• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 The president's message
 Copyright
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Clouds over the capitol
 Advertising
 Why bad design?
 The executive director says......
 Advertising
 The computing center
 Advertising
 Newly-registered architects
 Introducing: our photographers
 Advertising
 Calendar of events, Executive...
 Advertising
 International design conference:...
 Readers' viewpoint
 Advertisers' index
 Advertising














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00146
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: August 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00146
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    The president's message
        Page ii
    Copyright
        Page iii
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Clouds over the capitol
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Advertising
        Page 6
    Why bad design?
        Page 7
    The executive director says....
        Page 8
    Advertising
        Page 9
    The computing center
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Advertising
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Newly-registered architects
        Page 15
    Introducing: our photographers
        Page 16
    Advertising
        Page 17
    Calendar of events, Executive suite
        Page 18
    Advertising
        Page 19
    International design conference: A report
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Readers' viewpoint
        Page 22
    Advertisers' index
        Page 23
    Advertising
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

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As summer pours into Florida,
architects of this state begin the
task of selecting and rewarding
men and women who have per-
formed exceptional work on proj-
ects of architecture. Each Chap-
ter of the Florida Association
has, will soon have or should be
searching their sections of the
state to find qualities of crafts-
manship in individuals who have
performed outstanding work. A
chapter program organized for
presentation of these individuals
to the membership and to the
community brings an awareness
of the architect's concern for the
quality of his buildings.
As State President, I have been
privileged to attend several of
these programs and I have a few
more to attend. Each has been
conducted in a similar way and
each has instilled pride in the
recipient for the work he has ac-
complished. The methods of
presentation vary from full ban-
quets with invited labor, govern-
ment leaders and others, to a dis-
tinctive personal award as part of
the chapter's regular program.
As our Convention approaches
in October, all the names and
work will be searched again so
that we may honor a single per-
son for his craftsmanship. Not
that this name represents the
only craftsman to be honored but
rather that he will represent all
the others-and that quality of a
building which gives it distinc-
tion among others ... good work-
manship!
This appears to be a simple
task select and reward. But
architects tell me that good
workmanship is difficult to
come by. "The trades do not
encourage the craft of the
task." "Mechanization has re-
placed the hand in shaping."
"The budget doesn't allow
craftsmanship."


Nominations for these awards
are fewer and fewer in chapters
each year. Some award commit-
tees literally drag names from the
members. Others have considered
abandoning t h e craftsmanship
program because "craftsmanship
is dead."
I am reminded of an article
which occurred in a Yale Archi-
tectural Journal reviewing re-
marks by Philip Johnson. The
title was something like, "The
Seven Crutches of Architecture."
Its contents reviewed the familiar
excuses architectural students and
architects give for producing bad
works. Briefly, they were:
The Crutch of History
(they did it before)
The Crutch of Pretty Draw-
ing (illusion with trees)
The Crutch of Usefulness
(it works a Harvard habit)
The Crutch of Comfort
(stop the sun)


JAMES DEEN, AIA


The Crutch of Structure
(clean structural order)
The Crutch of Serving the
Client (he wanted it that way)
The Crutch of Cheapness
(anyone can design an expen-
sive architecture)
Well, then, if craftsmanship is
dead, so is architecture and so are
architects. The crutches we use to
justify buildings have come home
to us in our failure to find good
workmanship in our buildings. If
our programs to reward those per-
sons who construct for us are
more difficult because of the lack
of candidates, then architects are
not developing a framework for
this growth. Pretty drawings of
cheap buildings designed only to
work for a thoughtless client can-
not instill in the workman a pride
for the architecture. It becomes
as the architect may have con-
ceived it-a job, held up by all his
crutches.
Visit a good building with
good architecture and you will
find a spirit for its construction.
Each man knows his task and
does it well. And further will take
that additional interest to make
it his best. The building sings
with its success. You wonder why
and how the good workers come
to that building and not another.
It is because it began with a spirit
of craftsmanship. The design, its
execution, the drawings, the bids
- the entire project developed
confidence w h i c h encouraged
each person to excell. Excellence
was the result.
Our programs for reward to
individuals who have performed
exceptional work for us are selfish
in concept in that we are seeking
to encourage an excellence of per-
formance of our creations which
at times does not exist.
Craftsmanship begins at the
end of your pencil.


I


L;.a i h >i H IY r"





W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.

























I





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AUGUST, 1966




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OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach e Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast e Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest e Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach e Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
Black-Baker-Burton / Photography Consultants
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables 34, Florida.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distributed with-
out charge to 4,669 registered architects, builders, contractors, de-
signers and members of allied fields throughout the state of Florida
-and to leading national architectural firms and journals.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi.
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. .. Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00 ... McMurray Printers.
AUGUST, 1966


CLOUDS OVER THE CAPITOL

4-5
WHY BAD DESIGN?

7
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SAYS ...

8

THE COMPUTING CENTER
Newest Addition to the
University of Miami Campus

10 11

NEWLY-REGISTERED ARCHITECTS

15

INTRODUCING: OUR PHOTOGRAPHERS

16

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

18

EXECUTIVE SUITE
New FAAIA Offices

18

INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE-
A REPORT

20-21

READERS' VIEWPOINT
Letters to the Editor

22

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

23

FAAIA 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION
Back Cover


FRONT COVER-CLOUDS OVER THE CAPITOL, an
original editorial cartoon created for "The Florida Architect"
by Don Wright, Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist of the
Miami News. See story pages 4-5.


VOLUME 16 U NUMBER 8 U 1966








Clouds Over




The American Institute of Architects has continuously voiced its objections to extending the West Front of
the nation's Capitol. At the national convention in Denver, the AIA resolved to support a bill in Congress which
is against the proposed expansion of the Capitol. It is gratifying to see that our feelings are being supported by
some of the most respected journalists of our time men who are putting their feelings and facts into newspaper
articles for all to read. By reprinting some of these articles in support of our August cover by Pulitzer-Prize
winner Don Wright, we hope to enlist your support in the fight to save our Capitol.


