, South Carolina 29405
SOLID VINYL BUILDING
MATERIALS
Agency Reach, McClinton 6
Co., Inc.
4390 Prudential Center
Boston, Mass. 02199
Peter Bromer
2927 Flamingo Drive
Miami Beach, Florida
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Carolina Seating Company
Horst Gunther Contract
Furnishing Center
4111 No. Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 33127
OFFICE FURNITURE
The Coco Corporation
5601 West 26 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60650
COLORSTYLE STEEL DOORS
Agency The Fensholt
Advertising Agency, Inc.
17 East Erie Street
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Certified Plumbers of South Florida
2526 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED
MASTER PLUMBERS AND
CERTIFIED JOURNEYMEN
Cline Aluminum Products, Inc.
112 32 Avenue West
Bradenton, Florida
ARCHITECTURAL ALUMINUM
DOORS
Customwood Manufacturing
Company
3620 High Street, NE
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107
ARCHITECTURAL CARVED WOOD
GRILLES
Douglas Village Corporation
Douglas Road at the Trail
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
BUILDING PRODUCT EXHIBITS
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
1001 SE 11 Street


Hialeah, Florida
DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc.
921 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami, Florida
MANUFACUTRER OF KITCHENS FOR
MOTELS, RESORTS AND HOTELS
Agency Taylor-Chalmers
1001 Washington Street
Michigan City, Indiana 46360
Endure-A-Lifetime Products, Inc.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH
QUALITY ALUMINUM BUILDING
SPECIALTIES
Agency Advertising Directors
I Lincoln Road Building
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Jos. L. Rozier Machinery Co.,
Orlando-Tampa
Kelly Tractor Company, Miami-
West Palm Beach-Clewiston
Ring Power Corporation,
Jacksonville-Tallahassee-Ocala
PACKAGED ELECTRICITY FOR
PRIME AND STANDBY POWER
Agency Frv/Hammond/Barr
600 E. Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801
Florida Concrete & Products
Association
PO Box 160
Winter Park, Florida 32790
ASSOCIATION OF MASONRY UNIT
MANUFACTURERS
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
3737 NW 43 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
CUSTOM-CAST PLAQUES
Florida Gas Transmission Company
Orlando and Orange Avenues
Winter Park, Florida 32790
GAS--COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Fry/lIammond/Barr
600 E. Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801
Florida Industries Exposition
Exposition Park
Orlando, Florida
EXHIBITION OF FLORIDA-MADE
PRODUCTS
Agency Fry/l ammond/Barr
600 E. Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801
Florida Investor-Owned Electric
Utilities
Florida Power & Light Company
Gulf Power Company
Florida Power Corporation
Tampa Electric Company
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
Agency Bishopric/Green/
Fielden, Inc.
3361 SW 3 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
PO Box 2402
Lakeland, Florida 33803


Listed her are firms which
have helped this Official
Journal of the FAAIA grow
during the past year. All
services, materials and
products which they make
or sell are of quality to
merit your specification.
They seek your approval.


STATEWIDE MUNICIPAL ELECTRIC
UTILITIES
Agency--Walter 1i. Mitchell
229-B Pasadena Place
Orlando, Florida 32803
Florida Natural Gas Association
1500 E. Highway #50
Winter Garden, Florida
GAS COOKING AND HEATING
Agency Palmer Tyler and Co.
3000 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33137
Florida Portland Cement Division
General Portland Cement Company
PO Box 1528
Tampa, Florida 33601
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency Byington-Taliaferro,..Inc.
Riverside Professional Building
Tampa, Florida
GEM Aluminum Products, Inc.
715 Barnett Drive
Lake Worth, Florida
ALUMINUM DOORS AND FRAMES
Georgia-Pacific Corporation
PO Box 311
Portland, Oregon 97207
Jacksonville-Miami-Orlando-Tampa
PLYWOOD AND PANELING
Gory Roofing Tile Manufacturing,
Inc.
1773 NE 205 Street
North Miami, Florida
CONCRETE ROOFING TILES
Agency E. J. Scheaffer
1090 NE 79 Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Houdaille-Duval-Wright Company
A Division of Houdaille Industries
1000 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PRODUCTS
AND SERVICES
Jenkins Brick Company
PO Box 91
Montgomery 1, Alabama
COMPLETE LINE OF UNUSUAL
FACING BRICK AND HOLLOW
BUILDING TILE
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
3 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
MANUFACTURER OF STEEL
Agency Palmer Willson (
Worden Inc.
660 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10021
J. 1. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
1101 Brickell Avenue
Miami, Florida 33131












12th


Annual

Advertisers

Honor Roll
FINANCING FOR CONSTRUCTION
Agency Woody Kepner
3361 SW Third Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
Knoll Associates, Inc.
111 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida
320 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10022
FURNISHINGS AND FABRICS
Lambert Corporation of Florida
2125 West Central Avenue
Orlando, Florida
WATERPROOFING MATERIALS,
CONCRETE
Lehigh Portland Cement Company
Allentown, Pa.
District Sales Office:
Jacksonville, Fla. 32216
PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS
Agency Lewis 6 Gilman
6 Penn Center Plaza
Philadelphia, Pa. 19103
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company
811 Madison Avenue
Toledo, Ohio
GLASS PRODUCTS
Agency Fuller 6 Smith 6 Ross
55 Public Square
Cleveland, Ohio 44113
Mercer Plastics Company, Inc.
1 Jabez Street
Newark, New Jersey 07105
VINYL BUILDING PRODUCTS
Agency Alden Advertising
49 West 45 Street
New York, New York 10036
Merry Brothers Brick and Tile
Company
Augusta, Georgia
STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS
Agency- Withers 6 Carson
700 Security Federal Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201
Muzak Corporation
1646 San Marco Boulevard
Jacksonville 7, Florida
1859 Bay Road, Miami Beach, Fla.
3107 Edgewater Drive, Orlando, Fla.
PO Box 1803, Tampa 1, Fla.
PROGRAMMED BACKGROUND MUSIC
Agency Marsteller Inc.
800 Second Avenue
New York, New York 10017


Oil Fuel Institute of Florida, Inc.
OIL HEATING
Agency- McAllister-Barker, Inc.
PO Box 6966
Orlando, Florida 32803
Panolfold Doors Inc.
1090 East 17 Street
Hialeah, Florida
WOOD FOLDING PARTITIONS
Permaglass, Inc.
215 W. Main Street
Woodville, Ohio 43469
3060 SW Second Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
SAFEGLAZE TEMPERED SAFETY
GLASS
Agency Beeson-Reichert, Inc.
1806 Madison Avenue
Toledo 2, Ohio
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
1 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
GLASS COMMERCIAL MARKET -
GLASS CONDITIONING
Agency- Ketchum, MacLeod 6
Grove, Inc.
4 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
Richard Plumer Business Interiors
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
INTERIOR DECORATORS
Agency Blackwood Advertising
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
Portland Cement Association
1612 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
PORTLAND CEMENT AND
PRODUCTS
Agency J. Walter Thompson
410 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 11, Illinois
Prescolit Manufacturing
Corporation
1251 Doolittle Drive
San Leandro, California
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Agency Lennen 6 Newell
248 Battery Street
San Francisco, California 94111
Reflactal Borg-Warner Corporation
1000 W. 120 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60643
ALUMINUM FOIL BUILDING
INSULATION
Agency The Biddle Company
108 East Market Street
Bloomington, Illinois 61702
Rheem Manufacturing Company
Ruud Commercial Water Heaters
7600 So. Kedzic Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60652
COMMERCIAL GAS WATER
HEATERS
Agency Bronner ,6 Haas, Inc.
35 E. Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601


Robbins Manufacturing Company
Tampa and Orlando, Florida
PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER
Agency Louis Benito
507 Morgan Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
Shelton, Ullmann, Smith & Streich,
Inc.
600 SE 2 Court
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
CONTRACT AND COMMERCIAL
INTERIORS
Agency George Knoerr
2701 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Solite Corporation
Richmond, Virginia
LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS
AND STRUCTURAL CONCRETE
Agency- Cabell Eanes Inc.
509 West Grace Street
Richmond 20, Virginia
Southern Bell Telephone
and Telegraph Company
Atlanta, Georgia
COMMUNICATIONS
Agency- Tucker Wayne 6
2700 Peachtree Center Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Stairbuilders
Route 66
McCook, Illinois 60525
PREFABRICATED METAL
STAIRBUILDER UNITS
Agency Martin-Engel 6
Associates
423 Tenth Street
Wilmette, Illinois 60091
Stresscon International, Inc.
1000 NW 57 Avenue
Miami, Florida
PRECAST AND PRESTRESSED
PRODUCTS
Trinity White,
General Portland Cement Co.
Ill West Monroe Street
Chicago, Ill.
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency-Alex T. Franz
1 East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601
United States Steel
5 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
STEEL PRODUCTS
Agency Batten, Barton,
Durstine 6 Osborn, Inc.
I Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
F. Graham Williams Co.
1690 Monroe Drive, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
MASONRY BUILDING MATERIALS,
PRODUCTS
Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace & Co.
135 So. LaSalle Street
Chicago, Illinois
LIGHWEIGHT INSULATING FILL
Agency Fuller 6 Smith 6 Ross
410 No. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611













Douglas Village Corp., Douglas Road and Tamiami Trail, Coral Gables, Florida

The Quality Exhibitors at the Galerie of Building Products welcome
Members of FAAIA to Dade County and extend an invitation to visit
historic Douglas Village, a foremost architectural landmark at
Douglas Road & SW 8th Street in Coral Gables.


