• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The president's message
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Meet Jack Peeples
 Focus: Community - 52nd annual...
 Viewpoint
 Douglas village
 The gallerie of building produ...
 Re-examinations amendment Florida...
 Advertising
 Law and the building official
 The new Ft. Lauderdale city...
 The small office and urban...
 Let's be heard!
 Advertising
 Advertisers' index
 Seminar on design of medical...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00143
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: May 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00143
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The president's message
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Meet Jack Peeples
        Page 4
    Focus: Community - 52nd annual FAAIA meeting
        Page 5
    Viewpoint
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Douglas village
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The gallerie of building products
        Page 17
    Re-examinations amendment Florida state board of architecture
        Page 18
    Advertising
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Law and the building official
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The new Ft. Lauderdale city hall
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The small office and urban design
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Let's be heard!
        Page 32
    Advertising
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Advertisers' index
        Page 37
    Seminar on design of medical facilities
        Page 38
    Back Cover
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














Preservation and Conservation


As Florida develops a more
sophisticated system of renewal
of its physical environment, the
architecture of the past must
stand a test of its historic signi-
ficance. As the population of this
state doubles and redoubles, the
scenic beauty must verify its ne-
cessity as an amenity. We are
developing and redeveloping
lands at a race-car-speed, trans-
ported by the bulldozer which is
wiping out the full length of its
blade and always scaring at the
edges. A constructive future for
preservation and conservation
must be developed if we are to
stop the exploiting of our heri-
tages.
Activity for preservation and
conservation has increased in
this state at an unprecedented
rate during the years since the
second World War. Previous to
this time, historic parks and mu-
seums carried the burden of pro-
tecting significant achievements
associated with important events
or people. Those buildings rep-
resenting the best of our past,
as exemplifying our architectural
achievements, were rarely given
attention unless their current use
was productive.
Except for a few tourist at-
tractions with questionable cre-
dence, private enterprise has not
been an active method of preser-
vation or conservation.
The first records of preserva-
tion in the United States date
to 1850 when New York State
acquired General Washington's
headquarters at Newburgh. The
most significant single preserva-
tion project yet undertaken has
been Colonial Williamsburg,
started about 1928. This restora-
tion is still in progress and its
number of visitors now exceeds
one million persons a year. This
project demonstrates how much


we could lose by failing to recog-
nize the historic and aesthetic
significance of fine buildings in
time to preserve them.
The Historic Sites Act of Con-
gress in 1935 declared preserva-
tion of historic property a na-
tional policy. In 1933, the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects and
the Library of Congress conduct-
ed the Historic American Build-
ings Inventory-Survey, naming
6400 buildings of historic signi-
ficance. Acceleration of preserva-
tion activity and a great broad-
ening of its range commenced
with the founding of the Nation-
al Trust for Historic Preserva-
tion. The Trust has published
objective criteria for evaluating
preservation projects as to his-
torical and cultural significance,


JAMES DEEN, AIA

THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


suitability and integrity, educa-
tional value, costs and adminis-
trative responsibility. They rec-
ognize that museums and resto-
rations alone cannot begin to
meet the needs and that ways to
preserve continued economic use-
fulness must be developed.
As Florida begins its renewal
and highways accelerate through
the land, concern must be given
to our historic buildings and nat-
ural resources. Once we relax this
concern, we lose all traces of our
past. The implementing of pres-
ervation and conservation activi-
ties must stay abreast of the rate
of destruction for highway and
renewal projects. The developers
of these programs haven't given
attention to these needs. The
philosophy has been that every-
thing new will better anything
old.
Programs for identifying areas
for preservation and conservation
rest with the architects, histori-
ans and others with qualified
knowledge. The activity from this
identity will bring forth neces-
sity of private and public protec-
tion from destruction Some
buildings may be appropriate to
adapt to uses other than mu-
seums. Still others will require
protection by laws governing
their use and appearance. Special
conditions for the use of emi-
nent domain and remission of
taxes may be necessary. Direct
economic assistance to owners of
the most significant properties
would assure immediate restora-
tion and continued preservation.

Man-made ugliness of roads
and cities may reflect our aes-
thetic illiteracy. But the preser-
vation and conservation move-
ment, which is part of our grow-
ing maturity and confidence in
matters cultural, may yet swing
the scales in our favor.



















OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South e James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
Mid-Florida John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Consultant
G. Wade Swicord / Architectural Photographer
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use ... Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations .... Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $.00. . McMurray Printers.
MAY, 1966


THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Inside Front Cover
-7
MEET JACK PEEPLES
Our Legislative Counsel

4
"FOCUS: COMMUNITY"
52nd Annual FAAIA Convention

5
VIEWPOINT

6.7
DOUGLAS VILLAGE
The Past, Present and thank Heaven Future
of An Historic Landmark

9-16

THE GALERIE OF BUILDING PRODUCTS

17
RE-EXAMINATIONS AMENDMENT
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE

18

"LAW and the BUILDING OFFICIAL"
by William T. Arnett, AIA

26

FORT LAUDERDALE CITY HALL

2849

SMALL OFFICE & URBAN DESIGN

30
LET'S BE HEARD
by Fotis N. Karousatos

32
ADVERTISERS' INDEX

37
SEMINAR ON DESIGN OF MEDICAL FACILITIES

38

FRONT COVER--A special salute to Douglas Village,
proof-positive that preservation does pay. A landmark once
again takes her rightful place in South Florida's story.

VOLUME 16 NUMBER 5 N 1966










































CREDITS: St.John Bosco Church, Chicago; Architect: Belli& Belli, Chicago; General Contractor: Chell
& Anderson, Inc., Chicago; Lathing and Plastering Contractor: William A. Duguid Company, Chicago


MARBLECRETE PLUS...


PORTLAND CEMENT


Marblecrete plus imagination ...
that's your formula for a distinc-
tive building. Study the outstand-
ing example shown here: the new
St. John Bosco Church in Chicago.

The vertically tapered panels of
the building's facade are of Mar-
blecrete. Colorado Milky Quartz
(#1 and #2 sizes) was gunned into


a "%'beddingcoat of Trinity White
Portland Cement. There are 84 of
these panels-each 18 feet tall. To
avoid joint lines, three crews of
two men each worked simultane-
ously-at three different levels.
The result is a uniform distribu-
tion of color and texture that en-
hances the entire architectural
effect.


A PRODUCT OF GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO. Offices: Chicago Dallas Houston Tampa Miami
Chattanooga Fort Wayne Kansas City, Kansas Fredonia, Kansas Oklahoma City Los Angeles
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







SFirst National Bank

SGoes All-Electric


LI


Design & Supervision JOHN L. VOLK & ASSOCIATES *
Construction WIGGS & MAALE CONST. CO., INC. *


In April, 1963, the First National Bank in Lake Worth, Florida, moved
Total Electric banking home.