In a nationally-syndicated newspaper article, Howard
K. Smith headlined his story: "The Capital Architect--
Most Dangerous Man in Town." And his story continued:


J. GEORGE STEWART is a gentle and
elderly man who is bent on destruction. One
might perhaps paraphrase Thomas Jefferson and
say the Capitol architect has sworn eternal en-
mity to American history.

What the British could not do with rockets
in 1814 (they tried to burn the Capitol down
with the same rockets which later at Fort Mc-
Henry inspired Francis Scott Key to compose
The Star Spangled Banner but failed; so they
piled all the furniture in the middle of the build-
ing and set fire to it and partly succeeded) he is
doing; bringing down the wall of the capitol
building.

*


THIS REPORTER is not wholly a cultural
reactionary (only partly). I recollect the fool-
hardy protesters who chained themselves to
cherry trees along the Tidal Basin in our
nation's capital in order to keep a few of the
trees from being removed so that the Jefferson
Memorial might be erected there.

They were misguided: the trees were not
missed, and the Jefferson Memorial became a
lovely and stately decoration of Washington's
landscape.

*

BUT THE Capitol, where the marvelous arts
of government by consent of the governed were


first applied in the world on a noble scale, is
unique and sacred.

It or what Mr. Stewart has consented to
leave from his past depradations is one of the
only three structures that existed in Washington
City that raw November day in 1800 when our
government first moved there. The others are the
White House and the Octagon House which is
now the headquarters of the American Institute
of Architects.

When George Washington laid the corner-
stone of the Capitol, he said, "It may be relied
upon, it is the progress of that building which is
to inspire or depress the public confidence." He
was right: for many years only that structure
held the green, dissident union together. Its in-
fluence may be measured by the fact that for
a century and a third all state Capitols were
modeled after the one in Washington.




WHEN WORK on its was interrupted at the
outbreak of the Civil War, Lincoln ordered work
resumed, for "if the people see the Capitol going
on," he said, "it is a sign that we intend the
Union shall go on."

When Confederate commissioners came to
talk peace four years later, the first thing one
of them a former member of Congress said
to William Seward was, "Governor, how is the
Capitol?"

The part of the great building that will be
junked under Mr. Stewart's new plan will be the


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








The CAPITOL


last of the old sandstone walls of the little
square structure which awaited Congress in No-
vember, 1800. It housed the Senate, the House,
the Library of Congress, the Supreme Court--
and on Sundays was used as a church. At a cost
of 42 cents per cubic foot, it was the best build-
ing investment the nation ever made.




THE MATTER of economy alone should
encourage the Congress to resist Mr. Stewart's
new plan to tear down the old walls and move
the whole structure out 44 feet and re-do it in
marble. His past achievements -demolishing
the east front of the same great building and
re-doing it in marble, and building the mon-
strous Rayburn House Office Building have
ended up costing a multiple of the amount he
originally stated. "The Rayburn building, though
it houses fewer than 200 congressmen with their
staffs, is said to have cost more to build than
the Empire State Building or the huge Pentagon.


In the Miami News, columnist Joseph Alsop's Wash-
ington-bylined article begins, "J. George Stewart's poor
taste is exceeded only by his ability to survive as the
official architect of the Capitol. This fine old building
deserves a better fate."

Alsop writes, "The first point to note about the official
architect of the Capitol is that he never has been, is not
now and never will be an architect. J. Stewart is an amiable,
aging Republican congressional lame duck from Delaware,
who was named architect of the Capitol by President
Eisenhower. This was an appointment almost as whimsical
as the Emperor Caligula's famous nomination of his favor-
ite horse to the Roman consulship; and it has produced
far more practical results, all of them perfectly godawful."

Alsop follows the career of J. George Stewart. "It is
an extraordinary record," he writes. "It began with the
new Senate Office Building which seemed impossible
to surpass in extravagance, impracticality and tastelessness
until the Rayburn Building was constructed. Then fol-
lowed the extension of the Capitol's east front, with the
machine-made marble exterior and the new interiors that
appear to have been imitated from the costly men's
rooms in the Moscow subway."


* *


* *


IF CONGRESS needs more space, let it do
what it has done five times in the past: build
itself a separate building in a separate place.

If the old walls are weak, then do what was
done to the White House: reinforce them with
steel, but keep the old walls.

If J. George Stewart had the same job in
France, he would probably replace Chartres
Cathedral with a supermarket. That gentle,
politic old man the Capital architect who is
not an architect.

Let us resist him and hold onto a heritage
while we still have one.

(This article is reprinted courtesy of the Miami Herald
and the Hall Syndicate, New York.)


"... we are to have improvements on Latrobe and
Bulfinch by non-architect Stewart," Alsop added.

*


At a recent session of the Senate, Senator Paul Douglas
took the floor to recite his own poetic discourse on the
subject . .

O architect, spare our Capitol.
Touch not a single stone.
In youth, it sheltered our republic.
Oh, please let it alone.

And so the clouds gather over the nation's Capitol. Will
the storm pass?


AUGUST, 1966








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







WHY


BAD


DESIGN?