ACME KITCHENS OF FLA., INC.
ADAMS BUILDING SUPPLIES, INC.
ALLIED STEEL PRODUCTS
ALUMINUM MFG. INDUSTRIES, INC.
AMERICAN KITCHENS
ALDORA ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY
BY PETER R. BROMER
BLACK BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY
CERTIFIED PLUMBERS OF S. FLORIDA
CHAMPION MANUFACTURING CO., INC.
CLIMA COAT, INC.
CUSTOMWOOD MANUFACTURING CO.
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSN.
DAVIS NURSERY & LANDSCAPING CO.
DESIGNERS FLOORING CO.
DEVOE PAINT COMPANY
DWOSKIN, INC.
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
DUROMATIC WATER HEATER
ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC.
FARREY'S WHOLESALE HARDWARE CO., INC.
FEDERAL MILLWORK CORP.
FLORIDA GLASS & MIRROR CO.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORP.
W. R. GRACE & CO.
CONTRACT FURNISHING CENTER
HAMILTON TURF EQUIPMENT CO.
HURRICANE AWNING SHUTTER CO., INC.
MIAMI TILE & TERRAZZO, INC.
MILLER INDUSTRIES, INC.
MIMS & THOMAS MANUFACTURING CO., INC.
NATIONAL LEAD CO., PHILADELPHIA BRANCH
NESBITT & COMPANY
NEVAMAR COMPANY
PALM BEACH CLAY TILE CO.
SEABROOK WALLPAPERS


SOUTHERN BELL TEL. & TEL. CO.
STRESSCON INTERNATIONAL, INC.
ALUMA SCREEN PANELS, INC.
AMERICAN CANVAS PRODUCTS CORP.
ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE, INC.
AR-LITE PANELS, INC.
DAVID BUTT
CATALINA POOLS, INC.
COLOROC OF MIAMI
CLIMATROL CORP.
DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLA., INC.
THE FADEX CORP. OF AMERICA
FLA. BRICK & CLAY CO., INC.
FLA. TILE INDUSTRIES, INC.
GORY ROOFING MFG., INC.
HOTPOINT
JOHNS-MANVILLE
MODERN PARTITIONS, INC.
PALM CREST DESIGNS, INC.
QUALITY WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.
RICHARD PLUMER
PREMIX PRODUCTS, INC.
ROWELL-HARNAP DIST. CORP.
ROYAL AIR CONDITIONING CORPORATION
SYMMONS SHOWER SYSTEMS
STONE FLEX, INC.
STORES RESEARCH CORP.
STYLE-RITE OF AMERICA
TUB MASTER
TRULY NOLEN, INC.
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
UNIVERSITY NATIONAL BANK
VAN ATTEN-McKELVEY CORP.
KURT WALDMANN PHOTOGRAPHY
WALTON BUILDING PRODUCTS, INC.
WALTON WHOLESALE CORP.
WINDOW MASTER CORP.
YALE OGRON MANUFACTURING CO., INC.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














































THE PLATNER COFFEE TABLE
DESIGNED BY WARREN PLATNER, A.I.A.

If any table can be called an architectural achievement, this
one can.
To make it, steel rods must be held in place with micrometer
accuracy, while hundreds of welds are applied. The slightest error
would be exaggerated many times by the optical effect of the rods.
The top comes in either glass, wood or marble. The steel rod
base in bright nickel or dark bronze finish.
The Platner collection includes this coffee table, an easy
chair with ottoman, lounge chair, arm chair, stool, side tables and
a dining table.
Should you wish to see them all, please write for our Platner
brochure. Knoll Associates, Inc., Furniture and Textiles,
320 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10022. Knoll
International operates in 26 countries.


The Platncr Collection is now on display in the Knoll Slho\wromn, 111 N.E. 40tl Street.


OCTOBER, 1966








Quality


Thru Responsibility


in Planning.


e Door

Quality!


GEM-DOORS SHOWN AT LANTANA JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Arch.lecl. SMITH & SELZER, Lake Worth
r ".


Extruded Aluminum

DOORS and FRAMES

Heliarc Welded


VISIT US
AT
BOOTH 61


nL T PRODUCTS, INC.
Lake Worth, Florida Telephone 585-1766
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Focus


Specify


Ui


*





.'r
:e'
^.

';E .


)3;


"*~i
:'i; ..;
"'"."










Here, for the first time,


a truly competitive stainless steel fenestration system (Turn page for the story)


Il


__________________ I.


I *.. : ;.


.~II
:"


TV77.. .


I '
.r.
.
.a~C~.:











Announcing

Ultimet
a truly competitive stainless
steel fenestration system that
is available now for architectural
applications-for new construction
or building renovation.


USS ULTIMET Stainless Steel Wall Framing is
an entirely new architectural design concept
which takes advantage of modern manufactur-
ing methods. ULTIMET components give the
architect a completely integrated series of
structurally efficient and easily fabricated and
erected stainless steel shapes that lend them-
selves to a great variety of architectural
expressions and applications.
All USS ULTIMET shapes are roll-formed, to
make the best use of Type 304 stainless steel's
remarkable properties. This permits economic
achievements in the structural design, fabri-
cation and erection of stainless steel curtain
walls never before possible. Roll-forming also
results in closer tolerances than possible with
conventional custom manufacturing methods.
This is one of the reasons why USS ULTIMET
components can be erected more simply and
quickly than any previous stainless steel wall
framing system.
Only seven basic shapes are required to
provide a variety of architectural treatments.
The abrasion- and dent-resistant components
are fabricated and shipped "knocked down" to
the job site, ready to erect. Joining costs are
minimal because precise part-to-part uni-
formity assures mate-fitting of all shapes.
There are no exposed fasteners-no welding.
In fact, most of the members simply lock into
place. USS ULTIMETframingallowsfor normal
thermal and building movement. The
system controls water infiltration
because of its built-in drainage feature. Glass
and infill panels can be installed from either
the inside or the outside of the building.
USS ULTIMET framing is here now! It is com-
petitive! Components are readily available from
inventories maintained by United States Steel.


USS ULTIMET... the ultimate in curtain
wall simplicity and excellence









































































































































































This mark tells you a product is made of stainless steel.


II~








~
"'B16~YII.: .
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Q" ,






Ul met Doors i
Only four roll-formed shapes are required to
frame the USS ULTIMET Narrow-Stile Door. A
one-piece channel-gasket is fitted around
the perimeter of the glass, and the framing
members are simply tapped into place. Only one
screw in each corner completes the assembly,
and a simple adjustment in each corner squares
it up. USS ULTIMET Doors accommodate standard
locks, hinges and closer and combine maximum
visibility with security.



tummet
Horizontally Pivoted Windows
The USS ULTIMET Horizontally Pivoted Window
is attractive and practical. Designed to pivot
3600 horizontally for emergency ventilation and
ease of cleaning from the interior, it is easy to
fabricate and install. Only one basic shape is
required for the vent, and the basic grid members
provide the frame for the sash. The design pre-
sents a flush appearance around its entire
perimeter, with neat, narrow sight lines. USS
ULTIMET Windows are snug and weather-tight and
meet the NAAMM test requirements.


USS ULTIMET components are available
now. Send the coupon today for your copy of the
book, "USS ULTIMET Stainless Steel Wall
Framing," or contact a USS Architectural Prod-
ucts Representative through your nearest USS
Construction Marketing or Sales Office. USS and
ULTIMET are trademarks.

r-------------------------------
United States Steel
I Architectural Products Section
Room 9297
I 525 William Penn Place
I Pittsburgh, Pa. 15230
E] Please send my free copy of "USS ULTIMET Stain-
less Steel Wall Framing."
i] Please have a representative call.
Name
I Title
I Firm I
i Address _____ ____
I City State- Zip Code-



G United States Steel: where the big idea is innovation











SUPPORT
YOUR PUBLICATION

When writing to
manufacturers about new
products or advertisements
first seen here ...

tell them you saw it in ...

The
FLORIDA
ARCHITECT


the 52nd Annual Convention and Building Products

Exhibit of the FAAIA October 5-8







MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA


M uzak sound Muzak sound systems provide building-wide commu-
system s nications. Speakers are balanced for full range reproduction of
syste m s programmed background music and voice-paging or public
^ te:s f ed addressing. Your local Muzak franchiser can provide
are designed expert assistance in placing speakers for exact cover-
fa e e s i age according to size, ambient noise, and special needs of
Ifor voi e the areas to be installed. Whenever you need versatile sound
aPF41 l mi4 systems, call your local /
iand m usi c Muzak franchiser. .n..oy /











Jakomlilles Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orland: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1808
Miami Beeo: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road

OCTOBER, 1966 3


We are honored to headquarter

























Civic Buildings throughout F
(TAXPAYERS PROFIT BY T1


With civic buildings increasingly becoming centers of year-round com-
munity activities, flameless electric cuts costs as the source for all
cooling, heating, lighting and power.
The civic buildings shown here typify Florida's growing trend toward
ALL-ELECTRIC... signified by the All-Electric Building Award and the
Award of Merit for Electrical Excellence.
Cheaper than in combination with flame-type fuels, the total-electric
concept lowers construction costs and reduces maintenance expense,


S..- .. '


Florida's Electic Companies (


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.' ''.~:..;..L. S. .......


