• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Direct from Denver
 The president's message
 Perspective
 The architect takes a stand
 Advertising
 Candle shop in Vienna
 Advertising
 Letter from the AIA journal
 Advertising
 Calendar of events, executive suite,...
 Message from the tile industry
 More new buildings around...
 Readers' viewpoint
 City design and the revolution...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00145
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00145
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Direct from Denver
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The president's message
        Page 5
    Perspective
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The architect takes a stand
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Advertising
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Candle shop in Vienna
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Advertising
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Letter from the AIA journal
        Page 21
    Advertising
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Calendar of events, executive suite, and advertisers' index
        Page 24
    Message from the tile industry
        Page 25
    More new buildings around the state
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Readers' viewpoint
        Page 29
    City design and the revolutionaries
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






\\s'AP ~'1


III
II


P~~I II


_j







STRESSCON
------- INTERNATIONAL. INC. 1000 N.W. 57th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA / TELEPHONE: 666-8555


MIAMI HOUSING AUTHORITY e LOW RENT HOUSING . ARCHITECTS- POLEVITZKY-JOHNSON ASSOC.
a subsidiary of mI l I INDUSTRIES




... ._V .


OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast o Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North James T. Lendrum / ack Moore
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South o James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
Jacksonville o A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables 34, Florida.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. .. Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. . McMurray Printers.
JULY, 1966


DIRECT FROM DENVER

2.3
THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

5
PERSPECTIVE

6
THE ARCHITECT TAKES A STAND

809
CANDLE SHOP IN VIENNA
Architectural Prize-Winner

16.17
LETTER FROM THE AIA JOURNAL

21
CALENDAR OF EVENTS

24
EXECUTIVE SUITE
New FAAIA Offices

24
ADVERTISERS' INDEX

24
MESSAGE FROM THE TILE INDUSTRY

25
MORE NEW BUILDINGS
AROUND THE STATE

Z6,28
READERS' VIEWPOINT
Letters to the Editor

29
CITY DESIGN AND
THE REVOLUTIONARIES
by Paul Rudolph, AIA


FAAIA 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION
Back Cover
FRONT COVER This is a city of today, dissected by
sky-ways of overhead utility wires and highways carelessly
placed without thought or design. Through the efforts of the
AIA and its allied groups, this will NOT be the city of to-
morrow. See "The Architect Takes A Stand," pages 8-9.

VOLUME 16 E NUMBER 7 E 1966


- '*' -** / *"?







DIRECT FROM DENVER


New Officers of the Institute

President Charles M. Nes Jr., FAIA
Partner in the Baltimore firm of Fisher, Nes, Campbell & Partners.
Educated at Princeton University and Princeton's Graduate School
of Architecture, a member of Phi Beta Kappa and winner of the
Butler Prize for Architecture. Previously he had been president of
Baltimore Chapter, member of the national Convention Committee,
Commission on Architectural Design, chairman Honor Awards Jury.

First Vice President / President-Elect -
Robert L. Durham, FAIA
Principal in the Seattle firm of Durham, Anderson and Freed.
Graduate cum laude of University of Washington and winner of AIA
Student Medal. He is currently chairman of Council of Commission-
ers. Was president of Washington State Chapter. director of North-
west Region, chairman of Commission on Architectural Design. co-
ordinator of War on Community Ugliness. chairman of 1963 Honor
Awards Jury, vice president of Guild for Religious Architecture.

Vice President Samuel E. Homsey, FAIA
Principal of firm of Victorine & Samuel Homsey, Inc. of Wilmington,
Del. Bachelor and master's degrees from MIT. Is now president of
National Architectural Accrediting Board, chairman of 1966 Jury of
Fellows. Has been president of Delaware Chapter, member of Com-
mittees on Internship, International Relations, School Buildings.
chairman of Committee on Allied Arts, AIA delegate to Commisison
on Government and Art.

Vice-President -
George E. Kassabaum, AIA
Principal in the St. Louis firm of Hellmuth. Obata & Kassabaum, Inc.
Educated at Washineton University. For the past year has been vice
president of the Institute, chairman of Committees on Government
Liaison and the National Capital. Previously was president of St.
Louis Chapter, chairman of national Committtee on Housing for the
Aging. Member of design faculty at Washington University.

Vice President Harold Spitznagel, FAIA
Principal in the firm of Harold Spitznagel and Associates of Sioux
Falls, S.D. Educated at Art Institute of Chicago and University of
Pennsylvania. Currently chairman of national committee on Collabo-
w.s rating Arts and Interprofessional Task Force, chairman of Library
aj Buildings Award Program Jury 1966. Has served as director of North
Central States Region, chairman of Jury of Fellows 1964, member
of national Public Relations Committee and Jury of Fellows.

Secretary Rex Whitaker Allen, FAIA
President of Rex Whitakcr Allen and Associates of San Francisco.
Educated at Harvard College, Harvard's Graduate School of Design.
Uii\ecrsity of California. For the past two years, he has been vice
president of the Institute. He was a director of California Council,
member of the national Committee on Hospital Architecture. Serves
on faculty of American Hospital Association's Institute on Design and
Construction of Hospitals.

Daniel Schwartzman, FAIA, continues his
two-year term as Treasurer.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












FLORIDA'S NE% REGIONAL DI)REtIOR is H. Samuel Kruse,
FAIA, installed at the national convention in Denver. Sam
Kruse received his Bachelor of Science degree in Archi-
tecture in 1933 and has since been a leader in the profession.
He is vice-president of Watson, Deutschman & Kruse in
Miami, member of the AIA College of Fellows, chairman of
the national committee for Architectural Student Affairs,
and member of many civic planning groups.









ELEVATED TO FELLO%( SH IP is Andrew J. Ferendino, one of
60 architects so honored at the Denver convention. The AIA
honored Mr. Ferendino for his "significant contribution to
the profession of architecture through public service." A
partner in the Miami firm of Pancoast, Ferendino, Grafton &
Skeels, Mr. Ferendino has been active in Florida South
chapter activities for 20 years, is a member of the Dade
County Code Committee, Slum Clearance Committee, and
many more such groups.











THE O AG(;ON BIUILDING PROGRAM is designed to de-
velop the Institute's national headquarters into an
architectural solution of the highest. Total objective of
acquiring the adjacent Lemon Building property and of
authorizing restoration of Octagon House property is to create
an enlarged site adequate for long-term growth of the
Institute. Octagon House will be a beautiful landmark of our
architectural heritage . in short, it must exemplify what
the profession urges its clients to accomplish.
JULY, 1966






World's Largest

Non-repetitive Concrete Bas-Relief

Is Both Sculpture and Structure


Panels vary from 9' x 12' to 17' x 12' and are Panels are placed by crane and fastened to
6* thick. Chattahoochee stone and special cast-in-place concrete frame in precise order
sand were used as aggregates to produce required to form the continuous bas-relief
shades of brown and tan. Carved sections of face. Availability of units in proper order and
foamed polystyrene were laid in 6' steel forms at proper time was extremely important to New Professional Arts Building in Miami,
and concrete with the necessary reinforcing smooth construction of the building. Fla. used 23,000 sq. ft. of non-repetitive wall
steel placed over them. When moulds are panels to produce the unusual bas-relief ex-
stripped, the polystyrene is destroyed. tenor. Sculpture is by Albert Vrana.
I -. .*:-.;1 l~.'.r.T --r c l


200 precast
wall panels made
with Lehigh Cements
The exterior of this seven story,
all concrete building is both artistic
and functional. Each of the 200
precast panels has a portion of the
overall design cast into its face. In
addition to their decorative func-
tion, the panels constitute the struc-
tural walls.
Lehigh Early Strength Cement
benefits every member of the
team. To obtain both early and
ultimate high strengths for these
huge structural panels, Concrete
Structures, Inc. used Lehigh Early
Strength Cement. Here, as in im-
portant concrete jobs everywhere,
this cement provided benefits for
precaster, contractor and architect
alike. Quicker removal of panels
from forms. Earlier delivery of
units. Orderly, on-time construc-
tion. Lehigh Portland Cement
Company, Allentown, Pa.


