• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The president's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 City of the future
 Bodhisattva statue
 Perspective
 Advertising
 The future of architecture
 Burt E. Pringle
 Calendar of events
 Advertising
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00144
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: June 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00144
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The president's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    City of the future
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Bodhisattva statue
        Page 8
    Perspective
        Page 9
    Advertising
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The future of architecture
        Page 13
    Burt E. Pringle
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Calendar of events
        Page 16
    Advertising
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Advertisers' index
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.











the
florida
archilecl
1jne 1966











Florida Architecture 19661/2


I have been asked to report to
the Florida Arts Council at their
Jacksonville convention on the
status of architecture in Florida.
Serving with the FAAIA for the
previous six years, I have had the
opportunity to travel the limits
of this great state and to speak
to architects and others about
architecture. To evaluate the pro-
fession at this time, I must pre-
judice my comments by my own
desires for architects to constant-
ly strive for excellence. The ex-
pression of this excellence will
not always find agreement.
Architecture, painting and
sculpture are called the fine
arts-the arts concerned with
visual beauty. People judge
these arts by the appeal to the
eye. The architect works with
form and mass just as the
sculptor. The architect works
with color just as the painter.
The architect also must solve
a utility of purpose. Architec-
ture is a very special func-
tional art subject to intense
prejudices.
I report to you that architec-
ture is still the mother of the
arts . the same as when she
first married Dear Old Dad- cre-
ativity. I must confess, however,
that she has been permissive and
at times cannot recognize her
children.
Your careful observation of
any community in this state will
reveal the heritage. The roads of
Florida are the corridors through
the galleries of our environment,
hung with buildings in all their
glory of current (quote) ART.
Pop architecture exists in the
form of a big sphere in the shape
of an orange dispensing juice.
Rock and roll beats with the
flashing forms of hamburger
houses. Poetry speaks offbeat in
the rhythm of stop-and-go high-
ways. Junk sculpture is a favorite


of constructors who tack the
throw-aways of previous times on
the form of contemporary living.
Architecture has always been an
expression of man at his time in
history.
The rapid growth of our
state over the last twenty years
has given little opportunity
for anything but haphazard
planning and overnight con-
struction. Early habits live
with us as paper-thin structures
designed to match the mort-
gage. Man in Florida has taken
the very beauty of this state-
the elements which attracted
us... the land, the water, the
air-and exploited them with
waste and without care. Our
passiveness has allowed the
land to be filled with ugliness


JAMES DEEN, AIA

THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


built by the speculator without
his community in mind. Gov-
ernment regulations impose
endless rows of 'cupcake
houses' decorated to disguise
the ugly taste of living with-
out stimulation. Tax struc-
tures penalize the best and en-
courage the worst. The accel-
erated depreciation means
lower tax burdens.
But the public is beginning to
awaken. Architects and artists
have made serious mistakes in
physically separating ourselves
from each other and the public.
If we believe that art is impor-
tant, we will seek service to each
other and-most important-to
the public. We are not an intel-
lectual elite separate from the
ugliness beyond that door. We
are a part of the culture of our
time to be heard and seen.
To paraphrase recent remarks
by AIA President Morris Ketch-
um, "there is a new architecture
in Florida. It is founded on sym-
pathetic government, an enlight-
ened public, community mobili-
zation, and the full use of pro-
fessional talents . It is an arch-
itecture capable of enriching the
minds and hearts of those who
live within its boundaries . .
This is not an architecture set
within the disciplines of style ...
it is more than an architecture
of individual buildings; more
than a search for novelty in struc-
ture, form and materials; more
than an assemblage of techni-
ques . .
Society demands service and
society will be served. Archi-
tects of Florida are the custo-
dians of the visual environ-
ment. The task of creating an
architecture worthy of this
great state is being accepted.
Let us all join forces to bring
it to fulfillment.




~I- "- "























pea, a's 16 at 1

0 H. N t 3






























JUNE, 1966




Lc : -'t-'i.


If You're AIA Convention-Bound,


Here's All The Latest News!