'. ':: : ..























ida are going Total-Electric
.AMELESS ADVANTAGES)

:leaning and redecorating. Architects can effect significant savings and
achieve greater flexibility of design.
Automatic, flameless reverse-cycle electric air conditioning offers
greater year-round comforts and eliminates big-expense items like boiler
'ooms, fuel storage facilities, flues and vents.
Get the money-saving facts! You and your architect or engineer are
invited to consult your electric utility company at any time, without
obligation.


jI


hk'""


ax-paying. Investor-owned


OCTOBER, 1966


* :
















THE
PRESIDENT'S
GREETINGS
to the
FLORIDA REGIONAL CONVENTION
Miami Beach, Florida
October 5 8, 1966

I welcome this opportunity to greet the architects of the Florida region
and send you my best wishes on the occasion of your annual regional
convention.
You will be discussing one of the most pressing and vital areas of concern
to our profession: our relationship with the community and the contributions
that we can make to its future. The architect, design, and community are, we
have only recently begun to discover, interdependent elements in a society in
which a full and decent life is possible. Take away any one of them and the
others lose meaning and coherence. If architecture and the community are
mutually exclusive, as they seem to have been for decades, design will be recog-
nizable chiefly by a few isloated beautiful buildings in an overwhelming mass
of mediocrity.
The new revolution of change which is upon us makes it imperative that
our profession analyze, restudy and, if necessary, revise many of our traditional
methods of practice, education, and design in order to serve today's pressing
needs of our major clients, business and government. These needs involve
almost exclusively the desperate and growing problems of urban life.
Of even greater importance is the necessity to change our traditional isola-
tion toward community affairs. For unless every architect immerses himself to
the best of his ability in the political and social life of the community and
places himself in the maximum possible position to influence community sen-
timent, we will have no opportunity to provide a physical environment in which
good design is possible.
Charles M. Nes, Jr., FAIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









FOCUS:


COMMUNITY


FOCUS: CONVENTION





1he program for the 1966 Conmention is certainly one of the most inviting, vital
and promising schedules ever offered to the architects of Flonda. Ecnr day brings
interesting opportunities of great benefit- important seminars, outstanding architects,
our own legislative counsel. two leading candidates for Governor of Hlonda. and so
much morel On the next two pages. you'll find outlined a full schedule of business
sessions, luncheons, banquets, and fun-events- check the list carefully and be sure to
crowd in as much as possible. A multitude of new ideas, new theories, new solutions
-and new people-are waiting to bring new benefits to your architectural practice.
It's all yours for the taking at the 52nd Annual IAAIA Comention.

As you tour through the Building Product Exhibits, keep your ces open for the
constantly-changing location of special Visittion Prize boxes. Drop in the ippropri.ate
ticket stubs and .ou could win one of these excellent prizes: a 19-inch Emerson
portable television set . an Emerson solid-state Stereo phonograph . an SCM
portable electric typewriter . or a Polaroid 101 Color Camera!


CONVENTION
CO-CHAIRMEN


Robert Boerema


Henry Riccio


OCTOBER, 1966











CONVENTION









WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5


SCHEDULE









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6


8:30 A.M. Move in and set up Building Prod-
to uct Exhibits and Architectural Ex-
6:00 P.M. hibits (all day-Napoleon Room)

8:30 A.M. FAAIA Executive Committee Break-
fast Meeting-President James Deen
presiding (Regency Executive Suite,
Lower Lobby)


9:30 A.M.
to
6:00 P.M.

10:00 A.M.
to
Noon


Noon
to
'2:00 P.M.




Noon
to
5:00 P.M.


Registration (Lobby)



FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting
-President James Deen presiding
(Charlemagne Room-Main Lobby)

Board of Directors Luncheon
(FAAIA Officers, new and old
Board members, Chapter Officers,
Past Presidents, with wives and
other invited guests) (Richelieu
Room-Main Lobby)

Ladies Hospitality Room (Normandy
Room-Mezzanine)


2:30 P.M. Past Presidents Advisory Council
Meeting (Regency Executive Suite)
2:30 P.M. FAAIA General Committee Meet-
ings
Resolutions Committee-

2:30 P.M. Council of Commissioners Meeting
-Vice President Hilliard T. Smith
presiding

6:30 P.M. Gala Party- Host: Florida South
Chapter, AIA "Belles & Buoys"--
Boat departs from Deauville dock


8:00 A.M.
to 6:00 P.M.

9:00 A.M.
to
5:00 P.M.

'9:00 A.M.
to
11:00 A.M.

10:00 A.M.
to
2:00 P.M.


11:15 A.M.
to
12:15 P.M.

12:15 P.M.


2:00 P.M.
to
4:00 P.M.


Registration (Lobby)


Ladies Hospitality Room (Norman-
dy Room-Mezzanine)


Business Session I-President James
Deen presiding. Welcome by Mayor
Elliott Roosevelt (Napoleon Room)

Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies official-
ly opening Building Product Exhibits
-President James Deen officiating
(Entrance to Napoleon Room)

Cocktail Party--Building Products
Exhibit Hall


Luncheon-Speaker: Miami Mayor
Robert King High, Democratic Can-
didate for Governor Robert J.
Boerema, President, Florida South
Chapter, AIA, presiding (Richelieu
Room)

Seminar I. ENVIRONMENT
THROUGH DESIGN Seminar
Chairman: J. Arthur Wohlberg;
Speaker: Richard Hatch; Panel Mod-
erator: Doug Haskell, FAIA (Napo-
leon Room


2:30 P.M. Ladies Shopping Trip (Buses will
depart from Deauville Hotel)


3:00 P.M.
to
6:30 P.M.


Visit Duilding Product Exhibits-
-Napoleon Room


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






7:15 P M. "An Evening of Polynesian Paradise"
(Luau Restaurant on the 79th Street
Causeway) Buses depart from Deau-
ville Hotel


11:30 P.M.


Buses depart for Deauville Hotel( as
needed)


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7


Moderator: Doug Haskell, FAIA
(Napoleon Room)

4:00 P.M. Visit Building Product Exhibits
to 6:30 P.M.


4:30 P.M.
to
6:30 P.M.


Tea Reception-Architectural Sec-
taries Assn. (Baccarat Room)


6:30 P.M. Exhibits close.


8:00 A.M.
to 6:00 P.M.

8:30 A.M.



9:00 A.M.
to
5:00 P.M.

10:00 A.M.
to
12:00 Noon


11:00 A.M.
to
3:00 .P.M.

12:00 Noon



12:00 Noon




3:00 P.M.
to
5:00 P.M.


Registration (Lobby)


7:15 P.M.
to
8:00 P.M.


Breakfast Speaker: Claude Kirk,
Republican Candidate for Governor

Ladies Hospitality Room (Normandy
Room-Mezzanine)



Seminar II. ENVIRONMENT
THROUGH BUREAUCRACY-Sem-
inar Chairman: Henry Riccio;
Speaker: George T. Rockrise, FAIA;
Panel Moderator: Doug Haskell,
FAIA (Napoleon Room)


Visit Building Product
(Napoleon Room)


Exhibits


Buffet Luncheon (free)--Building
Products Exhibit Hall

Ladies Luncheon-LaGorce Country
Club Presentation "Love Life of
the Birds" by Mrs. Charles McWethy

Seminar III. ENVIRONMENT
THROUGH LEARNING Seminar
Chairman: Donald I. Singer; Speak-
er: Charles Colbert, FAIA; Panel


President's Reception (Charlemagne
Room-Main Lobby)


8:00 P.M. Annual Banquet- President James
Deen presiding
3rd Annual Florida Craftsman of the
Year Award
Architectural Exhibit Awards
Building Products Exhibit Awards
Anthony L. Pullara Awards
Announcement of Newly-elected
FAAIA Officers
Speaker: Robert L. Durham, FAIA,
1st Vice President of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects
Dancing-Free bar following Ban-
quet Program (Casanova Room)


10:30 P.M.


Architectural Students Seminar
(Normandy Room-Mezzanine)


SATURDAY,. OCTOBER 8


10:00 A.M. Business Session II-Vice President
to Hilliard T. Smith, Jr. presiding
11:00 A.M. (Charlemagne Room)


11:00 A.M.
to
12:00 Noon


Post-Convention Board Meeting -
President James Deen presiding
(Charlemagne Room)


OCTOBER, 1966







'SPOKESMEN' FOR OUR



we- -01I --



These are the outstanding men who are coming from all over the country to speak out at our Miami Beach con-
vention men of unparalleled reputation and experience, men with vital and sometimes controversial things to say, men
who will make this the most exciting FAAIA convention ever You won't want to miss the Seminar sessions because
they'll be directly concerned with problems and questions we face every day. Meet our Convention Spokesmenl



DOUGLAS HASKELL, FAIA Our New York panel moderator is
a famed architectural editor and writer since 1925. He was editor
of "Architectural Forum" and is author of numerous books.
Haskell has fought for all sorts of causes, with various allies, win or
lose: for inclusion of Wright in the Chicago 1933 Fair (lost);
for recognition of prefab pioneer Robert L. Davison (lost) and
Bucky Fuller (he won); against changing the Capitol (lost); for one-
story schools (he won); for new types of school plan (initiated
with Matthew Novicki's ((proposed FORUM school" won);
against Reader's Digest and all would cut school costs by cutting
off architectural creation (won-more or less); for the thesis
that architects should participate heavily in urban renewal (he was
awfully lonesome the first few years, but this may be considered
fairly won now); for recognition of modernism by FHA (won);
for better codes (?); for honesty in building departments (?); for
cross-industry education (lost, so far); for better training of
architects in building economics (beginning to win); against the
everlasting one-one-one-one rhythm (winning), and so on. It adds
up to one great cause: Better Architecture.






