• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 President's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Editorial: Of hurricanes and...
 The convention story
 Committee on resolutions
 By-laws recommended revisions
 Nominations for 1966 officers
 Outstading Florida craftsmen
 Joint announcement by architects...
 Drab stores begin at architects'...
 Advertisers' index and calendar...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00147
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00147
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    President's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Table of Contents
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Editorial: Of hurricanes and apathy
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The convention story
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Committee on resolutions
        Page 23
        Page 24
    By-laws recommended revisions
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Nominations for 1966 officers
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Outstading Florida craftsmen
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Joint announcement by architects and engineers
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Drab stores begin at architects' door
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Advertisers' index and calendar of events
        Page 44
    Back Cover
        Page 45
        Page 46
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




the
florida
architect
seplnerk 1061









The current movement to con-
temporary architecture has with-
out doubt been established. Few
clients are asking for reproduc-
tions of antiquities. Financial in-
stitutions, educational facilities,
buildings for public assembly,
shopping centers-all are expres-
sions of the architect's concept
for serving today's problems.
Single-family residential remains
the only large class of building
type that retains a large portion
of its character in a traditional
feeling. Beaux arts, vignola and
other influences of the past are
being forgotten.
This new architecture is the
product of the design influences
of Wright, Corbu, Mies, Gro-
pius. These are the traditions of
the fifties and sixties. This new
architecture is also the product
of a variety of new professionals.
Land planners shape cities which
shape buildings. Landscape ar-
chitects shade exterior circula-
tions and foliage masses which
shape buildings. Engineers of all
sorts shape the physical organs
of a building. From the bones to
the heart, surely this shapes the
buildings. The interior designer
shapes furnishings which shape
buildings. Look closely because
it is becoming increasingly diffi-
cult to recognize the architect as
we know him.
The architect as educated in
the forties or fifties has a diffi-
cult time relating to the new
architecture. He has felt that he
was all things to all people, but
the task has been too large.
A new architect is being de-
veloped to design the new en-
vironment. The new total archi-
tecture demands new techniques


A New Architect

and philosophies. Architects have
a deep social responsibility to-
ward the character of the en-
vironment. He is questioning the
validity of the client to arbitrari-
ly conceive ugly buildings and
place them on view. To serve
the client will gain new mean-
ings. If we are to build beautiful
cities, the total responsibility
must be maintained by the pro-
fessional trained to beauty.
Architects are becoming
clients. Architects are becoming
the client's representative to the
design architect. Architects are
becoming a review and advisory
profession for government, cor-
porations and developers to as-
sure good buildings.
A new architect is being edu-
cated for the new environment.
The Institute is studying the con-
cepts now. Architectural speciali-


L,-:jE


,JAMES DEEN, AIA

THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


zation will occur. Extended aca-
demic schooling be y o n d five
years will mature the profession.
Architectural technicians will be
trained. Recurrent education will
keep the architect abreast of to-
day's technological concepts. A
new system of cost control and
proven administration will solve
our most severe problem . .
getting the work out in a reason-
able time and within the budget.
Emerging techniques studies are
being reviewed for a changing
practice.
A new architect will take a
responsible role in government.
As cities reshape themselves, the
new architect will be responsible
for developing the rules and
regulations for guidance. Re-
newal and redevelopment pro-
grams by governments must by
concept involve the new archi-
tect. Proper government respon-
sibility to citizens in the form of
buildings, parks, and road sys-
tems are the concern of those
responsible for the environment.
Active participation in all forms
of government will be a service.
A total responsibility of the de-
sign profession is mandatory.
Would you like to meet the
new architect? Would you like
to see the new architect? The
Florida Association of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects' an-
nual convention on Miami Beach
in October will examine each of
the above topics as they relate
- Design, Education, Govern-
ment. If we are to exist as the
profession responsible for the
new environment, we must
create the new architect. If we
don't take this responsibility,
someone else will!









ARCHITECTURAL ALUMINUM DOORS


aluminum products i.
112 32nd Avenue West Bradenton, Florida


1966-671









Cline Aluminum Products is devoted exclusively to the manufacturing of quality engineered and designed ALUMINUM PRIME DOORS, swinging and
sliding for commercial, residential and government use.




Cline Aluminum Doors cannot rot, check or warp. They require little or no maintenance, and assure quick, easy installation without trimming or fitting.



Architect and Builder are offered the largest variety of types and sizes of Aluminum Doors.


Precision Craftsmanship
All Non-Corrosive Materials
Anodized Aluminum
Wool Pile Weather Stripping
Hardware Will Prepare for Any Make or Type


Help Specify or Select
Detailed Door Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Field Representative Service
Engineering Services for Special Door Application
Fast Delivery


INDEX


DOORS:

100 BE 5-ply Flush, Bevel Edge Commercial ------------------------ -----------------
Meets all government specifications, superior weather resistance, esthetics with anodized aluminum finish,
heavy gage material, full mortise for hardware, excellent torque stability, high surface impact resistance,
designed for high frequency use.
100 SE 5-ply Flush, Square Edge Commercial------------------------------------------------
Pre-finished baked enamel, excellent weather resistance, low maintenance, high surface inpact resistance,
good torque stability.

300 SE 3-ply Flush, Square Edge Residential.--------------------------------------- --------
Low maintenance, excellent weather resistance, pre-finished baked enamel.

500 5" Tube Extra Heavy Duty Commercial------------------------------------ ---- -------
Meets government specifications, extra heavy duty, can be prepared for all type hardware, .125" wall
thickness tube, 204R1 anodize finish.

450 4-1/2" Tube Heavy Duty Commercial--------------------------------------------------
Heavy duty, can be prepared for mortise lock and exit device, .093" wall thickness tube, 201R1 anodize
finish.

360 3-5/8" Tube Panel Light Commercial and Residential----------------------------------------
Medium duty, prepared for light duty hardware only, .093" wall thickness tube, 201-R1 anodize finish.

Cut-out Details for Flush Doors------------------------------------- ------------

200 Naro-Stile Store Front------- -----------------------------------------------------

600 Jalousie Residential---------------------------------- ---------------------

2500 Sliding Aluminum Flush Industrial---------------------------------------------------------
3000
4000


FRAMES:

Commercial..-----------------------------------------------------.----..---..--..............

Residential-----------------------------------......................---------------------------

THRESHOLDS------------------------_----------------------...............


LOUVERS-


nAfKUVVAKt----------------------------------------------------------------..................


PAGE


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





5-L ALUMINU FLUS DOORA OMECA 6;


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-DOOR-SWING
IN- SIDE -


-OUT-SIDE-


SPECIFICATIONS
CONSTRUCTION: An exterior flush aluminum door shall be normally 1-3/4" thick. The core shall be of honey-comb material 99 lb. per
3000 sq. ft. ream, 20% phenolic resin, 7/16" cell size, or polyurethane foam poured-in-place. Door shall be constructed of one piece .032"
3003-H14 stretcher leveled aluminum alloy facing. Fed. Specifications QQ-A-250/2b, vertically ribbed embossed No. 10 pattern laminated
to .125" tempered hardboard. Entire perimeter of door shall be furnished with special beveled edge design aluminum extrusion 6063-T5 alloys
to receive aluminum skin and hardboard the full width of door.
F I N I SH: Doors shall be anodized in accordance with ALUMILITE FINISH 204-R1 with a minimum coating of 0.4 mils thick and minimum coat-
ing weight of 17 mgm per square inch. The anodic coating shall be sealed and shall be a type that will maintain the natural color of aluminum.
PROTECTIVE COAT I N G: After cleaning and finishing and prior to shipment, two coats of a clear colorless methacrylate lacquer shall be
applied to all surfaces of the aluminum.