By LEROY POPE
United Press International

NEW YORK Bad business architecture is more
likely to be the result of shirking responsibility on the
part of the client than by the designer, a prominent arch-
itect says.
"Most corporation heads hate to make decisions about
architectural and building problems," said Richard Simoni
of Simoni, Heck & Associates of New York and New Or-
leans.
"Consequently they try to put all the responsibility
they can on the architect," Simoni said. "Worse than that,
the company's chief executive doesn't even like to take
the responsibility of choosing the architect so a commit-
tee of management is appointed to choose him.
"All too often the ultimate result is a building as
ungainly as the camel, which a wit once described as 'a
horse designed by a committee.'
"That's because the committee, having chosen the
architect, hands him a list of requirements and the skimp-
iest budget for the project it can draw up, then hastens
to wash its hands of the whole business."
What should happen, Simoni said, is what happened
to Michelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci in the Renais-
sance," The Popes and rich cardinals Michelangelo
worked for in Rome and the dukes Da Vinci worked for
in Florence and other cities may have been cantankerous
and dilatory sometimes but they respected Michelangelo
and Da Vinci as artists and took the trouble to work
closely with them for years to make sure the churches and
palaces they were paying for were beautifully designed
and magnificently constructed."
Simoni said the blunt fact is that much commercial
construction has to be on a monumental scale because of
the size of business today; therefore companies should
give architectural projects designed to be used for many
years, careful and loving attention. Top management
should work closely with the architect for many weeks or
months before deciding on a final design.
"Failure to do this is one reason so much modern
architecture fails to 'come off'," Simoni said.
"When the architect simply is handed a skimpy budg-
et and told to come up with a 'modern' building of a
certain size in the quickest time possible, what can he do
but play it safe and draw a glass-walled box that fits the
site and will contain the right quantities of people and
machinery?"
AUGUST, 1966


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Following treatment, products emerge dry, odorless,
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They are free from raised grain, can be made water
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V CELLON is a registered trademark of Koppers Company, Inc.






An Editorial


During the first week of Octo-
ber, the spotlight will be on the
architects and the profession they
represent in Florida. The scene will
be the 52nd Annual Convention of
the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects.
The Regional Convention will
highlight the theme "FOCUS:
COMMUNITY," which requires
the attention of every architect.
A Regional Conference such as
ours restates many national issues
on a "grassroots" level, for without
such liaison and dual communica-
tion, national policy (no matter
how good or meaningful) cannot
be carried out to its full potential.
Our Conference fulfills the need
to better acquaint the public with
our profession. Talking among
ourselves does not allow the public
to know about the profession's
place in the community. We must
let them in on it.
The strength and usefulness of
your professional organization is
dependent upon the interchange of
ideas. The Regional Conference
makes this interchange possible.
You may possibly ask "Why at-
tend?" Here are some reasons for
attending:
1. At our Regional Conference,
more members meet and actively
participate than at any other single
assembly in our professional soci-
ety.
2. To make you better aware of


A


CALL


TO


CONVENTION!


the activities of the Institute, Rob-
ert L. Durham, FAAIA, First Vice-
President, will be present to discuss
with you these programs.
3. The Conference gives you
the opportunity to attend seminars
on diverse subjects surrounding
the "FOCUS: COMMUNITY"
theme. These seminars ENVI-
RONMENT THROUGH DE-
SIGN, ENVIRONMENT
THROUGH LEARNING, and
ENVIRONMENT THROUGH
BUREAUCRACY -will be ably
manned by Douglas Haskell, Char-
les Colbert, George T. Rockrise,
and one other leading professional
who is out of the country and his
appearance can't be confirmed im-
mediately. These men may help
you solve some of the problems you
might have.
4. Our Conference affords the
time to meet and become friends
with professionals from all parts of
our region, and the opportunity to
talk about the "nuts and bolts"
and the "pink clouds" of our pro-
fession.


5. Here you may view the Archi-
tectural Exhibits from which the
jury will select 1966 Honors win-
ners. This in itself is worth the ef-
fort of attending the Convention.
6. The Building Products Ex-
hibit area is always outstanding
and afford the opportunity to pick
up ideas on materials and applica-
tion. This point is one area which
some architects carelessly neglect
in their Convention circuit. New
ideas are vitally important and
we should also show appreciation
to the manufacturers who by their
participation make our Conference
possible in the first place.
7. Not to be overlooked are the
outstanding social events. People
who have not attended incorrectly
feel that socializing is the sum of a
Convention. True, social events
play a necessary role in the overall
convention, but this is only a part
of the total scope.
Any conference of this sort
should be dedicated to broadening
your concepts and to giving you
something you in turn can return
to your profession.
Come to the Convention pre-
pared to participate in all phases
and you'll find your time and
money were well-spent.
See you at the Deauville Hotel,
Miami Beach, October 5-8.

FOTIS KAROUSATOS
Executive Director


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




SGASC GENIE


*lA^^ j 'IV ^ NATURAL GAS
1L0 0Aj mIN THE HEADLINES

CLEARWATER GAS DEPARTMENT KEEPS COOL WITH GAS. Complying with the old adage,
"Physician, heal thyself", Clearwater's Utilities Department became their own "customer" by installing
40 tons of natural gas air conditioning in their own office. Interesting feature: One 10-ton unit supplies
their IBM equipment room with separate, super-accurate temperature and humidity control remain-
ing 30 tons serves balance of building. Going "all the way", central boiler and automatic water heating
systems are gas-fired, too.

"DECISIONS FOR GAS" GO ON AND ON AND ON! Clearwater's new YMCA adds pool heating to
its natural gas installation. It's natural gas air conditioning for St. Petersburg's remodeled downtown
Public Library, and that city's Gulf Linen Service cited elimination of air pollution as one reason for
boiler conversion from oil to gas. In New Smyrna Beach, new Rainwater Apartments will have gas
kitchens, and central laundry with gas water heating and drying. In Orlando, Barq's Bottling Company
cited fuel savings as reason for boiler changeover to gas, and Jo-Jan Bottling Company chose gas for
new boiler in its expanded plant. Could be an epidemic!

"PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION" UNIV. OF SOUTH FLORIDA STYLE. Although the
"powers that be" chose natural gas for air conditioning Tampa's magnificent new
University of South Florida, the school's first cafeteria was all electric. The second
was mostly gas, with a few electric appliances. Now there's a third one being
LESSON 1 opened right, it's all gas!