CHARLES COLBERT, FAIA-Currently in private practise in
New Orleans as an architcot-city planner is Charles Colbert,
also a visiting professor at Tulane and Rice Universities. Colbert
is also former dean of the School of Architecture, Columbia
University, and his works appear in numerous American and European
magazines. For three years, Colbert also served as supervising
architect and director of the Office of Planning and Construction,
Orleans Parish School Board. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture
degree, his Master's, and has taken post-graduate courses in
naval architecture.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







1966 CONVENTION







You'll also have an opportunity to hear the next governor of the State of Florida! \\c'rc fortunate to have both
leading candidates for the state's highest office. Our Thursday luncheon will feature Miami Mayor ROBERT KING
HIGII, Democratic candidate for Governor. Friday morning, our breakfast speaker will be CLAUDE KIRK, Rcpubli-
can nominee.





C. RICIIARD IIATCIl-Conccivcr and executive director of the
Architects Renewal Committee in Harlem (ARCIi), Richard
Hatch is 32 years old and worked as an architectural designer
in New York City prior to formation of ARCH in October 1964.
Hatch acquired a B.A. at Hlarvard and an architectural degree
from the University of Pennsylvania, then spent four years in
Italy. lie went to work for Abbott, Mcrkt on his return to the U.S.
in 1963, and pursued his involvement with social action as a
volunteer worker for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating
Committee. It was the SNCC connection which first brought him into
contact with the Harlem community groups whom he advised
on renewal problems. This led directly to the AIA meeting
last fall, and thus to ARCH.





GEORGE T. ROCKRISE, FAIA He was named Advisor to the
Secretary on Design this year by Secretary Robert C. Weaver,
Department of Housing and Urban Devclopment. Rockrise has
been a practicing architect, planner, urban designer and landscape
architect for more than 20 years. lie has been associated since 1960
in the architectural and urban planning finn of Rockrise and
Watson. Mr. Rockrise received his academic training at the University
of Syracuse School of Architecture, graduating in 1938 with a
Bachelor's degree in Architecture. After two years as architectural
draftsman and construction field worker, he was awarded a
graduate fellowship in architecture at Columbia University %where he
won the school's IES design competition. tlc received his M.S.
degree in architecture from Columbia in 1941. The new IIUD)
adviser has received numerous awards for design excellence, including
two national Awards of Merit from the AIA (1953 and 1959).
lHe is author of seven books and several articles on architecture
and home building. In 1963 he was named a Fellow of the AIA,
which he currently serves as a member of
the Esthetics Commitec.


OCTOBER, 1966





d4 a0a4c& wa9 7. R"M&u4 c-.E.


The Annual Festive FAAIA Banquet


SPEAKER
Robert L. Durham, FAIA


1st Vice President
of the A.I.A.


A wonderful evening of fine food and excellent entertainment will begin with a President's
Reception in the Charlemagne Room at 7:15 p.m., on Friday, October 7th. After the cocktail party,
we'll adjourn to the Deauville's magnificent Casanova Room for a sumptuous feast and dancing
to the music of Fred Shannon Smith and his orchestra. There will be a free bar during the banquet.
Keynote of the evening will be an address by Robert L. Durham, FAIA, which will lead off an
award-filled Banquet Program.


Third Annual Florida Craftsman of the Year Award
Architectural Exhibit Awards
Product Exhibit Awards for:
a) Educational value ot display
b) Display Excellence
Anthony L. Pullara Award to Outstanding AIA Chapter
Announcement of Newly-Elected FAAIA Officers


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















EXCELLENCE
e (This is the speech presented by Arthur G. Phillips, associate professor of English
and Humanities, and chairman of the Humanities Division, University College,
University of Miami. The occasion was the Florida South Chapter Craftsman
Dinner; however, the remarks and comments by this award-winning author/profes-
O sor are so vital and interesting that the editorial staff of "The Florida Architect"
felt the speech represented a superb review of craftsmanship in general and our
program in particular. For these reasons and for your enjoyment we are
reprinting Mr. Phillips' presentation in full.)
* Of course, I should like to begin by expressing my appreciation of the honor
extended to me by your organization in being kind enough to invite me on this
important occasion to address you on the subject I am to address you on ... And
if that statement doesn't do justice to exactly how I feel, at least it does demon-
strate that I -am no slouch when it comes to handling a dependent phrase. The fact
of the matter is that I do feel honored and privileged because, like all Ameri-
cans, I suppose, I stand a little in awe of architects. To me, they are like doctors,
with the hypodermic needle removed. But, as Falstaff said of Dame Quickly, "A
man knows not where to have her." It seems to me that architecture is the most
schizophrenic of the professions. I'm not quite sure, for instance, whether an
architect is an artist masquerading as an engineer, or an engineer masquerading as
an artist. I have even gone to architects themselves for the answer. I have recently
read the Italian Gio Ponti on the subject. He said, and I quote, "The architects?
Theirs is not a profession but a grace." This is a new and disturbing thought.
Needless to say, it does not clarify the matter, for now I must apparently ask:
"The architects? Are they artists, engineers, or angels?"
But I have obviously not come here tonight to discuss architects, graceful as
they may be, but quite another and equally important matter . the question of
craftsmanship. I am proud to say that my own father was a craftsman- in, of
course, a very modest way. He used to carve wondrous pitchers and rings out of
peach stones. I suppose this was not a remarkable talent nor was the product of it
much to look upon, but I loved to see him work, to see him transmute a rough,
ugly and commonplace peach pit into a little thing of beauty. Even more, I think,
I enjoyed the triumphant smile on his face, when after long hours of scraping and
digging and polishing, he would place the little pitcher or ring or whatever in my
moist and childish hand. This is my first memory of a craftsman at work. It has
left an indelible admiration.
I have even tried my hand at the trades myself. It has been, I am sorry to say,
a dismal history of botchery. Blocks that somehow refused to stay level, wood
U j B joints that never came quite flush, paint that never ran smooth. I remember once
years ago I even dared to try to create a model Conestoga wagon. This was only
after hours of entreaty on the part of my then five year old boy, now, I am happy
to say, grown to young manhood and a considerably more realistic appraisal of his
sire's capabilities. I did make it, however- out of a lot of odds and ends I found
Around the house. And to my joy, somewhat mixed with dismay at my boy's
utter lack of taste and good judgment, he found it eminently satisfactory!
The point I am trying to make, I suppose, is that, although I represent a
profession as far removed as it is possible to be from the very physical stuff of the
crafts, my admiration and, yes, enyy of these skills remain unabated.
(Continued on next page)'


OCTOBER, 1.966







The Quest For


(Continued)
I have come here to consider with you the subject of
craftmanship which is to say the subject of excellence,
for to me the terms are synonymous. And I mean excellence
wherever it is found at the drafting board or at the
mortar board. And by excellence I mean the doing of any-
thing in the very best way it can be done.
The old saying goes that the Greeks "had a word for
it." I find this to be generally true. And they had a word
for excellence. They called it arete. To achieve arete be-
came the sole purpose for living. To the ancient Greek, life
was an ever-ending challenge, a challenge to seek out and
find the ultimate refinement, the ultimate subtlety, the
ultimate power, and the ultimate skill. In their early days
of course, arete came only to the warrior. They crowned
their Achilles and Hectors for their excellence with arms.
But as their civilization ripened and at last mellowed, they
began to crown their builders their sculptors and masons
and, yes, their architects honored them for arete,
excellence.
The Greeks also had two other curious words that
expressed their feelings on this matter. One of them was
Poietes from which obviously we derive our word "poet."
But to the Greeks the word Poietes meant not a writer of
verses but, simply, maker. To them a poet was "one who
made." It didn't matter what a song, a play, a statue, a
building or a vase. All were equally important. All de-
manded skill. All were the testing ground of excellence.
The other word I have in mind was Idiotes, "idiot"
in English. To the Greeks it meant simply an ignorant and
unprofessional person the very opopsite of arete, the
very opposite of excellence. Poietes and idiotes, the poet
and the idiot, these were the true opposites of man's
struggle for worth.
If I seem to make too much of the Ancient Greeks
and what they thought, there is a reason for it. They were
our teachers. They taught us to think of a building, not
just as a place to crawl out of the rain, but as a thing of
beauty and a joy foreevr. It was their Aristotle who insisted
that the duty of every man was to grow more perfect
through knowledge and self-discipline. Above all, they
taught us the value of caring to be excellent.
The Humanities, of which I am a humble professor,
is after all simply a record of man's exercises in excellence.
From Homer to Eliot, from Plidias to Picasso, from


Donatello to Wright, from Plato to Santayana in all the
arts, including the art of thinking, we are concerned with
the men who excelled. I cannot help but smile from
inward joy at their pride in achievement. At the humble
stone mason of Chartres cathedral who carved his name
in the wall so that posterity would remember whose skill
it was that had joined those stones together with such
loving care. Or the great Michelangelo who chiseled into
his beautiful Pieta the words, "Michelangelus Bonarotus
Florent Faciebat, "Michelangelo Buonaroti of Florence
made this," for fear that someone else would get the credit.
Or the boastful pride of a Cellini in the perfection of one
of his castings. Or of the poet John Keats who grew im-
patient with his lack of skill and knowledge, yearning for
perfection and this from one of the most perfect poets
of them all. Or of our own century's William Butler Yeats
who never really, by his own admission, finished a poem,
but was forever working at it, working at it until he had
utterly exasperated both his family and his friends. This
is the pride in workmanship that marks the great spirits
of history. As Matthew Arnold said, "Culture is a study
of perfection." It is to them we must return for our faith
that in the face of the atomic bomb, LSD, and Rock and
Roll, man will yet prevail.