I[i


-1st. Ply .032" Anodize Skin
-- 2nd. Ply Tempered Hardboard
3rd. Ply Honey-Comb Core
-- 4th. Ply Tempered Hardboard
--- 5th. Ply .032" Anodize Skin


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-Ist. Ply .025" White Skin
2nd. Ply Tempered Hardboard
3rd. Ply Honey-Comb Core
4th. Ply Tempered Hardboard
5th. Ply .025" White Skin


SPECIFICATIONS
CONSTRUCTION: An exterior flush aluminum door shall be normally 1-3/4" thick. The core
shall be of honey-comb material, 99 Ib. per 3000 sq. ft. ream, 20% phenolic resin, 7/16" cell size.
Door shall be constructed of one piece .025" 3003-H14 stretcher leveled aluminum alloy facing.
Fed. Specifications QQ-A-250/2b, stucco embossed pattern with baked on white enamel laminated
to .125" tempered hardboard. Entire perimeter of door shall be furnished with special edge design
aluminum extrusion 6063-T5 alloys to receive aluminum skin and hardboard the full width of door.


0 .10


TYPE 1A TYPE- IB YI


SQUA









: S ERIE 300 S
'I i I


SQUARE EDGE


Ist. Ply .025" White Skin
2nd. Ply Beaded Styrene
3rd. Ply .025" White Skin


CONSTRUCTION: An exterior flush aluminum door shall be
normally 1-3/4" thick. The core shall be beaded styrene.
Door shall be of one piece aluminum alloy stretcher leveled
facing, stucco embossed pattern with baked on white enamel.
Entire perimeter of door shall be furnished with special design
extrusion to receive aluminum skin and core the full width of
door. This door takes surface mounted hinges only.


FmLUSlBHS. DO EVATOS


TYPE 2B TYPE 2C TYPE 2D


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SPECIFICATIONS

CONSTRUCTION: Tubular doors shall be extruded tube
1-3/4" x 5" with a typical .125" wall thickness 6063-T5
aluminum alloy. Doors shall be fabricated with through bolts
in top and bottom rails. Clearance shall be not more than
3/32" at jambs and heads and 3/16" at bottom. Planted
edges at stiles shall be beveled 1/8" in two inches for doors
1-3/4" thick and thicker with wool pile seals. Doors shall
be mortised, reinforced, drilled and tapped to receive tem-
plate hinges, locks and flush bolts. Doors to receive sur-
face applied hardware, except push plates, kick and mop
plates shall be provided with reinforcing only. Drilling and
tapping shall be done in the field.
F I N IS H: Doors, louvers and trim shall be anodized in
accordance with ALUMILITE FINISH 204-R1 with a minimum
coating of 0.4 mils thick and minimum coating weight of
17 mgm per square inch. The anodic coating shall besealed
and shall be a type that will maintain the natural color of
aluminum.
PROTECTIVE COATING: After cleaning and finishing
and prior to shipment, two coats of a clear colorless metha-
crylate lacquer shall be applied to all surfaces of aluminum.


CONSTRUCTION: Tubular doors shall be extruded tube
-3/4" x 4-1/2" or 1-3/4" x 3-5/8" with a typical .093"
wall thickness 6063-T5 aluminum alloy. Doon shall be
fabricated with through bolts in top and bottom rails.
F I N ISH: Doors, louvers and trim shall be anodized in
accordance with ALUMILITE FINISH 201-R1.




CU-OT EAIL


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DOOR SWINGS ... A DOTM KEY or CYLINDER SIDE


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Pairs RH ACTIVE Pairs LHRB ACTIVE


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30-ST LUMNU DOOR


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T = -- DOOR OPENING WIDTH 3'' l



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---- =_,i P=---


SPECIFICATIONS
CONSTRUCTION: Doors shall be extruded tube
with a typical 125" wall thickness 6063-T5 alum-
inum alloy and fabricated with through bolts in the
top and bottom rails and have aluminum extruded
snap-in glass stops. Vinyl glazing bead shall be
provided for puttyless glazing.
FINIS H: Exposed surfaces shall be anodized 204-R1.


I


MAXIMUM PANEL SIZE FOR 40LB. WIND LOAD 3/0 x 8/0
SAFETY FACTOR AT 40LB. WINDLOAD 1.168
MOMENT OF INERTIA THRU SECTION 3 I .608
SECTION MODULUS THRU SECTION 3 Z .561


Aluminum extrustions for motels, apartments, small fronts and show
windows. Motel shapes open new trontiers in motel, apartment and
residential design. Just 4 basic shapes combine to form complete
front wall unit--door jambs, mullions and munitins for single or
double'glazing or panels.


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A. LAL LA S a.


-Polyurethane Foamed-In-Place



Prime Masonite Filler


Removable Insect Screen
Per Spec: RR-S-141A and AM-2





Operator Assembly


Polyurethane Foamed-In-Place

SAluminum Faced Masonite Kick-Plates


CONSTRUCTION -Door shall have picture frame mitered corners
heliarc welded with a one-piece tempered hard-board interior forming
an inter-locking self supporting hollow core filled with a foam in
place urethane insulating plastic. Weather stripping along header
shall be vinyl. Weather stripping along jambs and hanging frames
shall be aluminum backed wool pile silicone treated and manufac-
tured by the Standard Products Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Glass
clips shall be close fitting and of .051" thick 5052-H 34 aluminum
alloy. They shall be of one piece construction with 1/2" glass overlap.
Clips shall be riveted to door jambs with a tapered aluminum shoul-
der, rivet giving clip free movement around stationary rivet.
FINISH -The picture door frame shall have a satin finish No. 201-
R1 anodized. The interior shall have an attractive pre-sealed prime
coat tempered hardboard
Also Available with Anodize Aluminum Interior


I


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SLIDING ALUMINUM FLUSHeDOOR


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SERIES SPECIFICATIONS
CONSTRUCTION
2500 Hollow core aluminum.sliding door shall be normally 2-1/4" thick and the outer rim will be
a total 2-1/2" thick. The door shall be constructed of specially designed T-shape aluminum
extrusion 6063 T-5 alloy that snaps together with self, forming a series of 2-1/4" x 3" tube
the full height of door. The wall thickness shall be a minimum .080 and shall have outward
appearnace of vertical V-grooves every 3".
3000 Hollovw core aluminum sliding door shall be normally 2-3/4" thick and the outer rim will be
a total of 3" thick. The door shall be constructed of special designed tube shape aluminum
extrusion 0603 T-alloy that forms a series of 2-3/4" x 3-3/4" tubesmulled together with 2-3/4"
I mull the full height of doors. The wall thickness shall be aluminum .080" and shall have
outward appearance of vertical V-grooves 1-1/4" part every 4"
4000 Hollow core aluminum sliding door shall be normally 3-3/4" thick and the outer rim will be
a total of 4" thick. The door shall be constructed of special designed tube shape-aluminum
extrusion 6063 T-5 alloy that forms a series of 3-3/4" x 2-3/4" tubes mulled together with
3-3/4" I mull the full height of doors. The wall thicknessshall be a minimum .080" and shall
have outward appearance of vertical V-grooves 1-1/4" apart every 3"
Entire perimeter of door shall be furnished with aluminum channel extrusion 6063 T-5 allo)
to receive the aforementioned aluminum core on all sides. The channel shape section having
a minimum wall thickness of .125"
FINISH:
Doors and frames shall have .finish in accordance with MIL-A 8625A (Alcoa, Anodized 204-
RI)


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ALUMINUM DOO FRMS -CMMRCAL


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DOOR STOP


4-OBF


3-1/4-0B
3-1/4"-SF
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SCREW ON STOP


2-08 2-T


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4"-SF


G.S.
GLASS STOPS




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2" 2-P

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STANDARD IMADWARE LOCATION -..