Palm Beach, Florida
Palm Beach, Florida


into a modern-as-tomorrow,


Exterior of the building features a marble facade enhanced by louvers on all four sides. The north-
and south-facing louvers are stationary; those on the east and west are operated by the sun's rays.
An electric motor closes the moveable louvers on nights and weekends. "This is a very practical
feature," says President Roy E. Garnett.
Alachua Lakeland Inside, the lobby is illuminated by a total of 24,000 watts. It has two
Bartow Lake Worth
Blountstown Leesburg ceilings, the lower being a luminous ceiling with gold anodized finish
Bushnell Moore Haven which completely conceals all air-conditioning ducts. Air-conditioning
Chattahoochee Mt. Dora
Clewiston Newberry and heating are evenly distributed by an all-electric system.
Ft. Meade New Smyrna Beach
Ft. Pierce Ocala
Gainesville Orlando Other convenience features of this All-Electric structure include TV
Green Cove Springs Quincy
Havana St. Cloud communications systems for four of the outside teller windows; and
Homestead Sebring a pneumatic tube system throughout the bank.
Jacksonville Starke
Jacksonville Beach Tallahassee
Key West Vero Beach Architects, engineers, builders and owners are SOLD on "Total
Kissimmee Wauchula
Lake Helen Williston Electric" commercial construction. For your next project specify
ALL-ELECTRIC.

Fl dFlorida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME

MAY, 1966 3








Peeples Appointed


FAAIA Legislative Counsel


Photo- Slade's Studio
L. GRANT (JACK) PEEPLES


L. Grant (Jack) Peeples has been
appointed legislative counsel for the
Florida Association of the AIA. His
appointment was announced by Presi-
dent James Deen, effective March 1.
A partner in the Tallahassee firm
of Fokes, Peeples & McClure, Jack
was reared in Miami. He graduated
from Miami Edison High School and
entered the University of Florida in
1948. Jack enlisted in the U. S. Army
in 1950 and received a commission as
a Second Lieutenant in the Airborne
Infantry. He served in the Korean
War as a Rifle Company Command-
er and earned the Purple Heart,
Combat Infantryman's Award and
the Bronze Star. After release from
active duty in 1953, he returned to
the University of Florida and gradu-


ated from the University of Florida
College of Law in February of 1958.
While attending the University, he
served as president of Phi Delta Phi,
Legal Fraternity; was a member of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Social Frater-
nity, and was the author of the U. of
F. law review article entitled "Stock
Transfer Restrictions in Closely Held
Corporations."
Upon graduation from law school,
our new counsel practiced law in
Tallahassee, Florida until appointed
Legislative Counsel to Governor
LeRoy Collins during the 1959 ses-
sion of the legislature. At the end
of that session, he was appointed
State Beverage Director and served
until January of 1961.


four good In the design stages of your next buildings, specify Muzak* sound
systems; scientifically programmed background music by Muzak and re-
reasons liable, quality-engineered equipment. 1. Local service and technical as-
to sspec distance. 2. Tailor-made systems for programmed background music
to spe ify by Muzak and public addressing. 3. Muzak sound systems with music
M uzak k by Muzak become acoustical problem-solvers in open and noisy areas.
4. Thirty years of experience. Music by Muzak is designed to extend
y t ma welcome. Muzak equip- -. .
sound system s ment assures that it does. 7mziy/ /












Jacksonville: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Miami Beach: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







52nd ANNUAL FAAIA MEETING


CONVENTION-ally Speaking /
The FAAIA Convention Committee
- composed of J. Arthur Wohlberg,
chairman; Donald I. Singer, Robert
J. Boerma, Henry A. Riccio, and Hil-
liard T. Smith has announced the
theme of the 52nd Annual Conven-
tion and Building Products Exhibit
to be held October 5-8 at the Deau-
ville Hotel, Miami Beach.
The theme is FOCUS: COM-
MUNITY.
An architect is many men. He is a
man of the arts. Because of his artis-
tic skills and vital awareness, he is a
man most important to his commun-
ity. It is the duty of an architect to
focus his attention on the pulse of
that community its urban plan-
ning, educatioanl opportunities, good
government. It is the responsibility
of the architect to be involved, to
express himself to lead the way -
to see creative ideas become part of
major community decisions.
The overall theme sessions, in three
parts, will explore the areas of urban
planning, education and government


- and seek to relate them to the
architect and his responsibility to pro-
vide proper leadership to the com-
munity. The Convention Committee
is presently negotiating for top speak-
ers, nationally-known, who will offer
challenges to the architects and dem-
onstrate positive results that can be
obtained in our theme areas.
Program features will include busi-
ness and professional sessions; a gala
party sponsored by the Host Chapter,
Florida South; the 3rd Annual Crafts-
man Dinner; the Annual Banquet; as
well as an interesting Ladies' Pro-
gram. Scheduled for the Exhibit Area
will be two buffet luncheons, refresh-
ments and awarding of special prizes.
The Building Products Exhibit
Area layout has been prepared with
design in mind. You will note that
straight aisles and the usual turnpike
booths have been eliminated, and we
have added a Social Lounge. Approxi-
mately 40% of the available exhibit
space has already been reserved since
the first announcement 3 weeks ago.
For the first time in the history of


the FAAIA, an Exhibitors Committee
was organized and has already held a
meeting. The members of this com-
mittee are: Jack Torbett, Concrete
Products Inc.; George Haas, Formica
Corp.; Phyllis L. Finney, Houdaille-
Duval-Wright Co.; Paul W. Christie,
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co.; Allen
Kern, Mosaic Tile Co.; J. Velma
Lamb, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.;
Edmund Burke, Reflectal-Borg-War-
ner Corp.; Carl C. Caskadon, United
States Steel Corp.; C. S. Breslauer,
Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace &
Co.; and Leonard Waldman, Miami
Window Corp.
This committee approved the new
concept of the exhibit layout and re-
quested that specific exhibit hours
be established which would not be in
conflict with Convention sessions.
Advance reservations, architectural
exhibit entry forms, room reservation
requests and other preliminary infor-
mation will be mailed out during
June. Manufacturers who have not re-
ceived the Exhibit Prospectus may do
so by contacting the FAAIA office.


MAY, 1,966










VI


E


by Philip H. Hiss
(This article is reprinted from the St.
etersburg Times, November 14, 1965.
The author is a former member of the
Sarasota School Board and President-Elect
of the Florida Arts Council.)
How fares Florida in the architec-
tural rat race? Poorly, I fear. Certainly
the state has not lived up to its prom-
ise of the early 1950's. Since Florida
is the fastest growing state of the
United States, tremendous opportuni-
ties existed to provide better buildings
and a better environment for millions
of people. This fact made the state an
architectural frontier and talented
practitioners flocked to the state fol-
lowing World War II. Unfortunately,
other architects not so talented were
equally attracted by the promise of
easy money. The battle is not yet
over, but many of the preliminary
skirmishes already have been lost.
The United States generally is con-
ceded to lead the world today in
architectural design (though a minor-
ity of English dissenters insist that we
are overrated). American architects
and American-trained architects have
designed many of the major buildings
in Europe, Asia and Africa. Unfortun-
ately opportunities sometimes exist
abroad to do better work than at
home for the reason that Americans
generally have not valued esthetics as
highly as they have "practical" consid-
erations. I have put the word "prac-
tical" in quotation marks because I
think we too often have out-smarted
ourselves by thinking we were being
practical merely because we ignored
esthetics. Unfortunately, the best
work provides very little insight into
the caliber of our total environment.
The answer to the problem is ex-
tremely complex. It is sufficient to say
here that all blame (or credit) should
not be assigned to city planners, archi-
tects, or landscape architects; the
client is equally important in the de-
sign equation. It is possible to paint or
play the piano though starving in a
garret, but it is NOT possible to erect
a building, reconstruct a city or land-
scape an area, without a patron. We
have too few patrons of good design
in Florida.
Who are the patrons of architec-
ture and planing today? Government
and business. Government federal,
state, county and city too often
bases its decisions on political rather
6