VARIETY OF FUN-EVENTS PLANNED
The Colorado Chapter AIA is host chapter for the
week-long convention and building products exhibit. It
has planned a variety of events to help the visiting archi-
tects and their guests enjoy their stay in Denver. Major
event on the schedule is the Monday evening (June 27)
"Night at Historic Central City," a party to be held on
what was once the "richest square mile on earth."
Central City, Colorado's capital in the booming min-
ing days, will have its famed Eureka Street gilded and
roped off so a buffalo barbecue can be served from chuck
wagons. Orchestras, entertainment, drinking and dancing
at the Eureka Ballroom, Silver Dollar and Williams
Stables will spark the evening hours.
For opera lovers at the party, a command performance
of "Carmen" will be presented in the old Opera House.
Later the Central City Opera troupe will entertain in
the old saloons the Glory Hole, Grub Stake, Gilded
Garter and the Silver Slipper recreating the bonanza
spirit in the century-old town.
The following evening, June 28, Denver architects
and regional architectural groups will play host to visitors
at "Architects at Home" parties.
Special events arranged for the women who will attend
the convention as guests include a luncheon on June 30
at which a priceless collection of antique Indian costumes
and artifacts will be presented in a fashion show. Narra-
tor will be Norman Fader, Curator of Indian Art at the
Denver Art Museum.
There will also be a tour of Georgetown, Colo., on
July 1, taking 50 women to the historic mining town by
bus. Afternoon tea will be served at the Victorian Hotel
de Paris with Colonial Dames as hostesses.
Women and children will be able to attend a western
riding show on June 28, when a display of western horse-
manship and precision formation riding will be presented
by the "Westeraires" at the Jefferson County Fair-
grounds. On July 1, they will be offered a delightful after-
noon at Elitch's Gardens, which is modeled on a small
scale after Copenhagen's famous Tivoli. A unique amuse-
ment park, it has a famous old Repertory Theater, the
Orchard Dining Room, lush plantings and a fun-filled
Kiddieland.
BACON MEDAL, CITATION OF ORGANIZATION
The American Institute of Architects today announced
the selection of an architectural project and an organiza-
tion to receive special honors at the annual convention
of the professional organization next month.
The Gateway Arch of St. Louis, Mo., will be awarded
the Henry Bacon Medal for Memorial Architecture, which
is being presented for the first time. The Institute's Cita-
tion of an Organization will honor the Museum of Mod-
ern Art, New York City, with special commendation for
its new Philip L. Goodwin Galleries of Architecture and
Design.
Both awards will be presented at the AIA convention
in Denver, Colo., the week of June 26-July 1. The win-
ners were selected by the national board of directors of
the 18,000-member professional organization.
Symbolizing St. Louis as the historic gateway to the
American West, the soaring stainless steel arch promises
to be a distinctive landmark. It was designed by the late
2


Eero Saarinen, a Gold Medalist of the AIA. The Bacon
Medal will be accepted by the firm of Eero Saarinen and
Associates of Hamden, Conn.
Soaring 630 feet, the arch is the country's tallest na-
tional monument, surpassing the 555-foot Washington
Monument in the nation's capital. It is the dominant
feature of the $30,000,000 Jefferson National Expansion
Memorial, which commemorates the westward expansion
of this country'spioneers. The 80-acre wooded park bor-
ders the Mississippi River on the original townsite of
St. Louis.
Structural engineering was done for the Saarinen or-
ganization by Severud Associates of New York City. The
memorial project was undertaken by the city of St. Louis
and the National Park Service of the U. S. Department
of the Interior.
The Henry Bacon Medal for Memorial Architecture
honors the memory of the Institute's 1923 Gold Medalist.
He was the designer of many monuments and memorials,
best known of which is the Lincoln Memorial in Wash-
ington, D. C.
The Institute's Citation of an Organization is this
year given to New York's Museum of Modem Art in com-
mendation of its continuing concern with architecture
and man's physical environment. The citation takes note
particularly of the recent opening of the Philip L. Good-
win Galleries which permit continuous exhibition of
material from the Museum's Department of Architecture
and Design. Arthur Drexler, director of this department,
will accept the citation.
COVETED GOLD MEDAL
TO JAPANESE ARCHITECT
Kenzo Tange, Japanese architect, has been awarded
the 1966 Gold Medal of The American Institute of Archi-
tects, the highest honor bestowed by the national pro-
fessional organization.
The award, voted by the Board of Directors, will be
presented during the AIA's National convention in Den-
ver June 26-July 1. Tange is the first architect of Japan
to be so honored, and no other Gold Medal recipient has
been selected so soon after beginning his practice. At 52,
he is one of the youngest Gold Medalists in the Institute's
history.
Tange came to world prominence in 1949 when he
won the open competition for the design of the Peace
Museum at Hiroshima.
THIRD SEMINAR SPEAKER
Sterling Moss McMurrin has accepted The American
Institute of Architects' invitation to address its annual
convention at a seminar focusing on "Man," third of the
seminars covering the convention's triple theme, "Tech-
nology, Environment and Man."
Dr. McMurrin, who beares the dual title of Provost
and E. E. Ericksen Distinguished Professor of Philosophy
at the University of Utah, will be the featured speaker
on July 1. This is the final day of the convention.
Theme seminar speakers announced earlier by Institute
President Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA, were Nobel-Prize-
winning physicist Isidor I. Rabi for the seminar on "Tech-
nology" and Under Secretary of the Department of
Housing and Urban Development Robert C. Wood for
the seminar on "Environment".
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