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FRAME JOINTS TO MAKE UP TRANSOM


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CYLINDRICAL LOCKS CYUNDRICAL LOCKS HEAVY DUTY UNIT LOCKS
&A u e.,,AA.. AlP. U @- MORTISE LOCKS WM. A
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DOOR CLOSES HEAD MOUNTiD CLOSES OVERMAD FLUSN EXTENSION *OLTS
Wrlmi D1DOOR HOLERS A" "U-,..,-.







MOWISI DMAMOCKS CYLNDRICAL MADAOCKS SUMACE BOLTS ELECTRIC STRKIS
emft




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PUSH & PULL PIAMS AND. BARS :THRESHOLDS, KICKPLATe, HINGES
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SECT/OA A -A'


- I --- -

--


SPECIFICATIONS

CONSTRUCTION: Frame shall be .125"
and blades 1081" thick, 6063-T5 alloy -
screwed together with 18-8 stainless steel screws.
F I N ISH: Louvers shall be anodized in
accordance with ALUMILIT FINISH 204-R1.





ADJUSTABLE




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STATIONARY







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ARHTCUA ALUIU O R


CHURCH


SCHOOL
RESIDENTIAL

UTILITIES

HOSPITAL POST OFFICE


OFFICE
RESTAURANT O

INDUSTRIAL

MOTEL
STORE

WAREHOUSE --
SERVICE STATION







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OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast e Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest e Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. States
Jacksonville e A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Cables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
Black-Baker-Burton / Photography Consultants
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables 34, Florida.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distributed with-
out charge to 4,669 registered architects, builders, contractors, de-
signers and members of allied fields throughout the state of Florida
-and to leading national architectural firms and journals.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00 . McMurray Printers.
SEPTEMBER, 1966


PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Inside Front Cover

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SAYS ..

19

OFFICIAL NOTICE FAAIA CONVENTION

21

THE CONVENTION STORY

22-23

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS
23

BY-LAWS
Recommended Revisions

25

NOMINATIONS FOR 1966 OFFICERS

28-29

OUTSTANDING FLORIDA CRAFTSMEN
32-33

JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT BY ARCHITECTS &
ENGINEERS

36-39

DRAB STORES
Reprinted from Women's Wear Daily
40

ADVERTISERS' INDEX
44

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

44

FAAIA 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION
Back Cover

FRONT COVER- Hurricanes -subject of an interesting
report by State Treasurer Broward Williams in coordination
with the Insurance Information Council. See Editorial,
page 19. (Photo courtesy Jay Spencer, Miami News)

VOLUME 16 NUMBER U 1966






























Owner: Hillsborough County Board of Public Instruction. Architect: McLane-Ranon-McIntosh-Bernardo. Designing Architect: Rick Rados, Tampa,
Florida. Structural Engineer Consultant: Sidney L. Barker, Tampa, Florida. General Contractor: Ellis Construction Company, Tampa, Florida.


Imagination and concrete


turned into 24 classrooms

S1058*persq. ft.
(including air conditioning)


Williams Elementary School, Tampa, dramatizes the ability
of Florida architects to create schools of both design indi-
viduality and low cost.
Here, the architect capitalized handsomely on the versa-
tility of concrete. The design, embodying a concrete frame,
prestressed roof and concrete masonry walls, features an
unusual high-accessibility arrangement of air-conditioning
and mechanical systems.
Each classroom complex stands as two structural frames,
divided by a floor-to-roof mechanical chase through the center
of the building, providing ready access from both ends.
Absence of beams at the chase top permits the air-condi-
tioning feeder duct to fit snugly against the stem of the pre-
stressed double tee. Chase walls in the classrooms are utilized
for recessed bookcases, storage and duct outlets and returns.
Increasingly, architects as well as school boards are looking
to concrete-not for its design potential alone, but its fire
safety, insulating and acoustic values and life-long economy.


*Calculated per A.I.A. document D-101


aii


MECHANICAL CHASE DETAIL

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization of cement manufacturers to improve and
extend the uses of portland cement and concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





An Editorial


All persons connected with the
construction industry in Florida,
local county officials and our legis-
lature should obtain a copy of the
recently-released "Florida Hurricane
Survey Report 1965." These people
-architects, engineers, contractors,
builders, manufacturers of building
materials, building officials, county
officials, legislators, and banking
institutions should read this ex-
cellent report with an open mind
and a vow to take action in support
of the report's findings and recom-
mendations.

We all recognize the potency of
hurricanes, the damage that can be
inflicted to property and loss of
lives, but this recognition and the
urgency to do something seem to
dissipate after the hurricane season
passes. This is evidenced by the
lack of action since the previously-
published report.

Is this apathy to continue? We
hope not--and to this end, the
Florida Association of the AIA
pledges its leadership and resources
to our State Government for the
fulfillment of the 1965 Report
recommendations.

If there is anyone in this state
who is naive enough to think that


HURRICANES

AND

APATHY!




hurricanes are a menace only to
South Florida, then let us pray
their thinking will change. AU Flor-
ida at one time or another is sus-
ceptible to property damage and
loss of Floridians by the enormous
destructive energies contained with-
in this tropical storm.

Why is it then that the persons
most responsible are so complacent
on the matter of a minimum stand-
ard State Building Code that would
insure the welfare of all Floridians?
Why is it that our State permits
the wishes of so-called responsible
people in the construction industry
to lower the requirement of design
responsibility by professionals who
are certified by the State for the
health, safety and welfare of our
population? Why is it that many
builders were dead-set against the
efforts of our contractors to have a


licensing law for contractors enact-
ed in the last Legislature? Was it
because of fear of responsibility-
the desire of builders to reap profits
but shirk responsibility?

Well, it's high time responsible
persons and their organizations
unite in a joint effort to raise the
standards of construction; to have
the skilled professional design ALL
buildings; to extend their leadership
to our State for enactment of a
proper building code for Florida.

The latest "Florida Hurricane
Survey Report" was born of the
fury of Hurricane Betsy, when
Broward Williams met in Dade
County with the Insurance Infor-
mation Council, local builders and
contractors. They wanted to see
what could be done to reduce hur-
ricane losses. This report offers
some sound suggestions. Let's pay
attention this time.

We compliment State Treasurer
and Insurance Commissioner Brow-
ard Williams, his office, and the
Insurance Information Council for
their efforts to bring the facts once
again before the people of Florida.

FoTIs KARousATos
Executive Director


SEPTEMBER, 1966






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The secret of the all-electric concept can be
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you get more usable space. This means added
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for hospitals, nursing homes, medical centers
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Blountstown Leesburg
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Chattahoochee Mt. Dora
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Gainesville Orlando
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kessmeen Wacihulao medical market. For your next project specify ALL-ELECTRIC.

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20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pru.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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Represented in Florida by

RICHARD C. ROYSUM
10247 Colonial Court North


Jacksonville, Florida 32211


Telephone: (904) 724-7958


SEPTEMBER, 1966


NOTICE OF

FAAIA ANNUAL

MEETING



Notice of regular Annual
meeting of the Florida Associa-
tion of the American Institute
of Architects, Inc., and of pro-
posed amendments to the By-
laws to be presented.

Members and associate mem-
bers of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of
Architects, Inc., a corporation
not for profit, organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the
State of Florida, are hereby noti-
fied that:

1. The regular annual meet-
ing of The Florida Association
of the American Institute of
Architects, Inc., will be held 5,
6, 7, and 8, October 1966 at the
Deauville Hotel, Miami Beach,
Florida.

2. At said regular meeting,
proposed amendments to the
Bylaws, as published elsewhere
in this issue, will be presented
for action thereupon by mem-
bers of the croporation. A con-
curring vote of not less than
two-thirds (2/3) of the total
number of delegate votes pres-
ent at the meeting, together
with approval by the American
Institute of Architects, is ne-
cessary for the effective adop-
tion of the amendments.


ATLANTA
GA.

