.- . ... ... -
Architect: Herbert H. Johnson Associates, Miami, Fla.
Builder: Burk Builders, Inc., Miami, Fla.
Sculptor: Albert Vrana, Miami, Fla.
Precaster: Concrete Structures, Inc., Miami, Fla.

[LE OHIH
CBMcENTSol,3--6
District Sales Offce: Jacksonville, Fla. 32216


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









The National Convenion of
the American Institute of Archi-
tects has passed into memories.
Those from Florida who attend-
ed the proceedings carry back
stimulations seldom experienced
at such meetings. Renowned
minds in the nation's resources
of knowledge related their
thoughts to the problems of ar-
chitects and the environment.
From this convention will come
ideas which will affect each ar-
chitect in Florida. These ideas
span our educational, cultural,
economic, social and political
life . .
The business of the conven-
tion centered on two contro-
versies which ended in
compromise. The Institute did
not resolve against the expan-
sion of the Capitol but did
support a bill in Congress do-
ing the same. (The essence of
the legislation will provide a
planning committee concern-
ing those buildings involved
with the Nation's capitol.)
The Institute did take the first
steps necessary to purchase ex-
pansion facilities at its national
headquarters. (The Lemon prop-
erty will be obtained and new
designs developed which show
greater concern for the scale of
the historic Octagon House.)
The Institute did take the first
step in selling the Octagon House
to its Foundation. This must be
approved. (At two successful con-
ventions, a reservation was plac-
ed on this approval to insure the
perpetual ownership of the build-
ing within the profession by ask-
ing the Foundation to amend its
bylaws in this direction.)
An important theme of the
Convention was best summar-
ized by Charles M. Nes Jr.
"For a small organization,
AIA has done wonders in
arousing the public to demand
a better urban environment.
We must now shift focus to
broad-based educational pro-
gram designed to fit the pro-
fession for its future chal-
lenges--to guide and stimu-
late young potential archi-
tects, to train architectural
technicians at the subprofes-
sional level, and to keep the
architects themselves abreast
of contemporary develop-
ments."
Florida's architects have given
JULY, 1966


little concern for these chal-
lenges. Education in all phases of
the profession needs our atten-
tion now. Education is a life-
long process for the competent
professional.
The seminars of the conven-
tion will be published, I'm sure,
in forthcoming issues. However,
the opening remarks of Dr. John
Kenneth Calbraith, Professor of
Economics at Harvard, say with
clarity the real thrust of this con-
vention. Let me quote some ex-
cerpts:
SThe successful defense and
development of our living space
requires progress on three broad
fronts.
First. We must explicitly as-
sert the claims of beauty against
those of economics. That some-
thing is cheaper, more conven-
ient or more efficient is no
longer decisively in its favor. If it
is ugly, it is likely that it is not
desperately needed.
So wires and poles must go
underground. Factories must be
not in the most efficient but the
most agreeable locations. High-
ways and streets are not primar-
ily a business opportunity. They
are primarily places for tranquil
movement. And efficiency of
movement must be weighed
against charm. Air and water and
- ..~ :.w .: ~ .


JAMES DEEN, AIA

THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


DENVER

landscape must be protected
from pollution. It should not be
claimed that the eventual cost of
all this will be less that it will
pay in the long run. That is no
longer the test. The test is what,
in the end, people will enjoy
most.
Second. Effective management
of environment will require far
more effective planning and con-
trol of land use. There are sever-
al reasons for this. One is that
we cannot go on wasting space,
a scarce and important aspect, as
in the recent past. Even if plan-
ning and control lead to deliber-
ation and thus to delay, we
should welcome them. Once
again economic priority cannot
be granted. We should readily
trade a slower for a better plan-
ned growth .
Se need such planning and
control to permit the architect
to work within a suitable frame-
work a consistent design. This
is not to impose uniformity; rath-
er it is to require harmony and
order. Order is no more the ene-
my of artistic freedom than an-
archy is its servant.
Third and finally, it must be
evident from this discussion that
the city is the key unit in the
management of environment. In
the past the family, the business
firm and the nation have been
our basic units of economic and
social account. One is required
by all religious and social tradi-
tion to predict that the family
will continue to be of some im-
portance. It would be subversive
to suggest that General Electric
is on the way out. No doubt na-
tionalism will continue to be
something of a force. But, in-
creasingly, the city will be the
decisive unit of account.
This means that cities must be
run by stronger, more imagina-
tive, and, needless to say, less
larcenous men. They must have
better and much better paid em-
ployees. And they will need to
have much more money. They
already have the most important
tasks and the least money. This
endemic starvation cannot con-
tinue."
Those who attended Denver
have been rewarded. Those who
did not (and those who did)
should come to Miami in Octo-
ber. National and state conven-
tions are where the action is!










PERSPECTIVE


New Distinction

For Doxiadis
Dr. Constantinos Doxiadis, the
world renowned creator of "Ekistics-
the science of human settlements,"
was named as the third winner of the
$30,000 ASPEN AWARD in the
Humanities. The selection was an-
nounced by Alvin C. Eurich, Presi-
dent of the Aspen Institute for Hu-
manistic Studies.
The annual Award carries a tax-
free stipend of $30,000 and is the
largest tribute in humanistic achieve-
ment offered anywhere in the world.
The Award was established in 1964 by
Robert O. Anderson, business man,
rancher, and Chairman of the Board
of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic
Studies. The purpose of the prize is
to honor "that individual anywhere in
the world judged to have made the
greatest contribution to the advance-
ment of the humanities."
Dr. Doxiadis will come to Aspen to
receive the Award at a special cere-
mony on July 29.
Dr. Doxiadis is best known for his
concept of "Ekistics the science of
human settlement." Within its frame-
work he has gathered together world
leaders from the natural and social sci-
ences and the humanities. He has
drawn from a variety of disciples to
solve problems in living which range
from individual buildings to villages
and cities and even to countries.






Honorary AIA

Membership
The American Institute of Archi-
tects has awarded honorary member-
ships to four men for "distinguished
service to the profession of architec-
ture or to the arts and sciences allied
therewith."


The recipients are:
HENRY F. DU PONT of Winterthur,
Delaware. Born in 1880, du Pont is a
current member of the board of di-
rectors of the company bearing the
Du Pont name and has also been
associated with historic preservation
in several states. He is perhaps best
known to the public as a member of
the White House Preservation Com-
mittee.
HAROLD BISMARK GOREs, of Larch-
mont, New York. President of the
Educational Facilities Laboratories.
Inc., Ford Foundation, New York
City, since 1958, Gores is a former
teacher, guidance counsellor and high
school principal. He has been a mem-
ber of the President's Science Advis-
ory Committee and a member and
special advisor to the committee on
the Role of the Bureau of Standards
in Building Research of the National
Council on Schoolhouse Construction.
JAMES J. RORIMER, director of the
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New
York City, since 1955, and holder of
various positions there since his grad-
uation from Harvard University in
1927. While there he introduced new
methods in the examination, restora-
tion and preservation of works of art
and was the first to use ultra-violet
rays in museum technology.
JOHN G. FLOWERS, of Austin, Texas,
executive director of the Texas Soci-
ety of Architects, AIA, and the Texas
Architectural Foundation both for 12
years, and executive secretary of the
Texas Board of Architectural Examin-
ers for the past 11 years.