OFFICERS
james Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South e James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. States
Jacksonville e A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Pahn Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, 1600 N. W. LeJeune Rd., Miami
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor .
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. ... .Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. . McMurray Printers.
JUNE, 1966


THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Inside Front Cover


CITY OF THE FUTURE
Student Designs

46

BODHISATTVA STATUE
at University of Florida

8

PERSPECTIVE

9

A MESSAGE
ON THE FUTURE OF ARCHITECTURE
by Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA

13

BURT E. PRINGLE
Stamped for Success

14-15

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

16

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

20

FAAIA 52nd Annual Convention

Back Cover




FRONT COVER You'll see this stamp on many of your
envelopes. It was designed by a Florida artist, Burt E. Pringle,
and is the culmination of a most interesting story about a
dedicated young man.


VOLUME16 R NUMBER 1966









The highly-imaginative creativity of
some University of Florida fifth-year
students was recently put to the test
when five student teams designed
their City of the Future.
With a $600 grant from the City of
Jacksonville, these UF students were
given five problems to solve in the re-
development of the Riverside area of
Jacksonville, which today houses no
more than 5000 people but will be
expected to house a staggering num-
ber according to projected population
density predictions.
In six weeks, the fledgling archi-
tects researched the area and came up
with five complex models- all of
which were presented to the Jackson-
ville City Planning Advisory Board.
Panelists H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
of Miami, and George P. Simons Jr.


CITY
OF
THE

FUTURE




and Marvin C. Hill of Jacksonville
heaped praise on the future cities.
Kruse is Florida Regional Director-
Elect of the American Institute of
Architects. Mr. Simons is an outstand-
ing city planner and Mr. Hill is execu-
tive director of the Duval-Jacksonville
Area Planning Board.
According to Professor Sam Branch
of the UF School of Architecture,


panelists declined to select a winner
from among the five models because
"they're all so outstanding." The
models will be displayed throughout
Jacksonville for the rest of the year.
The future city, as envisioned by
the student teams, will be vertical
areas of 60,000-80,000 persons by the
year 2000, with apartment complexes
three or four times taller than Jackson-
ville's soaring Prudential Building.
The city will be fed by massive high-
way systems, 200-miles-an-hour trains,
and bus-helicopters that will put resi-
dents within minutes from the beach.
Today, these University of Florida
architectural students were declared
"bold, imaginative, and delivering a
challenge." Twenty years from now,
according to Mr. Simons, their solu-
tions could well be reality.


DESIGN TEAM: Chris Benninger, Carlos Gonzales, Jim Notestein, Donald Zimmer.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








N- _


U


U;


DESIGN TEAM: (picture at left) Alan
Chasan, T. W. Hickey, Paul Isch, Prime
Osborn. DESIGN TEAM: (picture below)
Lou Culver, Roger Noppe, George
Scheffer, Richard Stipe.