The 19th century novelist, Feodor Dostoevski, in that
very remarkable book, Notes from Underground, had his
main character say: . men still are men and not the
keys of a piano."

He was, of course, pointing out the follies of his time -
primarily that view of man that had rushed into Europe in
the wake of the Industrial Revolution, in the wake of the
new sciences. Mass production and that fruit of biology
and psychology and economics, determinism, threatened to
strip man of all that pride in self that had sustained him
through the ages. In the eyes of events man had suffered
mortal blows to his self-esteem. He could no longer claim
to be as Alexander Pope has said it: "Placed on this
isthmus of a middle state/ A being darkly wise, and rudely
great." Instead he was a blind worm being hurtled through
space on an obscure clod of dirt cast off from a minor star.
He was all belly and mouth. At the best a wondrously
complicated electronic device that somehow lived and
breathed and had its being. Happiness was simply the
avoidance of pain. The goal of civilization was simply to
achieve that perfect state wherein all men would be well-


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








EXCELLENCE


fed, well-clothed, and well-housed. And the end justified
the means. What did it matter how it was done as long
as it was done? And the individual? What did he matter?
A bone to throw into the hungry maw of the future. It
was the Great Society that mattered. The Great Man
drowned in that turbulent river of Progress.
I think we are still suffering from this trauma, this
wound of pride. One way or the other. Either we have
stopped caring for excellence, content merely to get the
job done as quickly and with as little effort as possible, or
we stand by silently suffering, resenting a world that cares
not for us or the gifts we have to offer. There is evidence
enough, heaven knows, of the first. All the standards of
mediocrity that permeate our culture. The social promo-
tions in our schools and the seniority promotions in our
businesses and professions; our carelessness concerning the
men we elect to high office; the poor haircut, the leaky
plumbing, the falling plaster, the bolts left off our new
car, the soap opera, the plagiarized theme, the old lecture
notes, and the TV dinner all are eloquent testimonies
to our contempt for excellence, for our failure of pride.

And that other side of the coin, our anguish as each
Sday the machine, the electronic computer, the Great God
Digit seems to rob us of more and more of our manhood.
We yearn for identity, we hunger for dignity, we search
for an outlet for our creativity in an indifferent world.

This is admittedly a gloomy picture. But there are
things that sustain me. There is a stubborn streak in man
that will not let him take defeat. He will still walk hoine
from his production belt and bake a pot in his backyard
kiln; he will stride from his adding machine to cast a
copper bowl; he will weave a tapestry or graft an orchid,
quilt a rug or make a chair. While the husband assembles
a hi-fi, the wife bakes her homemade bread. And thank
God, there are still those in the trades and the professions
whose conscience, whose sense of self-worth will not let
them do a shoddy job even when to do it right takes
precious time, precious only, of course, because "time is
money." I recall some years ago watching an old cabinet
maker working on a table he had made. It seemed to me
to be perfect the way it was but he worked on, touching
and retouching, sanding a little here and a little there. I
finally said, half in exasperation, half in admiration, "Why
are you spending so much time on that. It looks fine as
it is." He answered without looking up, "Son, I do not


regret the time." I think this is the spirit I have come here
tonight to celebrate. The spirit of excellence. The spirit
that makes one do his very best even when nobody is
looking.
No, man is not a piano key. He is not a machine either.
He is not a hole punched in a card. He is not, to quote
from Hamlet, merely something that "might stop a hole
to keep the wind away." Not yet; not by a long shot. He
does not live by bread alone, nor for circuses either. He is
not a statistic, a market quotation, a commodity or a
consumer. He is a Man! The mere fact that I am here
tonight, that all of you are here tonight to honor crafts-
manship, which is the same as to say to honor excellence,
is proof of that.
There is one last thought that comes to me when I
contemplate the prospects of craftsmanship, of excellence,
of the right rate, of the good and right. And this is that, in
the last analysis, it is a moral matter. It has a lot to do with
honesty. It has a lot to do with virtue in its broader sense.
It may even have a lot to do with what we call good
citizenship. I am not at all sure that the state of soul that
characterizes the good craftsman is the only ingredient a
continuing and prospering democracy demands; but I am
quite sure that its absence spells eventual decay and ruin.
I think no society can long endure if it rests on a founda-
tion of slovenliness, carelessness, and botch. Pride in self,
pride in one's worth is the only enduring quality of both
the individual and the nation. If this is allowed to seep
away, I see nothing for us but Orwell's 1984, or Huxley's
Brave New World. World of the ant heap. As William
James put it, "Democracy is on trial, and no one knows
how it will stand the ordeal . What its critics now
affirm is that its preferences are inveterately for the in-
ferior. So it was in the beginning, they say, and so it will
be, world without end. Vulgarity enthroned and institu-
tionalized, elbowing everything superior from the highway,
this, they tell us, is our irremediable destiny ... "
No. It is not an academic matter. Good craftsmanship,
high excellence must prevail if we are to fulfill our
destiny. We must "hitch our wagon to a star." We must
listen once more to Ecclesiastes, the teacher, who
from the pages of the Bible speaks out those ringing
words: "Whatsoever thy hand find it to do do it
with thy might."
Thank you.


OCTOBER, 1966







FLORIDA'S CRAFTSMAN OF THE YEAR!




JOHN J. POWERS is Florida's Craftsman of the
Year! A plasterer and Florida Central Chapter's
nominee for the state award, Mr. Powers was select-
ed for his work on Local #3 building, Plasterers'
Union, in Tampa, Florida. General Contractor for
the project was Oliver M. Lloyd. Mr. Powers was
nominated by the architects for that project:
MlcLane, Ranon. McIntosh and Bernardo. Jury comn-
mcnts on Mr. Powers' craftsmanship included,
. This astonishing example of virtuosity in
handling an everyday material in an outstanding
sway should be an inspiration to all craftsmen ... "
T'Ihe original nominating letter pointed out that
"Although traditionally thought of as a finishing
material, our entry involves the multi-purpose use
of plaster as an acoustical and main-surfaced sculp-
tural shape which provided a challenge to a plas-
tercr's ability." We salute John J. Powers, Florida's
Craftsman of the Year!






Photos below illustrate the work performed an outstanding acoustical complex of plastered folding panels. This work
was performed without use of any corner or casing beads. All edges are uniform, straight and true.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Product Exhibits Will Be


A Convention Highlight


#27 ADVANCE DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC.
PO Box 7336
Orlando, Florida 32804
SYSTEMS, WATER-COOLED HEAT PUMPS
TOTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMFORT
Representative: Maurice Scherr
#30 ALLIANCEWALL CORP.
Affiliate of Caloric Corp.
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095
ALLIANCE VENEER, INSULATED
CHALKBOARD PORCELAIN ON STEEL &
PORCELAIN ON ALUMINUM PANELS; (NEW)
DURA-COR, CORREGATED PORCELAIN
PANELS
Representatives:
Jerome R. Salton Irwin Lieberwitz
#55 AMERICAN OLEAN TILE COMPANY
1000 Cannon Avenue
Lansdale, Pennsylvania 19446
A COMPLETE LINE OF QUALITY
CERAMIC TILE FOR WALLS AND FLOORS
Representatives:
Paul W. Horton
Frank J. Jones George W. Thorp
#81 ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS, INC.
942 Florida National Bank Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
"WONDERFALL" ANIMATION IN
ORNAMENTATION- VOLKMER -
STRUCTURAL GASkET CURTAINWALL
Representative: R. P. "Rusty" Redman, Jr.
#56 AR-LITE PANELS, INC.
Division of Architectural Research Corporation
1515 W. Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida
AR-LITE EXPOSED AGGREGATE PANELS;
CATHEDRA STAINED GLASS; CULTURED
MARBLE
Representatives:
Richard C. Prusinski Carmen J. Alampi
Lewis W. Robinson, Jr. Fred Thomas
#1 GORDON V. ASTLE MANUFACTURERS AGENT
6727 NW 27 Court
Hollywood, Florida 33024
LCN DOOR CLOSER; BROOKLINE
INDUSTRIES, DOOR TRIM HARDWARE
Representatives:
Gordon V. Astle
T. Lasier Philip Cathey
#77 BIRD AND SON, INC.
PO Box 4336
Charleston Heights, South Carolina 29405
BIRD FIRESCREEN AND MARK 25 SHINGLES;
SOLID VINYL BUILDING PRODUCTS;
THE BIRL NEPOLON LIQUID ROOFING SYSTEM
Representatives:
A. K. Powers R. A. Popp
J. A. Scull J. E. Saunders
#17 BRADLEY WASHFOUNTAIN CO.
W142 N9101 Fountain Drive
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53055
GROUP WASHING EQUIPMENT-
SHOWERS WASHFOUNTAINS
Representatives:
John W. Holian, Sr. Jack Holian
#92 CEMENT ENAMEL DEVELOPMENT, INC.
18656 Fitzpatrick Avenue
Detriot, Michigan 48228
Florida Representative:
ARCHITECTURAL BUILDING PRODUCTS
Box 7472 Ludlam Branch
S Miami, Florida
OCTOBER, 1966