On behalf of the Florida South Chapter, hosts for the 1966 FAAIA Convention, I would like to extend a personal
welcome to each architect and associate of the profession who will attend the Convention at the Deauville Hotel,
Miami Beach, October 5- 8.
The Convention Committee has endeavored to expand the theme, Focus: Community, to the fullest degree. Stimu-
lating speakers have been engaged. Subjects include 1) the architect's place in urban planning 2) the government and
urban programs 3) the architect and politics.
Seminar topics will include: Environment through Design
through Learning
through Bureaucracy.
Miami Mayor Robert King High will speak at a luncheon entitled "The State Government and You".
There will be exhibits . Building Products, Architectural; the Craftsman of the Year Award Program; election of
officers.
On the social side of the agenda, an array of activities ... a moonlit cruise to dinner on a tropical island, complete
with dancing and entertainment ... a luau, amid the enchantment of a Polynesian setting . cocktail parties . .a
shopping spree and a country club luncheon for the ladies.
The Florida South Chapter looks forward to welcoming you October 5- 8.
Robert J. Boerema
President
Florida South Chapter


CONVENTION COMMITTEE MEMBERS have been hard at work to make this the beat convention
ever Seated are Phil Pearlman, FAAIA Executive Director Fotie Karousatos, and Stan Glasgow. Stand-
ing: Carson Wright, convention co-chairmen Henry Riccio and Bob Boerema.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Let's Chart


Our Legislative Course!





For the first time in a number of years, we're charting a course of action
in governmental policies and holding a forum for all our delegates and mem-
bers to be able to hear our plans and make their own invaluable suggestions.

At the first business session of the 52nd Annual Convention, Thursday
morning, October 6, Jack Peeples, legislative counsel for the Florida Association
of the AIA, will outline our Association's program. This proposed program
is the result of several meetings between Mr. Peeples, our executive committee
and the board of directors. This is your opportunity to have a voice in a positive
program of action designed to enhance our profession, our communities, our
nation's environment!


rnOTO aiaue s 5WIuU
L. GRANT (JACK) PEEPLES


Committee on Resolutions


Guides Convention Business

The following three men have been named as a Resolutions Committee:
Thomas H. Daniels, AIA, Chairman; Richard E. Pryor, AIA, and H. Samuel
Krus6, FAIA.
As a matter of helpful information ,we are re-printing here the Convention


Rules for resolutions and new business.
Resolutions and new business shall be
placed before the Convention and actions
shall be taken only in the following man-
ner, and at the following times:
1 . All resolutions or discussions
concerning matters contained in the
Board's Report shall be in order and
may be placed before the Convention
only if the relevant section has been
read and is still under consideration.
Resolutions concerned with matter con-
tained in the Board's Report shall not
be considered by the Committee on
Resolutions.
2 . All resolutions offered by the
Board will be printed in the Board's
Report and action taken thereon at the
time the relevant sections are placed


before the Convention. Amendments
to these resolutions or supplemental
resolutions and statements concerning
the section under consideration shall
be in order only while the relevant sec-
tion is before the Convention.
3 ... All resolutions concerning mat-
ters not contained in the Board's Re-
port and all matters of new business
shall be presented to the Committee
on Resolutions before a time set by
the Board and report to the Convention.
The Committee on Resolutions will
take one of the following actions and re-
port such action to the Convention on
each resolution and item of new business
received by it:


1 . Deem the resolution a matter
dealt with in the Board's Report and
return it promptly to its sponsor with
advice to present it when the relevant
section of the Board's Report is before
the Convention. The Committee shall
consult with the Secretary as necessary
in making the above ruling.
2 . Deem the resolution inappro-
priate to come before the Convention
and return it promptly to the sponsor,
with notice that it may be placed
directly before the Convention at the
time the report of the Committee on
Resolutions is made, provided the con-
sent of the Convention can be obtained
by a two-thirds vote of the delegates
present at the sessions.
3 ... Modify the resolution or com-
bine it with other resolutions, preferably
with the consent of its sponsor.
4 . Refer the resolution to the
Board for consideration with the con-
sent of its sponsor, and so report to
the Convention.
5 . Report the resolution to the
Convention with recommendation to
disapprove.
6 . Report the resolution to the
Convention without recommendation.
7 . Report the resolution to the
Convention with recommendation to ap-
prove, and move its adoption.


SEPTEMBER, 1966












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E FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








BY LAWS

FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.


Pursuant to a charge by the FAAIA Board of Directors, the Committee On Rules and
Regulations has organized and rewritten the FAAIA Bylaws that have been current
since their adoption, as revised, at the FAAIA's 1965 Convention. As published here,
new Bylaws as proposed for adoption are printed in italics. Present Bylaws which will
remain the same are printed in Roman type.


THE COMMITTEE ON RULES
AND REGULATIONS
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, Chairman


Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA


ARTICLE III. MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1. Annual.
a. There shall be an annual Meeting, herein referred
to as the Convention, which shall be the annual meeting
of the Association and the Florida Region of the Institute.
b. Time and place of the annual Convention shall
be fixed by the Board if not fixed by the preceding Con-
vention.
c. Business of the Convention shall be conducted by
the Officers of the Association and the Chapter Delegates.
(To encourage membership participation, to fully de-
velop friendship, and responsibility to the profession, the
Committee suggests this revise:)
"c. All members in good standing shall discuss the
business and debate the issues brought before the Conven-
tion. The voting necessary to enact the business before
the Convention shall be done by the Chapter Delegates,
and the President of the Association in case of a tie vote.
The Officers of the Association shall conduct the business
of the Convention."
d. Delegates to the Convention shall be selected by
each Chapter.
(1) The number of delegate votes entitled to each
Chapter shall be based on its number of Corporate Mem-
bers in good standing with Chapter, Association and
Institute and whose dues have been paid in full to the
Association thirty days prior to the Annual Convention,
as certified by the Secretary of the Association.
(Since your Convention date changes each year, the
following revision is merely for clarity.)
"(1) The number of delegate votes entitled to each
Chapter shall be based on its number of Corporate Mem-
bers in good standing with Chapter, Association and
Institute and whose dues have been paid in full to the
Association thirty days prior to the Annual Convention,
as certified by the Secretary of the Association."

ARTICLE IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 1. Membership.
b. The Directors, one or more from each Chapter,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting.
SEPTEMBER, 1966


* Jefferson N. Powell


(1) An Alternate Director, one for each Director,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its annual meeting
to function for the Director when the Director cannot
attend Board meetings to serve as a Director.
(2 The number of Directors from each Chapter
shall be based on the Institute membership in the various
Chapters as determined by the current membership roster
of The Institute as follows:


No. of Members in Chapter
1 to 19
20 to 59
60 or more


No. of Directors


(To improve FAAIA Board and Chapter communica-
and exploit the advantages of personal relationship be-
tween State and Chapter administrations . the Com-
mittee proposes . )
"(2) The number of Directors from each Chapter
shall be based on The Institute membership in the various
Chapters as determined by the current membership roster
of The Institute as follows:


No. of Members in Chapter
1 to 59
60 or more


No. of Directors
2
3


ARTICLE VII. ADMINISTRATIVE AND
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
(In order to organize the executive experience of past
presidents of the Association, we propose addition of the
following new section . )
"Section 5. Council of Past Presidents
a. There shall be a Council of Past Presidents con-
sisting of all past presidents of the Association.
b. The Council of Past Presidents shall meet when
called by the President.
c. The Council shall give advice and counsel to the
President and shall perform such peculiar duties
related to the Association or the Profession best
done by a prestigious group as the President re-
quests and the Council agrees to perform."


















































What's happening outside?
When this question crowds the mind of a school child,
there isn't room for much else.
Like what happened at Appomattox in April 1865.
Or who wrote Silas Marner.
S E Concentration on studies really suffers.
That's why windowless schools are out.
And lots of windows are in.
They're a sight more thoughtful.