JUNE, 1.966


r









*4

N .t
'm 'j


DESIGN TEAM: (picture at right) Frank Birdsong,
Mario Garcia, Lee Marsh. DESIGN TEAM: (picture
below) Wilmer Johnston, Bob Kelley,
Tom Mojo, Robert Prest.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


d~'f
















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JUNE, 1966


Telephone 751-9775


_*






1500-Year-Old Art Object at U-F
Honors Professor of Architecture


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An antique Bodhisattva head, believed to date back
before the 5th century, A.D., occupies a place of honor
in the library of the College of Architecture and Fine
Arts of the University of Florida.
This valuable art object was donated by former students
and colleagues in honor of Professor Pasquale M. Torraca,
who retired from the faculty of the school's Department
of Architecture in June of 1965.
In response to this gift, Professor Torraca said:
". . Young students, with their eyes centered on the
stars, have always been a source of inspiration to me. If I
have contributed ever so little to their motivation to em-
brace a noble profession, I will feel that my humble efforts
have not been in vain.
"So to these fine young people, and to my respected
colleagues who are dedicated to the challenging task and
endeavor of inspiring their students to achieve their aspira-
tions as professional and cultured gentlemen, I extend my
best wishes for a life of serenity, good health and profes-
sional achievement."
Also on display with the Bodhisattva head is the fol-
lowing description and history:
A Bodhisattva
Gandhara: Afganistan, Hadda
IIJ-V Century
Stucco with Touches of Polychrome
At the beginning of the Christian era, itinerant
Roman sculptors, working on the outer reaches of
the empire in Asia, made a strong impact on the em-
bryonic Buddhist School of Art in Gandhara. Since
a great quantity of sculpture was produced as archi-
tectural ornament, this head of BODHISATTVA,
was no doubt originally a part of a religious tableau
on a monastery or stupa. In Buddhism, BODHI-
SATTVAS are beings who have attained supreme
knowledge and are ready for salvation but renounce
nirvana until all mankind is saved ..
It is believed that this stucco head, once highly
colored, comes from Hadda in Afganistan where a
late second school of Gandharan art flourished. These
highly mannered products of Gandhara, made almost
exclusively of stucco, still retained (as does the pres-
ent piece) a strong visual mark of the earlier style
which was born when Eastern and Western cultures
met and blended.
The art object was obtained and prepared for suitable
display through the generous assistance of Professor Roy
C. Craven, Jr., Director of the University Gallery.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







PERSPECTIVE


Enjoying Florid living in front of their award-winning Coral able
Enjoying Florida living in front of their award-winning Coral Gables


home are the Joseph Garfields.


LOVELY HOMES PICKED IN 'THE CITY BEAUTIFUL'


The Coral Gables Association of Architects has select-
ed four homes as being most representative of "The City
Beautiful."
The Most Beautiful Home contest was co-sponsored
by the association and the city. The original 70 entries
were cut to 18 for the final judging which was held earlier
last month.
The owners and addresses of the winning homes are:
Joseph Garfield, 6510 Granada (architect-William H.
Merriam); James R. Gibson, 1345 Mendavia Avenue
(architect-Francis Mclntire); Dr. Maurice M. Green-
field, 5000 Granada (architect-Wahl Synder); William
H. Sutcliffe, 600 Campana, Hammock Oaks (architect-
George Root).
This was the first annual contest, according to Carl
Blohm, president of the association to foster more appre-


ciation of good residential architecture and maintenance
in the city. Eighty per cent of the judging was -based on
the home and 20 per cent on the landscaping.
Choosing the winning homes were George Read, AIA,
vice president of the Florida South Chapter of AIA;
Sam Kruse, FAIA, regional director, and architect Dean
Parmelee, AIA, of Miami.
After the judging was completed, they said, "All the
houses selected exhibit a marriage of site and building
using existing features such as trees, slopes, rock, water
and well-groomed landscaping that blends with native
materials whenever possible. Construction details were
skillfully designed and sensitively executed resulting in a
consistency of statement-whether traditional, period or
contemporary. Pride of design, pride of construction and
pride of ownership are discernible in all these examples."