#54 CLEARVIEW CORP.
3318 SW 2 Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315
SOLAR SHADE WINDOWS, LOUVERED
WINDOWS
Representative: Arthur W. Korfage
#64 COLOROC OF MIAMI and COLOROC OF TAMPA
16511 NW 8 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33169
COLAROC- THE VINYL-COATED LAWN ROCK
Representatives:
Rex G. Howard
Norman Bird Harold B. Austin
James H. Steel Jack Ridley
#89 CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC.
PO Box 130
Brunswick, Georgia 31521
PERMADECK ROOF PLANK, ROOF TILE,
SOFFIT SLABS, COVERING BOARD, WAFFLE
UNITS, FORMBOARD, ACOUSTICAL CEILING
TILE AND WALL PANELS
Representatives:
Jack Torbett
T. R. Bryan John E. Custer
#16 CONSULTING ENGINEERS COUNCIL OF FLORIDA
21 N. Lemon Avenue
Sarasota, Florida
Representatives:
Robert L. Crane
William B. Bradley Gilbert Waters
#91 CUSTOMWOOD MANUFACTURING COMPANY
3620 High Street, NE
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107
ARCHITECTURAL CARVED WOOD GRILLES
Representatives:
Bob Bogan, Jr. Barbara Bogan
#28 DUNAN BRICK YARDS INC.
PO Box 5
Miami International Airport Branch
Hialeah, Florida 33148
DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS
Representatives:
Otis Dunan
Barney Riveira Don Bates
#5 DWOSKIN INCORPORATED
4190 NW 2 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33137
VICRTEX VICRTEX T TEDLAR VICRWALL,
BY L. E. CARPENTER; SANITAS WALLCLAD,
BY STANDARD COATED PRODUCTS;
FLEXWOOD GRUVWOOD GRASSCLOTH -
FOIL, BY DWOSKIN, INC.
Representatives:
Maxwell I. Lubin
Henry I. Dreyfus Herman A. Pitter
#38 DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA
921 Dupont Plaza
300 Biscayne Blvd. Way
Miami, Florida 33131
TWO KITCHEN UNITS- 54" and 48"
Representative: Davil C. Kelso
#29 ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
FLUSH ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB CORE
DOORS, FLUSH PLASTIC LAMINATE
CORE DOORS, HONEYCOMB PANELS
Representatives:
Arthur A. Kimmel Jack E. Wiley
Jesse A. Kimmel John M. Mathis
Alan E. Jones Robert Oteiza







#35 EXECUTONE OF SOUTH FLORIDA, INC.
4629 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 3146
POCKET PAGE INTERCOM -
BACKGROUND MUSIC PHYSIOLOGICAL
MONITORING NURSE CALL
Representative: Earl E. Thery
#18 FLORIDA CHAPTER OF THE ARCHITECTURAL
WOODWORK INSTITUTE
PO Box 726
Gainesville, Florida 32601
ARCHITECTURAL MILLWORK
Representative: Estes L. Perry
#47 FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC
48 UTILITY COMPANIES
1213 16 Street North
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER COMPANY
GULF POWER COMPANY
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
ALL-ELECTRIC MEDALLION HOME LIVING
Representatives:
John A. Holland Jack Pinkerton
Ed Jenkins Jimmy Joynes
Vic Matthews Dave Hills
Frank Thompson Bill Davis
#33 FLORIDA SOLITE COMPANY
1114 Atlantic Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 2201
LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE CONCRETE,
LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE BLOCK,
LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE PRE-STRESSED
CONCRETE
Representatives:
James H. McLeroy
Malcolm D. Driver .Ken E. Newton
#59 H. B. FULLER COMPANY
655 Mead Street
Atlanta, Georgia 30316
TNFF LITE EPOXY EXPOSED AGGREGATE
Representatives:
James F. McCann Jack Portz
Bill Denes Marty D'Angelo
W. R. Mattox Lee Webb
#61 GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
PO Box 1259
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
ALUMINUM DOORS AND FRAMES
Representatives:
James H. Henry Reginald (Regie) Shepherd
E. Wayne Yordy William (Bill) Conover
#15 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Major Appliance Division
5266 Highway Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
TELEVISION RECEIVERS--
SELF-CONTAINED AIR CONDITIONING
EQUIPMENT
#65 GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION
66 PO Box 100 Gratigny Branch
Miami, Florida 33168
PREFINISHED PLYWOOD SIDING-
REDWOOD GYPSUM
Representatives:
Julian Ulmer Bill Dilley
Ed Garreau Don Barton
#19 GORY ROOFING TILE
1773 NE 205 Street
North Miami, Florida 33162
CEMENT ROOFING TILE -ALUMINUM
SOFFITS VINYL SIDING
Representative: Frank Cory
#73 HARRIS PAINT COMPANY
1010 N. 19 Street
Tampa, Florida 33601
48


"COLOR ENVIRONMENT"- A NEW
CONCEPT IN THE FUNCTIONAL USE
OF PAINT COLORS
Representatives:
Douglas G. McCoy
Douglas Fisher Walter O. Thomas
Donald Farley Ed Thompson
#79 HILTI FASTENING SYSTEMS
360 Fairfield Avenue
Stamford, Connecticut 06904
POWER ASSISTED PISTON DRIVE TOOLS,
FASTENERS AND ACCESSORIES FOR
FASTENING INTO MASONRY, CONCRETE
AND STRUCTURAL STEED
Representatives:
S. Kuppersmith
Tom Cassidy T. Cravey
M. Pierce W. Deem
#23 HOLLOWAY MATERIALS CORPORATION
PO Drawer 1360
Winter Park, Florida 32790
HOLLOWAY'S FLORIDA BRICK
Representatives:
Frank L. Williamson
H. R. Fetter E. E. McCorkle
#32 HOUDAILLE-DUVAL-WRIGHT COMPANY
1000 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
CONCRETE PRODUCTS, FEATURING
HOUDAILLE-SPAN
Representatives:
Phyllis Finney Hal Rush
Walter Hiis Philip Wemple
#82 THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY, INC.
67 Wall Street
New York, N.Y. 10005
DESIGN IN STAINLESS STEEL-
TYPICAL NICKEL STAINLESS STEEL
ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS
INCLUDING DOORS. WINDOWS
CURTAIN WALLS, STORE FRONTS,
ROOFING, FLASHING AND HARDWARE
Representatives:
W. A. Firstbrook M. G. Hobelman
C. E. Brandt W. R. Ferguson
#95 K-LUX PRODUCTS DIVISION
96 K-S-H Plastics, Inc.
10091 Manchester
St. Louis, Missouri 63122
K-LUX ARCHITECTURAL AND DECORATOR
PANELS; K-LUX ROOM DIVIDERS AND FOLDING
SCREENS; K-LUX WALL COVERING
Representatives:
Brian J. Raleigh Kenneth W. Thomas
#84 KENTILE FLOORS, INC.
15345 SW 87 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33157
NORTHERN DISTRIBUTORS INC., Miami
COOPER DISTRIBUTORS INC., Jacksonville
FLOORCRAFI' DISTRIBUTORS INC., Tallahassee
RESILIENT FLOORING
Representative: Jack T. Moore
#63 KOOLSHADE CORPORATION
1705 Gardena Avenue
Glendale, California
KOOLSIADE SOLAR HEAT AND GLARE
CONTROL LOUVERS, KOCH TRED
FIBERGLASS SAFETY FLOORING
Representatives:
Walter R. Lewis Carl Betz
A. L. Propps, Jr. J. M. Hetherington
Mrs. A. L. Proops, Jr. Bud Smith
#37 LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
PO Box 2226
Orlando, Florida 32802
LAMBERT CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS,
WATERPROOFINGS, SEALANTS, CURING
COMPOUNDS, KEYSTONE COLORBRITE
Representative: V. L. Sinisi
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






#60 LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS COMPANY
1819 Peachtree Road, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
PATTERNED GLASS, HEAVY DUTY
PLATE GLASS, PARALLEL-O-PLATE GLASS,
PARALLEL-O-GREY PLATE GLASS,
PARALLEL-O-BRONZE PLATE GLASS,
HEAT ABSORBING PLATE GLASS
Representatives:
Paul W. Christie
Robert Lauter Steve McQueen
#71 mcPHILBEN LIGHTING, INC.
270 Long Island Expressway
Melville, New York 11746
COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL
INCANDESCENT LIGHTING FIXTURES
Representatives:
Daniel J. Greaney James A. Foerster
#44 MERCER PLASTICS COMPANY, INC.
1 Jabez Street
Newark, New Jersey 07105
Plant: Eustis, Florida
COVER BASE, STAIR TREADS & NOSINGS,
CARPET MOLDINGS, PLASTIC THRESHOLDS,
PLASTIC SELF-SEAL DOOR STOPS,
PLASTIC PROFILE EXTRUSIONS
Representative:
Eric F. Ross M. A. Rizzo
#24 MIAMI TILE AND TERRAZZO, INC.
25 Tampa, Orlando, Jacksonville,
26 Fort Lauderdale, Miami
COMPRESSED CONCRETE CORP. "COTICO
STONE" INTERPACE- "FRANCISCAN TERRA
FLOOR TILES"; CAMBRIDGE TILE MFG. CO.
"CERATILE55, "ETRUSCAN TILE"; COLD
SPRING GRANITE CO. "GRANITE", KERASAV
"SCULPTURED TILES"; UNITED STATES
CERAMIC TILE CO. "CERAMIC FLOOR AND
WALL"
Representatives:
Barney B. Lee Douglas Bournique
Walter G. Earnest Bill Shea
William Cosper Earl Hayes
Jack Sutton Bill Fishley
#76 BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.
511 Canal Street
New York, N.Y.
MOORE'S A&UAGLO LATEX SEMI-GLOSS
ENAMEL-MOORE'S TILE-LIKE CATALYZED
ARCHITECTURAL COATINGS
Representative: M. L. Fisher
#39 NU TONE, INC.
Cincinnati 27, Ohio
BUILT-IN KITCHEN FOOD CENTER, RADIO
AND INTERCOM SYSTEMS, LIGHTING
FIXTURES, HOME VENTILATING EQUIPMENT
Representatives:
Marty Schneidman
Walter Kelly C. F. Zahler
#80 YALE OGRON MANUFACTURING CO., INC.
671 West 18 Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010
COMPLETE LINE OF ALUMINUM WINDOWS
AND GLASS SLIDING DOORS, INCLUDING
AWNING WINDOWS, JALOUSIES, SINGLE AND
DOUBLE HUNG, AND HORIZONTAL ROLLING
WINDOWS, AS WELL AS ANY TYPE OF
APPLICATION FOR SLIDING GLASS DOORS
Representatives:
Ralph S. Bush Jerry Mcycrson
Burleigh Kaplan Selig Golcn
Edward Zacka Yale Ogron
#68 OOLITE INDUSTRIES, INC.
PO Box 877, Ojus Branch
Miami, Florida 33163
MO-SAI- EXPOSED AGGREGATE PANELS
Representatives:
G. W. Reed E. G. Mealey
E. D. Kendall P. L. VanDijk
OCTOBER, 1966