The New Look
For Little Rock
The American Institute of Archi-
tects has honored the city of Little
Rock, Ark., for the major revitaliza-
tion program now underway in its
central business district.


The Institute's "Citation for Ex-
cellence in Community Architecture"
was presented last month at the an-
nual conference of AIA's Gulf States
region. The Central Little Rock Ur-
ban Renewal Project was the winning
nominee of the region, which com-
prises Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana,
Mississippi and Tennessee.
The citation program was inaugu-
rated one year ago to recognize cities
having planned architectural projects
which successfully realize the objective
of creating vital environments for
their core. No single building can
qualify for a citation.
Voted by the national Board of Di-
rectors of the architects' professional
organization, the citation was pre-
sented to the citizens of Little Rock
and to their mayor Harold E. Hen-
son "for their vision in undertaking
the planning of Central Little Rock,
a comprehensive solution to present
problems with bold anticipation of
future needs of the metropolitan area
of Little Rock, reasserting and en-
hancing the role of the city as a cul-
tural and commercial center."
Presentation was made by Insti-
tute President Morris Ketchum, Jr.,
FAIA, of New York City and the di-
rector of AIA's Gulf States region,
Dan C. Cowling of Little Rock.
The AIA's citation to Little Rock
is being made in recognition of the
remarkable transformation now tak-
ing place in its central business dis-
trict. A dreary and obsolete down-
town area marked by racial strife in
the late 1950's, it took its initial
step toward revitalization in 1957
when a National Citizens Planning
Conference was held in Little Rock
with the theme "Main Street-1969."
The Arkansas Chapter of the AIA
localized the theme and developed
a visualization of what the central
city might become. The bold ideas in
their concept of "Main Street-Little
Rock-1969" sparked the imagina-
tion of local businessmen and devel-
opers.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Tempered Safety Glass sections

this big
could have only one label.




v BY permaglass
0 You get a clear view of the action . with safety and
comfort... in the impressive new Race Track Pavilion at
Pompano Beach, Florida. Spectators are shielded from
wind and rain-yet visibility is unimpaired-behind the
broad expanse of 8 ft. x 10 ft. sections o % clear Safeglaze
Tempered Safety Glass. Only Permaglass can provide tem-
pered safety glass in such large sizes.
Extra safety. Permaglasw Safeglaze has 5 to 8 times
S ^ greater strength than ordinary sheet or plate... and fail-
safe breakage characteristics. Greater protection aghast
8 ft. x 0 ghs human accidents, flying objects and high winds. Safeglaze
of J8" clear is produced to tolerances previously unavailable. It is flat
Safeglaze Tempered and distortion-free. Fully meets local and federal codes
Safety Glass calling for safety glass.
used here. Leading glass distributors and contract glaziers supply
Safeglaze in clear sheet, clear plate, gray sheet, gray plate,
bronze plate, heat absorbing plate, or patterned glass. See
our catalog in Sweet's or write for further details.

permaglass, inc.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES: ARCHITECTURAL SALES OFFICES: PLANTS:
Woodville, Ohio 43469 Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Torrance, Calif. Payne, Oenoa and MillburyOhio
3060 S. W. 2nd Avenue 20008 South Normandle Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Phone: 305-525-3481 Phone: 213-327-3269 Torrance, California
Ajax, Ontario, Canada
























JULY, 1966

























THE



ARCHITECT



TAKES



A



STAND


ON HIGHWAY DESIGN
Federal polihces on the design of highways within
cities are producing "disastrous results" and are m "direct
opposition to those of President . Johnson," the presi-
dent of The American Institute of Architects has charged
in a letter to Secretary of Commerce John T. Connor.
Morris Ketchum Jr. FAIA, president of the Institute,
resigned from the Secretary's National Advisory Commit-
tee on Highway Beautification because such membership,
he felt, placed the AIA in a position of "tolerating, or
een approving, policies of which it disapproves."
The Honorable John T. Connor
Secretary
Department of Commerce
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Secretary:
T. The American Institute of Architects is deeply con-
cered with the fact that although standards for highway
design between cities are well developed and, in general,
well utilized, these same standards are blindly applied to
highway design within cities with disastrous results.
One has only to cite the example of the proposed elevated
expressway to be located along the waterfront of the
French Quarter in New Orleans. Despite both local and
national opposition, this proposed expressway has been
approved by the Bureau of Public Roads.
I would like to suggest that the Highway Research Board
of the National Research Council, which has done such
excellent work on design research for interstate systems, be
urged to undertake a broad investigation of urban highway
design. The AIA and other allied design professional or-
ganizations would be glad to offer their advice and help.
Meanwhile, I note that the professional Advisory Board of
Urban Consultants of the Bureau of Public Roads has
been restricted to advice on hypothetical highway projects
instead of giving advice and counsel on actual projects. In
similar fashion, my own and my colleagues' help as AIA
representatives on the National Advisory Committee on
Highway Beautification have been utilized only for theo-
retical discussions.
In view of the above circumstances, I believe The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects is being inadvertently placed in
a position of tolerating, or even approving, policies of
which it disapproves-policies which are also in direct
opposition to those of President Lyndon B. Johnson.
The President has stated:
". . highway beautification is more than a matter of
planting trees or setting aside scenic areas. The roads
themselves must reflect, in location and design, in-
creased respect for the natural and social integrity
and unity of the landscape and communities through
which they pass."
Apparently, his message has not reached the minds or
hearts of those responsible for the design of highways.
I, therefore, regretfully offer my resignation, effective
immediately, as a member of the National Advisory Com-
mittee on Highway Beautification.
Very sincerely yours,
Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA
President
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






(Naturally, The Florida Architect feels it is important- yes, vital-for architects to take a stand in all matters concerning
the growth and development and betterment of our nation. We also feel that it is equally as important for these official
opinions to be presented so that civic and governmental leaders can be guided accordingly. From time to time, The Florida
Architect will present more information on this theme. This month, we feature letters or excerpts from letters from Morris
Ketchum, Jr., FAIA, president of the American Institute of Architects. In these letters to appropriate leaders, Mr. Ketchum
presents the stand of the AIA and its 22,000 members.)


ON UTILITY LINES
Honorable Warren G. Magnuson, Chairman
Committee on Commerce
United States Senate
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Chairman:
The American Institute of Architects, a professional asso-
ciation organized in 1857 and which today claims a
membership of more than 22,000 licensed architects, ap-
preciates this opportunity to support S.2507 and S.2508,
legislation to conduct research into the effects of overhead
electric transmission lines on the lives, health and prop-
erty of citizens and to encourage the underground trans-
mission of electric power.
Throughout the nation there is a growing trend toward
the underground distribution and transmission of elec-
tricity. Aesthetic advantages of removing a "skyscrape of
wires and utility poles" are obvious. More practical bene-
fits accrue from the reduction of storm damage and main-
tenance expense.
In the past, the chief deterrents to a more universal ac-
ceptance of underground installation have been high cost
and technical difficulties. These are being overcome by
use of sophisticated materials and technology fostered by
a growing appreciation of the advantages of underground
transmission.
Even though much has been accomplished, a great deal
more must be done to overcome technical and economic
impediments to underground electric transmission. This
is why we endorse the research and development programs
which would be authorized by S.2507 and S.2508. Enact-
ment of this legislation will be an important step toward
the day when all but high-voltage electric power distribu-
tion and transmission facilities can be buried underground.
We note that Section 3 of both bills would authorize the
Secretary of the Interior "to cooperate with any other
Federal, State or municipal department, agency or instru-
mentality . in effectuating the purpose of this Act."
The Institute believes language should be adopted re-
quiring intergovernmental cooperation rather than simply
authorizing it. Also, we believe the Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Development, of which there is no mention
in either bill, should be consulted and involved in any
research program aimed at discovering the effect of over-
head electric transmission lines upon "community plan-
ning and zoning, real estate values . and the natural
beauty of our country."
Sincerely yours,
Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA
President