SCIIOOL ACCEPTS FAAIA AWARD

Presentation of honor award for architectural design for
Miami-Dade Junior College South Campus by the
Florida Association of Architects. Pictured are Jane Roberts,
Chairman, Dade County Board of Public Instruction; Dr.
Peter Masiko, President, Miami-Dade Junior College; Andrew
J. Ferendino, Architect, Pancoast/Ferendino/Grafton/
Skeels Architects; Paul Scott, Trustee, Miami-Dade Junior
College, and James Deen, President, Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects.


JUNE, 1966


























re
r


r








~OI~L~





r


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT























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JUNE, 1966 11
















































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







The Future of Architecture

by Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA,
President, American Institute of Architects


(An address to the Second Boston Archi-
tectural Conference-May 14, 1966.)

This conference on the future of
architecture is an appropriate occasion
to pause and look around us at the
world we live in, at the forces which
have shaped and are shaping that
world, and at the role which we, as
architects, must play in providing a
setting for the society which thesa
forces have created.
More than a hundred years ago, the
architect was a craftsman chiefly con-
cerned with the design of individual
buildings and their immediate sur-
roundings ...
The furious energy and headlong
pact of our country's growth gave
little opportunity for anything but
haphazard planning and overnight
construction. Habits of thought and
habits of building were established
which still persist today in spite of the
fact that our society and its settings
were matured and grown mellow with
the disappearance of the last frontier.
Our land, our air, our water, our
space for living are dwindling but we
still exploit them, wastefully and wan-
tonly, as if we had just landed on a
new continent.
Our urbanized society still inhabits
cities planned for another age, burst-
ing at the seams with traffic conges-
tion, ill adapted to the social, eco-
nomic and political demands of to-
day's urban living and ripe for rescue
and redevelopment. The time is long
overdue for a new urban architecture.
To create this architecture, the
architect must deal with new urban
clients. They are not individual clients
with whom he can talk face to face.
They are impersonal clients the
corporation, the private foundation,
the government agency--whom he
never meets face to face and with
whose representatives he often finds
communication difficult and, some-
times, impossible.
It almost seems that the strong
individuals who commissioned the
great architecture of the past would
never emerge from the rising tide of
mass culture. However, the great
individual clients are returning today
as merchant princes, business execu-
tives, and, in a few encouraging in-
stances, as leaders of government.
Our profession has been called,
amongst other things, the one least
enthusiastic about group action. Yet
as an individual, unaided by his fel-
lows, the architect's voice is a small
one seldom heard. As a total profes-
JUNE, 1966


sion, united in a vital, well organized
professional society, he is heard
throughout the land. We are making
tremendous progress as a profession
in establishing our new role in society
and in creating public awareness of
the fact that today's architects are
helping to reshape the face of Amer-
ica . .
I don't believe that architects can
do the job alone. We are not super-
men. We are the servants of society,
not its masters.
A great pool of talents and skills -
the assembled brainpower of our po-
litical leaders, sociologists, physical
scientists and educators is needed
to establish a great new urban pro-
gram. Then this program can be
translated into the environmental
architecture of cities by the architect
and his allies the design profes-
sions, the product manufacturers, the
builders, the craftsmen. A total build-
ing industry is needed for a total
answer.
Consider some of the problems that
confront us.
We are already using an obsolete
language when we talk about "cities"
as self-contained urban entities. Is
New York or Los Angeles really our
largest city? Or is it that glittering
mass that sprawls from southern New
Hampshire to the port cities of Vir-
ginia and contains forty million
people? If you want to be a bit tidier
in your demography, you might call
our biggest city that urban blotch
around the New York-New Jersey area
which houses some seventeen million
souls. A recent study of the Bureau of
Census shows that, for the first time,
the total population of the suburban
areas has exceeded the total popula-
tion within the bounaries of the tra-
ditional cities.
We need a balanced transpor-
tation system and all of us must point
out to our legislators that it is odd
indeed to spend billions of dollars of
public money on highways and call it
free enterprise at work while we deny
money to urban rail systems and look
on it as some dark form of socialism.
The relationship between our pro-
fession and governments at all levels
is crucially important if urban prob-
lems are to be solved. As the city has
come apart, traditional political boun-
daries have become blurred and vir-
tually meaningless. Where the states
have defaulted in representing urban
majorities, the Federal government
has moved in to fill the void. Local
government, meantime, has been slow
to bring the speculator under control.