#41 PACK ARCHITECTURAL BLOCK CO.
2190 NW 33 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33142
DECORATIVE BLOCK
Representative: John J. McClain, Jr.
#57 PALM BEACH CLAY TILE COMPANY
PO Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404
BARREL ROOF TILE--SHINGLE TILE--
FLOOR TILE DECORATIVE SCREEN BLOCK
Representatives:
Rafael L. Compres Joseph M. Schmidt
#11 PALM CREST DESIGNS
320 Lakeview Avenue
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401
ORBIT KITCHEN CABINETS
Representatives:
Edward Brigham A. W. Holmes, Jr.
Edwin S. Westphal L. Ross Clibbon
Mrs. Pat Letsch Eugene Boggs
#101 THE CHARLES PARKER COMPANY
50 Hanover Street
Meriden, Connceticut
WASHROOM ACCESSORIES BATHROOM
ACCESSORIES- HEAVY-DUTY GRAB BAR-
FRAMED MIRRORS-SOAP DISPENSERS
Depresentative: MacRae H. Curtis
#45 PAVLOW OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
2801 SW 31 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33133
DESKS AND SEATING FOR OFFICES
Representatives:
Shirley Edwards Harvey Stein
Jim Oliver George Shimm
#93 THE PERFECLITE COMPANY
1457 East 40 Street
Cleveland, Ohio 44103
INCANDESCENT COMMERCIAL AND
INSTITUTIONAL LIGHTING FIXTURES
Representatives:
Charles Osher Fiedda Porter
Ken Hill L. E. Porter
#67 PERMAGLASS, INC.
215 W. Main Street
Woodville, Ohio 43460
TEMPERED SAFETY GLASS
Representatives:
Ted Kruper Bob Brown
#2 PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
PO Box 15100
Orlando, Florida 32808
PIT'TGLAZE, PITTSBURGH PAINTS,
SATINHIDE LATEX ENAMEL
Representatives:
J. P. Ward, Jr. D. H. Vickers
#83 PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
Gateway No. 1
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222
HERCULITE K- SOLARBAN -
ENVIRONMENTAL GLASSES-T-WALL
Representatives:
J. V. Lamb
N. P. Owen J. M. Larkin


#10 RICHARD PLUMER BUSINESS INTERIORS, II
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
INTERIOR DESIGN
Representatives:
John E. Turner E. H. \
#34 PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando Florida 328 03
ARCHITECrURAL CONCRETE FINISHES
Representatives:
R. S. Gordon C. W. San
J. C. Bennett, Jr. R. J. McC
W. N. Hollman R. A. Ram
R. W. Jones, Jr. L. R. Robe


NC.



Vhitney


ford
ormack
sey
rtson






#46 PRECAST PANEL PRODUCTS, INC.
1501 So. 22 Avenue
Hollywood, Florida
EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR AGGREGATE
PANELS MADE BY A CHEMISTRY FORMULA
CONSISTING OF POLYESTER RESIN, ETC.
Representatives:
Edward R. Redmond
Mario De Meola Jerry De Meola
Larry Hartman Jack Marinaro
#31 REFLECTAL BORG-WARNER CORPORATION
1000 W. 120 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60643
FOUR NEW BORG-WARNER ALFOL
INSULATION PRODUCTS ESPECIALLY
DESIGNED FOR FLORIDA CLIMATIC
CONDITIONS
Representatives:
C. Fred Bowlin
John Devitte Homer Curtis
Ed Burke Phil Kaplan
Leo Bushnell Les Stubbins
#14 RHEEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY
1280 Chattahoochee Avenue, NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30325
PLUMBING FIXTURES
Representatives:
L. W. Stitt
Hal Groninger George E. Brauer
#62 ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY
Independence Mall West
Independence, Pennsylvania 19105
"PLEXIGLAS" ACRYLIC PLASTIC-ARCH USES
Representatives:
H. H. Hertner D. C. Smith


#9 ROWELL-VAN ATTA, INC.
4385 NE 12 Avenue
Oakland Park, Fla. 33307
GENERAL ELECTRIC SILICONE,
CONSTRUCTION SEALANTS
Representatives:
John Raffa
Nelson Romero


#40


Charles Boogher


ROYAL AIR CONDITIONING COMPANY
1335 E. 10 Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33010
ROYAL ALUMINUM CENTRAL AIR
CONDITIONERS
Representatives:
Mrs. L. Glickman Leonard Glickman


#4 RUUD MANUFACTURING CO.
1280 Chattahoochee Avenue
Atlanta, Georgia
RUUD COMMERCIAL WATER HEATERS;
COPPER WATER HEATER DISPLAY
Representatives:
William Birchfield
Jim Henderson William Seith
#87 SCHLAGE LOCK COMPANY
88 2401 Bayshore Boulevard
San Francisco, California 94119
SCHLAGE HAND-CRAFTED RESIDENTIAL AND
INDUSTRIAL LOCK SETS AND HARDWARE
Representatives:
W. J. Williamson Gilbert A. Viola
Alan Turner Robert Kelsey
#50 SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE
& TELEGRAPH COMPANY
250 Alhambra Circle
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
NEW TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT SUCH AS
DATA PHONE DATA SET, HOME
INTERPHONE, AUTOMATIC CARD DIALER,


DESK AND WALL TOUCH TONE SETS,
TRIMLINE, PICTURE PHONE
Representatives:
Miss Ailene Crocker
Chuck Campbell Chuck Warner
#90 TERRAZZO & MARBLE SUPPLY CO. OF FLORIDA
PO Box 9027
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33310
DECORATIVE PANELS OF EXPOSED GLASS,
TERAZZO CHIPS IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC,
EXPOSED HARD AGGREGATE, MARBLE
SLABS, SILLS AND TILES, HANSON ROCK
DASH GUN
Representatives:
Marty Maglio Charles Greenwald
Jake Nissley Hoyt Stiz
#86 BEN THOMSON, INC.
PO Box 6248
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33405
GLAZED CEMENT-GRANWOOD FLOORING
ARMOBOND
Representatives:
Ben Thomson J. E. Quesnel
#53 UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
3675 NW 62 Street
Miami, Florida 33147
PLYWOOD DOOR -GLASWELD FACADE
Representative: A. R. Banks
#8 UNITED STATES STEEL
5 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
INNOVATIONS IN CURTAIN-WALL FRAMING
FEATURING ULTIMET STAINLESS STEEL
GRID SYSTEM
Representatives:
Carl C. Caskadon C. Forney Nelson
K. Allen Ferrer J. Allan Myers
#43 WELLS TELEVISION, INC.
212 East 54 Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
COORDINATED HOSPITAL COMMUNICATIONS,
INCLUDING TELEVISION, RADIO, NURSE
CALL, CLOSED CIRCUIT, POCKET PAGING,
DOCTOR'S REGISTER, AND BED STATUS
Representative: Orville Fry
#3 F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO., INC.
1690 Monroe Dr., NE
Atlanta, Georgia
FACE BRICK, GLAZED BRICK, STRUCTURAL
GLAZED TILE, PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT
ROOF SLABS, CRAB ORCHARD STONE,
NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE, BUCKINGHAM &
VERMONT SLATES, HAR BAR PARKING
BARRIERS AND PAVING UNITS
Representative: Richard C. Roysum
#52 WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.
PO Box 726
Gainesville, Florida
SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY FURNITURE AND
EQUIPMENT HOSPITAL CASEWORK
Representatives:
Fred B. Bullard, Jr. Grant G. Glider
#7 ZONOLITE DIVISION, W. R. GRACE & CO.
PO Box 67
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
ZONOLITE CERTIFIED CONCRETE ROOF
DECKS, MONO-KOTE FIREPROOFING
VERMICULITE AND PERLITE AGGREGATES,
DYFOAM POLYSTYRENE INSULATION
ZONOLITE MASONRY FILL INSULATION
Representatives:
C. S. Breslauer H. L. Miller
E. R. (Red) Mitchell R. Turner
R. L. Asher E. R. Langy


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








AR-LTE Aggregate Panels in soft beige
tones distinguish the Auditorium of
the Humanities Building at Florida Atlantic
University in Boca Raton. AR-LTE is
the amazingly versatile aggregate
panel which is selected by leading
architects throughout the country
for its maintenance-free beauty
and lifetime durability.