WP



than professional considerations. This
has been particularly true of Florida
where a rural bloc has dominated the
State Legislature and where county
and city governments often have re-
mained in the hands of an entrenched
bureaucracy because of apathy on the
part of new residents. The best de-
signers are seldom considered for jobs
most rewarding artistically and finan-
cially, and on the few occasions when
they have been appointed, they more
often than not have been harassed by
the bureaucracy and otherwise pre-
vented from doing their best work.
In other states, the phenomenal
growth of state universities has pro-
vided opportunities for city planning
and architectural design. The most
outstanding examples today are Cali-
fornia and New York, which have
offered their most gifted designers
unparalleled opportunities to p r o v e
their worth on billion dollar building
programs. The same thing is true to a
lesser degree in some of the Midwest-
ern states. Not so Florida.
One of the biggest environmental
design problems in any state is the
highway program, and in this Florida
has not progressed so far in the wrong
direction as California probably be-
cause it has not built that many roads.
In California the road department
continues to wield almost unlimited
power to destroy both cities and stands
of virgin redwoods. We would do well
to make sure this does not happen
here. Furthermore, although Florida
has been developed almost entirely
since the advent of the automobile,
there is nothing to suggest in the plan-
ning of most of its cities and towns
that this is the case.
House design probably is the most
difficult and least financially reward-
ing job an architect can undertake,
which probably explains why it has
been largely abandoned by the pro-
fession; but it has a disproportionate
impact on the environment. The very
least architects can do is to come to
some sort of understanding with
builders so that the latter can profit
by professional help. Yet I greatly fear
that demand for better design will
have to come from the client, other-
wise builders will have very little in-
centive to improve the design of their
homes or the layout of their subdi-
visions.
Ultimately, better environment de-


INT



pends on better education in the arts.
Without it we will have few knowl-
edgeable clients for homes, offices,
factories, stores, motels, hospitals or
churches.
The design of chain stores, motels
and often offices and factories, has
become a national rather than a state
problem. Nevertheless, the quality of
design in Florida frequently is inferior
to the best elsewhere--though it
certainly is no worse than much that
is being done. There is scarcely a
decent shopping center or a chain
store in the state. The design of gas
stations, of course, is a national scan-
dal. And very little has been done to
neutralize the acquisitive instincts of
the outdoor advertising people. Yet
these are areas where a great deal
could be accomplished by relatively
few people.
One of the few bright spots has
been construction of a number of
headquarters buildings for life insur-
ance companies in the Jacksonville
area.
Talent always will seek its greatest
expression in the areas where such
expression is appreciated and encour-
aged. The best designers continue to
flock to California and New York,
whereas in the past few years Florida
has lost some of its most creative
people and is about to lose more. The
reasons for this exodus are varied and
complex, but the overriding one is
that Sarasota no longer represents
architectural opportunity.
...I do not mean to suggest that there
are not still talented designers at work
in Florida, merely that some of our
brightest luminaries have left that
we have driven out people who at very
least would have liked to have retained
a foothold here.
The best work that has been done
in recent years a park here, a bank
there, a subdivision house, a college
building usually has been the prod-
uct of extreme effort on the part of
an individual architect to educate an
individual client. I suggest that those
of us who are in a position to in-
fluence our environm ent do our
homework a little better, that we
realize fully that if we default on this
obligation to become better clients,
we most likely will destroy the very
things that attracted us to Florida in
the first place.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






This is the first presentation in a new series which will be an
important part of The Florida Architect. We plan to run articles and
features of interest to architects as often as possible. We feel
this is a bold step toward seeking a better 'climate' for the profession
in which to fulfill its objectives. What is said in these articles
is not necessarily the opinion of the editorial staff of this publication,
but each article will be written by respected, responsible people.
We feel that their comments and opinions whether plaudits
or criticism will help architecture to flourish. Your comments
and reactions are invited in "letters to the editor."


by Frederic Sherman
(The author is a well-known writer and
serves on the Editorial Board of the Mi-
ami Herald. A well-versed layman in the
field of architecture, he has long been
interested in and worked for advancement
of the profession.)

One of those sentimental ballads of
years past mourned over the fact that
"you always hurt the one you love."
Truth is that Philip Hiss of Sara-
sota admires architects. The trouble
is that he is disappointed that the
architects of the state are not better
than they are, or at least they don't
do as well as Mr. Hiss thinks they
should.
He is like the father who just knows
his son could make the football team
and/or honor roll if only he would
try harder.
Yet, in the article written by Mr.
Hiss for the St. Petersburg Times,
which is reprinted here as a compan-
ion to this one, it would be possible
to substitute California, Idaho, Louisi-
ana or any other state in the opening
sentence, "How fares Florida in the
architectural rat race?" And the
answer from many professional critics
and a good percentage of laymen
would be the same, "Poorly, I fear."
Isn't it a safe assumption that those
who mourn the most about the state
of architecture or any other profession
are those who have led themselves to
expect too much? There are members
of the bar who should not have been
allowed out of law school. Are all
lawyers considered eligible for the
judiciary?
The doctors bury their mistakes.
The best of the architects can only
paint theirs a neutral color. The worst
of the architects don't even know
they have cluttered up another piece
of real estate.
Here we come to the taproot of the
trouble in Florida. Mr. Hiss acknowl-
edges that a rural-minded Legislature
and a cracker viewpoint in courthouse
and city halls have combined to close
the door on the most talented within
the architectural profession.
MAY, 1966


The exceptions to this rule are few.
One of the outstanding exceptions
was contributed by Mr. Hiss when he
was a member of the school board in
Sarasota and simply demanded and
got his own way on the selection of
architects. In Miami, the level of
urban sophistication among school
board members rose to the point
where it was possible to root out a
piece of entrenched bureaucracy and
turn over the job of supervising school
design to a private firm of high pro-
fessional competence.
In both Sarasota and Miami, those
with new-found authority to select
the best of architectural talent did not
find that talent in short supply.
Certainly not all of the political
influences can be flushed out of the
good old American system, but in the
case of Miami today, there is better
school design because of the pressure
that builds up in the interaction be-
tween the commissioned architect and
his fellow who has the responsibility
to both the taxpaying public and the
profession.
If there is one great fault to
find with the architects of Florida,
it is not their lack of design talent.
It is instead their lack of real public
service. The architects have set them-
selves apart from the people. They
have been years at talking to each
other, telling themselves of their own
special talent for dealing with the
problems of man's environment.
And while the architects have been
talking to each other, the lawyers and
others politically oriented have just
about made a complete mess of Amer-
ica the Beautiful.
Urban renewal and other Federal
housing programs are to the point of
national scandal because the archi-
tects have ignored their responsibility.
Expressways have strangled the cities
they were supposed to save. The cor-
ruption of zoning boards continues
because the architects do not speak
out against what they know is wrong.
Is it possible that the noble profession
of the master builders suffers from