Libbey Owens Ford Glass Co.
Toledo, Ohio



26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































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You'll be glad to hear Ruud Sanimasters
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SEPTEMBER, 1966










Nominations For 1967 Officers


MEMORANDUM TO: President James Deen
FROM : Nominating Committee:
Thomas H. Daniels, AIA,
Jack Willson, Jr., AIA,
James O. Kemp, AIA,
Dana B. Johannes, AIA,
Earl M. Starnes, AIA, Chairman.
SUBJECT : Nominations for 1967



August 11, 1966

The first action of the Committee was to determine the number of nominees for each vacant office. This was
unanimously decided in favor of two nominees. The promulgation of a healthy competitive spirit at the conven-
tion and the interest created by the election prompted this thinking along with the further consideration for
the wealth of leadership in the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects and the chance to
offer these men an opportunity to be honored by nomination and service if elected.

The Committee without equivocation has nominated men we feel are best qualified for these posts and we
believe that any of them will render a great service to the Association and continue the active, intelligent lead-
ership image we present for the architects in this state.

The Committee feels that this is a vital year in view of the fact that we will be dealing with a new legislature
composed of urban oriented representatives, a legislature that should be responsive to professionalism and should
be responsive to the aesthetic and developmental programs that the architects in this state have historically
supported. Our state is rapidly beginning to be a system of urban areas and it is the Association's duty to serve
these areas at the broadest levels of planning and over-all development; and continue to sponsor the specific develop-
ment of well-conceived and well-designed architectural projects consistent with long range planning and sound
growth. We have, thusly, selected men who represent experienced practitioners, men who are and continue to be
active in their communities at all levels and men who h ve significant backgrounds in legislative experience locally
and state-wide. They are also men with great depth in terms of service to the Institute in the State of Florida.




August 24, 1966

Due to the withdrawal of two candidates, one for the office of Vice President/President Designate and
one for Treasurer, the committee after two conference calls decided to present a one-man slate of nom-
inees. This was contrary to our previous decision, but the exigencies of time and the communciations
capability of the committee with the membership caused our reversal.

We feel and recommend that a study of the methods of the committee is in order. Perhaps appointment
should be the first order of business for the new president each year. It could observe the membership for
potential leadership and receive suggestions regarding potential nominees from members.

Our revised nominations follow:


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






For President Designate Vice President


HERBERT SAVAGE, Miami, Florida Chairman of the
Commission on Public Affairs, he also serves on the Florida
Development Commission. Was chairman of the FAAIA
Public Relations committee, has served 6 years as Director of
the FAAIA, is a former vice president of the Association
and past president of the Florida South Chapter.





For Secretary



MYRL HANES, Gainesville, Florida Has had own archi-
tectural office since 1950. Past president Florida North Chapter,
AIA; served on various chapter and state committees: member
and past president Gainesville Exchange Club; member Gainesville
City Commission 1955-60; prsently member Board of
Directors Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce. In 1954,
received Oustanding Design Award, Southeastern District
Convention of AIA. In 1959, received "Young Man of the Year"
award from Gainesville Junior Chamber of Commerce.




For Treasurer


H. LESLIE WALKER, Tampa, Florida Since 1960, he
has served at various times as President of the Greater Tampa
Association of Architects; secretary and president of Florida
Central Chapter of the AIA; secretary of the FAAIA. He is a
member of the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce,
Exchange Club of Tampa, Commerce Club of Tampa, and the
Timuquanian Society. Has had own firm since 1960 in
Tampa, Florida. Is affiliated with the Construction
Specifications Institute.



For Regional Judiciary Committee





ROBERT B. MURPHY, Orlando, Florida Registered to
practice architecture in the state of Florida since 1947. He is a
former president of the Mid-Florida Chapter of the FAAIA
and served as vice-president of the Association
from 1959 to 1962.


SEPTEMBER, 1966














Now...
Florida's big ones
are cutting costs by going

TOTAL ELECTRIC
(IT'S CHEAPER THAN WHEN COMBINED WITH FLAME-TYPE FUELS)

The department stores and supermarket shown here typify the
growing trend toward ALL-ELECTRIC ... signified by the
All-Electric Building Award and the Award of Merit for
Electrical Excellence.
All-electric design, with flameless electric air conditioning
and heating for year-round shopping comfort, can hold down
construction costs by eliminating such items as boiler rooms,
fuel storage, flues or vents.
Flameless electric is the cleanest fuel of all-this reduces
soiled merchandise and the expense of cleaning, maintenance
and redecorating.
Find out how Total-Electric buildings can save you money.
Your electric utility company will be happy to give you the
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















































































SEPTEMBER, 1966 31










The Coveted Craftsman Award


For the third consecutive year, the Florida Asso-
ciation of the AIA will choose one craftsman from
among its Chapter nominees to be Florida Crafts-
man of the Year! Eight chapters participated in the
program this year and their craftsmen's work is
displayed on the following three pages. We were
especially delighted to learn that outstanding crafts-
manship does run in the family Jacksonville
Chapter's nominee is James Alonzo Young Jr., whose
father was the chapter's choice in 19651
The Florida Craftsman of the Year will be an-
nounced at our 52nd Annual Convention in Miami


Beach, October 5-8. This program has proven to be
most popular and successful, and it is certain to be
one of the most interesting highlights of our entire
meeting.
Last year's winner was Albert Lang, whose handi-
crafted aluminum work had won him the Mid-
Florida Chapter award and nomination.
This year, he will be succeeded by one of the fol-
lowing highly-talented professionals of the allied
building arts. We of the architectural profession
salute these skilled men and all the superior
craftsmen they represent.


(Editor's Note: In addition to the chapters listed, the Daytona Beach Chapter also held a Craftsman's Awards
competition. However, information and photographs could not be received by publication time. Daytona Beach's
craftsman will be included in consideration for the Craftsman of the Year award.)


NORMAN
Carpenter


LORD


Nominated by the
Broward County Chapter

Project: Richard Reed Residence
Pompano Beach, Florida

Contractor: John Dec

Architect: Dan C. Duckham


JOHN J. POWERS
Plasterer
~ : -' Nominated by the
Florida Central Chapter
Project: Office building for Local No. 3
Tampa, Florida
Contractor: Oliver M. Lloyd
Architect: McLane, Raion, Mclntosh and Bernardo


32 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































MARY GRABILL
Potter

Nominated by
Florida South Chapter

Project: Variety of pottery projects

Architect: Charles Lonsdale, AIA







JAMES ALONZO YOUNG, JR.
Marble-setter
Nominated by the
Jacksonville Chapter
Project: Roman-Travertine facing on fireplaces
Tway-Fulton residence
Jacksonville, Florida
Contractor: R. E. Bethune
Sub-Contractor: Steward-Mellon Co.
Architect: William K. Jackson, AIA
Associate Architect: Robert D. Lee, AIA


SEPTEMBER, 1966






























CHARLES WHITMORE
Masonry, brick
Nominated by
Mid-Florida Chapter
Project: Masonry
Security Federal Savings
& Loan
Winter Park, Florida
Contractor: Robert Rumpf
Architect: Lyle P. Fugleberg, AIA











Which of these outstanding AIA Chapter Nominees

do you think will receive the coveted

"Florida Craftsman of the Year Award"?


34 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Now


there are two


New GRAHAM M. DRESSLER completed in 1964 and houses 440
HALL is in the foreground. It will students The pastel green of the new
house 342 students and has a pent- dormitory provides a pleasing color
house meeting hall. GEORGE contrast with the light brown walls of
PEARCE HALL in background was the previous structure.