"LIVE AND LEARN." Some years ago, the Sweden House Restaurant in Saint Petersburg opened
with considerable fanfare about its all-electric kitchen. Recently, the same owners opened a new
Sweden House in Tampa. What's the kitchen this time? All gas ... supplied by Peoples Gas System.

METHUSELA COULD HAVE USED A NATGAS AIR CONDITIONER. With no moving parts in the
cooling system to break down or wear out, natural gas air conditioning units have established some
sensational longevity records. Peoples Gas System recently replaced an 18-year-old unit in Miami
Beach, still working perfectly owners just decided to get up to date.


COCOA BOASTS FLORIDA'S FIRST TOTAL ENERGY SCHOOL. Pioneering in the field of "total
energy" where natural gas fuels electric generators as well as kitchens, hot water, air
conditioning and heating City Gas reports highly satisfactory results at Cocoa's John F. Kennedy
Junior High. Meanwhile, at the college level, Clearwater Gas Department has air conditioning
installation for Florida Christian College underway.

"WOMAN'S TOUCH" PUTS GAS IN 100 OCALA HOMES. Trust a woman to know what
appeals to other women. That's why it's so significant that Evelyn Fishalon, one of
woNMS the few American women in the building business, has signed up with Gulf Natural
;coSon|l Gas for cooking, water heating and heating in over 100 Ocala homes.

DEPENDABLE GAS AIR CONDITIONING IDEAL IN INSTITUTIONS. St. Petersburg's Shore Acres
Nursing Home is installing 30 tons of natural gas air conditioning, along with all-gas cooking,
heating and water heating. United Gas also signed up Dwyer Health Clinic for air conditioning, and
for precision control of water temperatures for colonic baths. In Miami,Florida Gas is also supplying
two 125 HP boilers, water heating, heating and incinerators for Mercy Hospital.

GAS GOING GREAT ON ST. PETE FOOD FRONT. Morrison's famous foods in their newest cafeteria
will, as usual, have that all-gas flavor. In addition United Gas will fuel a 100 HP boiler for steam
kettles and hot water. Driftwood Cafeteria chain's latest all-gas kitchen features high-speed gas
equipment including a revolving bake oven. Gate House Restaurant adds gas air conditioning to
cooking and water heating installations.


Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without restric-
tion by the Florida Natural Gas Association. 1500 E. Highway #50. Winter Garden, Florida.







UM COMPUTING CENTER

One of the latest additions to the rapidly expanding main campus of the
University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, is a 5-story structure which is
the 'hub' of space physics, biometrics, planetary sciences, Tiros Satellite read-
out facilities, a hurricane research lab-and a glass-enclosed machine with a
memory unit of more than 32,000 words.
This is the UM's Computing Center, a $1.37 million structure which was
dedicated last year and is now under the direction of Professor Carl M. Kromp.
The building, which contains 58,248 square feet of work space, was designed
by Watson, Deutschman and Kruse of Miami, Architects and Engineers. It
was constructed by M. R. Harrison, Contractor.
The Computing Center is shared by the University's new School of En-
vironmental and Planetary Sciences and the research and forecasting elements
of the United States Weather Bureau. The computing systems, however, will
serve all of the University's more than 400 research projects.
The building is a striking structure four elevations essentially alike, com-
posed of an exposed concrete floor system supported on slender concrete
columns gracefully foliating at the top into the wide roof overhangs. The
enclosure, set back from the columns and between the floors, is dark glass
and charcoal enameled panels in aluminum frames. Masonry walls at stairs and
elevators and first floor lecture hall are tile in hues or grey with accents in
green and cinnabar.
The Center is air conditioned from an auxiliary building where hot and
chilled water are generated and pumped to coils of a high-pressure dual duct
system which distributes the climate as demanded by the sensing devices in
the various zones. Offices and equipment on the various floors include:
First Floor: Glass-enclosed computer room, lecture hall, program data library,
computer maintenance room, tape storage vault, offices of key Center
personnel.
Second Floor: Offices of Dean of the School of Environmental and Planetary
Sciences, Biometric Laboratory, seminar rooms, small work areas for
Institute of Marine Science and School of Medicine.
Third Floor: U.S. Weather Bureau.
Fourth and Fifth Floors: Offices, laboratories and work rooms for U.S.
Weather Bureau, Miami Branch; Nat'l Hurricane Research Labora-
tory and U.S. Air Force liaison unit, Tiros Satellite direct read-out
facility, severe weather TV studio for Miami's three stations.
Roof: Required antennae, radio and TV transmission devices.

Programmer Bruce Morris scans the IBM central board. Tape drive bank is in background.


























THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







-' '4 'r~ L 4 j r
4: -." 4i 4 -


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444';:~-C

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U. S. Weather Bureau, located in Computing Center.

- 7 3TO


AUGUST, 1966


































C4


12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







h ~ i: fr': i ;


Reverse-cycle electric air conditioning
(also known as heat pump) is proven
and accepted in hundreds of thousands
of residential, commercial and industrial
installations all around Florida.




' ~i : ~ IOne compact unit saves space and the extra cost
of separate heating and cooling systems.

'; : ;1 Compact, flexible installations for every requirement
... through -the-wall, individual packaged units, or central systems.

: ':~' -.- r:'No by-products of com-
bustion ... no fumes or flues ...with flameless reverse cycle year-round
air conditioning.


LO IA PO E OR O A IO AM A EEC RC CO P N

AUGUST, 19E6 13


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r~".;-'.:;* +e ~i:.i i.! 2 -`: :
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Flo/ida 's Electric Companies


Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


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14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








By FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE


REGISTRATION GRANTED TO PRACTICE ARCHITECTURE


IN FLORIDA


JUNE 1966


(Shown by AIA Chapter area)


BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
Robert F. Dickinson, Fort Lauderdale
John B. Kelso, Hollywood
FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
John Lubenow, St. Petersburg
Robert M. Friedman, Tampa
Emory H. Stansell, Tampa
FLORIDA GULF COAST CHAPTER
Donald S. Chapman, Sarasota (Associate)
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
William G. Wagner, Gainesville
Robert E. Nancarrow, Micanopy
Russell E. Hope, Ocala


FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
Freddie M. Humphrey, Opa Locka (Associate)
Hilario F. Candela, Coconut Grove
Peter J. Spillis, Miami (Associate)
Edward E. Pilkington, Miami
Charles H. Pawley, Miami

JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER
John V. Smith, Jacksonville (Associate)

OUT OF STATE
Charles Russell Long, Tamaqua, Pa.
Jose Fontan, Santurce, Puerto Rico
Mrs. Dorthann Rotundo, San Francisco, Cal.