the same malignancy that forbids a
real estate man from speaking out be-
cause he might knock a fellow broker
out of a commission?
Is the profession of architecture in-
capable of self-criticism? It is certainly
possible and probable that another
journalist will complain in the print
of next month's issue that this article
on the state of Florida's architects is
poorly conceived, badly written and
rambles to an inconclusive ending.
But where is the criticism of the
countless public buildings throughout
Florida that are the product of thick
heads and political contribution? If
professional code prohibits such criti-
cism, then those architects of Florida
who want something better of their
state will have to start serving their
state by moving closer to the seat of
power.
It is a disgrace to the Florida South
chapter of the AIA that not a single
architect offered himself as a candi-
date for the reapportioned Legislature
that gives Dade County nine seats in
the Senate and 22 in the House. And
this despite the remarkable influence
that Earl Starnes has achieved as an
architect setting on the Dade County
Board of Commissioners.
What happened to the indignation
that swept the profession statewide
when the 1965 Legislature knocked
the single-family residence out from
under architectural supervision?
This then is the real indictment of
Florida's architects, not any measure
of their creative genius.
Philip Hiss would have the state
filled with airports that look like the
ones in St. Louis and Washington.
He wants college buildings like the
ones built at Yale and Wayne. He
wants office buildings like those in
Houston and San Francisco.
But it will never be until architects
get into the political arena and prove
to the voters that they have some-
thing better to offer than the lawyers
and political hacks who have done so
poorly with this state.






























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An organization to improve snd extend the uses of concrete, made possil by the financial support of most cement manufacturers in the United States and Canada.
8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












DOUGLAS


VILLAGE


MAY, 1966


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The year 1924 a great year
for men of vision.
Such a man was George Mer-
rick, who envisioned a sprawling
building of Mediterranean de-
sign which would be a civic and
cultural center and would be
a magnificent entrance to attract
visitors to "the world's most
beautiful city."
As the sun beamed benignly
upon South Florida's Gold
Coast, a fort-like structure began
to take shape. Developer-dream-
er George Merrick, creator of
Miami's Master Suburb, watch-
ed as La Puerta del Sol (Gate
of the Sun) became a living re-
ality . a "calling card" for
Coral Gables.
Newspaper ads of 1924 tout-
ed the million-dollar Douglas
Entrance as "the finest of all
Coral Gables' great gateways ...
its 10 acres of glorified architec-
ture in a picturesque Spanish
note. Stretching out in artistic
groupings, yet as one harmoni-
ous unit, apartment houses,
stores, homes, antique shops and
all the delightful scramble of the
minor Spanish town in its Old
World setting .."
Designed to create the feeling
of a village square, La Puerta
Del Sol featured a central plaza
250-feet in diameter built around
a striking tower 90 feet tall.
The tower served as water tank
for the ity of Coral Gables, com-
plete with belfry and town
clock. The main arch curved
proudly 40 feet high.
No one could deny the beauty
and magnetism of the old tiled
roofs, shaded terraces, quaint
balconies, shadowed galleries
and winding stairs. Men and
women admired the cloistered
walls and quiet rest-seats . .
children happily explored the
sunken gardens and inviting
archways.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















































































MAY, 1966

















The street-floor shops were
busy with the activity of the
creative people George Merrick
so loved artists, doctors, ar-
chitects, antique dealers. In the
apartments above, people with
the discerning good taste to
appreciate Puerta del Sol en-
joyed their lives set amidst
wood-burning fireplaces, high-
beamed ceilings, wrought iron
balconies, and stairways in un-
expected places.
A community library was set
up for all residents of Coral
Gables . the two-story-high
Great Hall resounded with the
voices and laughter of festivity
. and the third-floor Ballroom
was the site of Masonic meet-
ings and lavish dances.
Merrick called for investors
to buy the adjoining land
around his magnificent Puerta
del Sol . land "so inviting
that no one at all awake to such
a chance will care to pass it by."
La Puerta del Sol was part
of the very fibre of life in Coral
Gables.
They were idyllic years but
short.
The hurricane of 1926 arriv-
ed with all its blustery force,
followed by the devastating De-
precsion. George Merrick lost
his dream and Puerta del Sol
lost its luster. The property at
Douglas Road and Tamiami
Trail changed hands often
through the years of recession.
Even its romantic name bowed
to the conservative "Douglas
Entrance." Only a few tenants
remained loyal to Merrick's
dream and stayed on. The
laughter of past years was a hol-
low ache . the stream of life
coursed elsewhere . and the
beauty of Puerta del Sol faded
like an aging Southern Belle.


But some of the magic stub-
bomly clung to the building.
Through the years, tradition-
steeped residents of the area
would pause just a moment
to admire the still-stately
grandeur of the building, and
children still found their way to
the enchantment of the drab
archways and paths.
Generally, though, apathy was
the name of the game. The
pigeons claimed the tower room
at the top of the circular steel
stairway. And the years folded
slowly over La Puerta del Sol.
Then, sleeping feelings and
loyalties were awakened after
40 years with the rude news
that a firm had declared its in-
tention to buy the building and
tear it down to make way for a
supermarket! Gables historians
were indignant; former residents
shook their heads sadly; and
youngsters mourned the loss of
a friend. Fierce love and dedica-
tion for an old building were
aroused. But feelings seemed to
swirl around in circles no
course of action was to be taken,
until a group of architects dra-
matically appeared upon the
scene to provide the sorely need-
ed leadership.
It was architect James Deen
who led 60 of his colleagues -
architects, engineers, decorators
- in the attempt to uphold the
zoning regulations and thus save
the Douglas Entrance. They
fought not only to save a build-
ing but also to preserve a mon-
ument of historical heritage for
the people. People who loyally
remembered the structure in her
earlier days of glory and others
who never knew La Puerta del
Sol in her grandeur scanned the
papers daily for news of the
struggle to save her. Finally,
word came that the Planning


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















and Zoning Board had vetoed a
zoning variance requested for
the market. And in 1964, the
Coral Gables City Commission
failed to approve the appeal.
The new owners were warned,
however, that they must raise
the necessary funds or the build-
ing would have to be razed to
cut heavy land taxes. Thus, the
Douglas Village Corporation
was formed, headed by Mr.
Deen, and the purchase price
was met.
Like fair Belinda sntached
from the railroad tracks, La Pu-
erta del Sol was rescued in the
nick of time.
And now the Douglas Village
Corporation is already hard at
work on the herculean task of
restoring the Entrance. Mer-
rick's dream of a cultural and
civic center will yet be realized.
Eventually, half-a-million dol-
lars will be spent on improve-
ments and expansion. But the
atmosphere will not be altered
. not a single stone will be
modernized. Everything will be
restored, repaired and lovingly
cared for. Regretfully, only the
pigeons must go, for their maj-
estic Grand Ballroom home will
be developed into the Douglas
Village Club -a social and busi-
ness center for members of the
construction industry.
New tenants are already
breathing new life into the old
building art studios, archi-
tectural firms, antique shops, a
cabaret theatre. All 27 apart-
ments are occupied. The Great-
er Miami Philharmonic Orches-
tra is headquartered there -
with plans to hold open-air con-
certs in the future under the
imposing Douglas arch and on
the Douglas Village green. So-
cial and business groups are
planning to hold their events in
the long-vacant Great Hall. The
Grand Ballroom, 80 feet long,
will be freshly refurbished and
air-conditioned for social and
after-the-theatre functions.