AR-LITE


aggregate panels



The only patented
time proven
Co-polymer
aggregate panels
>rium Humanities Building Florida Atlantic University
Boca Raton, Florida
Gamble, Pownall and Gilroy, Architects Visit us at
William A. Berbusse, Jr., of Florida, Inc., Contractors Booth #56


OCTOBER, 1966






BULING












B4


IB0CNVRTNG..


Spedfy Dwyr Kedwe. 40 model
in Idx dmrotor e ole, for apart
M ft. h a i ;.L Mae "f _
tuat, houe. l as from 39i to
r wide, when efwigerotor an
frmer, sink, ga= or IeIctric surface
oig unwhe and sowa (rmpaT 3)
and *k UflM. prw powelI fin.
1d, e*ovygaug seontrucgo


The Solite Awards

The coveted Solite Company Awards, which will be made at the
F.A.A.I.A. Convention, are:

First Prize to Robert Allen Hambrick, 817 8th Street, Merritt
Island, Florida. This award is in recognition for work in History
of Architecture consisting of special studies in development of
Romanesque Architecture in Western Europe. There arc
graphic representations of these studies which will be displayed
in the student exhibition at the Convention.

Second Prize to Herbert Arthur Pecht, 3003 Pearl Drive, Wash-
ington, D.C. for excellence in studies of History of Architecture.



The Solite Company has made available to the University of Florida
Department of Architecture substantial funds which not only provide
prize awards but also pay expenses of award winners to the annual
F.A.A.I.A. Convention.





HOUDAILLE 5/U6 /
FOR FLORIDA'S FUTURE




TO SERVE YOU
IN THE











HeudaigeCpaM precast, Irestress create slabs complete one entire fleer
Jan o1o i ay !
SO VILLE COMPANY
AREA





Executive and
Regional Office
1000 Riverside Ave.


AJACKSONVILLE, CONV COCO AU 356-1951
1mHl uals Sp al mret pesntn, d d cmn aat T soFb u t oD a nti* aHEr
IH dayFLRIA I
UDAI DUVAL WRIGHT COMPANY
1XIONIMI OFFICIS NOIOW M Auo Wa. Pue
MAM LOCcAIOWs McKSrmfu cOCOA n ". tA A*.TM*A a. mMaMse


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


5T'04







Plans require hot water?

Lots of it?



Then compare the recovery rates of oil versus gas versus electricity.


179DMMU3M O
%9TW9000em~I~r~~W9II~g9


30 sALuO ELECTRIC HEATER
10 ALS. PE Hus


011HI9 OIL FUEL INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA
OUCAN DEPEND ON IT


C-i Ywyw!^ywsovyiyyiywywinr~n9y




#g QyUI# O L-yELyC nWEATI: yu Ai CLI oo


r__1


I


VARIETY

is the KEY to

,-,A-DOR






TELEPHONE M Ma
28376 N.W. 70h STREET MIAMI =
L


30 GLOI GAS IuEATER: 0 ALS. PER H.L


I
I
I
I
I
-,I
I
I
I
I


There are many different types of alum-
inum doors for just as many purposes...

ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS
makes them all PLUS custom-built
models to your individual specifications.

Use your own designs and imagination
with Endure's variety of shapes, sizes
and colors to create the appropriate motif
fpr your clients.


r FM D ) IE MANUFACTURERS
SlOF ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
LIU TSIN. SINCE 147T


OCTOBER, 1966 53


I


modern safe clean economical










FOCUS:

On the

Borg-Warner

Insulation

custom-designed

for Florida construction


Borg-Warner's new Alfol provides the
thermal insulation protection so vital in a
State that has up to 4603 summer-degree
days a year. How? By reflecting 95%
of the sun's radiant heat away from
the structure... preventing the heat
build-up so common to bulk type
insulations. Result: air conditioning
costs go down...resale values go up!
Check the chart below. See how these
new Alfol products deliver top R Value for
your dollar. Available now at your Borg-
Warner Alfol Distributor. See him'today.


TYPE 2F
Provides three reflective
spaces featuring tough foil
laminated to kraft top sur-
face.
TYPE 2FK
Provides three reflective
spaces featuring tough foil
laminated to kraft top sur-
face.
TYPE 4FR
Provides four reflective
spaces featuring tough foil
laminated to kraft top sur-
face.
TYPE 4F
Provides four reflective
spaces featuring tough foil
laminated to kraft top sur-
face.


Reflectal Corporation 1000 W. 120th Stret Chcago. MInois 60643. Code 312/CO 4-780 SUBSIDIARY OF BORG-WARNER CORPORATION

builder nnB ni RD AR
products BME E

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






VISIT THE
Producers' Council

SCHOOL

CONSTRUCTION

SEMINAR

Tampa October 12

Miami October 20

Jacksonville October 26
Be ure to s L.O.F.'s demonstraton
of sidewall daylighting for better
wing.
Call your local L.O.F. repreenttve for
time and place.




LIBBEY OWENS FORD
GLASS CO.
Toledo, Ohio 43624




Custom-Cast

Plaques


We cam i fl yeow desog meeds
for amy type, 6s3 or shape of
caM breoze or alumiiin
plauMes. am peas or dec-
ewreo ba-nifs .

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
1737 N. W. 45r4 SeMet, Miami

OCTOBER, 1966


CONTRACT AND COMMERCIAL INTERIORS


By m*ln with a firm of proe onal commercial Interior des ers
rn tm bL i the architect can ofler his cit a unifea ent
talonrd to hs specific needs.
Thi TeW Cocenp ofln d e cos cod while cre lkicy.


SHELTON, ULLMANN, rMITH & ETREICH, INC.
800 S. E. 2nd Court Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33301 852-4779


The J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corporation of Florida
is proud to announce that on or about Sept. 1,
1966, its main offices will occupy new quarters
at 1101 BRICKELL AVENUE, MIAMI, FLOR-
IDA 33131. Telephone is 371-7431.

To our many Builders, Brokers, Mortgagors, In-
vestors and other friends who have made our
growth and expansion possible, we extend our
sincere thanks and invite you to visit us at any
time.


'JAY I. KISLAK
Chairman of the Board
R. W. JOHNSON
President









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Tresser
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pre.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vim-Prs.


TAILULD 9t1

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCOPORAMTID


"BeauMtied and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-04


ATLANTA 10 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
GA. OFFICES AND ARD


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING RQOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North

Jacksonville, Florida 32211 Telephone: (904). 724-7958


ADVERTISER'S INDEX
Ar-Lte Panels, Inc.
51
Bird & Son
1
Peter Bromer Architectural
Photographer
15
Ceco Corporation
10-11
Certified Plumbers of South Florida
Back Cover
Customwood Corporation
18
Deauville Hotel
33
Douglas Village Corporation
26
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc.
52
Endure-A-Life Products, Inc.
53
Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Inside Back Cover
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
55
Florida Gas Transmission Co.
16-17
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
34-35
Florida Municipal
Utilities Association
20
Florida Natdral Gas Association
13
Florida Portland Cement Division
9
GEM Aluminum Products, Inc.
28
Houdaille-Duval-Wright Co.,
Division of Houdaille Industries, Inc.
52
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
55
Knoll Furniture
27
Lambert Corporation of Florida
19
Libbey-Owens-Ford Class Co.
55
Mercer Plastics
3-5-7
Muzak Corporation
33
Oil Fuel Heat Institute
53
Panelfold Doors
4
Permaglass, Inc.
8
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
22-23
Richard Plumer Business Interiors
14
Portland Cement Association
21
Reflectal/Borg-Warner Corporation
54
Shelton, Ullmann, Smith &
Streieh, Inc.
55
Strescon International
Inside Front Cover
United States Steel Corporation
29-32
F. Graham Williams Co.
56
Zonolite Div., W. Grace & Co.
12

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


































CAT PRIME POWER

first on the job, the last to leave


This Caterpillar D343 Diesel Engine is a
dependable employee of the Jaxon Construc-
tion Company of Jacksonville. It's on the job
early, works long, hard hours, is last to knock
off and is almost never sick.
This Cat engine has an important job. It
supplies the prime power for the blower in an
asphalt mixing plant. Continuous, dependable,
prime power is needed to keep the plant


running that's why a Caterpillar engine
was selected.
How about your needs? If you are in the
market for good, reliable prime power or
standby power then contact your Florida
Caterpillar dealer. He's as dependable as
the equipment he sells. He can assist you
in engineering Caterpillar capabilities to fit
Your needs.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


Caterpillar, Cat and Trxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.




Architecture and Allied Arts Library
UniversLty of Florida
Gaineaville, Fla-. 10


An Association of Certified Master Plumbers and
Certified Journeymen, members of Plumbers
Local 519, who indicate through their contribution
of time and money that they are concerned with
the proper installation of plumbing for the pro-
tection of Public Health and Safety.


Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


See Our Display at the Galerie of Building Products, Douglas Village.


CERTIFIED PLUMBERS OF SOUTH FLORIDA
2526 W. FLAGLER STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA / TEL. 446-2541




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