W~ A




i I I III- 1 3 SI~f4
., I
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J PAFffERF...
SBEAUTY*SIMPLICITY*ECONOMY
The flexibility of design in these units is almost unlim-
ited. Our Representatives and Engineering Department
are ready to assist you on all stair planning . even
curved, flaired or circular stairs. You design it! ... We'll
build it!
Stairbuilder Units are prefabricated metal forms . .
complete with metal riser fronts, reinforcing and temper-
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welded into a rigid one piece unit!
Installation is simple and easy. They afford quick, early
and safe access to upper floors by all jobsite labor. .
saving time, labor and money!
WRITE TODAY FOR NEW STAIR DESIGN BROCHURE


ROUTE 66 McCOOK, ILL. 60525 312 458-2220

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ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS INC.
942 Florida National Bank Building. Jacksonville, Florida 32202
H. E. STEPHENSON COMPANY
P. 0. Box 4221. Tampa, Florida 33607


AUGUST, 1966


__


---











For the ,Annal Edition and Monthly lagaziine


INTRODUCING: THE FAAIA'S PHOTOGRAPHY TEAM


WILLIAM BURTON
Bill is also a Florida native--from
Jacksonville. His photography
assignments have taken him all
over the country for some of the
top names in the business . .
Goodyear, Piper Aircraft, Schenley
Corporation, etc. A photographer
since 1944, he is equally 'at-home'
shooting fashions or buildings. A
skilled technician in, the art of
photography, he has taught the
subject in Miami for more than
seven years.


U. L. BLACK
'Bud' Black has been a photog-
rapher for 20 years culmination.
of an exciting and varied career.
Member of a pioneer Florida
family, Bud grew up in Stuart,
Florida, graduated from colle.; in
Puerto Rico with a major in Psy-
chology, and taught in college for
several years. Prior to World War
II, he was a propaganda analyst
with the National Broadcasting
Company. After 3 years of military
service, he 'discovered' photography
and has since handled every type
of photographic assignment for
such top national concerns as
Standard Oil and Coca-Cola. He
was Chief of Motion Picture Pro-
duction for the Cape Canaveral
guided missile program.


C. O. BAKER
'Charlie' Baker's career closely
parallels his lifelong friend, Mr.
Black. Charlie was born and raised
in Stuart, Florida, and attended
college in Puerto Rico. He had his
own photographic business in Latin
America for several years before
returning to the United States. His
work ranged from industrial
photography to advertising illustra-
tion for the world's top accounts.
He was also a script writer and
film coordinator. Since entering
private business in 1956, he has
concentrated primarily on archi-
tectural photography work and his
photos have appeared in such
publications as House Beautiful,
House & Home. etc.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


t-rr -r; E" 1Mf I!-:--;
m~ff:lcit; ;i

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Florida


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7FLR IDAt


FLORIDA


I.


Bring Out the


Mason's Skill with


Florida


Masonry Cement


Mortar made with Florida Masonry Cement brings
out the best in any mason. Easy to spread and with
exceptional water retaining capacity, this mortar
assures complete workability. And the appearance,
strength and durability of the finished job will make
any craftsman proud. Florida Masonry Cement
mortar joints are highly water repellent, too, so no
waterproofing agents are required. Make your next
job your best job... insist on Florida Masonry
Cement, made in Florida by Floridians.


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIVISION


Keep Florida Prosperous!
Buy Florida Manufactured Products!
Specify and Use Florida Cements!


General Portland Cement Company
PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI


AUGUST, 1966


.4
a.~


-'a


I ,


Cements


MC IN ,S


a5'


















CALENDAR


August 5
FAAIA Budget and Finance Com-
mittee Meeting*


August 6
FAAIA Council of Commissioners
and Executive Committee Meet-
ing*~


August 17
Deadline, Annual Commissioners'
Report for Annual Board Report.


August 20
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing*


September 17
Annual Meeting of Council of
Commissioners, FAAIA Executive
Offices, 1000 Ponce De Leon
Blvd., Coral Gables, Fla.



October 5
Annual Meeting of Board of Di-
rectors, Pre-Convention 10
a.m., Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach, Fla.



October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.



October 8
Meeting of Board of Directors,
Post-Convention, Deauville Ho-
tel, Miami Beach, Fla.

*Due to airline strike, specific location
of these meetings will be announced by
mail or telephone.
18


Executive Suite


The Florida Association of
the American Institute of Ar-
chitects has moved into its new
Executive Offices at 1000 Ponce
De Leon Boulevard, Coral
Gables. Our handsome offices,
on the second floor of the
Teachers' Federal Credit Union
Building, will serve as the center
of activities for the Association's
Executive Director, and for pro-
ducing The Florida Architect
magazine and the forthcoming
Annual edition. The building
was designed by Watson,
Deutschman and Kruse, Archi-
tects and Engineers. Everyone
is invited to visit the FAAIA's
Executive Offices whenever they
are in town.


Our new telephone number is
444-5761, area code 305.