MAY, 1966 13





















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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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The ground floor of the East
Wing has already been estab-
lished as an exciting Galerie of
Building Products. Because of
its historical and architectural
significance, its charming at-
mosphere, its ideal location, and
its superb facilities, the building
is a perfect site for this much-
needed center.
Already 50 of the first 100
exhibit spaces have been reserv-
ed by the nation's best-known
manufacturers, suppliers and
distributors an interesting,
informative, permanent exhibit
of the latest products and devel-
opments for South Florida's
$600-million building construc-
tion industry.
Considerable international in-
terest has already been express-
ed because so many of the archi-
tects and engineers in the area
direct countless foreign projects
each year. Under the expert di-
rection of Howard J. Doehla,
executive director of the Doug-
las Village Corporation, the
Galerie of Building Products
will be an indispensable aid for
all those concerned with the
arts and crafts of buildings.
It is also being supplemented
by a unique Information Cen-
ter.This Center will be a fully-
stocked library of architectural
and building engineering texts,
periodicals, technical data and
catalogues. Thus, the architect,
for example, seeking informa-
tion regarding fireplaces in Flor-
ida, need only call the Center
to get all the data he wants on
this or any one of a thousand
other building details!
The sun shine brightly again
upon the Douglas Village. The
building is filled with life and
laughter. She is once again pam-
pered with loving care and
even if the pigeons are gone,
old dreams have come home to
roost. Forty-two Rip Van
Winkle years later, the historic
landmark has awakened. George
Merrick would be proud.
The year 1966 a great year
for men of vision.
MAY, 1966









Photographs by Richard Shield, Kurt Waldmann, and City of Coral Gables.


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16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














Exhibitors in Douglas Village's



Galerie of Building Products


ACME KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
808 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami, Fla. 33131
ALLIED STEEL PRODUCTS
7800 NW 37 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
ALUMINUM MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRIES, INC.
271 East 10th Avenue
Hialeah, Fla.
AMERICAN COATING CO., INC.
355 NW 171 Street
Miami, Fla.
AMERICAN KITCHENS
1553 Sunset Drive, Suite D
Coral Gables, Fla.
ARCHITECTURAL GLASS
PRODUCTS INC.
552 NW 5 Street
Miami, Fla.
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY
BY P. R. BROMER
2927 Flamingo Drive
Miami Beach, Fla.
CEMENT INTERNATIONAL CORP.
1001 East 52 Street
Hialeah, Fla.
CERTIFIED PLUMBER OF SO. FLA.
2526 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Fla.
CHAMPION MANUFACTURING CO.
450 West 28 Street
Hialeah, Fla.
CUSTOMWOOD MANUFACTUR-
ING CO.
3620 High Street, NE
Albuquerque, New Mexico
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSN.
101 East Flagler Street
Miami, Fla.
DAVIS NURSERY & LANDSCAPING
CO.
6767 SW 67 Avenue
South Miami, Fla.
DESIGNERS FLOORING CO.
6812 SW 81 Street
South Miami, Florida
DEVOE & RAYNOLDS CO., INC.
2127 No. Miami Avenue
Miami, Fla.
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
PO Box 48-5, International Airport
Branch
Miami, Fla.
MAY, 1966


DUROMATIC WATER HEATER
1000 East 17 Street
Hialeah, Fla.
DWOSKIN, INC.
4190 NW Second Avenue
Miami, Fla.
ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS,
INC.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Fla.
FARREY'S WAREHOUSE
HARDWARE CO.
PO Box 38-1597
Miami, Fla. 33138
FLORIDA GLASS & MIRROR CO.
INC.
1601 NW 7 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
PO Box 3311
Miami, Fla.
GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORP.
3201 NW 110th St.
Miami, Fla. 33168
W. R. GRACE & CO.
PO Box 67
Boca Raton, Fla.
HORST GUNTHER OFFICE
FURNITURE
4111 No. Miami Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HAMILTON TURF EQUIPMENT CO.
7541 NE Third Place
Miami, Fla.
HURRICANE AWNING SHUTTER
CO.
1001 East 24 Street
Hialeah, Fla.
MIAMI TILE & TERRAZZO, INC.
6454 NE 4 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
MILLER INDUSTRIES, INC.
16295 NW 13 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
MIMS & THOMAS
MANUFACTURING CO. INC.
3535 NW 50 Street
Miami, Fla.
NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY
545 West Flagler Street
Miami, Fla. 33130
NESBITT & CO. (PANELFOLD)
669 NW 90 Street
Miami, Fla.
PALM BEACH CLAY TILE CO.
PO Box 367
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134


RICHARD PLUMER BUSINESS
INTERIORS
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Fla.
PREMIX PRODUCTS, INC.
300 NE 72 Street
Miami, Fla.
ROWELL-VAN ATTA, INC.
273 E. Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
JOHN S. RYAN, MANUFACTURERS
AGENT
10918 NW 7 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
SEABROOK WALLPAPERS
4330 NE Second Avenue
Miami, Fla.
SOUTHERN BELL TEL. & TEL.
PO Box 1471
Miami, Fla.
STRESSCON INTERNATIONAL,
INC.
1000 NW 57 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
TRULY NOLEN, INC.
600 NW 7 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
3675 NW 62 Street
Miami, Fla.
UNIVERSITY NATIONAL BANK
PO Box 130
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
VAN ATTEN & McKELVY CORP.
4601 LeJeune Road
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
WALTON BUILDING PRODUCTS,
INC.
4237 Aurora
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
WALTON WHOLESALE CORP.
7110 NE 4 Court
Miami, Fla. 33138
WINDOWMASTER CORP.
6600 NW 32 Avenue
Miami, Fla.
KURT WALDMANN
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY
1905 NW 115 Street
Miami, Fla.
YALE OGRON MANUFACTURING
CO.
671 West 18 Street
Hialeah, Fla.


.II -












AMENDMENT


(The State Board of Architecture has
clarified the Re-Examination rule to
parallel the National Council of Arch-
itectural Registration Boards recom-
mendations.)
40-2.01(5) Junior examination "A",
general information
(5) Re-Examination:
Each applicant for registration by
taking the Junior (written) exami-
nation, shall have a maximum of
three years from the date he first
takes his examination, within which
he must successfully pass all of the
written examinations required for
registration; provided, such appli-
cant shall not be permitted to take
parts of such examinations more
than five times within said three
year period; and provided further,
if such applicant shall re-take all


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written examinations which he has
not yet passed and unless all of
such written examinations are taken
at each re-examination, no credit
shall be given the applicant for any
examination successfully passed at
that time.
Should any applicant for registra-
tion be unsuccessful in passing all
parts of the written examinations
within said three year period, such
applicant shall not be permitted to
take any other written examinations
under his pending application.
And such applicant who has not
successfully completed his examina-
tions within said three year period
shall not be eligible to file or be
permitted to file a new application
for registration by examination
within one year thereafter.


THE DESIGN BUILDING















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4111 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33127


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INVITES YOU TO ITS NEW AND

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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MAYor T966 is19s m-i t l -~







PERSPECTIVE


Discussing professional office management are, left to right, Francis Telesca, AIA, Greenleaf-Telesc, Miami; Harold W. Johnson,
of Russell Raine & Associates, Inc., Winter Park; nationally recognized management consultant, D'Osey Hurt, New York; and
Robert L Craine, Crain & Crouse, Inc., Miami, president of the Consulting Engineers Council of Florida.