Another circular dormitory

uses Lehigh Cements throughout


The second circular dormitory at Eastern Washington State College is
now ready for occupancy. It features 180 precast, exposed aggregate wall
panels. Each panel, 14' x 9' x 4", was made with Lehigh Type III Ce-
ment, white sand and green marble chips and marble dust. The central
utility core was made of regular weight concrete erected by the slip form
method. Floors of the main structure are cast-in-place lightweight con-
crete. The lounge floor is composed of 18 prestressed, tapered "T" beams
and the roof is formed by 23 precast, tapered folded plate beams. Here,
as in other important construction through the U.S., Lehigh Cements
contributed materially to the success of the project-just as they did to
the success of its earlier counterpart. Lehigh Portland Cement Company,
Allentown, Pa. District Sales Offices: Jacksonville, Fla. 32216.


I W-HIGH H!

own
Eastern Wahinaton State Colls Cheney, Wah.
Architect and Engeer
Culler, le, Marte & Ericon Architct
Norrie & Dav, Eancineer, Spokane, Wsh.
enerat Contractor
GeorPe n aro. Hu-H. Halvorson. Inc., SpoaeWash.
Graham M. Drser Hl-Selrk Co., Spokae, Wash.
Ready Mix Concrete
Central Premix Concrte Co., Spokane, Wash.
Precast & Prestruessed Unlit
Central Premix Cncre Co Pr essed Divon
Spokane, Wash.


SEPTEMBER, 1966















RES


SOLUTION


WHEREAS the professions of architecture and engineering are learned professions and
are legally recognized in the State of Florida in order to safeguard the life, health, property
and public welfare of her citizens and;

WHEREAS it is incumbent upon these professions to conduct their practice with such
fidelity to their clients and to the public as to warrant unquestioned confidence and;

WHEREAS the fields of architecture and engineering overlap in many respects and;

WHEREAS by its very nature the rendering of professional services by these professions
must be conducted in accordance with the highest ethical and moral standards:

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Florida State Board of Architecture and
the Florida State Board of Engineer Examiners that the attached statement on "Professional
Collaboration in Environmental Design" recently promulgated and endorsed by represen-
tative national organizations of the architectural and engineering professions be considered
to be a proper and sound statement of interprofessional practice applicable to the profes-
sions of architecture and engineering.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT these two boards will maintain a continuing
study of interprofessional needs in order to promote improved professional relationships in
their dealings with one another and with the public.

SIGNED this 29th day of April 1966.


Florida State Board of Architecture
HARRY E. BURNS, JR.
President

WILLIAM WEBBER
Vice President


Florida State Board of Engineer Examiners
JAMES F. SHIVLER, JR.
President

WILLIAM A. WATSON
Vice President


36 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















This Guide has been approved and adopted by
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CONSULTING ENGINEERS
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PLANNERS
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS
THE CONSULTING ENGINEERS COUNCIL OF THE UNITED STATES
THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS

Preface


In the interest of promoting the public
health, safety and general welfare, national
organizations representing members of the de-
sign professions who deal with research, plan-
ning, design and construction of man's living
environment have jointly prepared this guide
to professional collaboration in environmental
design.

There is a continuing need for a better
understanding of the services offered by those
professions concerned with the conception,
analysis and design of planning and construc-
tion projects. Uncertainty often exists in the
minds of both the public and the design pro-
fessions as to the functions performed and the
areas of service provided by these professions.
All of them entail exhaustive study and re-
search, demonstrated talent in planning and
design, and devotion and integrity in guarding
the public welfare and the client's interest. To
delineate the various design functions and


areas of practice precisely is impractical, as
they may overlap to a degree.
However, wth the complexity and magni-
tude of present-day buildings and man's living
environment, the merging of design services
through collaboration among all environmental
design professionals is required to meet ad-
vancing environmental standards, to solve the
complicated design problems of contemporary
projects, and to produce unified and harmon-
ious results. Such collaboration and teamwork
throughout the planning and design cycle are
supported wholeheartedly by environmental
design professionals in the interest of their
clients and the public.
It should be noted that, since registration
is not presently required of all design profes-
sionals in all states, the references to profes-
sional licensing, registration, registration laws
or legal qualifications made in this statement
are applicable to professionals whose registra-
tion is required in state laws.


Tenets of the Collaborating Design Professions


The environmental design professions in-
clude Architects, Engineers, Landscape Archi-
tects and Planners. Members of these profes-
sions adhere to the following tenets:
1) They uphold the dignity and advance
the progress of other design professions by ex-
changing information and experience.
2) They familiarize themselves with the
registration laws of the other design profes-
sions and adhere to the spirit as well as the
letter of those laws.
3) They recognize, whenever a project in-
volves skills practiced by several professions,
that close collaboration is desirable and should
begin at the very earliest stage of research,
analysis and design, and at that time responsi-
bilities of the collaborating professions should
be clarified and established.
4) They perform their services in accord-
ance with the standards of conduct and code
of ethics of their individual professions, and
each respects the standards and codes of the
other professions.


5) They respect the professional reputation,
prospects or business of all their colleagues in
the design professions.
6) They do not supplant another design
professional after definite steps have been
taken toward his employment whether as prin-
cipal or as collaborator.
7) They do not engage in competitive bid-
ding with another design professional on the
basis of professional charges.
8) They do not accept a commission on a
contingency basis as a device for obtaining
work.
9) They will not accept a commission on
which another design professional has been
engaged, unless his connection with the work
has been terminated.
10) They do not offer the services of an-
other professional as a collaborator without
his consent.
11) They do not review the work of an-
other design professional except with his
knowledge.


SEPTEMBER, 1966 37


Professional Collaboration in


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN


-
I







12) They do not alter or copy reports,
drawings or specifications prepared and iden-
tified by another design professional, whether
or not bearing his seal, without his knowledge
and consent.
13) They give due public recognition to the
work performed by collaborating design pro-
fessionals.
Collaborative Service Contracts
The combined talents of collaborating de-
sign professionals and their coordination are
required on many projects.
Ordinarily the client's interests are best
served in the research, analysis and design of a
project when the client has a single contract
with a prime professional who is responsible
for the direction of the work and for providing
through collaboration the specialized services
that may be needed. This makes available to
the client all the advantages of specialization
and at the same time centralizes responsibility.
It is then up to the prime professional to see
that collaboration is initiated at the earliest
possible stage and carried on throughout the
project.
It is recognized that some long-range plan-
ning projects requiring continuity and some
projects with a prolonged construction period
may be better handled by separate contracts
between the client and individual profession-
als under the general guidance of a coordinat-
ing professional.

Selection of Prime Professional
It is the responsibility of the client to select
and designate the prime professional and to
approve the selection of the collaborating pro-
fessionals for his project. When the major
portion of a project is in the recognized cate-
gory of a particular design profession, a mem-
ber of that profession should be the prime
professional. The prime professional's design
ability; professional reputation, demonstrated
competence, practical efficiency, business cap-
acity and integrity, good judgment and ability
to obtain the cooperation of those involved in

Selection and
of Environmental I
Selection Basis
Environmental design professionals furnish
the creative talent necessary to bring into rea-
lization the client's projects. The environment-
al design professions are learned professions,
requiring of their members sound technical
training, broad experience, personal ability,
honesty and integrity. The selection of design
professionals by an evaluation of these qualities
is the basis for comparison of their services.
Many projects require the teamwork of sev-
eral collaborators. The design team provides
management, research, planning, design, draft-
ing, technical and nonprofessional personnel
and the facilities needed. It is essential that


a project will be the primary considerations in
his appointment.
Coordination of the Work
The prime professional is responsible for the
design of the project. He will be the project
coordinator and will have the responsibility
for selecting the collaborators with the consent
of the client.
The education, experience and registration
(as prescribed by state law) of each of the
collaborators qualify him for design services
of particular type and scope. Each design pro-
fessional is cognizant of 'the training and ex-
perience required for competency in the design
professions, and does not render his services
in those areas in which his qualifications are
not established.
Contractual Responsibilities
The allocation of professional responsibili-
ties is determined in joint conference between
the prime professional and the collaborating
professionals prior to the design work to insure
proper consideration of all elements.
When the collaborative design services are
performed under a single contract, the areas
of responsibility and the division of the fee
between the collaborators are determined by
negotiation between the prime professional
and the various collaborators, and are agreed
upon prior to the start of design work.
When separate contracts between the client
and the various collaborators are executed, all
such contracts should include a clear statement
of areas of responsibility and work, should
state which of the parties is to be the project
coordinator and define his authority.
Professional Firms
Many firms will include in their organiza-
tions more than one of the usual specializa-
tions of the environmental design professions.
Such firms may perform more than one func-
tion, or may perform all design for an entire
project, to the extent they are legally qualified.
Two or more professionals or professional
firms may form a "joint venture" for the pur-
pose of rendering a complete design service.