ON PRESERVATION OF
HIGHWAY STRUCTURES
Honorable William A. Barnett, Chairman
Subcommittee on Housing
Committee on Banking and Currency
U. S. House of Representatives
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Chairman:
. . AIA's active participation in the preservation move-
ment began with a resolution passed at the 1890 Con-
JULY, 1966


vention calling for the appointment of a Committee on
Historic Buildings.
In late 1933, the Historic American Buildings Survey was
jointly organized by the AIA, the National Park Service
and the Library of Congress. AIA was also instrumental in
forming the National Trust for Historic Buildings, a serv-
ice organization chartered by Congress in 1949.
To round out this summary of our involvement in historic
preservation activities, we note our support of the work
of the Special Committee on Historic Preservation which
recently published their report entitled, "With Heritage
So Rich." The legislation (H.R. 13790) pending before
your Subcommittee reflects, in part, the recommendation
made by this report.
We support H. R. 13790 in every aspect and find parti-
cularly noteworthy provisions in the bill to:
restore buildings of such architectural as well as
historical value;
sell or dispose of such structures for restoration to
private as well as public groups;
relocate such buildings without as well as within
urban renewal areas;
authorize grant-in-aid credit for purchase and reno-
vation of historic structures;
authorize grants to the National Trust for Historic
Preservation to restore structures of historic or
architectural value;
make grants to cities to survey such existing struc-
tures;
provide loans to tenants as well as owners of his-
toric or architecturally significant structures to
assist in their restoration;
preserve historic structures under the urban beauti-
fication program; and
provide fellowships for architects and technicians
in the historic preservation field upon the recom-
mendation of a Fellowship Advisory Board estab-
lished for this purpose.
The Institute has two suggestions regarding Title II of
H.R. 13790, which provides for the establishment of a
National Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.
First, we note that with the exception of Federal and
private members all Council members are appointed
by the President from a panel suggested by organ-
izations of recognized standing in their field. To
assure that at least two of the four private Council
members are experts in the field of historic preser-
vation, we suggest that they be appointed by the
President from a panel of at least four individuals
submitted jointly by the National Trust for His-
toric Preservation and the AIA.
Second, we suggest that the Council's Executive
Director be appointed by the Council from among
qualified applicants. Further, the Executive Direc-
tor should be responsible only to the Council.
H.RR. 13790 is exceedingly timely legislation. It responds
to the alarm sounded by architects, historians and others
who have, up to now, fought a generally losing battle
against the bulldozer approach to redevelopment.
Sincerely yours,
Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA
President







This steel window won't rust.


CONTACT YOUR AREA
SALES OFFICE:

Jacksonville, Fla. 32205 441 Lane Ave., N.
Miami (Miami Springs), Fla. 33166 5901 N. W. 74th Ave.
St. Petersburg, Fla. 33733 300 31st Street, N.


It's finished

in polyvinyl

chloride.


Polyvinyl chloride is impervious to
moisture. We put it on our window
four times as thick as paint, using a
Ceco-researched method, an exclu-
sive process. This is a I .~_- t finish.
It doesn't crack or chip. It gives. We
ciii it Cecoclad. There is no other
finish like it.
The Cecoclad window is in the
price range of a galvanized-and-
painted steel window and a hard-
coat-anodized aluminum window.
The Cecoclad window needs practi-
r. :illy no maintenance. Your client
can keep it looking brand new by
.,. 1-lni it down with water when the
glass is washed. That's all.
We'll be g'a3.1 to .-i' you whatever
window you want. We make them a'i
But if you'll take our unbiased advice,
you'll specify the Cecoclad window.
It's incomparable.
Send for colors, test data, speci-
fications, samples and compre-
hensive list of projects built with
Cecoclad windows throughout the
country. The Ceco Corporation,
oerfril offices: 5601 West 26th
Street, Chi:-:-..: ii ,-. 60650. Sales
offices and plants in principal cities
from coast to coast.


CECOCLAD/STEEL WINDOWS
encased in colored polyvinyl chloride four times thicker than paint.













..,, .


'61


STATE
OF FLORIDA
-|-------| --iW


megre Major M
Degree Cities Degree
Days Days
4603 SOUTH-Miami 173
3669 CENTRAL-Tampa 674
3245 NORTH-Jacksonville 1113


Vh


Now! 4 types of Alfol Insulation

specially designed for Florida climatic conditions


As the SUN CHART
points up, thermal in-
sulation in your State
is primarily required
to combat heat gain.
Borg-Warner ALFOL
summons reserve R
units to meet just this
criteria. Prevents heat
build-up common to bulk-
type insulations by reflecting
95% of radiant heat. Sharply re-
duces air conditioning costs by mini-
mizing heat entry into residential and
commercial structures. o ALFOL snaps into
place to form multiple layers of aluminum
foil with air space in between. This insulating


concept led all others
in ability to resist heat
gain, according to rat-
ings released by the
U. S. Bureau of Stand-
ards. o So why not
specify the insulation
that provides the highest
R Value for the lowest
dollar. Your Borg-Warner
ALFOL Distributor is already
stocking these new types . .
consult him now.


Reflectal Corporation 1000 W. 120th Sreet. Chicago. Ilinois 60643. Code 312/CO 4 7800 SUBSIDIARY OF BORGWARNER CORPORATION

builder ORH ~M NER
products
12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


al


17


NtrA















Introducing 4 "advanced" new ALFOL types to


further insure...

* Year Round Comfort

* Reduced Heating Costs

* Reduced Air Conditioning Bills

* Protection From Moisture Problems

* Increased Home Resale Value


INSTALLED THERMAL RESISTANCE FOR NEW ALFOL TYPES-CEILINGS
Over +10F OOF to Under
Design Temperature +10-F to OF -100F -10F
Type Installation Direction of Heat Flow Installed Thermal Resistance for Ceilings-Vented Attic above
Face Stapled Dw gain 11.0
U p-Heat loss 6.0 6.0
Recessed Down- In 12.0 12.0
6.0
Recessed w14.0
Up-Ht loss 8.0
4 Recessed Dow19H.0
UpR seat loss i s 19.08.
8.0
Installed Thermal Resistance for Ceilings,
Flat or Low Slope Roof or Cathedral Ceiling
Face Stapled n ain 14.0 14.0
Recessed 5.0 15.0
Up-Heat o. 7.0
Recessed DownHet in .0 17.0
pHeat lo 9.0 9.0
Recessed Down-H 1.0 19.0
10.0

SPECIAL NOTES:
1) Installed Thermal Resistance is for the ALFOL insula- terior air film, roofing components and exterior air
tion only. To arrive at Total Thermal Resistance: film.
a) For vented attic construction-add the individual re- c) To arrive at the "U" factor divide 1.00 by the Total
sistances of the finished ceiling and the interior air Thermal Resistance.
film.
b) For flat or low slope roof and cathedral ceiling-add 2) All resistances derived from the Heating, Ventilating and
the individual resistances of the finished ceiling, in- Air Conditioning Guide and Technical Circular No. 7.