OFFICE MANAGEMENT WAS TOPIC


"When economic conditions are favorable as they are
now in Florida, professional firms and small businesses all
too often fail to realize their full potential," one of the
nation's foremost management consultants believes.
"Proprietors or principals do not properly plan, budget
and control," says D'Orsey Hurst, who heads the New
York management firm that bears his name.
He offered his views and some suggestions to the
Consultinf Engineers Council of Florida at its February


meeting in Orlando. Joining him in exploring office man-
agement was a panel of Florida architects and consulting
engineers: Robert L. Crain, Crain & Crouse, Inc., Miami,
president of the Consulting Engineers Council of Florida;
Robert Jaffer, Robert P. Jaffer, Inc., Tampa; John A.
Bedingfield, Bedingfield & Associates, Inc., Tampa; Fran-
cis Telesca, AIA, Greenleaf-Telesca, Miami; and the guest
speaker. The all-day session was a part of CEC's continu-
ing series of "Programs for Profit".


YOU'LL HEAR THEM IN DENVER


John Kenneth Galbraith, distinguished economist and
social philosopher, will be the keynote speaker at the 98th
annual convention of The American Institute of Architects
in Denver.
Announcement that the Harvard University professor
would head the inaugural ceremonies on June 27 was
made by Institute President Morris Ketchum, Jr. FAIA.
He also disclosed the names of speakers who will address


the convention's first two theme seminars.
Isidor I. Rabi, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics,
will address the convention on "Technology" at the first
theme seminar on Tuesday, June 28. The seminar on
"Environment" two days later will be addressed by Robert
C. Wood, Under Secretary of the Department of Housing
and Urban Development.


CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS


Dr. Nathan M. Pusey, president of Harvard University,
has been selected to deliver the second annual Purves
Memorial Lecture at the annual convention of The
American Institute of Architects.
The Purves Memorial Lecture, inaugurated last year by
Lewis Mumford and named after the late executive di-
rector of the AIA, will be delivered Wednesday, June 29,
at the Air Force Academy, where the convention will
spend the entire day.
Theme of the 1966 convention is "Technology, En-
vironment and Man," designed to provide a broad ap-
proach to practice of interest to all architects, regardless
of the size of their firms. There will be a major theme
session on each of the three aspects of the convention title


and a series of 10 workshops devoted to specific aspects
of contemporary practice.
Dr. Pusey, who became president of Harvard, his alma
mater, in 1953 after having served nine years as president
of Lawrence College in Wisconsin, heads a faculty of
more than 5,000 scholars teaching and doing research in
every major field of learning.
Other AIA convention highlights include the annual
producers' exhibit opening Sunday, June 26; the AIA
president's reception at picturesque and historical Central
City; professional exhibitions and a wide variety of
Colorado Chapter events. Convention headquarters will be
the Denver Hilton Hotel.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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Georgia-Pacific Style IV paneling is available in quarter sliced Oak and in quarter sliced American
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r Honor

; Award


Federal
Office
Building
'ampa, Florida


At the 1965 FAA Convention, a panel of outstanding architectural design experts
awarded an Honor Award-tops in competition-to the new Federal Office Building
in Tampa, Florida.
Consisting of seven stories and a penthouse, the building is of reinforced concrete
construction. It utilizes Solite lightweight structural concrete in floors, roofdecks and
columns. Use of lightweight construction reduced dead load and effected substantial
savings in time and materials. In addition, Solite lightweight masonry units, left exposed
for interior walls, greatly contribute to the quiet and comfort of the building.
This is indeed another outstanding example of the interaction of architectural in-
genuity with the latest construction materials and techniques. There can be no higher
honor than recognition by a jury of America's leading architects.

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Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete






Cut yourself
a bigger slice of
Profit Pie...


I0


cook electrically!


24 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














Throughout Florida, flameless electric cooking equipment is rapidly
replacing outmoded flame-type for all phases of food preparation.

Operators appreciate its long life, low operating costs and minimum
maintenance needs.

Positive heat controls hold temperature at any selected level...better,
tastier foods.

m High-speed elements mean faster preheating and cooking...better
peak service, more satisfied customers.

m Fully automatic cooking...kitchen staff is free for more important
duties than pot-watching and flame adjusting.

Flameless...no soot, smoke or combustion products...saves on wash-
up of kitchen utensils, keeps a cleaner kitchen with less frequent painting
... and equipment can be placed anywhere.

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There's No Match for Flameless Electric I


MAY, 1966







Law and The Building Official
By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA


Remarks at a panel discussion be-
fore the Fourteenth Annual Course of
the Building Officials Association of
Florida, Ramada Inn, Gainesville,
Florida February 28, 1966.
As an architect, I suggest that for
the past hundred years our cities have
been shaped largely by avarice, acci-
dent, and apathy. Far from being con-
centrations of the best in our civiliza-
tion, our cities are a travesty on the
productive genius and creative energy
of America.
Strangled by congestion, riddled by
decay, scarred by ugliness, their strain-
ed finances, tangled jurisdictions, and
deplorable living conditions provide
mounting evidence of the fact that
our local governments are often pretty
bad examples of democracy in action.
City building is guided by the max-
imum quantity and minimum quality
allowed by law. As an architect, I
suggest that it is an obligation of the
people to determine the standards
they consider appropriate for their
city, and to translate these standards
into effective rules and regulations.
... To milk the public may be an in-
alienable right, but I submit that it is
neither right nor necessary for gov-
ernment to subsidize the dairy.
Our Crazy-Quilt Regulation
The construction industry in Flor-
ida is plagued by a number of prob-
lems, not the least of which is the
hodgepodge of laws and regulations
which govern or fail to govern -
the activities of its various compon-
ents.
Take the matter of building codes.
Does it make any sense to regulate a
dumbwaiter, but fail to regulate the
entire building in which the dumb-
waiter is placed?
Take the matter of planning and
zoning. Does it make any sense that
Florida is one of three states without
any general planning enabling legis-
lation:
Or take the matter of professional
licensing. Does it make any sense that
when the Florida Supreme Court up-
holds a professional licensing act, a
non-professional group should then
seek to change the law to suit their
own professional convenience?
Multiplicity of Codes
The Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects has
recently completed a comprehensive
study of building codes in Florida.
The study discloses the unfortunate
fact that 49 of Florida's 67 counties
have no building code whatsoever.