*carefree

ideas

begin
with

GAS


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
YOUR NATURAL GAS UTILITY

Apopka, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Bartow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Blountstown, City of Blountstown
Boca Raton, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Boynton Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahoochee, Town of Chattahoochee
Chipley, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
Cocoa Beach, City Gas Co.
Coral Gables, City Gas Co.
Crescent City, City of Crescent City
Cutler Ridge, City Gas Co.
Daytona Beach, Florida Gas Co.
DeLand, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delray Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Eau Gallic, City Gas Co.
Eustis, Florida Gas Co.
Fort Lauderdale, Peoples Gas System
Fort Meade, City of Fort Meade
Fort Pierce, City of Fort Pierce
Gainesville, Gainesville Gas Co.
Geneva, Alabama, Geneva County Gas
District
Haines City, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Hialeah, City Gas Co.
Hollywood, Peoples Gas System
Jacksonville, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake Alfred, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake City, City of Lake City
Lakeland, Florida Gas Co.
Lake Wales, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Leesburg, City of Leesburg
Live Oak, City of Live Oak
Madison, City of Madison
Marianna, City of Marianna
Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
Mount Dora, Florida Gas Co.
New Smyrna Beach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
North Miami, Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Opa Locka, City Gas Co.
Orlando, Florida Gas Co.
Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
Palm Beach Gardens
Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Pensacola, City of Pensacola
Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
Port St. Joe, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
Rockledge, City Gas Co.
St. Petersburg, United Gas Co.
Sanford, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Sarasota, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Starke, City of Starke
Tallahassee, City of Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Tavares, Florida Gas Co.
Titusville, City Gas Co.
Umatilla, Florida Gas Co.
Valparaiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park, Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


SUPPORT

YOUR PUBLICATION


When writing to

manufacturers about new

products or advertisements

first seen here . .


tell them you saw it in .. .


The

FLORIDA

ARCHITECT


i


i.: ** '
t
?"














carefree ideas

*


SI


I


WHERE SERVICE AND ECONOMY COUNT-GAS IS THE NATURAL ANSWER


Clearwater's new Bayview Garden Apart-
ments are designed for carefree retirement
living. That means comfort, good service and
expenses that won't gobble up retirement
incomes.
No wonder Bayview Gardens went big for
natural gas . for heating, air conditioning,
water heating, drying and for food prepara-
tion in the central dining room.


Don Trager, construction superinten-
dent for Bayview Gardens, says years
of experience in the retirement build-
ing business "have convinced me
that gas is the answer to these major
requirements. It does a great job ...
AND it provides savings in maintenance and operating
expenses that can be passed on to the tenants in the
form of lower rents."


HOW ABOUT YOU? If you want the best for less, look to natural gas for the answer.
More and more people do everyday. Call your local natural gas utility.


,YeI WI n m
U b* -er w


Bayview Gardens, beautiful new retirement center at Clearwater, Florida, features 96-unit Bayview House hi-rise
Sand 310-unit single story garden apartments. Served by the City of Clearwater Natural Gas Division.
L,,-


WINTER PARK / FLORIDA


Florida's Pipeline to the Future...
serving 34 Natural Gas Distribution
Companies in over 70 communities
throughout the state.


AUGUST, 1966


f

























INTERNATIONAL



DESIGN


CONFERENCE



IN



ASPEN


HUMAN VALUES STRESSED
In the course of examining "Sources and Resources
of 20th Century Design," the 16th annual International
Design Conference in Aspen, Colorado, June 19-24, re-
vealed a growing pre-occupation of designers with their
role as defenders of human values in a technological
society. At the same time, there were indications that
traditional antagonisms and misunderstandings between
designers and technologists are evolving into mutual ac-
commodations, even cross-fertilization.
In the opening address of the conference, Reyner Ban-
ham, the English architectural critic and historian, went
so far as to name the plastics industry as one of two prin-
cipal resources of modern design. The other, he said, is
the tradition of worrying about the state of the art.
In the closing talk on the program five days later,
Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., adjunct professor of architecture at
Columbia University, enumerated five main resources of
present-day design, one of which is technology. The others,
he said, are the profit motive, which is one of the spurs
to creative activity in modern society; systematics, which
is the science of determining how men think; mass psy-
chology, which determines how men feel; and scientific
investigations of perception, which will determine how
men respond to visual stimuli.
Between Banham and Kaufmann there were many
overtures from designers to technologists, some guarded
and tentative, others outright and enthusiastic.
Henry Dreyfuss, the dean of American industrial de-
sign, called designers "the elected representatives of the
consumer before the high tribunal of technology." He
also suggested that a time is coming when there will be
a "vast computer trust into which all disciplines will con-
tribute their latest technogical developments and knowl-
edge." It then will be possible, he said, "to go to the
computer to get the perimeters of a problem; for example,
to get accurate dimensions of the human anatomy and
to get precise information on how the human body works."
Dreyfuss predicted that by the year 2,000, "We won't
be using a single item of natural materials in our clothing.
Man-made materials have an integral beauty of their own,"
he said, "and don't need to copy natural ones. There will
be new forms, not awkward imitations." While the de-
signer should be a bridge between technology and the
consumer, he pointed out, "too often the designer may
turn out to be the 21st Century junk dealer's best friend."
He said designers must intelligently lead the public to
demand purity in design. "We must ask ourselves if the
thing is right, necessary, beautiful, honest."
DESIGN AND RESEARCH
Tomas Maldonado, director of the Hochschule fir Ges-
taltung in Ulm, Germany, made a wary acknowledgement
of the common interests of design and technology. "The
theory of a total reduction of the activity of designing
to that of researching," he said, "or the theory of a
complete and definite substitution of designing by rea-
searching, is detrimental to the very aims which the
theory claims to favor. As a matter of fact, this theory
only propounds a prohibition of design.
"We must, nevertheless, acknowledge one positive
aspect of this tendency. It undoubtedly bears implicit
within itself a healthy rejection of the very opposite
tendency. I refer to that which obstinately continues to
,believe that design and research are alien to one another,
or what is even worse, that they are absolutely antagon-
istic activities.
"This is not true," Maldonado continued. "Designing
and researching, notwithstanding their inherent differ-
ences, belong to the same kind of behavior, a behavior
that has been called purposive or decisive, aiming at the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