At the same time, archaic zoning
regulations are preventing architects
and enlightened clients from building
compact and stimulating communities
rather than endless rows of dreary
suburban bedrooms.
.. .Nor can we re-make our cities
without solving our painful social
problems. As blight, congestion, and
lack of decent housing drive middle-
income residents from our urban cen-
ters, the poor move in. They continue
to leave the rural areas for the crowd-
ed urban centers. Because of the lack
cf education and job skills often,
too, because of prejudice they work
part time or are unemployed. The gap
between the rich and poor grows. The
suburban noose draws tighter. If the
present trend continues, the untrained
and uneducated poor will become
the dominant population group in
virtually all our major cities within
the next few years.
Each of these problems -techno-
logical, political, social, economic--
confronts us with harsh realities which
stand in the way of a better urban life
and a better urban architecture.
Given a sympathetic government,
an enlightened public, community
mobilization, the full use of profes-
sional talents and a revitalized build-
ing industry, we can create a new
architecture.
... In city or country, it will be an
architecture of quiet serenity, of prop-
erly organized space within and
around its buildings, of forin appro-
priate to our own age, and of a visual
delight capable of enriching the minds
and hearts of those who live within
its boundaries. It will be an architec-
ture of controlled and balanced auto
traffic and public transportation, of
urban neighborhoods where close knit
building groups and green open spaces
add diversity and spice to living.
Today, we are an affluent profes-
sion in an affluent society. If we
allow ourselves to be submerged in the
day-to-day demands of our own pros-
perous workloads, ours will be a petty
triumph soon forgotten. Failure to
give a full measure of devotion to the
demands of function, craftsmanship,
art, and science which architecture
must satisfy means that others will fill
a gap we ourselves have created.
On the other hand, if we apply
patience, fortitude, courage and un-
selfish devotion to the task before us,
we will broaden the horizon of archi-
tecture and our own achievement.
That is the bright future of archi-
tecture.









BURT

PRINGLE


Other designs submitted by Mr.
Pringle for the Migratory Bird Treaty
include the two at left: flyways
of migratory birds superimposed on
an outline map of the United States
and Canada . and "Martha,"
last passenger pigeon, extinct since
1914, and now preserved in the
National Museum, Washington, D.C.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'1"" ".,: J : ,/ : ? t















Making his debut as a designer of United States stamps is a tlS t

Burt E. Pringle, Jacksonville display director and graphic artist. w ith the

The fulfillment of his long-time ambition to be a stamp-designer Sta mp of

is a handsome, modern portrayal- commemorating the 50th anni- SUCC5
versary of the Migratory Bird Treaty between the United States and Canada.

The 54 stamp is an horizontal presentation of two birds in flight over the U.S.-Canada border. Outlined in
white, their wings almost touching, one bird is flying north and the other is winging his way south over the
Great Lakes. Canada is depicted in red and the United States in blue, with the lakes in a lighter blue.

In a panel at the top of the stamp, which was recently issued by the Post Office Department, is the two-line
legend: "Migratory Bird Treaty / 1916 / UNITED STATES CANADA 1966." At the bottom of the stamp is
this panel: "U.S. Postage Five Cents". The stamp design by Pringle was unveiled by Postmaster General
Lawrence F. O'Brien in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in conjunction with the annual North American Wildlife and
Natural Resources Conference. More than a thousand conservationists were in attendance.

In addition to the chosen design, Mr. Pringle also submitted two other sketches, which are shown here. "I've
always wanted to design stamps," Pringle says. So, in the past year alone, he submitted a tall stack of unsolicited
designs for new stamps.

For every subject issued by the United States Post Office in 1965, you can be sure they had received several
Pringle suggestions. But this is an honor rarely extended to an artist outside of the Post Office Department, so it
was not until the Migratory Bird Treaty stamp that Mr. Pringle had any success. His winning design packs strong
symbolism and, like many good stamp designs, is simplicity itself.

For many years, Burt Pringle has been recognized as a leading authority in the display field. He is display and
advertising director of Rosenblum's in Jacksonville, and has designed all of their stores. In fact, he has just
completed plans for a fourth Rosenblum's to be located in one of Jacksonville's new multi-million-dollar shopping
centers.