Introducing Introducing

ype2F ALFOL "e 4FR ALFOL
Featuring tough Featuring tough
foil laminated to foil laminated to
kraft top surface kraft top surface

Introducing Introducing
type 2FK ALFOL type4F ALFOL

Featuring tough Featuring tough
foil laminated to foil laminated to
kraft top surface kraft top surface




















COMPONENT PARTS OF FOUR NEW ALFOL TYPES


Type



ALFOL


MEN


Support Sheet


Extra heavy
asphalt impreg-
nated kraft



Extra heavy
natural kraft


.I1
::
-
9 c!
c:.,.:q~.*;:::~l~n ..,.
:1
:r; ~?L'*-~.,:.*,,.. ;.!i
'"":;'i'" ~~q
.... ... .y


ALFOL .



*Types 2FK and 4FR do not provide a vapor
barrier on the down side. Type 2F and 4F com-
ply with FHA requirements for vapor resist-
ance on the down side.
All four new ALFOL types are designed for


Extra heavy ,
natural kraft




Extra heavy
natural kraft



either a face stapled or recessed installation.
However, for optimum thermal efficiency re-
cessed installation of types 4FR and 4F is
recommended. All four new ALFOL types are
manufactured for 12, 16, 20 and 24" centers.


Borg-Warner ALFOL distributors and insulation contractors
are already ordering these new advanced ALFOL types.
Contact your local source now for pricing and the out-
standing wall and floor factors these new types also provide.


~----- --






















"Opeatr Theea a fieat 109Am


i, *one. I'l *e 3ntm ik





















JULY, 1966 15













A CANDLE SHOP


MEN.



41


2;





...





B
*i'
I.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'i'
i
irl
L~ -1i~



























A tiny specialty candle shop in Vienna has won architecture's largest prize, the $25,000 R. S. Reynolds Memorial
Award, for its 32-year-old Austrian designer.
Hans Hollein, a Viennese architect who has studied and lectured extensively in the United States, was chosen for the
honor by a jury of The American Institute of Architects, which administers the Award. Formal presentation of this 1966
tenth annual international award for "distinguished achievement in architecture with significant use of aluminum" was
made June 28 at the AIA convention in Denver, Colorado.
Since its completion in November last year, the candle shop on one of the city's most exclusive shopping streets has
become a popular conversation piece in Vienna. itlh clean, simple lines formed by an exterior of polished, anodized
aluminum sheet in natural finish, it stands out forcefully as a beachhead of modern design in a stronghold of ornate 19th
Century architectural splendor. Surrounded on both sides and above by buildings of typical late 19th Century design, it
was constructed in the limited recesses left by razing of an old store.
The candle shop occupies only 12 feet of street frontage, and its interior floor space measures 160 square feet. It pro-
vides a display showroom and a room for sales of its single product.
AIA jurors cited the building for its original and thorough detailing. "Aluminum has been used in a fresh invigorat-
ing way, and was one of the main contributing factors for the success of the project," the jury report stated.
The Vienna architect said: "Aluhminum is used as the primary material because it is a true material of our century ..
the elegance and nobility ofthe material was in keeping with the desired character and was used as the main theme of
design. Its silver hue provides the 'image' of the shop, in advertising and packaging. Silver shopping bags and wrapping
paper tie the total concept together."
To give the visual impression of a much larger interior space, the architect utilized the continuity of a single build-
ing material; the reflective surface of polished aluminum, and extensive mirrors.
Color accent is provided with orange shantung hung in display niches and with terracotta red wall-to-wall carpeting.
All other features of the interior, including specially designed display stands, are in natural finish aluminum. Almost
every fixture in the candle shop, down to the hinges and the packaging for the products, was designed by the architect.
The building was designed to meet the requirements of the owner, Marius Retti W'achswarcnwerk of Innsbruck. for
a shop to project dramatically the "image" of the company and draw attention to introduction of new products, as well
as to make retail sales.
Hans Hollein is one of a new generation of architects working to change design concepts in his country. He was grad-
uated from the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts in 1956 \with a diploma in architecture. He worked for two years in Stock-
holm, Sweden, with the firm of Ahlgrcn-Olson-Silow, and then studied architecture and city planning at Illinois Institute
of Technology, Chicago. in 1958-59 under a Commonwealth Fund (New York) scholarship. The following year was
spent at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received a master's degree in architecture.
From 1960 to 1963 Mr. Hollein worked in Vienna, in the firm of F. Kiener, Architect. In 1963 he had an exhibit
in Vienna which attracted the attention of Dean Joseph Passonneau of the Washington Univcrsih School of Architect-
ure, St. Louis, who invited him to teach there. This he did in 1963-64, and then returned to Vienna to establish his
own office.
"I try to be an architect of the 20th Century by designing with materials of our time for the needs of our time."
he says. He expresses considerable concern for what he considers architecture's lag in making use of technological ad-
vancements. But the flame of inspiring architectural design burs bright . .



... IN VIENNA


JULY, 1966











any way you figure it...



An ALL-ELECTRIC

OFFICE BUILDING

means more for your money


More economical to build, own and operate. Easier to rent or sell.
All-Electric design provides greater flexibility and increased revenue-
producing space.
Using Electricity as the sole power source is cheaper than in combina-
tion with flame-type fuels... for heating, cooling, lighting, water heating,
and other basic functions.
First costs are reduced by eliminating big-expense items like boiler
rooms, fuel storage facilities, vents and flues.
Maintenance, cleaning and redecorating costs are held to a mini-
mum because flameless electricity creates no soot or fuel-grime ... and
no "air pollution."
The buildings shown here, representative of the growing trend in
modern Florida, vary in size and design, but they have one common
denominator: They're All-Electric I
The All-Electric Building Award and the Award of Merit for Electrical
Excellence identify a building which is electrically modern today-and
which will remain electrically modern tomorrow.

You and your architect or engineer are invited to consult your
electric utility company about the many reasons you would
be money ahead in specifying and building ALL-ELECTRIC.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















































































JULY, 1966 19
























































CREDITS: Architect: Steward-Skinner As.
soclates and Charles Giller & Associates,
Architects & Engineers, Miami, Florida.
Contractor: John A. Volpe Construction Co.,
Inc., Miami. Florida. Panels: by Mabie-
Bell Schokbeton Corp., Peachtree City.
Georgia and Greensboro, N.C.


III


SGeneral Portland Cement Company
OFFICES: CHICAGO CHATTANOOGA DALLAS FORT WORTH HOUSTON FREDONIA, KAN.
e FORT WAYNE JACKSON, MICH. KANSAS CITY TAMPA MIAMI LOS ANGELES

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







A Letter of

Interest to You

from

The AIA Journal

Dear Staff Executive:

"Ten years is perhaps the longest
time a typical research or design engi-
neer can expect to be effective today
without a continuing education or a
major effort to refurbish and update
both his basic and his specialized pro-
fessional skills." from "Education
for Creativity in the Scienc2s," special
Summer 1965 edition, The Journal of
the American Academy of Arts and
Sciences.

With the June issue, AIA JOUR-
NAL will inaugurate a new monthly
service, The Architects Information
Service, which will make available to
the profession published articles, re-
ports and studies from professional,
technical and scientific groups at work
on architecturally related problems.

This new service features a consoli-
dated listing of what is available each
month, plus a simple order card that
requires only the circling of key num-
bers to order the items listed. In addi-
tion, the service is backed by a com-
puterized commercial clearing house
to expidite delivery of the information
architects order.