Compensation
)esign Professionals
the client undertsand that design professionals
have expenses considerably greater than direct
salaries. Adequate compensation is necessary
to provide the scope and quality of services
that the client desires and has a right to expect.
Members of the design professions will not
solicit or submit proposals for professional serv-
ices, including supporting services, on the basis
of competitive bidding. Such competition by
design professionals for employment on the
basis of professional fees or charges is defined
as : the formal or informal submission, or re-
ceipt, of verbal or written estimates of cost
or proposals in terms of dollars, man-days of
work required, percentage of construction cost,


38 THE FLORIDA ARCHITE







or any other measures of compensation where-
by the prospective client may compare services
on a price basis prior to the time that one
individual, firm or organization has been sel-
ected for negotiation.
Selection Policies
The responsible member of the professional
firm being considered by the client for a par-
ticular project, having established competency
to perform the necessary services, must be
legally qualified to practice as prescribed in
the state in which the services are required,
and must have adequate recent experience in
responsible charge of the professional disci-
plines involved. The client is referred to the
appropriate professional society for a definition
of "responsible charge" if he is not familiar
with the requirements.
Every firm being considered should be re-
quested to provide complete information on
its qualifications. This information should in-
clude the personal qualifications of principals
and key personnel, current work load and a
record of recent projects. Similar information
should be supplied for the collaborators.
Selection Procedures
In selecting the prime professional, the cli-
ent should proceed as follows:
1) Prepare a description of the proposed
project, the purpose to be served and any
other pertinent factors for transmittal to de-
sign professionals.
2) Request data on the qualifications of a
reasonable number of professionals (and their
proposed major collaborators) who appear
capable of meeting the requirements of the
project, and review their qualifications and
experience.
3) Arrange personal interviews, preferably
in the office of each professional, to assure
mutual undertsanding of the contemplated
project and the capabilities of the firm. ~
4) Investigate each professional's work, if
desired, by requesting a visit to one or more
of his projects, or an interview with the owners
and possibly others associated with the proj-
ects. Where appropriate, this procedure may
be extended to some or all of the major
collaborators.
5) Select the preferred prime professional
and reach an agreement on mutually satisfac-
tory contract terms, including compensation
based on the value of the services to be
performed.
6) If a satisfactory agreement cannot be
concluded with the preferred prime profession-4
al, the client terminates the negotiation and
repeats the process of review and negotiation
with the next party of his choice.
Compensation
Compensation for professional services may
be established by a variety of methods. Pro-
fessional societies have issued manuals de-
scribing these methods, and the client may


wish to refer to these manuals for guidance.
Among the more common methods, or com-
binations thereof, are the following:
1) Percentage of construction cost
2) Lump sum
3) Cost plus a fixed amount or percentage
4) Salary cost times a factor
5) Per diem 6) Retainer fee
The type and size of the project, the scope
of the professional services required, the area
in which the design professional is located,
and the area in which the work is to be per-
formed, all have a bearing on the cost of pro-
fessional services. Quality is the only true
measure of the services offered by the pro-
fessional.
Functions of the Coordinator
Where professional services are performed
under a single contract between client and
prime professional, the prime professional acts
as a coordinator. In addition to his usual serv-
ices as a design professional, it is his duty and
responsibility to :
1) Negotiate the scope of professional serv-
ices, compensation and terms of payment with
each independent collaborator.
2) Prepare a time schedule based upon the
client's program for the project in agreement
with the client and collaborators.
3) Obtain from the client, and furnish as
needed to the collaborators, all surveys, sub-
surface and soil mechanics investigations and
reports and other necessary data.
4) Arrange for all project conferences be-
tween the client and design collaborators, and
maintain liaison continuity with them on all
project matters.
5) Coordinate and transmit all recommen-
dations received from and made to the client.
6) Assume final responsibility for all de-
cisions required by the agreement with the
client for the services to be rendered.
7) Establish and coordinate design stand-
ards with concurrence of the collaborators
and, where pertinent, coordinate statements of
probable construction costs prepared by them.
8) Where construction is involved, it is
also the duty and responsibility of the coordi-
nator to:
a) Coordinate the preparation and arrange
for the printing, publication and distri-
bution of the construction contract doc-
uments.
b) Advise the client of the construction
contract procedure, and with the advice
of appropriate collaborators, assist in
compiling a list of bidders or aid in
negotiations with selected contractors.
c) Coordinate the analysis of bids and sub-
mit to the client recommendations as to
award.
d) Coordinate the general administration
of the construction contracts among the
collaborators.
e) Prepare a completion report with the
assistance of the collaborators and recom-
mend as to acceptance of the work.


SEPTEMBER, 1966 39







DRAB STORES BEGIN

AT ARCHITECTS' DOOR
(Reprinted from Women's Wear Daily, August 2, 1966)
LOS ANGELES-Department store design is becoming stereo-
typed, contends Dan Morganelli, partner in the architectural/design
firm of Morganelli-Heumann & Rudd.
Much. of the blame, he feels, is due to overstaffed architectural
houses that tend to repeat themselves, and where the principals find
themselves more administrators than designers.
"Imageless cliches" is the phrase partner Werner Heumann describes
the stores thus being turned out.
Large architectural firms often disparage the department stores'
own in-store design staffs and ride rough shod over their recommenda-
tions.
There may have been a time once when in-store people didn't have
the knowledge and would refer to a National Retail Dry Goods manual
for information on square footage," Mr. Morganelli concedes. "But
now they've become sophisticated and know their needs better than any-
one else. When they say they need 12,800 square feet for an intimate
apparel department, they know what they're doing."
Mr. Morganelli says he thinks the eventual trend may be for in-store
people to block out basic store design, then turn to small outside firms
for the artistic, finishing touches.
Morganelli-Heumann & Rudd, not surprisingly, is just such a firm.
It was founded in February, 1965, and its principals are all former execu-
tives at Welton Becket & Associates.
The principle, Mr. Morganelli stresses, is to keep down the firm's
size and number of clients (Saks is its major retail account now), to cut
down on basic costs and still leave enough "fat" for the design depart-
ment.
Richard Beaudet, formerly vice-president and director of store plan-
ning for Victor Gruen & Associates, recently joined the company as head
of its store-planning division. He has completed a book called "Retail
Planning Standards" which may well prove helpful to merchants con-
templating expansion.
Basically, the book is a catalog of typical store fixtures, enabling a
merchant to choose his own with a minimum of fuss. Previously, Mr.
Beaudet explains, merchants would vaguely describe to architects the
dimensions of such desired fixtures, which would then be custom-de-
signed at high cost, sometimes with "every little screw hole" detailed.
Mr. Morganelli, in an interview several years ago when he was still
with Becket, indicated the ideal shape for a store was round with a cir-
cular perimeter of wall to allow maximulp exposure and a minimum of
100,000 square feet per floor to make it work. He hopes Ohrbach's, his
choice for the ideal round store, will someday go round with him.
Another Morganelli pet theory is that merchants shouldn't ask for
special architectural effects in a store without providing space for them.
If a store requests a certain number of feet, he's found, the merchandise
managers generally have planned on using all the space for selling area.
When a special architectural effect was requested for a Strawbridge
& Clothier branch, Mr. Morganelli took management aback by asking
for an extra 1,000 feet per floor. This was granted, and a pleasing stair-
well area was created.
Extra artistic area is not wasted space, he points out. It creates an
atmosphere necessary for impulse buying.
Lighting is another area in which some store people fall into money-
saving traps. A contractor will call, promise nrpre lumens for less money,
and then the store management will tell the architect not to bother
about designing the lighting-"We've got it all sewed up." Afterwards
they'll wonder why the store just doesn't look right and blame the
architect.
"They don't realize that one area of a store might require 100
lumens, another less than 20. Raymond Dexter, Bullock's vice-president
in charge of design, is someone who understands this and is a great be-
liever in romantic lighting." Mr. Morganelli has harsh words for depart-
ment store people who still lack confidence and insist on erecting "big
barns" with flexible interior walls.
40