attainment of a goal. They are, moreover, activities of
a strategic nature. Strategies, however, do exist without
strategems. Designing and researching both have their
own particular strategems, and they also have strategems
in common. Some of these are much more than mere
technical coincidences; they are really cooperative strate-
gems, models of efficient action, where the role of design
and the role of research are practically inseparable."
Maldonado predicted that complete automation will
bring the end of the "reign of necessity" in human life,
with technology becoming a "trans-human" activity. "Just
as the post-historic man, the post-literate man, and the
post-political man have been announced," he said, "so
let me foretell the coming of the post-technical man.
Science will once again turn its attention to man and his
destiny."
Benjamin Thompson, president of Design Research,
Inc., and chairman of the department of architecture in
the Harvard Graduate School of Design, also acknowl-
edged, but with reservations, the relationship of design
to technology. "I am quite aware that we do need plan-
ning, and research, and objectivity, and all those attitudes
that prove we have an intellect and can use it," he said.
"I maintain it is needed, but it is not enough. It simply
will not do the whole job. What is missing from our holy
'objective methodology' is an allowance for human sensi-
bility. Today we live in a cool, cool time when there is
almost a national phobia about expressing our private
feelings, especially feelings about that obsolete quality
called 'beauty.' Not so long ago men felt free to admit
that they loved the flow of a river, a field of Devil's
Paintbrush, or a woman's crazy loveliness. Today, it kind
of makes us squirm. Do we dare any more to express
delight at the sight of a soft summer sky? Can we still
cry out at the anguish of our fellow man? Or does the
cold shell of logic imprison our feelings? I believe that
all knowledge begins with our own awareness, and unless
the doorway to the senses is opened and lighted, how
can we sing, or write, or draw? Or design a happy environ-
ment for others? Perhaps the central question of our age
is, can we be free without LSD?"
DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE
A non-designer on the Aspen program. Psychologist
Richard E. Farson, who is director of the Western Behav-
ioral Sciences Institute, also addressed himself to the
human element in design. "Before I came here," he said,
"I thought you were concerned about designing things,
but now I fird that as you talk to each other, you are
very much concerned about not just designing things, but
designing things in relationship to people."
Farson said he thinks designers do a good job of
designing for efficiency now. He urged the conferees to
concentrate on designing for the improvement of human
relationships, "so they can be more fun, more exciting,
more romantic, more sexy, more intimate, more loving,
more honest and open." And as we design systems, he
added, "we need to remember that the fundamental ele-
ment in designing a system is that it must be self-renew-
ing, self-determing, even self-designing. So we must make
use of the people who are the components of the system
as the designers of the system itself."
In a panel discussion which followed the Farson talk,
Gyorgy Kepes, artist, author and professor of visual de-
sign at M.I.T., entered a firm objection to the picture of
an improved society which the psychologist had sketched.
"Somehow," Kepes said, "he managed to create a feeling
of Utopia, but he forgot one thing. He left out the fact
that tension and conflict are part of human life. Without
them, men lack the stimulus to achieve their full po-
tential."
AUGUST, 1966


In an unscheduled talk during the closing session of
the conference, Ben Shahn, one of America's foremost
painters and graphic artists, eloquently supported the
Kepes caveat. Shahn, who had appeared on a panel earlier
in the week, took the rostrum to plead for chaos. "I love
chaos," he said. "It is a mysterious, unknown road with
unexpected turnings. It is the way out. It is freedom,
man's best hope."
ORDER - AND FREEDOM
Shahn observed that chaos does exist in science.
"In science," he said, "all is order." However, he pointed
out, "thousands and millions of orders exist independ-
ently," and the moment of impact between two such
systems or order is a moment of chaos. Shahn said great
changes have been brought about by conflict between
orders, but he predicted that the decisive conflict will be
between omniscience, which he equated with tyranny, on
one hand, and chaos, or freedom, on the other.
Shahn acknowledged that a certain amount of order
is necessary for the conduct of men's lives, and this fact
is reflected in our system of laws. "I can't denounce order,
but I can't accept it as an unqualified good. I can't accept
chaos as an unqualified good, either, but the artist, in
seeking freedom for himself, wants it for all of society.
I think it would be nice to make a pet of chaos, to give
her a breath of fresh air and let her romp around in the
planned society with which we are all so preoccupied."
In his summation of the conference, Edgar Kaufmann,
Jr., defined design as "an area bounded by other areas,"
just as geographical areas appear on a map. The areas sur-
rounding design, he said, are usage, salesmanship, arch-
itecture, engineering, fashion and fine art. "The bound-
aries are in dispute," he said, "and there is a lot of
smuggling across the borders."
Kaufmann discounted the importance of the philoso-
phical bases and sources of modern design. 'We often use
inherited ideas and values," he said, "which actually are
a drag on what we're trying to do." He suggested that in
the future, designers will be guided by such values as
numbers, personalism and disposability of objects.
Kaufmann indicated that there is great significance to
designers in the trend toward disposability of products.
"It means," he said, "that the value of the object is no
longer in the object itself, but in how people think about
it and use it. This is giving rise to new ideas of quality,
new ideas of change and improvement."
The future of design lies in "situation design, not in
product design," Kaufmann concluded. When this devel-
ops, he said, "smuggling across the boundaries" between
design and the areas surrounding it "will be a very good
and positive thing."
Others on the IDCA program included Leo Lionni,
former advertising and magazine art director in the U. S.,
now an artist, designer and writer residing in Italy; Julian
Beinart, architect and professor of urban and regional
planning at the University of Cape Town, South Africa;
Henry Wolf, designer and art director; John Peter, archi-
tectural commentator, editor and designer; Dougls Mac-
Agy, director of the Dallas Museum of Contemporary
Arts; John Cage, composer and Fellow of the Center for
Advanced Studies of Wesleyan University; John D. En-
tenza, director of the Graham Foundation for Advanced
Studies in the Fine Arts; Willard Van Dyke, director of
the film library of the Museum of Modern Art; Yaacov
Agam, painter.
Program chairman for the conference was Allen Hurl-
burt, art director of Look. Mildred Constantine, associate
curator of design of the Museum of Modern Art, was
co-chairman.
21