Your help in making architects
aware of this important new service
will be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Robert E. Koehler
Editor, AIA JOURNAL
JULY, 1966


JOHN F. HUMAN, J., FPm. & Treaur
MARKJ.. J. WILIAUS, Vl c-Pm.


a ED LUNSFORD, JR., Seretay
FRANK D. WILUIAMS, Vice-Plm.


aranOuD 19m

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.

"Bea l and Perment Buildin ateria

"Beautifutl and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5.004


ATLANTA 10 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
GA. OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Our new Florida representative will be announced soon.
If any information is needed before this announcement is
made, please contact our Atlanta, Georgia office, P. O. Box
13406, Station K, Zip Code 30324, or through our tele-
phone number 875-0043, Area Code 404.


I


.\> ,` ,- .; '
















































David William Apartment-Hotel. Coral Gables, Florida; Maurice S. Weintraub, A.I.A., Miami Beach, Florida, Architect; Bliss &
Nyitray, Miami Beach, Florida, Structural Engineers; Robert L. Turchin, Miami Beach, Florida, General Contractors; Acme Concrete
Corporation, Miami, Florida, Suppliers of Solite Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete


SOne of the most interesting new buildings in a state noted
S:: for architectural innovation, the 13-story David William
SApartment-Hotel boasts Florida's largest underground park-
ing system, two restaurants and cocktail lounges, and a roof-
top swimming pool and cabanas.
S MrpETW t I Construction is reinforced Solite lightweight structural con-
r J create, flat plate and one way rib slab. No poured exterior
columns were used for this handsome new building. Its pre-
S. ,. cast architectural window frames are the sole structural sup-
ports from the first floor through the roof.




: Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202








For greater return

on capital investment


ALL ELECTRIC!


UP TO




STEP









a;




OWNERS realize greater return on capital investment
This basic advantage of the all-electric building appeals directly to the investor-sponsor. In many
instances, lower initial cost is possible through reduction or elimination of much of the equipment
needed for conventional energy systems.

ARCHITECTS enjoy greater design freedom with more usable space
The widely varying needs of individual occupants demand flexibility of design. No energy system better
complements this goal than all-electric.
a Lakeland By taking full advantage of electricity's simplicity and economy, the
Aua Lakeland
Bartow Lake Worth architect can increase a structure's revenue-producing space, thus
Blountstown Leesburg achieving a higher profitability for his client.


Bushnell
Chattahoochee
Clewiston
Ft. Meade
Ft. Pierce
Gainesville
Green Cove Springs
Havana
Homestead
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Key West
Kissimmee
Lake Helen
son


Moore Haven
Mt. Dora
Newberry
New Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Quincy
St. Cloud
Sebring
Starke
Tallahassee
Vero Beach
Wauchula
Williston


* ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS find increased client
satisfaction.
The integration of lighting, heating and cooling into a combined elec-
trical space conditioning system means that each component is utilized
to its maximum potential. This and other proven advantages of the
all-electric system more than justify its application, or at least a
comparative feasibility study.
Architects, engineers, builders and owners are SOLD on "Total Electric"
commercial construction. For your next project specify ALL-ELECTRIC.


J Florida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME


JULY, 1966 23







ADVERTISERS' INDEX


The Ceco Corporation
10-11


Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover


Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
18-19


Florida Municipal
Utilities Association
23


Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing Inc.
29


J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
24


Lehigh Portland Cement Company
4


Muzak Corporation
25


Permaglass, Inc.
7


Reflectal/Borg-Warner Corporation
12-14


Solite Corporation
22


Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co.
15


Stresscon International, Inc.
Inside Front Cover


Trinity White -
General Portland Cement Co.
20


F. Graham Williams Co.
21


CALENDAR


July 29
FAAIA Budget and Finance Com-
mittee meeting-FAAIA Execu-
tive Offices, 1000 Ponce De
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Fla.


July 30
Council of Commissions meeting
-Miami, Fla.


August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing-Tallahassee, Fla.


August 15
Deadline, Annual Commissioners'
Report for Annual Board Report.


September 17
Annual Meeting of Council of
Commissioners, FAAIA Executive
Offices, 1000 Ponce De Leon
Blvd., Coral Gables, Fla.


October 5
Annual Meeting of Board of Di-
rectors, Pre-Convention 10
a.m., Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach, Fla.


October 5 -8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.


October 8
Meeting of Board of Directors,
Post-Convention, Deauville Ho-
tel, Miami Beach, Fla.


Executive Suite


The Florida Association of
the American Institute of Ar-
chitects has moved into its new
Executive Offices at 1000 Ponce
De Leon Boulevard, Coral
Gables. Our handsome offices,
on the second floor of the
Teachers' Federal Credit Union
Building, will serve as the center
of activities for the Association's
Executive Director, and for pro-
ducing The Florida Architect
magazine and the forthcoming
Annual edition. The building
was designed by Watson,
Deutschman and Kruse, Archi-
tects. Everyone is invited to visit
the FAAIA's Executive Offices
whenever they are in town.



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Country Dwellers Now Migrating


To Urban Areas, Educator Says


"The environment of man is becoming increasingly
urban," Harlan McClure, dean of the School of Architec-
ture of Clemson College, S. C., told the Tile Council of
America at its general membership meeting in Hot Springs,
Va., May 29 through 31.
McClure predicted that in a short time, "precious few
people will be living in non-urban areas."
"In your own self-interest," Dean McClure told the
Tile Council members, "you must be concerned as to how
the architect is educated, how he practices today and how
he will practice tomorrow."
McClure said that he was interested in the tile indus-
try as an architect as well as an educator. Referring to the
Tile Council's well-known designer series of settings by
famous architects, McClure called the program "a step
in the right direction."
He also said the Tile Council was doing a good job
with its installation and specification work, and praised
the recently introduced Tile Council Certification Pro-
gram.
"Despite the complexities the architect and urban
designers will face," Dean McClure continued, "architec-
ture remains a visual art, with all that art implies. The
architect is concerned with space, volume, color, scale,
rhythm, harmony, dissonance, time and movement. Time
becomes the important factor for movement. Therefore,


architecture remains the art of developing useful spaces
which in turn, are defined by surfaces."
"Materials such as ceramic tile, which cover these
surfaces, are of primary interest to you," McClure said.
"Surfaces should not only be appropriate and economical,
but beautiful as well. New surfacing materials will be
developed -new designs, new shapes, new colors and
forms."
"Also, some materials will give way to others, due to
production and shipping costs, availability and superior
substitutes. But frequently, a material which has such
enduring qualities as color, texture, permanence and
weather resistance, can survive by innovation. One of
those materials, of course is ceramic tile."
"There is an age-old problem in design regarding the
permanence of some materials as against materials which
are less enduring. Durability is one of the greatest assets
of ceramic tile."
"You are familiar with the problems in the ceramic
tile industry," McClure concluded, "but you are doing
something about it. However, much more will have to be
done in the future. The architect will have to turn to the
ceramic tile industry as well as other industries for
help in the development of technical tools that he can
use."