He has won several gold medals from Display World Magazine for his work and, in 1958, received an award
from the Societe de L'Exploition Universelle for his promotional displays for the Brussels World Fair. Mr. Pringle
is a member of the National Society of Art Directors and artist-custodian of the Gator Bowl Hall of Fame.

He has an invitation from the United Nations to submit postal designs and has been awarded two honorariums for
his work from that administration.

But now that one of his designs has finally been accepted and appears on a U.S. postal stamp, will Burt Pringle
retire from stamp-designing? "Never," he says. "This is just the beginning . I've got several new
design-suggestions in the works already."

Even though he devotes a great deal of his time to his work, his stamp-design avocation, and civic responsibilities,
Burt Pringle admits to making time for just one hobby. "I'm an ardent stamp collector," he smiled. Of course!


JUNE, 1966









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. k Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


CALENDAR


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


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PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


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We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
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Our new Florida representative will be announced soon.
If any information is needed before this announcement is
made, please contact our Atlanta, Georgia office, P. 0. Box
13406, Station K, Zip Code 30324, or through our tele-
phone number 875-0043, Area Code 404.


June 26 July 1
AIA National Convention-Den-
ver, Colorado.
June 29
Florida Breakfast at AIA National
Convention-7 a.m., Denver Hil-
ton Hotel. To provide opportunity
for AIA delegates to meet and
greet the candidates for Institute
offices.

July 30
Council of Commissions meeting
-Miami, Florida.
August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing-Tallahassee, Fla.
October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.



DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?
If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect .. We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address"....

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.









































All-electric construction has already

proven itself in the commercial market

Owners realize greater return on investment
Architects enjoy greater design freedom, better use of space
Engineers and contractors find increased client satisfaction


Alachua
Bartow
Blountstown
Bushnell
Chattahoochee
Clewiston
Ft. Meade
Ft. Pierce
Gainesville
Green Cove Springs
Havana
Homestead
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Key West
Kissimmee
Lake Helen


Lakeland
Lake Worth
Leesburg
Moore Haven
Mt. Dora
Newberry
New Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Quincy
St. Cloud
Sebring
Starke
Tallahassee
Vero Beach
Wauchula
Williston


All-electric buildings are returning daily proof that they are better
investments than those restricted to the limitations of conventional
systems. The integration of lighting, heating, cooling and ventilating
into a combined electrical space conditioning system means that each
component is utilized to its maximum potential. Much of the area
required for conventional mechanical equipment can be returned to
the investor as added revenue-producing space.


Architects, engineers, builders and owners are SOLD on "Total
Electric" commercial construction. For your next project specify
ALL-ELECTRIC.


rr Florida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME

JUNE, 1966 17































Owner: Hillsborough County Board of Public Instruction. Architect: McLane-Ranon-Mclntosh-Bernardo. Designing Architect: Rick Rados, Tampa,
Florida. Structural Engineer Consultant: Sidney L. Barker, Tampa, Florida. General Contractor: Ellis Construction Company, Tampa, Florida.


Imagination and concrete


turned into 24 classrooms

$1058*
10 per sq. ft.
(including air conditioning)


Williams Elementary School, Tampa, dramatizes the ability
of Florida architects to create schools of both design indi-
viduality and low cost.
Here, the architect capitalized handsomely on the versa-
tility of concrete. The design, embodying a concrete frame,
prestressed roof and concrete masonry walls, features an
unusual high-accessibility arrangement of air-conditioning
and mechanical systems.
Each classroom complex stands as two structural frames,
divided by a floor-to-roof mechanical chase through the center
of the building, providing ready access from both ends.
Absence of beams at the chase top permits the air-condi-
tioning feeder duct to fit snugly against the stem of the pre-
stressed double tee. Chase walls in the classrooms are utilized
for recessed bookcases, storage and duct outlets and returns.
Increasingly, architects as well as school boards are looking
to concrete-not for its design potential alone, but its fire
safety, insulating and acoustic values and life-long economy.


*Calculated per A.I.A. document D-101


lildi


MECHANICAL CHASE DETAIL

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization of cement manufacturers to improve and
extend the uses of portland cement and concrete
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.ii .I iii.i
~:;CL~









EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY


TITLE OF POSITION:
Staff Architect


BEGINNING SALARY:
$8,280 per annum


REQUIREMENTS:
Degree in Architecture
and three years of experi-
ence without registration.