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Apepha, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Bal Central orida Gas Corp.
BatIni tm, City of Blounttown
Ba late, Florida Public Utilities Co.
loyea lBic, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradeut, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
CLettahlenee Towl of Chattahoochee
CieyF, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clerrt. Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cam, City Gas Co.
Caes lBkh, City Gas Co.
Carl Gao*e, Ciy Gas Co.
aCre r City of Crescent City
Col ie City Gas Co.
Dayltu Bla, Florida Gas Co.
ol Forida Home Gas Co.
Dekary Bech, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Ea 6aMl. City Gas Co.
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Fat Laurdale Peoples Gas System
Fert M .ade City of Fort Meade
Fat Pier, City of Fort Pierce
aleriulk Galnesville Gas Co.
Sue. Alabama, Geneva County Gas
Ditrict
HI s Cty, Central Florida Gas Corp.
iaia. Cty Gas Co.
HWleed Peoples Gas System
asc vll, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake AI Central Florida Gas Corp.
La Ciy, City of Lake City
LaUd. Florida Gas Co.
Lake Waks, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Loeahr City of Leesburg
Lie Ok, City of ULive Oak
Mass, City of Madison
MarmiA, City of Marianna
MedL s,, City Gas Co.
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Mial lBus, Peoples Gas System
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Oca Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
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Orlds, Florida Gas Co.
Palha, Palae Gas Authoity
Pal Ba, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Palm leas earde City of
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Pam City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
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Pay, City oa Perry
Plit City, Plant Cty Natural Gas Co.
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Florida Public Utilities Co.
Sarta. Southem Gas and Electric Corp.
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Talasse, City of Tallahassee
Ta*s, Peoples Gas System
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tr a Central Florida Gas Corp.
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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hot water. No problem. The architect who locker rooms and in the kitchen.
designed the school's beautiful Early Natural Gas makes a big differ-
American buildings specified long lasting, ence, too, in clean, fast cooking
fast recovery Ruud water heaters and de- to satisfy student appetites...
pendable, modern Natural Gas a first and in providing healthful fresh
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SEPTEMBER, 1966




















































THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


m music IS When you want to add flexible communications systems to your
on y half buildings, specify Muzak sound systems. Quality-engineered for
hy h Ia heavy-duty voice paging, public addressing, signalling, and emer-
the be efit f agency warning. And Muzak's programmed background
the Dbeneflit music masks noise and complements design. You ben-
M uz k sod efit. So does your client. Four Florida franchisers can
M uzak sound provide expert assistance and detailed specifications
system s for complete Muzak sound .
Syste mS systems. Call today. w m e


Jacksonville: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 8107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Mimi Beach: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road












































CREDITS: MEMPHIS METROPOLITAN AIRPORT: ARCHITECT: MANN & HARROVER, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE. GENERAL CONTRACTOR: J. A.
JONES CONSTRUCTION COMPANY. NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE. TERRAZZO CONTRACTOR: AMERICAN TERRAZZO COMPANY. DALLAS, TEXAS.


TE IRRAZZO... beauty...low maintenance... durability


SEPTEMBER, 966


SEPTEMBER, 1966


WHEN AN OWNER ASKS, "What
kind of floors... ?" The best
answer is terrazzo.
Terrazzo is the one floor that
actually improves with age. Regu-
lar traffic combined with simple
maintenance mellows it, polishes
it, makes it look better as the
years pass. Terrazzo adds beauty
... beauty adds value.
Terrazzo costs less to maintain.


The little bit extra it costs origi-
nally will be recovered many times
over in the years to come.
Add up the advantages and
you will see why the architects
chose terrazzo for 120,000 square
feet of floors at the Memphis
Metropolitan Airport in Mem-
phis, Tennessee. And you'll see
why it should be your choice for
your next building.


General Portland Cement Company U
Offices: Chicago, Illinois Chattanooga. Tennessee Dallas, Texas Fort Worth, Texas Houston, Texas Fredonia, Kansas
Fort Wayne, Indiana Jackson. Michigan Kansas City Tampa, Florida Miami, Florida Los Angeles. California




7k :


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Cline Aluminum Products, Inc.
1-16


Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover


Florida Gas Transmission Co.
40-41


Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
30-31


Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
20


Gory Roofing Tile Manufacturing,
Inc.
42


J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
44


Lehigh Portland Cement Co.
35


Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co.
26


Muzak Corporation
42


Portland Cement Association
18

Reflectal/Borg-Warner Corporation
24

Rheem Manufacturing Co./
Ruud Commercial Water Heaters
27

Trinity White-
General Portland Cement Co.
43


F. Graham Williams Co.
21


CALENDAR


SUPPORT
YOUR PUBLICATION


When writing to

manufacturers about new
products or advertisements
first seen here ...


tell them you saw it in...

The
FLORIDA
ARCHITECT


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


September 17
Annual Meeting of Council of
Commissioners, FAAIA Executive
Offices, 1000 Ponce De Leon
Blvd., Coral Gables, Fla.

October 5
Annual Meeting of Board of Di-
rectors, Pre-Convention 10
a.m., Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach, Fla.

October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.

October 8
Meeting of Board of Directors,
Post-Convention, Deauville Ho-
tel, Miami Beach, Fla.


The J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corporation of Florida
is proud to announce that on or about Sept. 1,
1966, its main offices will occupy new quarters
at 1101 BRICKELL AVENUE, MIAMI, FLOR-
IDA 33131. Telephone is 371-7431.


To our many Builders, Brokers, Mortgagors, In-
vestors and other friends who have made our
growth and expansion possible, we extend our
sincere thanks and invite you to visit us at any
time.


JAY I. KISLAK
Chairman of the Board .

R. W. JOHNSON
President







This Is Zyrian Stone ...


This is an angle photograph of an actual panel 17' wide.


It began over 500 million years ago . in a quarry outside Min-
eral Bluff, Georgia. Through the ages, it adapted to a multitude
of earth changes. Today, It is a fine-grained mica schist that has
remained remarkably adaptable. It breaks into slabs of any desired
thickness (stocked only in /2" thickness) . or cut and saw it
to any shape. Variety is infinite. No two slabs show the same color
shades . they range from greens and bluish-greens through yel-
lows, browns and chocolate tones. Blend them to produce striking,
artistic effects. This unusual stone is ideal for veneering ... future
uses are unlimited. It took over 500 million years for Zyrian Stone
to reach such perfection of beauty and facility. It was worth the wait.


I iiFUIA


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA TUXEDO 7-1525




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


Miles S. UcDowell
1336 NE 6 Terr.
Gainesville, Fla. 4




"FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE
HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA... "FOCUS: COM Y" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND
BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION I HE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8 .. ."FOCUS: COMMUN-
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"FOCUS: COMMUNI ONV UILDI CTS EXHIBIT OF THE
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION 0 OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE
HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA.. CUS: CO MUNItY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND
BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE ASSOCIATION ,OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA .. "FOCUS: COMMUN-
ITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSO-




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