READ RS VIE& TPOIN T

c^,i^ ^M^B_ ____^ ^^^^^


STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE
Enclosed is my opinion resulting from your editorial
which better explains the concern of the Board and their
recent discussions of some parts of the rules which have
been adopted for the Administrations of the Provisions of
the Act, Florida Statutes 467.03.
This is entirely my own opinion and you will find later
on in the accompanying article that this has not, as yet,
been discussed with the other Board Members.
Sincerely,
WILLIAM J. WEBBER
Vice President
Florida State Board of Architecture
After the creation of The Florida State Board of Arch-
itecture by an Act of the Legislature on May 29, 1915,
467.03 Florida Statutes allowed the Board to adopt rules
and regulations for the administration of the provisions of
the Act. The Board can revise and amend these rules by
their own action but the Act itself can only be changed by
the Legislature.
One of the rules, Chapter 40-7, which describes the
approved style of names for the practice of architecture
was recently discussed in an editorial in the Florida Archc-
itect. The editorial was not quite accurate and conse-
quently somewhat misleading.
The problem facing the State Board of Architecture
is whether certain parts of Rule 40-7 are legally enforce-
able. Historically, from the records of the State Board
files, the Rule (which has several sections) has been en-
forced and in almost every case offenders have conformed
to the requirements with little or no protest. However,
the State Board has yet to be faced with a court action
on this Rule and any serious threat of such action has
caused the Board to hesitate rather than get involved in
expensive litigation with limited funds and which might
achieve doubtful success.
Let me say here that it is not the intention of the
State Board to do other than vigorously enforce the law
governing the practice of architecture in the State of Flor-
ida. But, as the practicality of parts of Rule 40-7 have been
questioned, by our own legal council, before proceeding
further, the thought of revising those parts might make
sense.
Now, let me over-simplify with a hypothetical case-
(with all the risks that that brings about).
The fictitious case of Black and Associates, Architects-
Engineers. This is a partnership and the principals
are registered architects and engineers. They are finan-
cially and legally responsible for the firm's affairs. The
names and professions of the principals are listed on
their letterhead, etc. If Black is an engineer, the firm's
title is in violation of Rule 40-7.08(a). If Black is an
architect, there is no problem because the Engineering
Board allows such a title providing Black's partners are
registered engineers. However, in either case under the
Statutes governing both professions regardless of the
registration of Black, both Boards can take regulatory
action against each and every member of the partner-
ship no matter what the offense, regardless of the
whereabouts of the principals' names in the firm's title
and regardless of the Sections in Rule 40-7.


If we were to revise Rule 7, particularly 40-7.08, we
haven't in the least weakened the Board's regulatory
powers over registered architects and it would streamline
the Board's efforts in policing the State Law governing
the practice of arcihtecture.
For this reason only, I want to approve the usage of
Black and Associates, Architects and Engineers, regardless
of the registration of Black . (40-7.08(a), providing
all names of the Architectural and Professional Engineer-
ing principals are listed. I want to approve the usage
"Arktex Associates, Architects" and "Architects Collabor-
ative" providing there is compliance with Rule 40-7.07.
These are the only changes I would recommend to the
-Board. The rules governing partnerships, associates, cor-
porations, consultants, etc., would remain unchanged.
I realize this, to some people, might read like heresy
to the old line and traditional position of the architect in
the community, but strictly from a practical standpoint in
trying to regulate the practice of architecture, and safe-
guarding the ethical practitioner, we have not lost a thing
and it would free-up the expenditure of monies and the
efforts of our investigative staff for more positive problems.
*
THANKS AND APPRECIATION
Please publish in The Florida Architect my expression
of thanks and appreciation to all those who so graciously
contributed to the fund which made the purchase of the
Bodhisattva head.possible and which was presented to the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts in my honor.
Your favor will be most greatly appreciated.
Respectfully submitted,
P. M. TORRACA
Professor of Architecture, Emeritus

To My Fellow Students, Respected Colleagues
Friends:
Permit me to take this occasion to express to you,
individually and collectively, my heartfelt gratitude for
the honor you have bestowed upon me. However unde-
serving I am of this recognition, I would be less than
human if I did not admit that I am indeed proud of this
distinction; yet, I can only accept this with a feeling of
deep humility and complete inadequacy.
Thirty-three years of my forty-five years of professional
life on five different campuses have enabled me to be in
close contact with many young students; and with their
eyes centered on the stars they have been always a source
of inspiration to me. If I have contributed ever so little
to their motivation to embrace a noble profession, I will
feel that my humble efforts have not been in vain.
So to these fine young people and to my respected
colleagues who are dedicated to the challenging task and
endeavor of inspiring their students to achieve their aspi-
rations as professional and cultured gentlemen, I extend
my best wishes for a life of serenity, good health and pro-
fessional achievement.
Thanks, many thanks to all of you.
We welcome your letters on any of the articles
which appear in The Florida Architect . in
fact on any subject of interest to architects. Ad-
dress letters to "Readers' Viewpoint," The Flor-
ida Architect, 1000 Ponce de Leon Boulevard,
Coral Gables, Fla. We reserve right to edit.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




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IF YOU'RE MOVING,
please send us your old
and new address. Don't
miss a single issue of
THE FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT! Just drop a note
or card with your correct
mailing address to The
Florida Association of
the American Institute
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Ponce de Leon Boule-
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ida 33134.








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Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


James T. Lendrur, AIA 1
College of Architecture & Fine Arts AUG 12
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. INC



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