CONTACT:
Florida Board of Parks,
101 W. Gaines Street,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Phone 224-8102.


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


m music ws When you want to add flexible communications systems to your
nly h lf buildings, specify Muzak sound systems. Quality-engineered for
nly hl heavy-duty voice paging, public addressing, signalling, and emer-
the befit f agency warning. And Muzak's programmed background
the benefit music masks noise and complements design. You ben-
M uzak sound efit. So does your client. Four Florida franchisers can
M uzak souprovide expert assistance and detailed specifications
System s for complete Muzak sound
syste 1m s systems. Call today. Mo* by,













Jacksonville: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Miami Beach: Melody Inc., 1769 Bay Road


JUNE, 1966 1


Custom-Cast

Plaques




.


We are pleased to announce the appointment

of

MR. JOHN HEARD


area 912 246-0668


area 205 269-1572


as our
Florida Sales Representative


With his varied background in the brick business, he is
experienced, able and ready to assist you, the architect,
in the selection and use of brick on your jobs.



JENKINS BRICK COMPANY


Manufacturers

A complete line of unusual
Facing Brick and Hollow Building Tile

Phone 269-1572 P.O. Box 91
Montgomery 1, Alabama


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Alger-Sullivan Company
8


Behlen Manufacturing Company
20


Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Inside Back -.over
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
19
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
10-11
Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
17
Florida Portland Cement Division
12


Jenkins Brick Company
20


J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
19
Muzak Corporation
19


Portland Cement Association
18


Richard Plumer Business Interiors
7
Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co.
1


State of Florida Board of Parks
19


F. Graham Williams Co.
1I


I ___ __ ___ ___ __ __16_


198' WIDE,
NO COLUMNS, POSTS.
OR BEAMS WITH THIS

STRESSED-SKIN

ROOF SYSTEM


This is Europe's largest clear span
structure 198' wide, 527' long. It's
the Motta Candy Factory in Verona,
Italy.
The roof, fabricated in the United
States by Behlen Manufacturing Com-
pany, has a dead load of less than 10
lbs. per sq. ft. It is composed of par-
allel chords of bolted steel panels,
stressed to serve as load-carrying
members, and connected by a light-
weight strut system. The top chord
forms a weather-tight, maintenance-
free exterior. The bottom chord, shown
above, can simply be painted for an
attractive finished ceiling. Electrical
conduit, mechanicals and insulation


can be hidden from sight between the
chords.
This Behlen Dubl-Panl structural sys-
tem is rapidly gaining in favor with
architects and engineers around the
world. They like its simplicity. They
like the way it gives them practical
column-free construction and the way
it speeds erection with its bolt-together
construction.
Phone or write us today for a complete
technical manual.
Lybro Southern Sales Company
Route 5. Box 1099 Lakeland, Florida
Behlen Roof Systems & Load-Bearing Curtain Walls
are further detailed in Sweets 2b/Be and Sa/Be.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


: 1 .: -'!' !..I ~ t !; , c.
i



































When the doctor orders light...


Cat standby engines
Nothing is more important to a hospital than
light or electrical power. Where would they
be without it? In the dark, like everyone else.
Standing by at Miami's Jackson Memorial
Hospital are four Caterpillar D397 diesel elec-
tric sets. In the event of commercial power
failure, these engines are started and take
their assigned load.
Most other major medical centers in Florida


fill the prescription.
also rely on Caterpillar engines for standby
power when outside power fails. They can't
chance a power failure that's why they use
Caterpillar engines when needed most.
Emergency power is a must at hospitals,
and is important in most other buildings, too.
Don't wait until you're in the dark. Do what the
doctor orders and call for standby power. Get
the information from your Caterpillar dealer.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.


~L -l-c~-~a~lRmar~'O*na~~~--aPll.li-~


1q, II I C 1 11 1 113




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
3730 S. W. 8th Street
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.
John L. R. Grani, AIA
College of Architecture & Fine Arts
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. 1NC





"FOCUS: COMMUNITY" 52nd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT OF TH
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