M uzak sound Muzak sound systems provide building-wide commu-
system s nications. Speakers are balanced for full range reproduction of
syst m programmed background music and voice-paging or public
Qa *Oeil &ld addressing. Your local Muzak franchiser can provide
are design d expert assistance in placing speakers for exact cover-
f Pn *J^ age according to size, ambient noise, and special needs of
for voice the areas to be installed. Whenever you need versatile sound
ai mI I *un 5 systems, call your local \
ian, nm usic Muzak franchiser. w1/













Jaeksomnll*: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Odando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 8107 Edgewater Drive
Tmpe: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1808
Miami B-eah: Melody Inc., 1780 Bay Road

JULY, 1966 2











MORE NEW

BUILDINGS AROUND THE STATE














SOARING BELLTOWER adjoining
the baptistry of St. Rose of Lima
Catholic Church, Miami Shores, consists
of four 85-foot crosses, precast in
concrete and erected by Stresscon
International, a division of Maule Indus-
tries, Inc. The huge crosses, weighing
in excess of 100,000 pounds each,
are believed to be the largest precast
concrete components manufactured in
Florida. Marble aggregate was used in the
concrete, and the bas relief design was
emphasized with blue and green tiles.
The local consulting architect was
Murray Blair Wright, AIA.
Polizzi Construction Co. was the
general contractor.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















1 ~rc t.7
'-. 1'


KODAK HEADQUARTERS-A $250,000 mortgage commitment has been obtained by Florida Mortgage Funding
Corp. for an 11,700 sq. ft. building to house offices of the Eastman Kodak Co. microfilm products division.
The structure, at Ponce de Leon Blvd. and Santillane Ave., in Coral Gables, will contain processing and warehouse
facilities on the ground floor, administrative and sales offices on the second.
Thomas D. Wood, general counsel of Florida Mortgage, said the commitment was obtained from The Continental
Assurance Co. of Chicago.
Ferguson-Glasgow architects of Coral Gables designed the building.



PARKING GARAGE (below)-According to the architectural firm of Reynolds, Smith and Hills, the Whiting
Street Parking Garage in Tampa is a "low maintenance utilitarian structure whose appearance would provide impetus
to improving an aging industrial area." The entire structure is exposed concrete. Patterned form boards were used to
form the vertical outside surfaces. The structural requirements at the column heads were expressed in tree form, pro-
ducing a strong repetitive shape which contrasts with the simple rectangular horizontal masses of the parking decks.
Contractor was J. S. Stephens. Parking Consultant was E. A. Barton. Photograph by Ted Saylor/A. C. McCarthy.


JULY, 1966


7 k~2,r;~" ~ F'




























WALL-TO-WALL MONEY-Authentic reproductions of coin designs in reinforced polyester sandwich panels cre-
ate an artistic and unusual exterior wall at the First National Bank at Hialeah, Florida. The "Wall of Coins" contains
57 different reproductions that represent currency from over 50 countries. Some of the coins depicted in the wall were
used as early as 2100 B.C.
The idea for the decorative interior was conceived by Miami architect Herbert Mathes, who sought to design some-
thing different in a wall for the bank. He posed the problem to noted Coral Gables designer J. D. Van Atten, president
of Van Atten-McKelvy Corp. Decorative Architectural Plastics. Mr. Van Atten decided that coin motifs embedded in
translucent polyester sandwich panels would create colorful geometric patterns against a textured neutral background.
"In planning the Wall of Coins," says Mr. Van Atten, "I did not seek to display any special coin collection. Rather,
I chose subjects solely for their inherent beauty and for the adaptability of their form and color to the over-all design
pattern. As a result, sizes of coins are not related-nor are the coins placed in any particular order."
The wall of the bank is unique not only for its artistic beauty, but for its construction as well. It consists of 27
panels /4-inch thick made of an acrylic-modified polyester resin reinforced with glass fibers. The polyester resin used is
Paraplex RP-444A, a product of Rohm and Haas Company, Philadelphia plastics and chemicals manufacturer.
Each panel measures approximately 4 feet by 12 feet. The wall constructed from them covers both sides of the acrylic
the bank and a small portion of the north and south sides. The coin designs embedded in both sides of the acrylic
modified polyester panels range from 5 inches to 42 inches in diameter. The panels glow at night with a softly dif-
fused luminosity, and appear as a color mosaic in the daytime.
Each of the 57 coins exhibited in the wall has an interesting history. Among the coin reproductions are ancient
Chinese "cubes." These dice-like chunks of gold predate minted coins. They were used for money as far back as 2100
B.C. Also of interest is 16th century Tibetan brass bottle money. Such money consisted of actual brass bottles about 6
inches high and was given to important travelers by the head Lama to be shown to receive aid if necessary anywhere
in Tibet. The earliest American coin shown is a copper penny minted in Philadelphia in 1793.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









READERS' VIEWPOINT
%I I


DOUGLAS VILLAGE PRAISE
In years to come, Douglas Village is
sure to be a greatly publicized project
on the local, state and national level
S. but we cannot envision any effort
that could ever surpass your coverage
in the May issue. The perfect timing,
the warmth, and delightful human in-
terest approach are indeed a journal-
istic gem . .
Howard Doehla
for the Board of Directors
VIEWPOINT TO VIEWPOINT
Philip Hiss' "Viewpoint" in the May
issue of The Florida Architect is both
accurate and refreshing. Ever one is
responsible for our environment. In
the future, let us hope that Ecology
will be a science better known to all
of us.
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA
LETS BE HEARD!
Regarding your editorial question
(May issue) about names of architec-
tural firms, I feel as though the ques-
tion is incompletely put. In reality, the
question probably should hinge on


whether or not the practice of Archi-
tecture is an indi idual, personal (i.e.
professional) effort or whether it is a
commercial disconnected thing from
its clientele. I believe that most Ar-
chitects practice in small offices and,
therefore, probably believe in the per-
sonal, professional approach, and I
am one of these. However, I find
that this does not adequately satisfy
all of the demands and needs of
the public. Regardless of what we
think of ourselves, our problem is
to meet and fulfill the requirements
of those people who employ us and
pay us. If those people you describe
in your Editorial could attempt to
show us why it is advantageous to
function in their system and why it
would be advantageous to all con-
cerned, then perhaps we should
change the law. If, on the other hand,
their arguments are hollow and based
on greedy premises only, the law
should be enforced and they should
correct their mispractices.
... I feel that a law is a law and en-


forcement should begin slowly, and
build up to a strict interpretation of
it, during which time the questions I
raised probably will be answered.
Donald R. Edge,
Architect
P.S. You will note from our letter-
head that we carry a deceased member
in the firm title, after which we have
appended the dates of birth and
death. When we set this firm up, we
had an opinion (I do not remember
the source) that this was a proper
way to indicate that this person is
not continuing to practice architec-
ture. Some time limit should prob-
ably be placed on this dce ice and, as
a matter of fact, we will drop it short-
ly after some two years.
We welcome your letters on any of
the articles which appear in The Flor-
ida Architect . in fact, on any
subject of interest to architects. Ad-
dress letters to "Readers' Viewpoint,"
The Florida Architect, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables, Fla.
33134. We reserve the right to edit.


P0 TOPITIIN IIT. O IN COLOR!
ROO TIE IN9 OO SIO VR UID EO


POLY-GLAZE PROTECTS
I"a HER BEAUTY
; 0. You can be sure, when
& 5a. you specify Gory tiles,
that the roof will main-
S* tain the beauty and color
that you have in mind,
years longer than any
other. Brilliant whites
stay white and colors retain their richness of hue because
of our quality controls and tint imprcgnations Moisture-
and soil-resistant materials deter the ravages of weather
and our Poly-Glaze finishes insure lasting beauty.


So let your imagination soar, for Gory offers a
rainbow selection of 900 different colors in a variety
of attractive, functional shapes and sizes for any
architectural motif. The colors are an integral
part of the Gory roof tile and will not fade under
the hot Florida sun. The foundation of Gory
beauty is Hi-Early type Portland Cement and incor-
porates the best white cement available. Here is
roofing beauty that will last a lifetime with a mini-
mum of maintenance . Gory Roof Tile.


