• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The prsident's message
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 We nominate Robert Levison
 A message from Broward William...
 Distinction out of nothing
 Sculpture - A technique for...
 Advertising
 Education research project
 Perspective
 Advertising
 Calendar of events and advertisers'...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00142
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: April 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00142
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The prsident's message
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
    We nominate Robert Levison
        Page 4
    A message from Broward Williams
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Distinction out of nothing
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Sculpture - A technique for beauty
        Page 9
    Advertising
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Education research project
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Perspective
        Page 16
    Advertising
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Calendar of events and advertisers' index
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












































il~li

It J1











An Open Letter To The Candidates


For State Offices


This letter is addressed to each
person seeking office in the gov-
ernment of the State of Florida.
It is addressed to the candidates
for Governor, for the State Cab-
inet, and for the Senate and the
House.
Architects of Florida are con-
cerned about the future growth
of this state. Each of you is
also concerned, as evidenced by
the fact that you offer yourself
for public service. I believe our
goals are common . to insure
the ever-increasing healthy
growth of Florida. Florida is on
the move. Our rate of growth has
been among the leaders in the
United States.
This growth, however, is cre-
ating new problems and aggra-
vating old ones. It is these prob-
lems about which architects are
deeply concerned.
It is the obligation of our
state government to provide
the framework for guidance to
solutions of these problems.
It is YOUR obligation to
speak out at this time, to tell
your views on this framework
of solutions.
Let me point out for your
knowledge and understanding
some of the critical factors af-
fecting one of the greatest in-
dustries of Florida construc-
tion which is related directly
to growth.

STATE BUILDING CODE -
No uniformity of building re-
quirements now exists on a state-
wide basis. Construction is con-
fronted with a variety of authori-
ties, often overlapping and con-
flicting. The results of this situ-
ation are technical confusion, in-
creased costs, and hardship to the


public and building projects alike.
Hurricanes recently underscored
the need for effective building
code requirements on a state-
wide basis. Do you favor a com-
mission empowered to develop
and implement such a code?

MECHANICS LIEN LAW -
As a result of the diligent work
of an interim study committee,
the 1963 Legislature enacted a
new mechanics lien law which
provides infinitely better protec-
tion for the owner. Three years
of use have indicated need for
refinement and polishing. The
law is over-complex and owners
are confused as to procedures
and protections. Would you


SD
JAMES DEEN, AIA


sponsor the necessary legislation
to provide clarifications of these
provisions?

REGIONAL PLANNING -
Growth in our state requires
more state-wide, long-range plan-
ning than has yet been done to
conserve our natural resources.
New people, new roads, new
cities are without control and
could destroy forever the land
and the seashore. We must pre-
serve parts of our open space as
public facilities adequate for fu-
ture needs. Would you offer
firm leadership toward establish-
ing a regional planning authority?

AESTHETICS Florida's tour-
ism depends on sunshine and
beaches. Yet lic dli c will not
be attractive enough for future
travelers. A society's architecture
is the greatest tourist attraction.
Contemplate Paris, London,
New York. Any contribution
state government can make to
stimulate orderly and beautiful
development will bring profit
and pride to visitor and resident
alike. The character of this en-
vironment is properly a concern
of government. Government
must set the best example for
others to follow. Florida needs a
Commission on Environmental
Design. Will you advocate this
Commission to assure that struc-
tures will be designed at the high-
est creative and professional
levels?
These are not all the prob-
lems but they are an im-
portant beginning. Architects
will support those candidates
who demonstrate the best
awareness of these problems
- and who show a desire to
do something about them.






the
florila
archilecl
olicialiournal
o0 Iheolorila
association
o tle american
Inslilule ol
archilocls


OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
H. Leslie Walker, Treasurer
Citizens Building, Suite 1218, 706 Franklin Street, Tampa

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
Ted Fasnacht
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo / Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Director
G. Wade Swicord / Architectural Photographer
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not foi
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations ... Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00 .... McMurray Printers.
APRIL, 1966


THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Inside Front Cover

WE NOMINATE ROBERT LEVISON

4

A MESSAGE FROM BROWARD WILLIAMS

5

DISTINCTION OUT OF NOTHING
An article by
Professor Robert Willson

7-8

SCULPTURE NEW TECHNIQUE FOR BEAUTY
The Professional Arts Building in Miami

9

EDUCATION RESEARCH PROJECT
An interview with
Robert L. Geddes, FAIA

14-15

PERSPECTIVE

16

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

20

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

20

DESIGN CONCEPT SEMINAR
Back Cover


FRONT COVER Reproduction of an engraving by Giam-
battista Piranesi, entitled "Views of Rome." Piranesi, famed
Italian draftsman and etcher, engraved over 1000 plates in
his lifetime 1720 to 1778.


VOLUME 16 U NUMBER 4 f 1966













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"VILLAGE GREEN" DEVELOPER

ENDORSES ELECTRIC HEAT


Alachua Lal
Bartow Lal
Blountstown Lee
Bushnell Mo
Chattahoochee Mt.
Clewiston Ne'
Ft. Meade Nei
Ft. Pierce Oci
Gainesville Orl
Green Cove Springs Qui
Havana St.
Homestead Seb
Jacksonville Sta
Jacksonville Beach Tal
Key West Ver
Kissimmee Wa
Lake Helen Wil


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keland
ke Worth
esburg
ore Haven
.Dora
wberry
w Smyrna Beach
ala
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Cloud
bring
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lahassee
o Beach
uchula
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Hugh Edwards, Inc. were the first volume builders of "Total Electric" Gold
Medallion homes in the Gainesville area. Their Village Green development has
approximately 50 Gold Medallion homes.

According to Hugh C. Edwards, president of the corporation, the installation
of electric radiant heating was a vital factor in the decision to switch to the
All-Electric home.

"The sales appeal was a most important consideration," says Edwards. Among
the popular features he cites are "no flammable fuel in the house... more
healthful... thermostats in each room .. one bill for all utilities."

Edwards concludes, "Many buyers ... have volunteered that they would insist
on electric radiant heat in the next house they purchased."

Architects, engineers, builders and owners are sold on "Total Electric" com-
mercial construction. For your next project, specify ALL-ELECTRIC.


Florida Municipal Utilities Association
WHEN CONSUMERS OWN,
PROFITS STAY AT HOME


2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


HUGH EDWARDS, INC.
Bulrl.r C .elI r


I


-I







'Through


50

1ears...


9 16 Steam-powered concrete mixers and horse
19 hauling built quality streets and roads


96 High-speed trucks deliver concrete ready
S966 mixed for every type of construction


improving and extending the uses of concrete
Helping architects, engineers and builders to realize ever Users of concrete, faced with continuously changing con-
broader success with concrete has been a major objective struction technology, have depended on the continuing
of cement manufacturers. Through their Portland Cement flow of PCA technical literature. They have benefited from
Association, now observing its 50th year, they have con- the services of over 375 field engineers and numerous other
tribute to construction progress, quality and economy by specialists working out of 38 district offices.
sponsoring large-scale service programs. In the future, as in the past, the continuing job of the
Research conducted in a $10 million laboratory instal- Portland Cement Association remains service... service
lation has helped concrete meet the needs of a new era. that aids every user of cement.



PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
An organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete, made possible by the financial support of most cement manufacturers in the United States and Canada.
APRIL, 1966 3







Florida's Nominee for AIA Vice-Preside.


The Florida Region of the AIA has
an opportunity this year to present to
the AIA a vice-president never-to-be-
equalled by any other region in the
Institute.
Robert Levison has been nomi-
nated by the region. The election to
this office will take place in Denver,
Colorado, between June 27 and July
1, 1966. Bob Levison has been en-
dorsed by other chapters in the coun-
try and there is optimism everywhere
about his election.
Bob is opposed to making a cam-
paign as such; however, he cannot
object to his friends making personal
contacts on his behalf. Florida is
proud of "dear ole Bob" and is willing
to share his talents and personality
with all of the AIA
He can be remembered for his
meetings at Sarasota, Boca Raton, the
bouquet of roses in Jacksonville and
the 'ole' rocking chair in Clearwater;
for his work on almost every phase of
state association and region business;
and for his everlasing enthusiasm
which exemplifies a driving force to
take on a job and make good at it.


As a matter of background for
few new members who may not haN
met him, Bob lives in Clearwater wit'
his wife Roberta ("Tooty"), daugl
ters Barbara and Carol, and son Roi
aid. He was graduated from the Un,
versity of Florida in 1937, retired as
a lieutenant colonel in the U. S. Army
Reserve in 1962. His community serv-
ices are too numerous to mention, as
they include almost everything in his
city, county and such membership as
Chambers of Commerce, Lions, Boy
Scouts of America, etc. In the Associ-
ation, his activities included local,
state and regional groups. Bob has
held almost every office in these
groups and is impressively serving now
as chairman of the Commission on
Professional Society for the AIA.
There are few opportunities for
Florida, architecture and the Institute
to receive the benefits from such a
man. If you have some friend in the
AIA, out-of-state, and desire to send
him a copy of this resume, request the
executive office in Miami to send you
some additional copies and then really
pull for "dear ole Bob" in June!


MI uzak sound Muzak sound systems provide building-wide commu-
M S nications. Speakers are balanced for full range reproduction of
system S programmed background music and voice-paging or public
Sde i ned addressing. Your local Muzak franchiser can provide
are design d expert assistance in placing speakers for exact cover-
for voice age according to size, ambient noise, and special needs of,
SVO the areas to be installed. Whenever you need versatile sound
a d m usic systems, call your local 1
and m usic Muzak franchiser. mZ ^ -













Jacksonville: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Miami Beach: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ROBERT LEVISON







aurda Huarruice Study--1965




Message to the Architectural Profession

by BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner


Promptly following the impact of
hurricane Betsy on our state, I visited
south Florida and personally made an
on-the-ground investigation over the
entire area involved, including the
Keys. This indicated the need for a
thorough study of all factors con-
tributing to the damage sustained and
the formulation of recommendations
deemed advisable to minimize or pre-
clude such in the future. Obviously,
this would include building codes,
the quality of their enforcement, hur-
ricane watch programs, ordinances or
regulations relating to safety to life
and property from the standpoint of
the perils of windstorm including
flooding, wave-wash and tidal wave.
With safety to life and property and
the availability of insurance facilities
necessary to the continued develop-
ment of our state uppermost in mind,
I appealed to the State Cabinet which
promptly authorized the funds neces-
sary to conduct the survey and the
expense of publishing the report.
The next step was the selection of
personnel qualified to serve on the
survey committee. The wide scope
and comprehensive nature of the work
necessitated care in selecting men of
high calibre in their respective fields.
Fortunately, this was accomplished
and I am both pleased and proud of
the results. As you will see from the
report, the committee included two
prominent members of your Florida
Association of Architects who con-
tributed generously of their time and
services.
The committee began work imme-
diately, conducting a thorough inves-
tigation of the damage done by hurri-
cane Betsy and visiting as many build-
ing officials as possible. The Insurance
Information Council of Dade County
co-operated by arranging "A demon-
stration of the wind and debris-re-
sistive characteristics of advanced win-
dow and door products in the interest
cf reducing hurricane property dam-
age". Window, Door and Glass Sec-
tion Tests were conducted by various
industry representatives. Also taking
part in this program were representa-
tives of Florida Savings & Loan
League, the FHA, AIA, Metropolitan
APRIL, 1966


Dade County Building Office and the
Board of Appeals of Broward County.
This interesting program demonstrat-
ed the ability of both the glass and
metals industries to produce units
with the capability to withstand wind
forces up to and including 200 miles
per hour with added impact stresses.
It was timed to follow the closing of
the convention of the Southern
Building Code Congress at Miami
Beach in order to give the delegates
to this meeting opportunity to attend
and observe the tests. This entire pro-
gram was both interesting and infor-
mative and I would like again to ex-
tend my personal gratitude to the In-
surance Information Council and to
all of the various people who so kind-
ly took part in it or contributed to it
in any way.
The committee received the full co-
operation of all who were contacted,
which greatly facilitated the work and
I am grateful to them for this. Of
particular assistance, however, was the
Metropolitan Dade County Building
Department under Mr. Robert F.
Cook, Director Building and Zoning,
who made available the detailed re-
ports of individual inspections of the
damage sustained by a large number
of buildings of various types and class-
es in Dade County.
In addition to the damage observed
from hurricane Betsy, the committee
also examined the records of other
recent storms as well as the histories
of certain hurricanes of the past, par-
ticularly those from which valuable
lessons were learned. The report will
be found to contain track charts and
meteorological data of interest on
these.
The survey also included an ex-
amination into the various building
codes in effect and an evaluation of
the enforcement found in as much
of the lower East Coast territory as
was possible.
A special sub-committee was ap-
pointed for the purpose of surveying
the damage sustained by mobile
homes, travel trailers and motor ve-
hicles. This study also extended into
other recent storms, such as Cleo, and
the results will be found in a separate


section of the report.
The survey report will be found to
contain a number of recommenda-
tions, too numerous to be detailed in
this article. Speaking from the stand-
point of buildings, suffice it to say
that these concern mostly the areas
of glass, roof coverings, products test-
ing and enforcement. Consideration
has also been given to the advisability
of a state-wide minimum standard
building code to apply as detailed in
the chapter by Mr. Ivan H. Smith,
AIA. Of particular interest is the ad-
vancement of the idea of the "Certi-
fied Building"; how this can be
achieved and its possible advantages.
The committee has given thorough
study to the problem of minimizing
the severe damage to glass. Several
recommendations for amendments to
building codes have been made to
accomplish this. Notable among these
is the proposal of an authorized test-
ing laboratory for the purpose of test-
ing glass and other products against
wind forces, and labeling to indicate
the rating. In short, to render from
the standpoint of wind forces a serv-
ice comparable to that of "Under-
writers Laboratories" for fire. This
would expand and in no way reflect
on the good work now being done by
certain jurisdictions. Better protection
for large lites of glass has also been
stressed by recommending building
code requirements for more general
use of storm shutters of standard de-
sign for all large lites of glass in first
and second stories of commercial
buildings, readily accessible from the
ground.
Of importance was the discovery
of the failure of roof coverings applied
over certain light-weight slab materi-
als in wind forces considerably below
the design load.
The survey and study do not con-
fine themselves merely to one hurri-
cane. The report is more comprehen-
sive than the usual and it is earnestly
hoped that it will serve to encourage
better construction, more careful at-
tention to the protection of property
upon the release of a "Hurricane
Watch," and greater safety to human
life.







Il In nn^ NATURAL GA
&fOi AIATIN THE HEADLINES

"BIG NAMES" CHECK ALL ANGLES THEN GO GAS! Holiday Inn, Sears, Howard Johnson,
Grant's, Ramada Inn you can be sure the big chains check costs, performance, dependability,
everything before they decide. So what happens? New 6-story Holiday Inn in Hollywood and 9-story
Howard Johnson's in Miami Beach signed up with Peoples Gas System for cooking and central
water heating. And Gulf Natural Gas will supply natural gas air conditioning, gaslights, heating, all-
gas kitchen and water heating to Ramada Inn; and heating and hot water for big new Sears and
Grant's stores in Ocala.

SSWEETEST STORY YET ABOUT NATURAL GAS ... IT'S A HONEY! Tropical Orange
Blossom Honey, New Smyrna, converted oil-fired steam boiler and L.P.-fueled dryers
and vats to natural gas for higher efficiency, lower costs. South Florida Natural Gas
Company did the honors.

HOT WATER RIDES HIGH (10 STORIES) WITH NATURAL GAS. La Fontana Hi-Rise Apartments in
West Palm Beach had Florida Public Utilities convert two 50-HP Boilers and 1,200,000 BTU Pool
Heater from oil to natural gas. Manager says 10th floor apartments have had unlimited supply of
hot water for first time well-pleased with switch to cleaner, more dependable fuel.

INDUSTRIAL USES OF NATURAL GAS STILL GROWING. Southern Gas and Electric estimates
doubled facilities at Bradenton's Tropicana Industrial Glass Co. will push its annual use of natural
gas past the billion-cubic-feet mark. City of New Smyrna Beach has converted its Asphalt Plant to
natural gas. In Ocala, National Hood Company is expanding its plant, and stepping up its use of
gas in manufacture of steel doors and kitchen range ventilating hoods, while nearby Cummer, Inc.
will fire a new 100-H.P. boiler with gas for its building block plant. In West Florida, Marianna
Municipal Gas System is serving a new 50-H.P. boiler in Rhyme Manufacturing Co.'s furniture plant.

CLEARWATER CONTINUES BIG MOVE TO GAS AIR CONDITIONING. Continuing a trend which
counts some of the State's most impressive gas air conditioning installations, Clearwater's Gas
Department reports 120-tons for new Bayview Gardens 99-unit hi-rise, also Central all-gas kitchen;
heating and heating water also featured in 309-unit Gardens Apartments, 55 buildings in all.

LIKES IT SO WELL HE ORDERS MORE! Ardmore Farms Orange Juice, Deland, already
uses natural gas for their citrus pulp feed mill dryer. Now Florida Home Gas will supply
three 100 H.P. gas engines to drive refrigeration compressors for frozen juice storage
S rooms operating at 30 degrees below zero... a job where dependability and economy
kv are essential. Across state, Ft. Meade Gas Department is supplying some 15,000,000
cu. ft. of natural gas for Citrus Feed Dryer and Fruit Processing Boiler for Fort Meade
Canners, Inc.

CONVERSIONS... CONVERSIONS... EVERYBODY'S DOING IT. In New Smyrna Beach six laundries
have converted from oil or L.P. to natural gas since January 1. In Ocala, Silver Springs Sportswear
and two cleaning establishments headed a parade of eight motels who made the switch from oil
this year.

"SUCCESS STORIES" FROM ALL OVER FLORIDA! Fort Pierce Nursing and Convalescent Home
cooking, heating and heating water with natural gas. It's all-gas kitchens for cafeterias at Boca
Raton's Florida Atlantic University and Seacrest High School. Crescent City reports 46 gaslights for
street lighting at Welaka Mobile Homes, expected to grow to 1400 homes in an all-gas community.
Fort Pierce serving new Holiday Inn with natural gas for cooking and hot water plus heating and
laundry facilities. Lake Apopka Natural Gas District has completed mile-long pipeline extension to
serve Sunland Hospital and Silver Star Estates west of Orlando.


BELATED BULLETIN
GASGRAMS MISSED BIGGEST AIR CONDITIONING STORY OF 1965. When the
first air conditioned baseball game in history was played last April, Gasgrams
GENIE slept soundly while natural gas cooled Houston's Giant Astrodome. Now wide
SI awake, and with baseball once again in the spotlight, Genie calls attention once
S GOOFED! again that jobs just don't come too big for natural gas air conditioning!


Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without restric-
tion by the Florida Natural Gas Association, 1500 E. Highway #50, Winter Garden, Florida.















DISTINCTION OUT OF NOTHING

By ROBERT WILLSON, SCULPTOR

il l l I


A study of architecture and sculpture in relation to quality


The author, Robert Willson, is a
sculptor of world-renown and a pro-
fessor in the University of Miami's
Art Department. Advisor for the Lowe
Gallery for the past 14 years, Pro-
fessor Willson is the recipient of
numerous national and state art
awards and fellowships. In 1964, he
was an international panelist on glass
at the World Congress of Craftsmen.
That same year, he presented a one-
man exhibit in the city of Venice,
Italy. Robert Willson has become a
leader in the highly-specialized and
ancient art of glass sculpture.
DEFINITIONS
Symposia on the subject of the
sculptor's relations with the architect
have become frenetic. Each of these
ancient professions claims not to need
the other-and does not. Each seeks
delightfully sterile isolation, to avoid
contamination from the other, and
each of course has a special monopoly
on delicate taste.
Most sculptors know little about
architecture; most architects know the
same about sculptor or art. And the
real question today is not whether
architecture and sculpture must work
together. Obviously they have no liv-
ing necessity of laboring cooperatively.
Buildings today survive without sculp-
ture. Likely sculpture does not need
an architectural location, for it is
shown well enough in museums, gal-
leries, and homes.
The important question is: do both
professions lose their chance for great-
ness by not working together? By not
having a vital desire to work and
think together?
The answer is likely to be yes! Both
have lost much already, particularly
architecture.
It seems to be the consensus of
critical opinion that there is little
APRIL, 1966


significant relationship between art
and architecture at present. Laissez
faire is implicit. Mies van der Rohe
said that modern architectural de-
sign is too complicated to permit the
architect even to try to take care of
the other arts.
How precisely wrong he was! How
desperate the need of sculpture in
architecture. Combined, architecture
and sculpture may equal greatness;
alone either is the loser.
A BRILLIANT CO-HISTORY
We have within us racial mem-
ories of ancient buildings in which art
and architecture were one and the
same thought. It is a list which is a
credit to mankind.
The great Temple of Rameses II at
Thebes is a majestic place. The be-
loved Parthenon on a hill in Attica.
That sparkling gem, the Cathedral at
Chartres; and the happy Sainte- Cha-
pelle in the Seine. The Temple of the
Warriors at Chichen Itza. The sacred
Ajanta Cave in Hyderabad. The great
Stupa at Sanchi. And the many others
made from the earlier strength of our
kind.
The significant architecture of an-
tiquity used art as a known tool for
the establishment of human purpose.
That it was usually a religious pur-
pose is not as important as the fact
that it was an authentic purpose.
This brilliant history ended some
centuries ago when man became a
modern, industrial, and technological
creature who thought he could do
without a public art. Since then,
buildings generally have lacked even
elementary evidence of art conceptual
stability and thus of human purpose
and permanency. The bulldozer is the
architect's finishing tool.
Reference may be made to the un-
relieved monotony of the Lever build-


ing, the clumsy block of the United
Nations, the clutter of UNESCO, the
stack of crates at the new Lincoln
center, the Bauhaus sameness in a
thousand cities, colleges which look
like factories, irrational screens, un-
church churches, and millions of de-
pressing project houses and apartment
complexes.
Exceptions to mediorcrity are few
in recent years. Yet surely these very
exceptions indicate a direction for
sculptors and architects. Henri Ma-
tisse's Chapel of the Rosary at Vence
is a pleasure. The English have a
proud achievement at lofty new
Coventry Cathedral. The Assy
Church and the Audincourt Church
both are revolutionary. Le Corbusier's
Pilgrimage Chapel, Notre-Dame-du-
Haut, at Ronchamp, is expressive,
and many private homes are experi-
mental and tasteful.
Yet, greatness may be slow to come
to today's works in any field just be-
cause architecture and sculpture do
have their independence.
THE ATTITUDES
Some periods of man's history have
been unusually rich in art and there
seems to be a discernable pattern in
them. Invariably the art eras have
come during strong nationalistic
surges, when racial pride reinforced
the national fellowship, and when
there was common agreement among
citizens as to values, ideals, family,
and religion. Wealth usually was pre-
sent to liberate the revolutionary
statement which is dominant in all
great art.
The difference between the situa-
tion in ancient times and in the mod,
ern world is obvious. Then there was
a known and valued harmony which
gave unity and achieved a set purpose.
Today, lacking both purpose and





group cohesion, we have become ar-
bitary, coincidental, organizational,
and anti-freedom-for-the-individual.
.. Cutting across all eras, all races,
and all art styles is the one word:
Quality. Perhaps older races more
truly sought quality as the mark of
their work? Perhaps today we will
settle for less?
THE SCULPTOR
Phidias! Michelangelo! Leonardo
da Vinci! Forget it. There are no
more of the breed left. Not in your
century.
Great architecture, we see in these
examples, has been produced often by
the man who was a sculptor, a
painter, an architect, a civil servant,
and a philosopher, all in one package.
By contrast in our era of special-
ization and organizational fanatics,
we need not expect such a man to
appear. He was eliminated at the
start, perhaps in the first grade.
Today there seems to be this criti-
cal judgement that architects and
sculptors cannot really work together,
because each profession expects to re-
tain its full independence. The result
is that art on a building becomes an
afterthought, or a decoration. Coop-
eration is a practical myth.
No longer do commissions seem to
produce work of quality, thus elimin-
ating one of the traditional contacts


... There has never been so much
confusion between the meaning of
talent and the meaning of the prestige
of a commission. The commission
goes to the salesman. It no longer has
validity.
THE SOLUTION
Perhaps the solutions for a meeting
of minds between sculpture and" ar-
chitecture will come in these four
areas:
1. Quality: when there is quality
there will be important art and ar-
chitecture. There is no other rule or
way. Quality in man comes from de-
velopment to the utmost, narrow but
selective. It does not come from syn-
thesis, one-world, brotherhood, gov-
ernment contracts, or critical rank.
2. Authentic purpose: the human
personality has always revolted against
make-work. He likes to have a rea-
son even for his art. If religion was
the authentic purpose up to now, and
if we are losing confidence in it, we
must find another causative. Without
real desire for art, the decorative and
playfully sterile products of today-
such as the op, the zip, the mop, and
the neon will continue.
3. Presentation architecture: the
one-artist building such as Matisse's
Chapel at Vence seems to be a di-
rection worth further study. If the
artist and the architect can not now
work together on a building, then the


architect, to achieve a cultural
and unity in his structure, mus,
a personal display of the artist
selects. The art should not be useci
decorate areas, or be made to fit
like a caged animal. But the variables
in the building should be handled to
make a presentation, like a jewel, of
the art.
4. The museum: the rise of the
public museum all over the world is
a force not well understood by most
architects and sculptors. While the
museum offers sculpture a proper dis-
play and respectful attention, it does
so in an artificial collection, indoors,
without need of the architect or of
permanency. If the museum culture
takes the place of personal judge-
ments, there may be no future need
for architect sculptor cooperation.
Sculpture will be simply slanted to
the exhibition and review page.
Great architecture has always been
a building plus its special art. With-
out sculpture on the building, there
will not be quality-history tells us
this fact-and without quality, there
will not be greatness.
Perhaps we are willing to settle for
less. But make no mistake about it,
no building of cultural value will be
built without art, however you plan
it. You can not make distinction out
of nothing and still give us reason to
return again and again to the temple.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















The problem of in- L
corporating art and
craftsmanship into *
an office building "
simply for the sake
of beauty has been
a highly expensive
and unsolved prob-
lem for most devel-
opers and investors
who are working on
iuni iclJin budgets. After all, good design
isn't much of a heavyweight when feasi-
bility and economic studies are prepared
on a proposed project.
However, a Miami sculptor has devised
a new concrete casting technique which
could go a long way towards enhancing
the usually lackluster facades of office
structures. And it can be done at a reas-
onable cost.
The sculptor is Albert Vrana. And the
project on which he is applying his tal-
ents is the Professional Arts Building,
1150 NW 14th St., a $1.5 million project.
The six-story building will have over
20,000 square feet of sculptured bas relief
on its giant 60-foot exterior wall panels.
They are all designed by Vrana and are
being made with his new casting tech-
nique.
Vrana's technique is largely based on
the material he uses for molds. It's that
feathery styrofoam which came into pop-
ularity recently and is used for everything
from ice chests to children's toys.
Vrana began work on the building
panel project a year ago in his own studio
where he also works with copper, iron,
and stone in creating decorative items for
homes and commercial establishments.
However, this phase of the project quick-
ly outgrew his studio when he started
designing the styrofoam molds for the
Professional Arts Building. After all,
there are few studios that will accommo-
date forms of 60 feet in length. His
current workroom is an old lumber yard
warehouse on NW 17th Ave.
Vrana and his four assistants are cur-
rently carving the master design into the
styrofoam sheets, working in reverse in


Professional Arts
Building in Miami is
being constructed by
Sa group of doctors.
building, which will
be ready for
occupancy next
month, was designed
by Herbert H.
Johnson 6
ii ,by cialt t,
Architects.
order to create areas of high and low
relief.
The 60-foot sheets, each 12 feet wide,
are placed side-by-side on the floor of the
warehouse and the master design is trans-
ferred onto them. The sculptor and has
assistants then cut the design into the
foam, using such tools as heated knives,
saws, grinders, and wire brushes.
After the sculpting was complete, the
forms were taken to a concrete firm
where required reinforcing steel were
added and the molds encased by steel
forms to add strength to the styrofoam
while the concrete was poured.
After the concrete had hardened, the
styrofoam was stripped off and the panels
stacked in the yard for curing. As con-
struction proceeded, the panels were
trucked to the project site as needed.
Vrana said the styrofoam performs
two important functions. One is eco-
nomic and the other is aesthetic. "Since
the molds have relatively little weight
they can be prepared and shipped to
almost any part of the world," he said.
The sculptor also pointed out that the
material is quite cheap and when the
casting job is finished the molds are
expendable.
"On the basis of these two things, plus
the obvious advantages of being able to
create artistically exciting sculptured pan-
els, we should no longer be restricted to
uninteresting design in our public build-
ings," he said.
The only maintenance on the panels
will be a coat of silicone about every four
or five years. The relief will probably be
more prominent after the panels ".ag"
for a while.


A TECHNIQUE FOR BEAUTY


APRIL, 1966


SWLPTURE


































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10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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closer to the point of greatest hot-water use. This flexibility permits
shorter hot-water pipe runs, reduces heat loss, and saves on water
and heating costs.
A quick recovery electric water heater can deliver as much hot
water in 24 hours as the average family uses in two full weeks
. plus the peace of mind that comes with its worry-free flame-
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Cheaper, too! Electric water heaters cost less to buy, to install,
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APRIL, 1966




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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













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Ever since the AIA announced that it had contracted with
Princeton University for a study of educational programs
that would better prepare the profession for its expanding
national role in design of the total physical environment
and had appropriated $100,000 for this study, ii,1i'. ques-
tions have been asked as to procedure, scope, etc.
In an exclusive interview with Dean Geddes, your Editor
obtained the following complete report.
BACKGROUND
For a good number of years spokesmen for the profession
have been calling for the redesign of the academic training
program for architects. The faults of the present educa-
tional system have been described in many, often conflict-
ing, ways. But running through most of the commentary
on architectural education is a widely shared belief that
there is a mismatch between academic training and the
actual task that faces the profession.
The task of the profession is no less than guiding effec-
tively the complete rebuilding of our cities and towns in
the coming decades. Architects must develop the compe-
tence that will make them a leading force in the creation
of a more humane physical environment.
To develop a basic policy for educational change, the
American Institute of Architects formed a Special Com-
mittee on Education in 1961. The report of this Commit-
tee, published in April, 1963, recommended that "a single
group of professionals must be educated and qualified to
assume central responsibility for the increasing present and
future needs of the expanded urban planning concepts."
On March 15, 1965, the AIA asked Robert L. Geddes,
now of the Princcton University School of Architecture, to
undertake a program of research to carry out the recom-
mendation of the Special Committee that specific new
programs for architectural education be developed.
In a letter to Dean Geddes, AIA President A. G. Odell,
Jr. stated, "the task of the research program ... is neither
one of image building or self-justification, nor one of
choosing, absolutely, between the two approaches sug-
gested by the Special Committee on Education, AIA, but
rather to test new and bold ideas, new procedures, perhaps
invent institutions where needed: to better serve the ulti-
mate goal of a comprehensive, unified design profession,
and the si Jtcm of education to support such a profession
at a high level of quality."

STATEMENT OF INTENTIONS
Strategy / The Architectural Research Unit at Princeton
University will guide the development of a set of specific
new educational programs which will help solve the key
problems of architectural education (see Section III).
These new programs will be based upon the coordination
of clearly defined educational goals and educational
methods. They will be developed in cooperation with
schools presently granting professional degrees in archi-
tecture, and other schools engaged in education for the
creation of the human environment.
The intention of this research is to improve the education
of architects. This goal will be achieved only when changes
in architectural education, as developed by this research,
are adopted by schools. Thus the publication of a report
containing recommendations is not seen as the end point
of our work.
A group of schools will be asked by the research staff to
test new curricula. Some should be ready to start in the
fall semester of 1967. The results of these tests will be
carefully monitored and reported.
It is essential to the research plan that the new programs
be developed within the framework of the administrative


RIR Education Research Project

procedures, academic traditions and special strengths of
the institutions which will participate. We recognize that
no workable course structure can be imposed upon a
school from without.
The Princeton research staff also plans to develop lines of
communication that will encourage the cooperation and
support of accrediting boards, registration boards and
professional societies.
The Princeton research staff will strive to develop each
change made by the participating schools into a highly
visible experiment in education. This is a form of com-
munication that will lead to the most rapid evolution of
successful programs throughout the nation.
The participating schools will be asked to make all cur-
riculum changes in the form of clear cut tests of hypo-
theses. All hypotheses will be coordinated so that they can
be compared to hypotheses being tested at other partici-
pating schools...
It would be fatuous to expect that this program could
develop a set of precise goals for architecture that would
he agreed upon by all members of the profession. The out-
come of a new educational program can only be evaluated
(,bjccti\L1 against the special set of goals preselected by
the participating school. Discourse and debate concerning
the ultimate value of a particular set of goals for archi-
tectural education will continue for many years. With the
issues sharpened by our research approach, such debate
can only be beneficial to the profession.
The central contribution of the program will be to help
the schools to make the changes they want more rapidly
and in a form that will insure that these changes eventu-
ally benefit all schools, the entire profession, and the
society to whose changing needs they are the response.
Procedure / Each participating school will be asked to
make clear and compatible statements of goals to be
achieved by curriculum change. Such statements must be
in a form specific enough to allow subsequent evaluation
of results. They will have to prescribe in detail the skills
and attitudes that an architect is expected to have. Writing
goals in this form is an exacting task but it is the essence
of any attempt to do research in education. Once estab-
lished by a school, these goals will have to be matched
with the most apt tt.1ching methods. This combination
of goals and teaching methods (or tools) will provide the
basis for new course descriptions and finally for new cur-
ricular structures.
A rapid and complete feedback of the results of the experi-
mental programs to all schools and the profession is
intended. In this way successful innovation will be spread
and the inevitable failures will not be frozen into the
curriculum.
It should be clear that no attempt will be made to force
the educational goals or methods favored by the research
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







This article, reprinted from the
January 1966 issuc of the
New Jersey Architect, is the
result of at exclisiide inter iew
wvith the esteemed Robert L.
Geddes, FAIA.
t ir. Geddes is Dean of the
School of Architecture,
Princeton University, New Jersey.
7 lhe vital study wiihich is
being understaken by) this
research project has been
underwas on0e year.


staff onto any of the participating schools. There will be
ample opportunity to test our own ideas at Princeton. It
will not be a useful experiment unless some quite different
ideas are tested eslewhere.
Several objectives of the study go beyond academic train-
ing programs: it is clear that we can use and build upon
studies done outside of our field. The project staff will
seek the advice of leading minds in engineering, the arts
and humanities, the behavioral sciences, the physical sci-
ences, the research methodology as well as leaders in other
fields of professional education...
SOME KEY PROBLEMS
OF ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION
The development of competence in the creation of formal
order in the physical environment has always been the
central concern of schools of architecture. The problems
of architectural education are not caused by a lack of in-
terest in the development of aesthetic sensibility to the
physical environment. Instead, the problems arise because
it has become so difficult for architects -practitioners,
faculty and students alike- to apply their understanding
of form in the context of today's society. The needs of the
user have become more complex and diverse. Often, con-
flicting needs can be articulated by special interest groups
in a way that was unheard of only a few decades ago. And
the social, economic and technological processes through
which the physical environment is built have also grown
enormously in complexity...
The essential problem is that the schools are not turning
out enough men to cope with the vast building program of
the coming decades. Too few can make the formal skills
they developed in their academic training a potent force
in the creation of a better environment. Too many fail to
develop the competence that will make them a vital force
in the improvement of their communities. We suggest
that today we must focus our energies on the problems
outlined below.
A. We must develop a more reliable methodology to
identify and solve the environmental problems of to-
day's more complex, urbanized society. This method-
ology must include workable techniques to:
1. Identify the broadest useful frame of reference for
a profession.
2. Clarify the priorities and values of the client, the
user and the community.
3. Program a complete and operational set of require-
ments in terms of human needs.
4. Call forth all relevant data and information at the
point of decision.
5. Analyze the perceptual and conceptual order ex-
perienced by the user and the language of form
that creates these.
6. Assure the deployment of the skills and resources
available through form and design that are most
responsive to the known needs and values.
APRIL, 1966


7. Evaluate form and design decisions against the
known needs and values.
B. We must develop means of communication and
education that will make an improved design method-
ology operational on a much broader scale. To do this,
we must develop more effective techniques to:
1. Work closely and productively with other disci-
plines, not only in engineering but also in the
sciences and the humanities.
2. Explain the work of the architect to the general
public.
3. Recruit better informed, more aware students.
4. Make the internship a more meaningful educa-
tional experience.
5. Develop new teaching skills and knowledge in
faculty members.
6. Support research that will deliver useful informa-
tion to education and practice.
7. Develop more effective programs for continuing
education of practitioners.
8. Develop more useful methods of documenting,
storing and retrieving information that will in-
crease the reliability of our form and design
decisions.
9. Develop training programs that will increase the
number and the competence of sub-professionals
supporting the practice of architecture.
OUTLINE OF RESEARCH PLAN:
AIA RESEARCH IN EDUCATION
A. Recruit a group of schools of architecture to partici-
pate in the research effort. The new programs to be
developed will be designed in collaboration with the
schools to meet their specific goals. No attempt will
be made to work out a single program that is
universally applicable.
B. Develop an extensive list of goal statements. These
shall be in a form that will specify the abilities and
attitudes an architect should be expected to have.
The statements shall be specific enough to permit
subsequent evaluations of achievement.
C. Develop a comprehensive list of teaching tools,
methods, and media applicable to professional
education.
D. Develop matching sub-sets of goals and tools with
each of the participating institutions.
E. Evolve new course specifications and schedules on
the basis of the matching sub-sets selected by the
participating schools.
F. Test and refine the proopsed new programs devel-
oped in step B-E in a series of working sessions with
consultants from the profession of architecture as
well as from education, the sciences and the arts.
G. Test and refine the proposed new programs in a
series of discussions with institutions concerned with
changes in professional education.
H. Work with consultants to design a mechanism for
monitoring and reporting the results of the test
programs at the participating.
TIME SCHEDULE
MAY, 1966: Working Conference I.
AUGUST, 1966: Statements of educational goals and
tools to be completed.
NOVEMBER, 1966: School programs and schedules to
be completed.
JANUARY, 1967: Working Conference II.
AUGUST, 1967: Final report and recommendations to be
completed.
SEPTEMBER, 1967: Testing of new programs to begin
at some schools.








PERSPECTIVE


FLORIDA ARCHITECTS . .
Are you looking for a good architectural draftsman for this summer?

If you are, do yourself and the state a favor by contacting the University of
Florida's Student Chapter, employment service department for student em-
ployees.

By considering students for your firm, you are providing the opportunity to
share your talent and experience with young, creative minds. Also, you will
find that students will follow your pace and work as hard as you to produce a
good design that is complete with excellent plans and specifications. Finally,
by hiring students for the summer, you will learn of new ideas and fresh ap-
proaches to a problem, and at the same time instruct and contribute yours.
All of these things contribute to a better future for Florida and make the tran-
sition from student to practitioner a more meaningful one.
The students want to assist you, so please help them. Send now your require-
ments for summer employment. There is no charge.

University of Florida
Student Chapter of the AIA
Employment Service Division
Gainesville, Florida






WEATHER RESISTANCE

State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner
Broward Williams, who was featured luncheon
speaker at the FAAIA's Seminar on Weather
Resistance, receives an appreciation award from
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA. The award was a
special presentation edition of "Urban Design:
The Architecture of Towns and Cities," by Paul
D. Sprciregen, AIA.






PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD TO BAER
Morley Baer, west coast photographer of architecture and nature, has been
selected the recipient of the annual Architectural Photography Medal bestowed
by The American Institute of Architects. Baer, a resident of Berkley, Califor-
nia, will receive his medal at the annual AIA Convention June 26-July 1 in
Denver, Colorado.





COMPUTERS ARE TOPIC

Three South Florida Professional Groups are holding a one-day conference
on Saturday, April 16, entitled "Computers for Managers and Engineers." The
conference will be held at the University of Miami under the joint sponsorship
of the Miami Chapter, American Institute of Industrial Engineers; Data Pro-
cessing Management Association; and South Florida Technical Society's Council.
16


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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APRIL, 1966 17







MR. ARCHITECT

... would you like
to know why
our services will
help you command
larger fees?

A phone call will
bring a member of
the firm to explain
our program.

SHELTON, ULLMANN,
SMITH & STRETCH, Inc.

Designers & Furnishers
for Commercial Interiors
in Association with
Architects

600 S. E. 2nd COURT
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
HMM Telephone 522-4779 l


198' WIDE,
NO COLUMNS, POSTS,
OR BEAMS WITH THIS

STRESSED-SKIN

ROOF SYSTEM


[


This is Europe's largest clear span
structure 198' wide, 527' long. It's
the Motta Candy Factory in Verona,
Italy.
The roof, fabricated in the United
States by Behlen Manufacturing Com-
pany, has a dead load of less than 10
bs. per sq. ft. It is composed of par-
allel chords of bolted steel panels,
stressed to serve as load-carrying
members, and connected by a light-
weight strut system. The top chord
forms a weather-tight, maintenance-
free exterior. The bottom chord, shown
above, can simply be painted for an
attractive finished ceiling. Electrical
conduit, mechanicals and insulation


can be hidden from sight between the
chords.
This Behlen Dubl-Pani structural sys-
tem is rapidly gaining in favor with
architects and engineers around the
world. They like its simplicity. They
like the way it gives them practical
column-free construction and the way
it speeds erection with its bolt-together
construction.
Phone or write us today for a complete
technical manual.
Lybro Southern Sales Company
Route 5, Box 1099 Lakeland, Florida
Behlen Roof Systems & Load-Bearing Curtain Walls
are further detailed in Sweets 2b/Be and 3a/Be.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I


-0









FINANCING

IS PART OF

THE PLAN...
Let our $300,000,000
worth of experience
in FHA Multi-Family
Financing help you
help your client.
Write or call
C R. Golder,
vice President


5*153 ~rA








TEEPON: 377378


Custom-Cast


Plaques


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043
G





FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


L I. -1 1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD
L.





STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami

APRIL, 1966


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Our new Florida representative will be announced soon.
If any information is needed before this announcement is
made, please contact our Atlanta, Georgia office, P. 0. Box
13406, Station K, Zip Code 30324, or through our tele-
phone number 875-0043, Area Code 404.


ATrP A T1 A


\,
1






SPECIFY

CERTIFIED

BLOCK


7 -


Which meets CM-1 specs"

of the
Florida Concrete
and
Products Association






HIGHEST




QUALITY


Masonry Units


delivered to


your job!


AVAILABLE IN ALL AREAS OF FLA.!


Units are backed by laboratory test results
and signature of the Block Producer.

*Specifications included in July, 1965 edition of
"Who Makes What in Concrete and Products
in Florida," or write to P.O. Box 160, Winter
Park, Fla. for copy.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Behlen Manufacturing Company
18

Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Inside Back Cover

Florida Concrete &
Products Association
20

Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
19

Florida Gas Transmission Co.
16-17

Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
10-11

Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
2

Florida Natural Gas Association
6

Florida Portland Cement Division
13

J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
19

Muzak Corporation
4

Portland Cement Association
3

Robbins Manufacturing Co.
18

Shelton, Ullmann, Smith &
Streich, Inc.
18

Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co.
12

F. Graham Williams Co.
19


CALENDAR


April 5
Florida South Chapter Conven-
tion Committee Meeting-4 p.m.,
550 Brickell Avenue, Miami (of-
fices of Herbert Johnson & Asso-
ciates).
April 7
FAAIA Convention Committee
Meeting-10 a.m., 550 Brickell
Avenue, Miami (offices of Her-
bert Johnson & Associates).
April 15
Deadline for registration for De-
sign Concept Seminar.
April 19 22
Florida Industries Exposition-
Orlando, Florida.
April 22
Design Concept Seminar-Spon-
sored by Mid-Florida Chapter of
the AIA and FAAIA-Robert
Meyer Motor Inn-9:30 A.M.
April 23
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing Robert Meyer Motor Inn,
Orlando, Fla.
May 21
Council of Commissions meeting
-Tampa, Fla.
June 4
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing Sarasota, Fla.
June 26 July 1
AIA National Convention-Den-
ver, Colorado.
July 30
Council of Commissions meeting
-Miami, Florida.
August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing-Tallahassee, Fla.
October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



































CAT STANDBY ENGINE...


GOES TO PRISON FOR LIFE


For a Caterpillar diesel engine, life could be
a long time. It won't even get time off for
good behavior.
Long-time dependable service is why the
Florida State Board of Correction installed a
Caterpillar D-398 Diesel Engine and a 600 KW
generator in the Reception Diagnostic and
Medical Treatment Center at Lake Butler.
In this recently constructed part of the
correction system of the state, dependable


standby power is a must. Electricity is restored
automatically which makes electric power fail-
ure no problem at this institution. That's why
a Caterpillar engine was selected.
How about your needs? Do you want
long-life, dependable power of one sort or
another? Check with your Florida Caterpillar
Dealer for standby power, prime power or the
many other capabilities of a Cat engine.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS"

JOS. L. ROZIER KELLY TRACTOR RING POWER
MACHINERY CO. COMPANY CORPORATION
ORLANDO TAMPA MIAMI WEST PALM BEACH CLEWISTON JACKSONVILLE TALLAHASSEE OCALA
Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
John L. R. Grand, ATA 3730 S. W. 8th Street
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Col. .-, of Architecture & Fine Arts Accepted As Controlled Circulatio
University of Florida Publication at Miami, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla. INC















JOHN JOHANSEN, AIA, well-known architect throughout the
country, will be one of the participating architects at the forthcom-
ing Design Concept Seminar on April 22 at the Robert Meyer
Motor Inn, Orlando, Florida. Robert C. Broward, AIA, of Jackson-
ville, and Gene Leedy of Winter Haven are the other two architects
who will present projects.
In addition to the above architects who will serve on the Design
Advisory Panel, two other architects will take their places on the
panel. They are: James T. Lendrum, AIA, Head of the Department
of Architecture, University of Florida, who will be the panel mod-
erator, and Mark Hampton, AIA, a member of the AIA Committee
on Aesthetics.
The Design Concept Seminar is a closed-door session limited to
practicing architects, to present critical analyses and candid discus-
sion of the development through schematic stages of well-designed
projects, and thereby to inspire architects to devote more time, care
and thought to conceptual design.
Attendance at this important educational seminar sponsored by the
Mid-Florida Chapter, AIA, and the FAAIA, is limited to 75-100.
The registration fee is $6.00 for FAAIA members, which includes
cocktail and lunch. The March issue of CONTACT will contain
a registration form for your use to pre-register. Members are re-
quested to pre-register prior to April 15.
PROGRAM
9:30 A.M. Coffee
10:00 A.M. Welcome-James Deen, President, FAAIA
Architect: John Johansen, AIA, New York, N. Y.
Project: Theatre for the St. Charles Redevelopment
Area, Baltimore, Maryland
12 Noon Cocktails
12:45 P.M. Lunch
Speaker: State Representative Robert Alligood
2:00 P.M. Architect, Robert Broward, AIA, Jacksonville, Fla.
Project: Dr. Albert Clark Residence,
St. Johns Bluff, Jacksonville
3:30 P.M. Architect: Gene Leedy, Winter Haven, Fla.
Project: Multi-Story Office Building, Lakeland, Fla.


i'-? -




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