Fourteen counties use the Southern
Standard Code, three the South Flor-
ida Code, and one the National Code.
The study reveals another unfortu-
nate situation in Florida. In our eight
largest cities, three different building
codes are in use. And in two of these
cities, the surrounding county-where
much new development is taking plare
-had no building code at all.
Florida architects, whose practice
generally extends over a reasonably
large area, have on the one hand
either no building code to guide them,
or on the other no less than three
different local codes. I suggest that it
would be to the advantage of build-
ing owners, and to other segments of
the construction industry, if Florida
had one all-inclusive building code.
Furthermore, I suggest that we
ought to explore the possibility of
using competent design professionals
in nearby cities to examine project
drawings on a contract basis, rather
than attempt to provide a well-paid
staff of competent building officials
in each county and town.
Lack of Enabling Legislation
The Florida Association of the AIA
is seeking enactment at the earliest
possible time of appropriate enabling
legislation for urban development,
zoning, subdivision regulation, and
related subjects. Florida cities and
counties have long needed proper
tools to improve their physical en-
vironment.
Who is an Architect?
Is an architect a person who en-
gages "in the planning or design . .
of buildings for others" or is he some-
thing else? The answer depends on
whether or not you happen to live
in Florida.
For more than 50 years, this state
has had an orderly procedure, through
Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes,
for evaluating the qualifications of
those engaged in the practice of archi-
tecture.
But the 1965 Florida Legislature
was persuaded to amend Chapter 467
over the objections of the Florida As-
sociation of the AIA. Section 467.09,
as amended, now exempts all one- and
two-family residences from regulation
under the state laws regulating the
practice of architecture ...
Our Explosive Growth
President Lyndon Johnson reminds
us that in the remainder of this cen-
tury-in less than forty years-urban
population will double, city land will
double, and we will have to build in
our cities as much as all that we have


built since the first Colonists arrived
on our shores. It is as if we had 40
years to rebuild the entire United
States.
The question is not whether we
will build. It is rather how well we do
it. We can either create a new nation
of high purpose, efficiency, and beau-
ty, or we can erect the most chaotic.
and waseful urban civilization which
man's capacity for folly can devise.
The choice is up to this generation
of Americans.
Improving our Regulatory Tools
Florida architects, deeply concern-
ed about those things which control
and regulate their task of building a
better human environment, are at
work through the Florida Association
of the AIA to improve the regulatory
tools of government. Will we have
the gumption in Florida to provide
the necessary framework of regulatory
acts to safeguard public health, safe-
ty, and welfare with respect to our
physical environment?
Will we have wit enough to bring
some order into our chaotic building
code situation? Will we at long
last have the courage to pass state-
wide planning enabling legislation, so
that cities and counties may have the
necessary tools to improve human en-
vironment? Will we have sense
enough to provide an orderly pro-
cedure for evaluating the qualifica-
tions of all those who engage in the
planning or design of buildings for
others, instead of just some of those
so engaged?
Our Foremost Regulator
As professionals deeply involved in
the making and remaking of cities,
architects are determined that in our
maze of urban complexity we shall not
lose sight of what should be foremost
among the regulators the fulfill-
ment of human aspirations and pur-
pose in our surroundings.
. . How can I summarize all this?
Two ancient Creeks, caught up in the
first struggle of free men to build
worthy cities within the framework of
democratic government, summarized
it many centuries ago.
One said that "the problem of
human society is to combine that
degree of liberty without which law
is tyranny, with that degree of law
without which liberty is license".
And the other, with equal wisdom,
reminds us that "not houses finely
roofed or the stones of walls well-
builded . make the city, but men
able to use their opportunity".
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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MAY, 1966











Winner of the competition to select an architect for the new Fort Lauderdale City Hall is William Par-
rish Plumb, AIA! The entry submitted by Mr. Plumb; Paul Robin John, A1A; and Edward D. Stone Jr.,
Landscape Architect, was unanimously chosen by this top-flight jury: Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA, Miami;
Pietro Belluscho, FAIA, Boston; Mark G. Hampton, AIA, Tampa; Robert H. Bubier. Fort Lauderdale City
Manager; and E. L. Patterson, City Engineer, Fort Lauderdale. Professional advisor was James M. Hartley,
AIA, Hollywood, Florida.
Jury comments included: "The plan is excellent from any point of view... Circulation and relationship
of the functions are logical and generous... the general character of the building seems to be in harmony
with the concept of a City Hall."
The architects' comments were: "Rather than a self-conscious monumental form, we felt that the human
scale should be significant in developing the spatial relationships, the character of the site, and the selection
of materials... at the same time maintaining the dignity necessary to a civic building which hopefully will
become the nucleus of a revitalized downtown neighborhood."


winning


design:


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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J. Bailey


Mae W m


new ft. lauderdale city hall


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MAY, 1966


FIVE VIEWS of the prize-winning
design: exterior perspectives, site plan,
floor plan and the east elevation.
"The interplay of the landscaped
courts and passageways is very well
done," the jury commented.
Base budget is $1.6 million for
80,000 square feet.


,1 L~
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~.
c~;i






Iateatati Eiaea hased (tws Semuena



The SMALL OFFICE and


URBAN DESIGN


George Rockwise, FAIA, well-
known San Francisco architect and
urban designer, will be the featured
speaker at the forthcoming seminar,
"The Small Office and Urban De-
sign," scheduled on June 3 at the
Colony Beach Resort Club, Long-
boat Key, Sarasota, Florida .
In addition, several other architects
will serve on a panel which will dis-
cuss this important seminar topic,
for the purpose of making Florida's
architects more aware of urban de-
sign specifically in the small-office
field. This seminar will provide de-
tailed information on the method of
assembling an urban design team -
the real nuts-'n-bolts.
Mr. Rockwise recently completed
the site planning for urban design of
the NASA Space Center, Monterey,
California. He serves as urban plan-
ning consultant for Salem and Ta-


coma, Washington, as well as other
Western cities. At the Sarasota sem-
inar, he will present slides illustrat-
ing the history of planing and will
present a case history. Architects at-
tending the seminar will have the
opportunity to discuss problems and
question the panel.
The seminar is sponsored by the
FAAIA and the Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter. Registration fee is $6 for
FAAIA members and $10 for non-
members. This includes refreshments
and lunch. Non-members may pre-
register by writing the FAAIA and
enclosing a check covering the regis-
tration fee. FAAIA members will have
a pre-registration form in the next
issue of The Florida Architect. Archi-
tects can invite as their guests city
planners, city and count commission-
ers, and newspaper personnel who
have an interest in this vital subject.


by PRESCOLITE
MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
1251 Doollttle Dr., San Leandro, Calif.
FACTORIES: San Leandro. Calilornia
Warminstlr. Penna., El Dorado. Arkansas


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














































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et l presents a collection of ARCHITECTURAL
CARVED WOOD GRILLES specifically for the
Architect's and Designer's use in controlling

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See our display at Douglas Village.
Literature, samples and price lists available on request.
Write Bob Bogan, Jr.:

0Telephone ( 505) 344-1691
jU tlU( A MANUFACTURING COMPANY 3620 High Street, N.E. Albuquerque, New Mexico
MAY, 1966 31















An Editorial





LET'S BE HEARD!


Take the case of "the forgotten rules." Chapter 40-7 of the Florida State
Board of Architecture rules is concerned with 'Approved Style of Names for
Practice of Architecture.' Chapter 40-7.02, Partnerships . provides the name
of a partnership must include the name of at least one architect. Chapter
40-7.06, Names of Retired or Deceased Architects . prohibits the use of
architect's name in any way to indicate he is practicing architecture ...

It seems the State Board over the past years has not enforced these rules for
one reason or another. This is certainly unfortunate since rules are established
for a purpose rather than just to take up space in print.

According to reliable sources, legal counsel advises the present State Board
not to take court action against those firms violating Chapter 40-7 since the
past years have established a precedence. Perhaps this hands-off advice is the
crux of the dilemna now facing the membership of the State Board.

A recent meeting of the State Board brought about a deadlock vote on this
matter- 2 for, 2 against and 1 abstaining on the motion to enforce Chapter
40-7. It seems that several of the firms violating this rule will abide by Chapter
40-7 if the other firms will do the same. The latter are the firms who have
flatly stated, "Take us to court."

Since the State Board is presently deadlocked, it seems this would be an
ideal time for the voices of the architects of Florida to be heard on this vital
matter.

Every registered architect in the State is asked to give his opinions on the
following questions and to send these opinions to the President of the State
Board of Architecture, P.O. Box 2185, Elinor Village Station, Ormond Beach,
Florida.
1. Should the State Board actively enforce Chapter 40-7?
2. Should the State Board revise or eliminate Chapters 40-7.02 and/or
40-7.06?

LET'S BE HEARD!

Fotis N. Karousatos


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MAY, 1966


33














CALENDAR


May 20
FAAIA Public Relations Commit-
tee meeting 10 a.m., Interna-
tional Inn, Tampa, Fla.

May 21
Council of Commissions meeting
-10 a.m., International Inn
-Tampa, Fla.

May 26 27
Seminar: Designing for Patient
Care Today and Tomorrow.
Sponsored for architects and
engineers by the Florida State
Board of Health. 8:30 a.m. Flori-
da State Board of Health Audi-
torium, Jacksonville, Fla.

May 27
Mortgage Bankers Association of
Florida, Annual Convention. Sem-
inar with Alfred Browning Park-
er, FAIA, and James Deen, AIA,
participating. 9 a.m., Diplomat
Hotel, Hollywood, Fla.

June 3
FAAIA Seminar "The Small
Office and Urban Design." 10
a.m., Colony Beach Resort Club,
Longboat Key, Sarasota, Fla.

June 4
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing 9:30 a.m. Colony Beach
Resort Club Long Beach Key,
Sarasota, Fla.

June 26 July 1
AIA National Convention-Den-
ver, Colorado.

July 30
Council of Commissions meeting
--Miami, Florida.

August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing-Tallahassee, Fla.

October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








RP


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MAY, 1966









































Architects-Engineers: Smith, Korach & Arnold, Miami, Fla., General Contractor: J. W. Bateson Co.. Inc., Dallas. Texas, who used concrete made with Lehigh Portland
Cement. Mason Contractor: Cook & Pruitt Masonry Contractors, Inc., Miami, Fla., who used Lehigh Mortar Cement throughout. Precast Concrete: Pre-Cast Industries
Inc., Miami, Fla., who used Lehigh Early Strength Cement in the manufacture of wall panels.


... enclosed this 12-story Veterans Hospital

This new veterans' facility in Miami is built almost by Pre-Cast Industries, Inc. in the manufacture of the
entirely of concrete. Its reinforced concrete frame is precast panels. Here as in almost any precast work, this
covered with precast exposed aggregate panels. Interior cement benefits precaster, erector, and architect alike.
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Lehigh Early Strength Cement benefits the entire con- LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Behlen Manufacturing Company
38

Carolina Seating Company
18

Certified Plumber of South Florida
Back Cover

Customwood Manufacturing Company
31

Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover

Florida Gas Transmission Co.
32-33

Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
24-25

Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
3

Georgia-Pacific Corporation
21-22

Gory Roofing Tile Manufacturing,
Inc.
30

J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
18

Lehigh Portland Cement Company
36

Muzak Corporation
4

Panelfold Doors Inc.
27

Richard Plumer Business Interiors
35

Portland Cement Association
8

Prescolite Manufacturing Corp.
30

Solite Corporation
23

Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co.
19

Trinity White -
General Portland Cement Co.
2

F. Graham Williams Co.
37
Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace & Co.
34

MAY, 1966


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pros. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Prs.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Prs.


*


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37


ATLANTA

GA.







DESIGNING FOR PATIENT CARE


A second seminar for professional
architects and engineers on functional
design of medical care and related fa-
cilities will be held in the Auditorium
of the Florida State Board of Health,
1217 Pearl Street, Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, Thursday and Friday, May 26-27.
It is being co-sponsored by the Flor-
ida State Board of Health, Florida
Association of the AIA, Florida En-
gineering Society, Florida Hospital
Association, Florida Nursing Home
Association, and the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts, and College of
Engineering at the U. of Florida.
The purposes of the seminar are to
discuss modem concepts and trends
in patient care and the important im-
plications they have in design; to
bring to attention difficulties experi-
enced in project plans submitted for
hospitals, nursing homes and related
facilities; and to consider mutual
problems and approaches for solutions
in connection with design of medical
facilities.
The registration fee is $10.00,
which may be forwarded to Walter B.
Schultz, c/o Reynolds, Smith and
Hills, P. O. Box 4850, Jacksonville.


198' WIDE,
NO COLUMNS, POSTS,
OR BEAMS WITH THIS

STRESSED-SKIN

ROOF SYSTEM


Thursday, I
8:30 A.M.
9:00

9:45
10:05

10:45
11:15
12:00
2:00
3:25
Friday, May
9:00 A.M.
9:20

9:40

10:15

10:35

11:00

12:00
2:00
3:15
4:30


lay 26
Registration
Welcome ..--.................--- ..-............-..--C. L. Nayfield, M. D.
Introduction to the Seminar.....-----. ___.E. Russell Jackson
The State Mental Health Plan .R. C. Eaton, M. D.
The Impact of the Milieu of
Therapy on Psychiatric Care __- W. C. Ruffin, M. D.
Design for Psychiatric Care ...---___ __Alston Gutterson
Discussion Panel of Morning Speakers
Lunch
Concepts of Automation._ -.. Gordon A. Friesen
Air Conditioning for Asepsis ---....-...---. Richard P. Gaulin
27
Modem Medical Concepts ...... __.. Jack Evans, M. D.
How Nursing Relates to Trends
in Patient Care._-___--......---..--.Lucille Mercadante, R. N.
Relationship of Administration
to Trends in Patient Care___ .... ... Dan Olsen
Systems Engineering and Trends
in Patient Care __ -Ronald Gue
Trends in Patient Care and
Architecture Implications Speaker to be announced
Discussion Panel of Morning Speakers -
Moderator _.__ ____ .......William C. Grobe
Lunch
Planning for Efficient Food Service--..-...-....John D. Fellers
Areawide Planning Speaker to be announced
Adjournment


This is Europe's largest clear span
structure 198' wide, 527' long. It's
the Motta Candy Factory in Verona,
Italy.
The roof, fabricated in the United
States by Behlen Manufacturing Com-
pany, has a dead load of less than 10
Ibs. per sq. ft. It is composed of par-
allel chords of bolted steel panels,
stressed to serve as load-carrying
members, and connected by a light-
weight strut system. The top chord
forms a weather-tight, maintenance-
free exterior. The bottom chord, shown
above, can simply be painted for an
attractive finished ceiling. Electrical
conduit, mechanicals and insulation


can be hidden from sight between the
chords.
This Behlen Dubl-Panl structural sys-
tem is rapidly gaining in favor with
architects and engineers around the
world. They like its simplicity. They
like the way it gives them practical
column-free construction and the way
it speeds erection with its bolt-together
construction.
Phone or write us today for a complete
technical manual.
Lbro Southern Sales Company
Route 5. Box 1099 Lakeland. Florda
Behlen Roof Systems & Load-Bearing Curtain Walls
are further detailed in Sweets 2b/Be and Sa/Be.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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