THE LARGEST AND FINEST MANUFACTURER OF QUALITY TILE IN FLORIDA

GORY ROOFING TILE
GORY INDUSTRIES INC. P.O. BOX 490 135 N. W. 20th ST. BOCA RATON 395-1770

GORY ROOFING TILE MFG., INC. 1773 N. E. 205th ST. NORTH MIAMI 945-7691

JULY, 1966 29







City Design and The Revolutionaries

by Paul Rudolph, AIA


---drcltttll Ict.rlitir. It .tlLI L Lrt(llr Jand
d.iit io--- t tlit Pnt i aIin.al K 'ppcr
Architectural Student Digi Com petition
in Washington, D. C, .\pd 21, 1966.)
. The subject tonight-Design
-of course, can be interpreted in
many different ways. I chose to inter-
pret it as city design. Indeed that is
the only thing we're talking about as
an architect in this decade. It was not
always so. As a matter of fact the
great revolutionaries of this century,
while giving lip service to the notion
that a city could be designed, always
thought that it had to be started from
scratch; that nothing that was there
should be kept, so you had to tear
down everything in sight. Of course,
nothing could be further from the
truth in terms of what a city really
is. If you are a part of a great revo-
lution, undoubtedly you have to over-
state the case, but it seems to me that
it is now up to us to make much more
clear where we really do stand. The
great revolutionaries, of course, in-
cluding Le Corbusier wanted to tear
down all of Paris and build his huge
skyscrapers and plant trees there.
Fortunately, the city fathers of Paris
didn't go along with that at all.
Mr. Wright, of course, thought
that there had never really been an
architect worth talking about besides
himself, and didn't feel that there
would ever be another one after him.
Therefore, it was completely unnec-
essary to pay any attention to what
had gone before and certainly not to
what was to come afterwards. He was
best building in the middle of a forty
acre field.
Mr. Gropius felt that if everything
was anal zced in a scientific way, or I
would say pseudo-scientific way, that
all of us would see the light. Indeed,
he felt, apparently, that he discovered
the setting of the sun, and by making
graphs showing how far buildings of a
certain height should be separated
from each other, that one could come
to something which would be called a
city.
Now of all these people the most
modest was Mies. Mies felt, at least
upon arriving in this country, if I
understand him correctly, that since
all buildings were for human beings,
you could treat them all as packages
and he makes very, very beautiful
packages indeed the most beautiful
of anyone and, consequently, one can
forgive him.


Now 1 mention these things be-
cause we don't really feel the way the
revolutionaries did at all. I sympathize
with the students here because of the
complications. When I was in school,
which was way back in the 1940's,
things were really quite simple. If you
made a regular structural system with
a flat roof and ribbon windows, and if
you were sure that the plumbing was
back to back, and a few other moder-
ate little matters, you were fairly sure
of passing, at least. But now we really
don't think that at all. We feel that
the true meaning of the word archi-
tect implies that he is participating in
something which is far larger, that
even though it's a single building, it
is part of the city as a whole and that
it is really only a point in time, and
that the only thing you can really be
sure of is that the city will change.
...Now the question of being sym-
pathetic with the surroundings also has
brought about an almost complete
denial of the package as a building
type, at least on those campuses
which have a very real character. It's
noteworthy that much architecture
built on campuses is treated "some-
what more seriously than other places
and this is quite obvious because the
control of such things is usually in a
very few peoples hands. Whereas. in
building a city there is little or no
control in spite of the planners.
...Neglecticism, however, on a col-
lege campus is an extremely dangerous
thing. One English critic has just
pointed out that most campuses in
the United States nowadays look like
each department has its own embassy,
if you will, and tries to attract as
much attention as the next one.
Now the question of scale is ob-
viously bound up in city design with
the automobile. And I feel that we,
as architects, have waited long
enough for the automobile to be
tamed. Automobile traffic engineers
are marvelous when they're in the
countryside, and indeed have built
some of the most beautiful construc-
tions known to many without any
help from any esthete, but when the
automobile comes to the city, it's an
entirely different matter and we as
Americans, of course, are perfectly
happy to spend any amount of money
as long as it deals with the automo-
bile.
I have come to the following con-
clusions, that only the automobile
and its configurations give one large


enough element to really break up
and define certain areas in cities and
that it might well be usel to correct
some slight little faults which we find
on all sides.
To give you an example, the Ken-
nedy Airport has been descnbed, not
by me, but others, as an architectural
zoo and I'm inclined to agree with
them about that. I would like to pro-
pose that since one quite often misses
planes at the Kennedy Airport be-
cause you park right in the middle
and have to walk for twenty or thirty
minutes to your plane, you know,
that one solution would be to build
four or five layers of parking over the
architectural zoo. You not only would
get to your plane much more quickly,
but you would then have a gateway
to a city worthy of the name.
So maybe this terrible thing which
we call the automobile and what it
does to our cities has inherent in it
the possibilities of regaining some-
thing which we truly have lost.
. People bemoan what has hap-
pened to San Francisco and its great
thruways. I personally find it marvel-
ous. I don't live in San Francisco, it
so happens, but I can at least see it
in ways which I never dreamed of
seeing it before.
. Now I realize that we're sup-
posed to simply say that the automo-
bile is the terrible thing and it should
be kept out 'of the city and that's
that. I don't believe that that's the
way it will work out at all. We have
architects constantly talking about
more plazas and outside living space.
Streets are the plazas, really. I find
that in New York City the cars
obviously move so slow that you can
really talk, if you happen to know
the people in the next car. You can
talk perfectly well. There's probably
as much social intercourse in the
streets of New York as there is in an
Italian plaza. This is one of the
reasons why we don't really have
courtyards and plazas.
So, my thesis is that it is high
time that we realize that the revolu-
tion, the great revolution, is over;
that it's high time that we stopped
thinking in terms of the planners
taking care of all the really difficult
problems while we build our little
outhouses somewhere; and that large
scale, three dimensional design will
come fundamentally by the configura-
tion of the automobile, interestingly
enough.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Vffe Wnr #&a v.


Our Three Ingredients...

Concrete, Imagination, Know-How...

STOCK DECORATIVE MASONRY
AS WELL AS CUSTOM UNITS


We a&o ofe ...


CLAY-FACE-FIRE AND GLAZED
BRICK OF ALL TYPES



NATURAL STONES FROM
MANY QUARRIES


CERAMIC VENEER




METAL UNITS FOR FIREPLACES
AND BARBEQUES


f we dCon't av e eae materal ysu catet-- we'll tCy to maSe or get it/


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA 887-1525


IDU





-- -T Tuir n ) DfA AR CHITECT
FLA. i A It MT=S f*5c Le2 -Blvd.
S-. Coral G -hrLtC43 34
r Raond AA -Accepte As GedfrilotrCiclIation
Walter aysond, AIA -- Publication at Miami, Fla.
College of Arenltecture & Fine Arts
UniversLty of Florida
Gaineaville. Fa. IC.






"FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE
HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ... "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND
BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAtDtLL NHOT1W, MIAMI BEACH, jODA .. "FOCUS: COMMUN-
ITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIA-
TION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI
BEACH, FLORIDA .. "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING
PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
- OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA .. "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd
ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLOR-
IDA.. "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EX-
HIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER
5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL. MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ... "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CON-
VENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN
INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA... "FOCUS:
COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL,
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA . "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILD-
ING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHI-
TECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA... "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" -
52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH,
FLORIDA.. "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS
EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTO-
BER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA... "FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL
CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN
INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA . .
"FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE
HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA .."FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND
BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS OCTOBER 5-8, DEAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA.. "FOCUS: COMMUN-
ITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF THE FLORIDA ASSO-




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs