• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The president's message
 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 Convention seminar
 Advertising
 The February seminar
 Organization chart committee structure...
 Future town forms
 Postscripts
 The editor comments
 Calendar of events
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00140
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00140
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The president's message
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Convention seminar
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Advertising
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The February seminar
        Page 16
    Organization chart committee structure bylaws
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Future town forms
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Postscripts
        Page 36
    The editor comments
        Page 37
    Calendar of events
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Advertisers' index
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




FEB 1966 lh
florida
archilect
february1966













A YOUNG architect from
the Midwest quotes for the
current issue of FORI'LUNE
magazine -
"Life in architecture is a
chance to intervene, to contri-
bute, to enhance what exists by
the sheer power of one's pres-
ence and activity."
His definition of life in archi-
tecture is closely related to a
definition of leadership. He pro-
poses the opportunities of great-
ness with the performance of
tasks of leading.
The American Institute of
Architects in each of its subdi-
visions is once again at the
beginning of a new year estab-
lishing its leadership for contin-
uing and future activities. The
Institute, the State Association
and the Chapters have elected
officers, selected committees,
and are beginning the simula-
tions of creating thinking for the
profession.
MOLDING A PROGRAM
Perhaps you have heard your
Chapter President tell of his re-
warding trip to AIA national
headquarters, "The Octagon", in
Washington. "Operation Grass-
roots" enjoined State and Chap-
ter Presidents from the Eastern
areas, inviting a closer relation-
ship with national programs. He
was vocal in searching for new
ways to increase the effective-
ness of his leadership. National
officers and staff briefed each
phase of their activity in order
to better his efforts. Perhaps
your Chapter President has also
shared with you his meeting with


the FAAIA officers and staff
held in Miami at mid-December
with a similar purpose of call-
ing together leaders for critical
and constructive thinking.
Your Chapter is now dividing
the work of its public and pro-
fessional service among its com-
mittees. The Chapter and its
committees are the base of all
activities leading toward better
environment and a stronger AIA.
Standing back, we see a very
proper vertical establishment of
leadership from Chapter, to
State, to the Institute. This is a
very necessary structure of a pro-


WW7


-N



urn w-

a







A:


JAMES


DEEN, AIA


fession dedicated to public serv-
ice. I am certain that each sub-
division of the Institute selects
those men who have the group's
good will and the members'
trust for its officers and com-
mittees.
But leadership is not for this
select group alone. If the pro-
grams for a better environment
are to succeed, each architect
must accept leadership. The
Chapter, the State and the Insti-
tute chances to intervene, to con-
tribute, to enhance, exist by the
architect's leadership in his com-
munity. We need hundreds of
leaders to accept the responsi-
bility for a better environment.
The call is out for the architect
to be a legislator, a state com-
mittee worker, a city planning
board member, a voice at civic
meetings against ugliness, a lead-
er. Each architect must do his
share of the work leading toward
beauty and away from the pres-
ent turmoil and dissatisfaction
with the ugly. Those architects
involved with Chapter, State and
Institute leadership can only pro-
vide a platform from which the
individual architect must speak
as a leader.
"With a good conscience
our only sure reward, with
history the final judge of
our deeds, let us go forth to
lead the land we love, ask-
ing His blessing and His
help, but know that here on
earth God's work must truly
be our own."
-President John F. Kennedy
1961




























































To your construction site from our Jacksonville
terminal, Merry Brick moves constantly to build a
finer Florida.
You get quality brick by the bargeload (for
economy), delivered by a modern motorized fleet
(for speed and efficiency) throughout Northern
Florida, or by rail to other Florida points.
Wherever in Florida you may be, serving you
is the constant concern of all Merry Brick person-
nel.


HARRY G. MADDEN
District Sales
Manager, Florida


ROBERT J. DICKSON
Sales Representative
St. Petersburg


JOHN C. PREBLE
Sales Representative
Jacksonville


in44sruu BnOthhrLd

&rHJck dmjd- TiL 614Ua*n4LL
1ln141t 'Ae., n=fic







the
ilorid
arclilect
onlcial journal
of le florla
associallon
ol01he aerical
IRSOiln 01
arcIulcol
arcllecls


OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Ave., Clearwater

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
H. Leslie Walker
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest e Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
Jacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
Mid-Florida John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo, /Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Director
G. Wade Swicord / Architectural Photographer
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. . McMurray Printers.
2


THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
by James Deen
Inside Front Cover

DEDICATION
College of Architecture & Fine Arts

5-8

CONVENTION SEMINAR REPORT
"Quality or Mediocrity"

9-12

THE FEBRUARY SEMINAR

16

ORGANIZATION CHART
COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
BYLAWS

17-32

FUTURE TOWN FORMS
A Matter of Choice
Part II

34435

POSTSCRIPTS

36

THE EDITOR COMMENTS
by Fotis N. Karousatos

37

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

38

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

40


FRONT COVER -This is the "family tree" issue of The
Florida Architect, devoted in great part to the FAAIA
organizational chart and the bylaws by which we are
governed. May our "cover tree" continue to grow strong -
and may our work always "bear fruit"!

VOLUME 16 K NUMBER 2 K 1966
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT































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7L NWL rII


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Lm 11 ..)I!1)I1 I*Y, rl.~l*II1~L rt.~ 1 -LI V. TL *r
r';n .~*.,. IrA .-


JACKSONVILLE APARTMENT OWNER


Lakeland
Lake Worth
Leesburg
Moore Haven
Mt. Dora
Newberry
New Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Qu incy
St. Cloud
Sebring
Starke
Tallahassee
Vero Beach
Wauchula
Williston


I


Florida Municipal Utilities Associaifion



FEBRUARY, 1966,


Alachua
Bartow
Blountstown
Bushnell
Chattahoochee
Clewiston
Ft. Meade
Ft. Pierce
Gainesville
Green Cove Springs
Havana
Homestead
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
K~ey West
Kissimmee
Lake Helen


Located near Jacksonville University, the
beautiful Carriage. House Apartments,
constructed in contemporary Colonial
style, offer luxurious Florida living in
"Total Electric" comfort.
The ultramodern apartment complex has
many attractive features including
soundproof construction, wall-to-wall
carpeting or terrazzo, adjacent parking,
lounge area, fully equipped recreation
room, three pools and tennis court.
Contributing to the comfort of All Elec-
tric Living are individually-controlled
central air conditioning and heating and


built-in range, refrigerator and dish-
washer in every unit.
The owner chose all-electric construc-
tion because of electricity's economy
and convenience of operation. In the
words of Jack B. Wales of the Carriage
House Apartments, "There are one
hundred sixty-three units, all elec-
trically equipped. All of our resi-
dents are very satisfied ."
Architects, engineers, builders and
owners are sold on "Total Electric"
commercial construction. For your
next commercial building, specify
ALL-ELECTRIC.


CHOOSES ALL-ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION





Appointed by Governor Haydon Burns


Barrett Named to State

Board of Architecture


The appointment of Pearce L. Barrett to Florida's
State Board of Architecture was recently announced
by Governor Haydon Bums. Mr. Barrett received his
Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University
of Florida in 1950. He is presently a partner in the
architectural firm of Barrett, Daffin & Bishop in Tal-
lahassee, Florida. Mr. Barrett has also served as chief
supervising architect for the Florida Hotel and Res-
taurant Commission, and was previously architectural
designer with the Florida State Improvement Com-
mission. He was president of the North Central Chap-
ter of the FAA/AIA, 1964-65 and is an active member
of the American Institute of Architects.


suss

*
IT'S
EASIER
TO
SAY
THAN
*

SHELTON, ULLMANN,
SMITH & STREICH, INC.
Designers & Furnishers
of Contract & Commercial
Interiors in Association with
Architects
600 S. E. 2nd Court
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Telephone 522-4779


I THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Important Change!


The FAAIA's Seminar
on

"WEATHER RESISTANCE"

Friday, February 4th,
Will Be Held at the
HOLIDAY INN
Gainesville, Florida

Featured Speaker BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner

PLAN TO ATTEND!

























RUDOLPH WEAVER
FELLOW
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

1880 1944


GIFTED ARCHITECT INSPIRING TEACHER FIRM ADHERENT OF THE HIGHEST PRINCIPLES
OF PROFESSIONAL, ACADEMIC AND PRIVATE LIFE

IN 1925 HE CAME TO THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TO ESTABLISH ITS CURRICULUM IN
ARCHITECTURE AND TO SERVE AS THE FIRST ARCHITECT TO THE BOARD OF CONTROL *
DURING NINETEEN YEARS OF EXEMPLARY LEADERSHIP HE FORMED THE SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS, PIONEERED ITS CURRICULA IN ART, LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE, AND BUILDING CONSTRUCTION THE NATION'S FIRST, AND SUCCESS-
FULLY DIRECTED FOR THE BOARD OF CONTROL THE DESIGN AND ERECTION OF MANY
NOTABLE BUILDINGS THROUGHOUT THE STATE

IN APPRECIATION OF HIS LONG AND DEVOTED SERVICE, AND FOR THE INSPIRATION OF
ALL FUTURE STUDENTS, THIS BUILDING AT THE CENTER OF THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITEC-
TURE AND FINE ARTS IS NAMED IN HIS HONOR



RUDOLPH WEAVER HALL

IN COMMEMORATION OF WHICH THIS TABLET HAS BEEN DEDI-
CATED BY THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTI-
TUTE OF ARCHITECTS
FEBRUARY 5, 1966


FEBRUARY, 1966






Photos by G. Wade Swicord
_-VIM


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEDICATION is Saturday, February 5th, at 2:30
p.m. After greetings by University of Florida Pres-
ident Dr. I. Wayne Reitz, the dedication speech
will be given by Professor Leonard I. Currie, dean
of the College of Architecture and Arts, Univer-
sity of Illinois. Governor Haydon Burns is expect-
ed to attend the ceremonies, and President James
Deen will represent the Florida Association of the
AIA. Landscaping for the new center of archi-
tecture was designed by Thomas Wallis of Stresau
6 Wallis. Noel Lake, landscape architect of the
University of Florida, is in charge of plants and
grounds.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Photo by Bodden Fotos


COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE
At long last the University of Florida "Step-
child College" has a new 98,500-square-foot
home! In the past, the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts has been housed in one place and
then another, always using more-or-less unaccept-
able space given up by some other campus activ-
ity. Rudolph Weaver, FAIA, founded the School
of Architecture in the attic of Peabody Hall in
1925. Since that time, because of the phenom-
enal growth of the College, it has been neces-
sary to move to various temporary buildings
without ever having a permanent location.
Dean Turpin Bannister, FAIA, and his faculty
prepared a very detailed program of requirements
for both the ultimate plan and the first phase.
Included was the requirement that north-south
crosswalks through the site be maintained and
that an attempt be made to expose the students
passing through the complex to art objects in
such a way that they would acquire an apprecia-
tion of art through subtle contact.
Kemp, Bunch & Jackson of Jacksonville were
engaged. Planning for a permanent building was
begun in 1957 when the Legislature appropriated
money for design only. After completion of the
design development phase, the project remained
dorman until funds were made available for con-
struction in 1963.
The new Architecture and Fine Arts Center is
the first phase of a master plan which includes
several other elements such as a music hall and
classroom buildings for the various departments
within the College. The newly completed class-
room building will be used by only the Depart-
ment of Architecture in the developed plan. The
terraced area between Rudolph Weaver Hall and
the classroom building is the beginning of an
cast-west mall which will extend the length of the
site tying all of the buildings into an integrated
design. It is anticipated that the Music Hall will
form the western terminus of this mall. Adequate
parking will be provided.
The University Gallery forms the entrance to
the project at Thirteenth Street and includes, in
addition to the art gallery, two acoustically de-
FEBRUARY, 1966


AND FINE ARTS CENTER
signed lecture halls seating 136 and 95 students.
This building has a gross area of 10,860 square
feet and a volume of 208,840 cubic feet. In the
center of the building is an atrium with a sunken
court where spotlights can be trained upon sculp-
ture for dramatic emphasis.
The two-story Administration-Library unit has
been appropriately dedicated Rudolph Weaver
Hall in honor of the founder of the College. This
building houses the Administrative Suite, class-
rooms, faculty offices, audio-visual aids and the
Architecture and Fine Arts Library. The Admini-
strative Suite includes the Dean's office, Assistant
Dean's office, secretarial space, work room, con-
ference room, mail room and reception space.
Connecting \Veaver Hall with the classroom
building are a covered passage at the first floor
level and a glazed passage at the second floor
level. The glazed passage is 18'-6" wide, 83 feet
long and includes portable display stands for ex-
hibits and faculty judging of student work. A
gross area of 22,480 square feet is included in
Weaver Hall and the connecting passage with a
volume of 283,392 cubic feet.
The classroom building consists of four stories,
a partial basement and a penthouse with a total
area of 65,170 square feet and a volume of 856,-
692 cubic feet. Department head's suites are pro-
vided for Architecture, Building Construction and
Art. Each suite consists of a private office, sec-
retarial-waiting area and a workroom-storage space.
The Building Construction Department uses
eight classrooms as well as several computation
rooms. Eleven drafting rooms, two classrooms and
two seminar rooms are in use by the Department
of Architecture, while the Art Department occu-
pies thirteen major spaces for studios, teaching
gallery, and storage areas. Interdepartmental
spaces include a materials lab, woodwork shop,
and a work court for constructing building mock-
ups. Faculty offices are provided for each of the
departments.
Consulting Engineers were Van Wagenen &
Van Wagenen of Jacksonville and the $1,500,000
complex was constructed by Tassinari Construc-
tion Co. of Gainesville.







A Trio of Outstanding Architects



Take A Candid Look at the New



School of Architecture


We can be thankful that one of the Nation's largest
architectural schools has at long last moved from its
shanty-town environment to occupy more acceptable
quarters. For this the people of Florida must be justifi-
ably proud.
Unfortunately the demand for more and better edu-
cated architects has not waited for the construction of the
new building for the University of Florida's Architectural
School. The new building is appropriate for the reading,
writing and arithmetic curriculum utilizing paper, pencil,
stools, drafting boards and those funny little sand pads.
But the dynamics of our time demand more. They
require computers, audio-visual devices and techniques;
need seminar rooms, and spaces for inter-disciplinary
team teaching involving psychology, sociology, economics,
government and other design professions; require work-
shops for research, creating and testing architecture at
both theoretical and practical levels, but involving uni-
versity-wide collaboration; and beg for an environment in
which a university-wide creative life is stimulated. Our
brand new building is already too small for existing re-
quirements and inadequate according to emerging stand-
ards for teaching creative architecture.
Instead of dedicating the new building, it seems more
fitting that we dedicate ourselves to the task of expanding
this new facility to meet current demands and to keep
pace with the twentieth century.
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA
Miami, Florida

In order to comment effectively on the building in
question, one ought to know and understand the educa-
tional process and philosophy which it houses. Not know-
ing this, I venture my thoughts and ask "does the building
reflect these thoughts?"
The architect must be a man of conviction, possessing
knowledge not only of his profesison and the building
trades but of his society as well. The life of today's stu-
dent will be spent shaping a new world; understanding of
this world can and should begin in the school.
Thus, in the school there first must exist the educator
and philosophy of education tuned to the greater needs
of the profession and capable of imparting to the student
knowledge sufficient for his life's work. I think, perhaps,
given the educator and student, environment becomes an
important force in the educational process.
The environment (building) should be alive, possess-
ing the soul of architecture. It should call forth that feel-
ing in the student which drives him to become an architect.
It should speak to the lay mind calling out "Here is Archi-
tecture, what it can be and what it can do for you." The
building should tell all people that an Architect was there.
Fitting into the fabric of a campus, such a building
should reflect and respect precepts and principles of urban


planning. It should not stand as an ivory tower but should
become a thruway and meeting place for students of all
disciplines, imitating that congregation of human beings
called society.
With these comments, I leave the reader to draw his
own conclusions as to the validity of this building and
school as well as their place in the future of the pro-
fession. Notwithstanding requirements of client, restric-
tions of budget and need to fit an established environment
(factors affecting all design problems), this building
would perhaps function best as a home for students of
Business Administration.
John W. Totty
Titusville, Florida

When a person or group of persons undertakes a
building project, logic and reason call for careful analysis
of all problems, aimed at reaching solutions based on the
full extent of the knowledge of the people involved.
When an Architect builds for himself he has the ad-
vantage of a client with complete undertsanding of worth-
while aims and goals and an unlimited outlet for creative
expression unstifled by preconception.
When the only school of architecture in a rapidly

growing state is given a prize site on a beautiful campus
on which to build a multi-million dollar complex to house
the creative nerve-center of the state's educational sys-
tem, it follows that:
1) the building be in the true spirit of creative ex-
perimentation so that it provides inspiration to the
students whose lives are affected every day by its
spaces;
2) the "statement" be honest and uncluttered so that
there be no doubt in the student's minds of the
sincerity of the surroundings in which they are
asked to mold a course for the future;
3) every resource of advanced technology that can pro-
vide systems and products for building be drawn
on fully, so that the endeavor is truly creative from
all points of view.
Unfortunately for the students, for the people of the
State of Florida, and for Architecture, our new school has
fallen far short!
There are always handy excuses for not having reached
greatness. Some usually relate to political involvements.
Others often speak of adimnistrative problems, and more
often than not there is talk of "making everybody happy".
These excuses are shameful reasons for dismissing the
true potential of architecture and for allowing what should
be the mistress of creativity to be clothed in second-hand
rags!
There is no reason for mediocrity!
Donald I. Singer
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







"Who is responsible for Quality or Mediocrity in our
Cities?"
Matt M. Jetton, CHAIRMAN / Hillsborough County
Planning Commission / Today, with over 70 per cent
of our nation's population residing in urban communi-
ties, we face social, economic, and physical problems.
These problems collectively form the greatest challenge
of our time. Our present cities are hopelessly outdated;
it has been estimated that we will have to completely
rebuild them within the next 20 years. What physical
form will our new cities take? ... And how may we be
assured that they will be beautiful and efficient, rather
than ugly and disorderly?
When we speak of quality we must deal not only
with individual components but with the total environ-
ment.
. The establishment of official public planning
agencies or departments employing fulltime professional
planning staffs has proven the best method of insuring
the continuity of the comprehensive planning function.
... It remains for elected city officials and city
councils to adopt the long-range plans and to translate
these plans into policies which will guide and direct the
proper growth and development of our cities ... The
establishment and administration of zoning and build-
ing codes to guide private development also lies directly
within the control of our elected officials.
Within this framework, private land developers and
builders and businessmen mold their individual plans
for construction and development.
Who is responsible for building quality into our
cities? Obviously, this responsibility lies with no single
representative group but with all of the several profes-
sions, business groups, civic leaders, and governmental
officials which invidually have any part in the shaping,
guiding, and carrying out of the growth of our commu-
nities. And to the list we should add the general public,
as well, for it is in the last analysis the public which
ultimately has the choice of accepting or rejecting the
environment which is offered.
While the responsibility for bringing quality to our
urban areas lies individually with all of the professions
and groups which have a role in community develop-
ment, such professions and groups have yet another
responsibility which, to my mind, is not now being
properly exercised. I speak of the responsibility which
the professions, officials and business leaders have to
each other- the responsibility of discussing joint prob-
lems by means of a free interchange of ideas. Today,
this essential intercommunication is virtually lacking.
How often have we gone to annual conferences and
conventions only to hear our own interest groups
wrestle with problems of urban development as only
we see it. Each year, at countless meetings, architects
talk to architects, builders talk to builders, city plan-
ners talk to city planners, landscape architects talk to
landscape architects, land planners talk to land plan-
ners, and public officials talk to public officials. W.


THE CONVENTION


"QUALITY OR MEDIOCRITY"
... We must not forget that the major portions of
our cities are developed, and will continue to develop,
under the workings of our democratic system, largely as
the result of private enterprise ... We must find ways
to make beauty and quality pay -and to rationalize
Swhy mediocrity will not pay. We must strive to make
good community design a product desired by the
general public.
These are the responsibilities we must shoulder.
Jack L. Mllin / Mortgage Broker / I'm no flag-
waving nut ... but the American people are confused
in their values today. We never look outside the front
door and are getting fatness of the brain because of
this.
S.. We have Appalachia of the soul in too much
of Urban America today. Too many of our residential
developments have mainly been speculative ventures
with one thing in mind -to mass-produce a cubicle
jammed in a spreading cluster of almost identical other
cubicles.
This population and building explosion has pro-
duced one recognizable result mass anxiety.
S. The tragedy of our nation is that nature has
been needlessly destroyed by earth-moving machines
directed by greedy investors and builders with no sense
of responsibility to the earth or the community.
... We must safeguard the natural beauty of our
state immediately with architectural and community
planning senseless intra-city four-lane highways
through prime residential areas and a super market and
a gasoline station on every corer will destroy the para-
dise we advertise.
A well-balanced residential area . with bicycle
paths, a library, and natural foliage .. is not a pipe
dream it is the only hope we have for our youth and
young adults.
So great is this tragic crisis in Urban America that
many psychologists believe the family unit as we have
known it will be destroyed.
... I feel a moral crisis exists today because parents
never think often enough of their children and their
children's children. As a consequence, our honesty and
ethics are debased ... parents aren't furnishing proper
stimulation ...
We are too busy indulging our rich way of life.
And while a firm look at our inner self probably won't
change all the people, at least we can have a realistic
motivation towards a more moral and spiritual way of
life.
The destruction of values goes along with the
destruction of trees and this, too, is a hypocrisy of life
that must be ended.
We live in an age of computers, but machines will
never provide the answers for a lack of good common
sense.
.. .We must plan wisely and act firmly.
Eve Proctor, CHARMAN / Downtown Beautification
Committee, WINTEr PARK / In a small city there
are many people responsible for quality -namely the
citizens or a committee of citizens the merchants -
Chamber of Commerce the landlords and the City
Commission with its park boards. I would like to


FEBRUARY, 1966






explain the roles of these various
groups.
To my mind the basic reason
for Quality is economics. To draw
people, an area must first be attrac-
tive to the eye . This is the
responsibility of the owners of the
property. It is their sacred duty to
the citizens, to do the very best
they can. Fortunately, they are
now compelled to use architects. If
only the architects could impress
these people with the necessity of
giving a little space-so that a
tree might grow. So many of them
are shortsighted and build right up
to the lot line, instead of making
their neighborhoods a thing of
beauty with planned planting. In
this regard, I would urge these
owners to use the services of a
landscape architect....
Most cities have a Merchants
Association. In Winter Park this
group was responsible for the form-
ing of a Beautification Committee
... Our committee has a represen-
tative cross section of citizens -
bankers, architects, owners of prop-
erty and members of the Chamber
of Commerce. We meet about
every two months depending upon
what has to be done ...
It is the duty of the Chamber
of Commerce to keep the City on
its toes. All too often the Commis-
sion becomes involved with City
affairs, and rightly so. However,
when work is heavy they are apt to
overlook the City's appearance and
what it should represent.
Quality can only be obtained by
workers-very often it seems like
a thankless job. It is so difficult to
get things moving, but what a re-
ward to see Quality rise where
Mediocrity stood. It is the responsi-
bility of many and not only a few.
R. D. Hill I Division Manager,
The Florida Power 6 Light Com-
pany, Palm Beach, Fla. / .. An
old Chinese proverb states: "The
man who moved the mountain was
he who began carrying away the
stones."
Many mountains have been
moved since the founding of our
United States. What has been the
single most significant factor that
has enabled the free man in our
country's history to carry away the
stones individually and move
mountains collectively? It is a
unique system of government
which, by its very basic concepts,
recognizes quality and discourages
mediocrity.
. Our economic system is not
something separate and apart from
the other aspects of our way of life


-it is a part of our way of life.
Through its unique interaction,
our economic system provides a
means for putting the spotlight on
quality and at the same time sen-
tences the mediocre to eventual
starvation. In my opinion, here
lies the greatest weapon we have in
the war on ugliness . .
The electric utility business is
particularly conscious of aesthetic
as very few citizens escape the in-
fluence of its services and facili-
ties .. .
Government, at all levels, must
reaffirm its true role in the shaping
of a better environment. For it is
the role of government to provide
for internal tranquility and thus
allow the free process of economy
to flourish. Free citizens must be
encouraged to take an active part
in the affairs of state. Our leaders
in government must be carefully
selected for it is they who set the
stage for present and future growth
and development.
What of the individual citizen
and his role in the question of
quality or mediocrity? As the mov-
ing of mountains begins with the
carrying away of stones, develop-
ment of our citizens begins with
education. More and better insti-
tutions of learning are desperately
needed to meet the demands of
present and future needs ... It is
from pride that come the basic in-
gredients of quality.
To the members of the Florida
Association of Architects, the chal-
lenge has been aptly put by Past
President of AIA, Mr. Odell. "Our
task is a big one, but if we, as
architects, don't take up the chal-
lenge, we will have lost by default
our role as shapers of a better
American environment, a role
which we have said is our right.
But our right is not a divine one;
it must be earned."
Finally, to the architects, engi-
neers, and builders, I leave you
with this parting quote from Henry
J. Kaiser: "When your work speaks
for itself, don't interrupt."
Norman Davis, Public Affairs Ed-
itor I WIXT Television / I have
focused my attention on a break-
down in two fundamental process-
es which have permitted our cities
to become what they are today and
which will determine substantially
what they will become tomorrow.
We are handicapped today (1)
by local and state governments
which have been unwilling or un-
able to tackle the needs of gallop-
ing urbanism, and (2) by a lack of
an intensive and continuing debate


on what the city is and what it
should try to become. These two
topics are particularly relevant to
the State of Florida.
As a backdrop to an exploration
of state and local government, it
is important to remind ourselves
that government at a national level
is moving rapidly to the rescue of
the American city ... Whether or
not you agree with the motives or
the methods of the federal push,
the growing assumption of respon-
sibility at the federal level is a
reality . .
Yet below the federal level, gov-
ernment has in most cases con-
tented itself with being a care-
taker and not an innovator.
The story of the domination of
our state legislature by rural forces
for over a generation is being re-
written today under pressure from
the U.S. Supreme Court.
By 1967, the Florida Legislature
will be reapportioned to represent
people instead of pine trees.
But state government has not
been alone in refusing to adapt its
form and function to recognize the
new reality posed by sprawling
cities, for the urban areas them-
selves have clung rigidly to out-
dated forms of local government.
Our cities and counties are severely
hamstrung by fragmented, over-
lapping, contradictory layers of gov-
ernment that stifle the emergence
of a true sense of community pur-
pose and make comprehensive ur-
ban design and planning impos-
sible.
... At this point, I would like
to shift the emphasis somewhat to
take up the second part of my
thesis. Even if local government
were made truly representative, and
responsive to the people it serves,
we still would need what I like to
call a continuing dialogue on what
the city is and what it should try
to become.
The responsibility here falls
most heavily on architects, plan-
ners, and other design professionals
who are best qualified by training
and experience to point out the
features of our environment that
are good and why and to sug-
gest what is bad in our environ-
ment-and why. This obligation
has by no means been fulfilled.
"How is Mediocrity eliminated and
Quality achieved in our Cities?"


Haley Sofge, EXECUTIVE DIREC-
TOR / The Housing Authority of
the City of Miami, Florida / ...
Men must have pride in their
homes, in their cities ... and they
must find a "place" for themselves


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I






in this urban environment. Success
in the AIA's effort to achieve qual-
ity in man's physical environment
will occur in direct proportion to
man's constant search for "iden-
tity"; to man's rebellion against
unplanned, ugly cities.
This rebellion will take place
sooner if we can give man some-
thing in which to take pride, to
enjoy, or to compare. A well-de-
signed school, library, public hous-
ing project; a well-conceived shop-
ping center, filling station, or
what-have-you, may be the commu-
nity spark to ignite man's interest
in a better environment. To the
extent that he is successful in de-
signing such a building or develop-
ment, the individual architect is
a "doer" in his profession's "War
on Ugliness." To the extent that
a public official or private sponsor
can play a part in such an under-
taking, he then joins the architect
as a "doer" in this war.
There is no question of the need
for a national research effort on
man's environment comparable to
the present organized effort to ex-
plore outer space ... Today, how-
ever, the "War on Community
Ugliness" must continue to be
waged on many individual, unor-
ganized fronts.
. Architects who have de-
signed public facilities find quite
often that they have been put in a
strait jacket by federal and local
authorities. The authorities justify
this in the name of economy and
their concern with the protection
of the public's interest as if they
are the only ones capable of defin-
ing the public's interest. With an
eye chiefly on profit, private build-
ers are often guilty of the same
thing. If a public administrator is
called upon to explain his involve-
ment in an ugly, poorly-designed
public building and he is not re-
quested to explain as often as he
should be- one popular excuse is
to blame the architect, saying he
considered it a bread-and-butter
account, not lucrative enough to
engage his full talents. The archi-
tect, remembering all the agency
policy and procedure seemingly de-
signed to put a rein on his creative
design impulses, might reply that
there was no butter at all and very
little bread in the undertaking.
Fortunately, there has appeared
in recent years an increased aware-
ness of the need for "quality" as
we proceed with individual pro-
gram efforts to build or re-build
our cities. There is excitement
afoot in many of our cities in the
FEBRUARY, 1966


form of beautiful, imaginative
buildings and facilities the re-
sult, I believe, of the proper mixing
of good architecture and good ad-
ministration.
The "proper mixing" I am talk-
ing about comes from our mutual
understanding of our respective
roles.
It is not enough merely to build
more and more. We must continue
to reinforce the drive for "quality"
... We know that beauty is good
business for our tourist-oriented
economy.
Harrison W. Covington / Painter
and Chairman of the Visual Arts
Department, University of South
Florida / .. Our cities are some-
what less than inspiring.
One suggestion I have often
heard is that a few carefully placed
atomic bombs should be detonated
in our "lovely" cities. As tempting
as this suggestion is, I find that I
can't agree . Cities are needed
because there are people.
Ultimately these people control
the aesthetic quality of their cities.
It is impossible to force people to
make major adjustments in their
environment. For the most part,
change is resisted and old forms
retained. I believe the example of
Brazilia proves this point. Even
though this totally new city was
designed by a master architect, the
people who must live in it reject it.
The only way to bring about
significant changes in our man-
made environment is by changing
the attitudes of a significant seg-
ment of the population. Preferably
this segment will include the deci-
sion makers of the community.
However, it is difficult to persuade
a man to take a chance with his
pocketbook when the abstract prin-
ciple involved is of dubious merit
to him in the first place. It is also
difficult to discuss aesthetics with
the man who's major thoughts re-
volve around the "practical". You
simply can't get his attention. The
normal result of this confrontation
of "idealistic" planner or architect
and "practical" businessman or
politician is an unfortunate com-
promise. What I am trying to sug-
gest is that by the time a man
becomes a community or business
leader it is very difficult to aes-
thetically educate him. The best
time to reach him and to convince
him of the importance of an aes-
thetically organized environment is
while he is still a student.
Specifically, I suggest that the
offerings in Fine Art at the univer-
sities in this State be investigated


and supported by the local AIA
chapters ... museums, art centers,
performing auditoriums and the-
atres of significant design should
be built on our campuses. They
can serve as symbols of excellence
as well as centers for the continu-
ing confrontation of important art
work for the students and citizens
of the community ( this is ex-
tremely important since conviction
tends to fade if the aesthetic bat-
teries aren't recharged occasion-
ally).
One last point . if we agree
that the people should be aestheti-
cally awakened, we should also try
to bring aesthetically alert people
to the State if possible. This means
that careful consideration should
be given to the image created by
Florida in other areas . This
image has been embarrassing on
occasion. For example, the exhibits
included in the Florida Pavilion at
the New York World Fair. While
some were successful the presenta-
tion of dozens of separate booths
-each shouting for attention--
was in extreme bad taste .. I'm
afraid that people attracted to this
State by out Pavilion are not apt
to aid us in our struggle for ex-
cellence.
Philip IL Hiss, PRESIDENT-ELECT
/ Florida Arts Council / In an age
when many individuals feel helpless
to contend with the forces of big
government and big business, I
remain a great believer in the
power of the individual. I am con-
vinced that whenever anything is
accomplished it is because of the
deep conviction and the devoted
work of one person or of a small
group of people.
One of the greatest forces work-
ing against the effective participa-
tion of the individual -in fact,
against effective government-is
the present extreme mobility of the
American people. This is especially
true of such states as Florida and
California. In Florida we are cer.
tainly faced with the serious prob-
lem of an uncommitted and un-
knowledgeable electorate. To be
blunt, too large a proportion of the
electorate doesn't know anything
about its adopted state or about its
elected officials, and furthermore
doesn't give a damn.
Linked with this extreme mo-
bility is unprecedented technologi-
cal and social change, which has
come so rapidly that even the best
minds have been unable to cope
with it.
We are not going to have a
better physical environment until





Sa people we understand the need
for it and will support it, and this
is purely a matter of education.
Today it is perfectly possible to
spend nineteen years in our schools
and universities in other words,
to progress from kindergarten
through several advanced degrees
-without ever being exposed to
any of the arts ... We have pro-
duced a whole generation of aes-
thetic illiterates persons who are
only partially educated no matter
how many degrees they may have
-and it is these people by and
large who are making crucial deci-
sions affecting our environment...
I am constantly astonished and
disheartened to discover persons in
government, education and busi-
ness, who are in positions of great
influence in the selection of archi-
tects, city planners, conservation,
and many other matters critically
affecting our physical environment,
who simply are not competent to
make these decisions. Worse, many
of them are so ignorant that they
don't know they are ignorant. I
am constantly told that design is a
matter of "opinion" or "taste." It
certainly is! Only some people's
opinion isn't worth very much
... The architect today is much
more than an arranger of building
components from the pages of
Sweet's. Ideally, the architect-plan-
ner should be a superman with
enough comprehension of engineer-
ing, acoustics, lighting, aircondi-
tioning, et cetera, to at least be
able to ask his consultants the
right questions. In addition, he
needs to be more than a passable
psychologist in order to influence
clients who "know" what they
want when they want it.
Very few architects are all of
these things. In interviews I have
recently done all over the country
for a book on architecture and edu-
cation, the consensus among many
of our most respected architects is
that there are no more than 25
highly creative architects in the
entire country, and, more signifi-
cantly, that probably no more than
one of 10 practicing architects is
even highly competent...
Not everyone wants a highly
creative architect (frankly, they are
an awful nuisance, constantly
bringing up new ideas and chal-
lenging clients to do something
better), but I know of very few
people who would settle for less
than a highly competent one--if
they were capable of making the
judgment.
In summation: How are we go-


ing to eliminate mediocrity and
achieve quality in our cities-or
anywhere? The long range and
absolutely indispensable solution is
better education for both clients
and architects.
The only group who will suffer
if we are able to achieve a better
environment is the psychiatrists,
and so far as I can see they are
overworked in any case.
Robert F. Coehrane, EXECUTIV
Vicz PR ESrNT / Donnely Ad-
vertising Corporation of Florida,
Miami, Florida / ... I am engaged
in the business of Outdoor Adver-
tising. This is a business of stan-
dardize displays operated by about
900 companies and corporations on
a nationwide basis. Economically,
outdoor advertising is one of very
few sources in a community which
makes it possible for an otherwise
unusuable remnant of land in pri-
vate ownership to produce income,
even if only enough to pay the
taxes. More than a quarter of a
million people in this country re-
ceive regular income from adver-
tising companies for rental of
property.
In the broad categories of mn-
ing, outdoor advertising has no
place in residential or scenic areas.
As a legitimate business, it should
be permitted in commercial and
industrial zoning district under
proper and reasonable controls.
During the recent hearings on
the Administration's Highway
Beautification Bill, the majority of
the Metropolitan dailies constantly
referred to the administration's ef-
forts to protect the traveling public
from the ugliness of "Billboards
and Junkyards."
Little attention or space was given
to the statement of Mr. Phillip
Tocker, Chairman of the Board,
Outdoor Advertising Asociation of
America, who said: "Billboards
have no place in the scenic areas
of our highways. Cities and towns
in the last half of the 20th century
should and must be places of
beauty. Outdoor Advertising will
continue therefore to relate to the
environment of the community
and we will support legislation and
engage in voluntary effort to meet
these ends."
... Surveys indicate that an ex-
tremely small percentage of mod-
em city dwellers have a highly
developed sense of aesthetics. Yet
the mass of American people un-
questionably possess a certain in-
born appreciation of something
"better."
You in the architectural field


have a tremendous opportunity to
point the way to perhaps a better
and more understanding relation-
ship between those concerned with
the aesthetic environment of our
cities and those primarily concern-
ed with the economic aspect.
Through such understanding and
mutual respect, the road from
mediocrity to quality might indeed
be shortened.
Benard W. Shied / PuRSWZrr
/ Mortgage Bankers Association of
Florida / One of man's greatest
weaknesses is in his failure to plan
far enough into the future. In the
name of progress we have moved
hastily and carelesly from the end
of our noses. As a result of this
shortsightedness, we are faced with
our man-made environment of
mediocrity. Our being here today
admits that we are now taking
stock of ourselves and that we are
beginning to wor together.
If the answer lies in stimulating
community leaders to work with
the architects, I suggest the archi-
tects should make the first move.
1. One way of stimulating
community leaders to work with
you would be for you to take an
active part in community affairs,
sflch as the Chamber of Com-
merce, Committee of 100, local
civic dubs, churches and politics.
2. Demonstrate to those com-
munity leaders that you, the archi-
tects, have some knowledge and
care about the economics of the
problem.
3. Architects should join to-
gether on a local level and be vo.
ciferous in their attack on ugliness.
We need your positive approach to
the problem. Tell us uninformed
citizens what specifically we can do
and then show us the ultimate ben-
efits.
4. We are told that in 1966
there wil be approximately 1,800,
000 single family dwellings built
and this figure will increase stead-
ily, even rapidly, each year for
many more years . We must
find some way for architects to
work with the builders who will be
building the millions of houses in
the years to come.
... We should remind ourselves
that one of the things which we
Americans hold so dear is directly
responsible for this mediocrity and
ugliness-and that is our free en-
terprise system. So, while we are
pursuing this goal of eliminating
mediocrity and ugliness, let's be
careful not to do it at the expense
of our cherished freedoms.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































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A Seminar on Weather Resistance
An FAAIA Seminar on February 4, 1966 at the Ramada Inn, Gainesville, Florida


A dynamic, hard-hitting, educational seminar
for architects, engineers and others related with
the building industry has been prepared by the
Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects.
This "Weather Resistance" seminar will cover
the many ramifications of glass usage and specifi-
cations, with live demonstrations of water infil-
tration; characteristics; special features and rela-
tive strength of regular, wire, laminated and
tempered glass; wind deflection; human impact
and flying objects.
The Honorable Broward Williams, State Treas-
urer and Insurance Commissioner, will be the
luncheon speaker. Mr. Williams will discuss in-
surance problems relating to construction.
The invited experts on this seminar program
will provide technical data of value to you, and


BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer & Insurance Commissioner


ample time has been allowed for you to question
these speakers.
REGISTRATION / $5.00 for FAAIA Members (in-
cludes cocktail and luncheon). Your 1965 Membership
Card must be shown at the Registration Desk. / $10.00
for others (includes cocktail and luncheon).
PROGRAM
9:30 a.m. Coffee
10:00 a.m. "Statutes and Rules Affecting Design
Under Jurisdiction of Hotel and Restau-
rant Commission"
Pearce Barrett, AIA
10:30 a.m. "Wired Glass--Safety with Beauty of
Utility"
R. L. Keplinger, Product:on Manager,
American Saint Gobain
11:00 a.m. "Glass Strength Tests"
Paul Christie, District Manager,
Libbey-Owens-Ford Company
11:30 a.m. "Environmental Glasses"
J. Velma Lamb, Architectural
Representative,
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
12:00 noon Cocktails
12:45 p.m. Lunch
1:15 p.m. Honorable Broward Williams,
State Treasurer
2:00 p.m. "Application of Fenestration"
George Stoltz, Vice President-General
Manager, Porterfield Industries Inc. /
Architectural Vice President of Archi-
tectural Aluminum Manufacturers
Association
Frank Fitzgerald, Technical Director,
Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers
Association
3:30 p.m. "Tempered Safety Glass"
R. E. Brown, Sales Manager,
and
C. Nitschke, Vice President of
Engineering, Permaglass Inc.
and
Robert Kohl, Manager,
Hordis Brothers of Florida
5:00 p.m. Summary
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA
5:30 p.m. Adjournment
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








THE
FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION
OF
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF


ARCHITECTS


ORGANIZATION CHART
COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
BYLAWS


FEBRUARY, 1966


























SECRETARY
Forrest R. Coxen


BOARD

OF

DIRECTORS





PRESIDENT
James Deen


a


PRESIDENT DESIGNATE
VICE PRESIDENT
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.

I
COUNCIL OF
COMMISSIONERS
(Chainrin of Commissions)


TREASURER
Dana B. Johannes


DIRECTOR
FLORIDA REGION
Robert H. Levison


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
James Deen ........ President
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.,
Pres. Designate-V.P.
Forrest R. Coxen . . Secretary
Dana B. Johannes .... Treasurer
Robert H. Levison Dir. Fla. Reg.
William T. Amett . Past Pres.


Joint Cooperative Council
A-E Joint Committee
Florida Professional Council
Past Presidents Advisory Council


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Fotis N. Karousatos






PERSONNEL AND DUTIES OF FAAIA COMMITTEES FOR 1966


Duties of each comm



A. Commission on the Professional Society
Sidney Wilkinson, Chairman
Jefferson N. Powell, Vice-Chairman
I .. STATE AND CHAPTER COORDINATION
Chairman: Jefferson N. Powell
Duties: To provide effective leadership in the execution of na-
tional and state programs and policies by chapters; to provide
information and recommendations concerning local affairs and
problems; to foster increased membership; to effect closer rela-
tionships between students and the profession.
2.. STUDENT AFFAIRS
Co-Chairman: O. K. Houston
Co-Chairman: Arthur L. Campbell, Jr.
Duties: To formulate programs and procedures intended to in-
crease the interest and knowledge of architectural students in
the profession and in the aims and accomplishments of the In-
stitute and the Association.
3 .. RULES AND REGULATIONS
Chairman: H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA
Duties: To study the By-Laws and to prepare the text of pro-
posed amendments thereto; to advise the Board so that the
rules of the Association may be current with needs and prac-
tices; to prepare and keep current Policy Statements of the
Association and the Board.
4 .. HONORS AND AWARDS
Chairman: Trip Russell
a. Craftsmanship Awards
Chairmen: Harold Goldman, Randolph Wedding
Duties: To encourage and advise chapters concerning local
Craftsmanship Awards programs; to conduct the state program
of Craftsmanship Awards in accordance with policies established
by the Board.
b. Student Awards
Chairman: M. H. Johnson
Duties: To conduct the program of student awards including the
Florida Association of Architects Medal* to administer and serve
as trustees for student grants and student loan funds including
the Association Student Loan Fund, the Rudolph Weaver Stu-
dent Loan Fund, and the Sanford Goin Memorial Loan Fund.
a. Honor Awards
Chairman: Trip Russell
Duties: To conduct the Honor Awards program of the Associ-
ation in accordance with policies established by the Board.
5 REGIONAL JUDICIARY
Chairman: Jack West
6 FINANCE AND BUDGET
Chairman: Dana Johannes
Duties: To perform the duties prescribed by the Bylaws.


mission: To direct, coordinate, and review the objectives and activities of committees
within the commission; to interrelate these functions with other commis-
sions; to maintain liaison with the Board.
BROWARD DAYTONA FLORIDA FLORIDA FLORIDA FLA.NORTH FLA.NORTH FLORIDA JACKSON-
COUNTY BEACH CENTRAL GULF CO S NORTH CENTRAL WEST SOUTH VILLE


Robert E.
Hall


William R.
Gomon




















William P.
Greening


J. Arthur
Wohlberg




















Frank R.
Prince























Dana B.
Johannes
(1 yr.)


Tollyn J.
Twitchell




















Roland
Sellew




















D. Jack
West
(1 yr.)


J. Vance
Duncan


Richard C.
Haley


Joseph N.
Clemens


Hugh T.
Leitch


Forrest R. Stewart
Coxen Morrison


Forrest R.
Coxen
(2 yr.)


Robert J.
Boerema













Russell T.
Pancoast,
FAIA
(Vice-
Chairman)



Thurston
Hatcher























James
Deen
(2 yr.)


John P.
Stevens




















John T.
Brickert




















Walter
Schultz
(3 yr.)
James Kemp
(3 yr.)


MID-
FLORIDA



Harold W.
Johnson




















Lyle P.
Fugleberg




















Robert
Murphy
(Alternate)


PALM
BEACH



John B.
Marion













Jefferson
N. Powell
(Vice
Chairman)




Charles E.
Toth




















Kenneth
Jacobson
(2 yr.)
Hllliard T.
Smith, Jr.
(3 yr.)







COMMISSION ON THE
PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY
Sidney R. Wilkinson
Chairman
Jefferson N. Powell
Vice Chairman




STATE AND CHAPTER
COORDINATION
Jefferson N. Powell
Chairman
STUDENT AFFAIRS
O. K. Houston
Arthur L. Campbell, Jr.
Co-Chairmen

RULES AND REGULATIONS
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA
Chairman
a. Credentials Committee
b. Resolutions Committee
c. Nominating Committee
HONORS AND AWARDS
Trip Russell
Chairman
a. Craftsman Awards
b. Student Awards
c. Honor Awards

REGIONAL JUDICIARY
Jack West
Chairman

FINANCE AND BUDGET
Dana B. Johannes
Chairman

CONVENTION
William J. Webber
Chairman


I
COMMISSION ON
EDUCATION AND
RESEARCH
Harry Bums, Jr.
Chairman
Lou Schneider
Vice Chairman


I
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
GUIDANCE &
PROFESSIONAL
EDUCATION
John Sweet
Chairman

INTERNSHIP AND
REGISTRATION FOR
PRACTICE
Herbert Anson
Chairman


CONTINUING EDUCATION
FOR ARCHITECTS
Lou Schneider
Chairman

RESEARCH FOR
ARCHITECTURE
James Lendrum
Chairman


COMMISSION ON
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
Ivan H. Smith
Chairman
J. Arthur Wohlberg
Vice Chairman


I

OFFICE PROCEDURES
Jack McCandless
Chairman



BUILDING CODES AND
HURRICANE STUDIES
J. Arthur Wohlberg
Chairman


ENABLING LEGISLATION
FOR PLANNING
Ken Jacobson
Chairman

STATE BOARD OF
ARCHITECTURE
William T. Arnett
Chairman


COMMISSION ON
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
Frank F. Smith
Chairman
James Jennewein
Vice Chairman





RESIDENTIAL
ARCHITECTURE
William Morgan
Chairman

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Taylor Hardwick
Lester Pancoast
Co-Chairmen
a. Hospitals
b. Churches
c. Industrial
d. Financial Institutions
e. Schools

URBAN DESIGN
D. Jack West
Chairman

COLLABORATING ARTS
Mark Hampton
Chairman


COMMISSION ON
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Herbert R. Savage
Chairman
William J. Webber
Vice Chairman





PUBLICATIONS
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Chairman


EXHIBITIONS
I. Blount Wagner
Chairman

PUBLIC RELATIONS
Frank Schmidt
Chairman

GOVERNMENTAL
RELATIONS
Edward Grafton
Chairman

HISTORIC BUILDINGS
F. Blair Reeves
Chairman


I I I 1





1 . PRE-PROFESSIONAL GUIDANCE
& PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Chairman: John Sweet
Duties: To encourage and advise chapters in developing pre-
professional guidance and career day programs in local high
schools; to serve as a source for obtaining films, filmstrips, and
related materials on vocational guidance and the work of archi-
tects; to foster closer relationships between schools of archi-
tecture and the profession.

2 INTERNSHIP & REGISTRATION FOR PRACTICE
Chairman: Herbert Anson
Duties: To encourage and advise chapters In developing pre-
registration training programs at the local level; to serve as a
source of information on the pre-registration training program
of the Institute; to maintain liaison with the Florida State Board
of Architecture and with the National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards with respect to examinations for registra-
tion.

3 . CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR ARCHITECTS
Chairman: Louis Schneider
Vice Chairman: Horace H. Hamlin, Jr.
Duties: To foster and encourage the continuing development of
professional competence within the profession; to encourage
and advise the various commissions and committees in develop-
ing seminars, workshops, and similar educational devices for
architects; to serve as a focus for the Association in develop-
ing techniques for continuing professional education.

4 RESEARCH FOR ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: James Lendrum
Duties: To study and make recommendations to the Board with
respect to the role of the Association in research for archi-
tecture; to develop broader understanding of the purposes of
research and of the necessity for research in this age of accel-
erated change.



C. Commission on Professional Practice
Chairman: Ivan Smith
Vice-Chairman: J. Arthur Wohlberg

I OFFICE PROCEDURES
Chairman: Jack McCandless
Duties: To assist the architect to perfect himself in his profes-
sion through technical improvement in his office organization
and techniques; to develop seminars and office aids to accomp-
lish this purpose.

2 .. BUILDING CODES & HURRICANE STUDIES
Chairman: J. Arthur Wohlberg
Vice-Chairmar: Robert F. Darby
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the study of the
principles of design, including codes and standards, to protect
human life and minimize damage to buildings resulting from
disaster such as fire, flood, hurricane, and deterioration; to es-
tablish productive liaison with other organizations on the state
and local level; to promote uniformity of codes in the interest
of simplifying design procedures and the use of proven new ma-
terials and techniques.


Donald
Singer







Donald
Singer








Donald
Singer








Donald
Singer














Clinton
Gamble






Robert
Hansen


Ernest H.
Notz







Ernest H.
Notz








Ernest H.
Notz








Ernest H.
Notz














Joseph
Blais, Jr.






Joseph
Blais, Jr.


Archie G.
Parish







Mark
Hampton








Archie G.
Parish








William B.
Harvard














Melvin F.
Schultz
(Vice-
Chairman)
Richard M.
Jones
(Vice-
Chairman)

James R.
Dry


Louis
Schneider







Louis
Schneider








Louis
Schneider









Louis
Schneider














Joseph
Blacker






Joseph
Blacker


Arthur L.
Campbell, Jr.


William H.
Guerin


Arthur L. William H.
Campbell, Jr. Guerin


Arthur L. William H.
Campbell, Jr. Guerin


Arthur L I William H.
Campbell, Jr. Guerin


Arthur F.
Butt






Arthur F.
Butt


Pearce L.
Barrett






Pearce L
Barrett


Sam
Marshall







Sam
Marshall








Sam
Marshall








Sam
Marshall














Dan
Hart






Dan
Hart


Henry
Riccio


Harry E.
Burns, Jr.


Henry James
Riccio Meehan


John Sweet










Stephen
Davis














Ed Rempe







0. H.
Oppm-
haimer


Faunce
McCully









Harry E.
Burns, Jr.














Thomas E.
Ewart






Walter
Schulftz
Robert F.
Darby
(Vice-
Chairman)


Wayne D.
Heasley







Wayne D.
Heasley








Wayne D.
Heasley









Wayne D.
Heasley














Clifford W.
Wright






Clifford W.
Wright


Jack S.
Willson, Jr.







Jack S.
Willson, Jr.








Jack S.
Willson, Jr.









Jack S.
Willson, Jr.













Donald R.
Edge






Donald R.
Edge









3 ENABLING LEGISLATION FOR PLANNING
Chairman: Ken Jacobson
Duties: To provide professional leadership In the study of the
presence or lack of regulation and control with respect to ur-
ban design and development; to study the lack of adequate
planning enabling legislation in Florida and the reasons there-
for; to establish effective liaison with other organizations con-
cerned with urban development, zoning, subdivision regulation,
and related subjects.

4 .STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: William T. Arnett
Vice-Chairman: Herbert L. Anson
Duties: To maintain effective liaison between the Association
and the Florida State Board of Architecture; to cooperate in
matters of mutual Interest.



D. Commission on Architectural Design
Chairman: Frank F. Smith
Vice-Chairman: James Jennewein

1 . RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: William Morgan
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the study of de-
sign principles in planning single family housing, low income
housing, and housing for the elderly, including functional, tech-
nical, economic, aesthetic, financial, and construction require-
ments; to maintain productive liaison with public and private
agencies, organizations, and associations aligned with specific
interests in the field of residential architecture.

2 . ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Chairman: Taylor Hardwick
Vice-Chairmen::
(Hospitals)
(Churches)
(Industrial)
(Financial Institutions)
(Schools)
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the principles of
planning of all facilities and their environment, including
functional, technical, economic, and aesthetic requirements; to
maintain effective liaison with governmental and private agen-
cies in matters of mutual interests.

3 URBAN DESIGN
Chairman: Jack West
Duties: To provide professional leadership, assistance, and direc-
tion to the architectural profession In fulfilling its responsibil-
ity for the design and redesign of urban, metropolitan, and
regional areas; to foster sound community growth throughout
the state; to maintain liaison with allied professions and organi-
tions in this field.

4 COLLABORATING ARTS
Chairman: Mark Hampton
Duties: To encourage and strengthen productive Interprofes-
slonal collaboration with the arts related to architecture; to
recommend procedures andncogramsL.toward. tbg.en4.af.increas-


BROWARD
COUNTY
Clinton
Gamble








Herbert L.
Anson
(Vice-
Chairman)












Paul Robin
John









Paul Robin
John













Robert
Hansen






Paul Robin
John


DAYTONA FLORIDA FLORIDA
BEACH CENTRAL GULF COAST
Joseph James R. Joseph
Blais, Jr. Dry Blacker


Francis R.
Walton









Francis R.
Walton














Francis R.
Walton







Francis R.
Walton


Sandford
Goldman









James J.
Jennewein













H. Dean
Rowe







James Y.
Bruce


Frank F.
Smith, Jr.









Frank F.
Smith, Jr.













Frank F.
Smith, Jr.






Frank F.
Smith, Jr.


FLORIDA FLA. NORTH
NORTH CENTRAL
Arthur F. Pearce L.
Butt Barrett


Frank G.
George









Frank G.
George













Frank G.
George






Frank G.
George


Mays L.
Gray








Mays L.
Gray













Mays L.
Gray






Mays L.
Gray


FLA. NORTH
WEST
Dan Hart
























Roy Ricks










Roy Ricks














Roy Ricks







Roy Ricks


-,i-~~ J _________________ .1


FLORIDA
SOUTH
Curtis Haley









Russell T.
Pancoast,
FAIA
(Vice-
Chairman)











Donald H.
Forfar









Donald H.
Forfar













Donald H.
Forfar






Kenneth
Miller


JACKSON- MID-
VILLE FLORIDA
Walter Clifford W.
Schultz Wright


J. Brooks
Haas









Walter
Schulmt













Jim Kemp







Herbert
Coons


Lyle P.
Fugleberg









Lyle P.
Fugleberg













Harold W.
Johnson






Lyle P.
Fugleberg


PALM
BEACH
Donald R.
Edge
























R. Carroll
Peacock









R. Carroll
Peacock













R. Carroll
Peacock







R. Carroll
Peacock





1 PUBLICATIONS
Chairman: Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Duties: To act as liaison between the editor of the official
publications of the Association and the Board; to be responsible
for publication programs; to recommend publication policies to
the Board.

2 .EXHIBITIONS
Chairman: I. Blount Wagner
Duties: To develop exhibition programs of current interest to
the profession; to represent the work of the Association and
the Institute to the general public.

3 PUBLIC RELATIONS
Chairman: Frank Schmidt
Duties: To develop the public relations of the architectural pro-
fession; to recommend means by which the national and state
programs can be extended to the maximum at the local level.

4 . GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Chairman: Edward Grafton
Duties: To promote the usefulness of the profession and the
Association to the various governmental bureaus and agencies
having charge of the planning and designing of public build-
ings and monuments and their environment; to promote the
employment of architects in private practice to plan and de-
sign such public works; to maintain liaison with the Florida
Legislature to forward statewide and local legislation that will
promote the welfare of the architectural profession and the
construction industry and the public health and welfare; to co-
operate with the Commission on Public Affairs of the Institute.

5 . HISTORIC BUILDINGS
Chairman: F. Blair Reeves
Vice-Chairman: Herschel E. Shepard, Jr.
Duties: To collaborate with allied organizations and chapters
in identifying historic buildings of architectural significance; to
foster the preservation and care of such buildings in appropri-
ate instances.

6 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Chairman:
Duties: Serves the best interests of the United States of America
in the Institute's relations with foreign architects and foreign
and international architectural organizations; makes recommenda-
tions as to Institute representation in international organizations
and their meetings, prepares for dissemination to the member-
ship information and professional knowledge obtained through
international relations; makes nominations for Honorary Fellow-
ships through the Commission on the Professional Society.


Don Singer







William
Plumb





William
Plumb





William
Plumb











William
Plumb


Tom
Jannetides





Tom
Jannetides





Tom
Jannetides










Tom
Jannetides


John R.
Howey





Don E.
Mcintosh





Richard
Jessen










Henry L.
Roberts


Sidney R.
Wilkinson





Sidney R.
Wilkinson


Frank G.
Schmidt, Jr.





Frank G.
Schmidt, Jr.
(Vice-
Chairman)


Sidney R. Frank G.
Wilkinson Schmidt, Jr.


Sidney R.
Wilkinson


F. Blair
Reeves


Warren
Dixon





Pearce L.
Barrett
(Vice-
Chairman)









Warren
Dixon


James
Crooke


James
Crooke





James
Crooke











James
Crooke


Robert W.
Clark





Walter
KIements





Reuben
Schneider


Joseph M.
Shifalo






Lowell L.
Lotspeich





Joseph M.
Shipalo





Donald R.
Hampton











Hill
Stiggins


Ted Pappas






Roy M.
Pooley, Jr.


Norman
Robson





Norman
Robson





Norman
Robson











Norman
Robson


Richard D. Charles
Miskiel Pattillo







BY


LAWS


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

As adopted by the Membership at the 1965 Convention.


ARTICLE 1. THE ORGANIZATION
Section 1. Name.
a. The name of this organization is the FLORIDA
AsSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS, INC., a non-profit incorporated, State or-
ganization chartered by The American Institute of Archi-
tects and the State of Florida; however, excepting for
reports to governments, property transfer and transactions
requiring legally correct identification, the name for
common use shall be contracted to: Florida Association
of The American Institute of Architects.
b. In these bylaws the corporation is called the Asso-
ciation, the American Institute of Architects, The Institute,
and the Articles of Reincorporation, the Charter.
Section 2. Purposes.
a. The purpose of the Association shall be to orga-
nize and unite in fellowship the architects of the State of
Florida to combine their efforts so as to promote the
aesthetic, scientific and practical efficiency of the pro-
fession; to advance the science and art of planning and
building by advancing the standard of architectural edu-
cation, training and practice; to coordinate the building
industry and the profession of architecture to insure the
advancement of the living standards of our people through
their improved environment; and to make the profession
of ever-increasing service to society.
b. The Association shall function as the statewide
representative of and unifying body for the various Chap-
ters and Sections of Chapters of The American Institute
of Architects chartered within the State of Florida on
matters of statewide and regional interest affecting the
interests of such Chapters and Sections of Chapters.
c. The Association may borrow and lend money and
own property of all kinds, movable or immovable, and
engage in other activities which may be incidental to any
of the above purposes.
d. The Association may act as trustee for scholar-
ships, endowments or trusts of philanthropic nature.
e. This enumeration of purposes shall not be con-
strued as limiting or restricting in any manner the powers
of this Association but the Association shall have all of the
powers and authority which may be conferred upon non-
profit corporations under the provisions of the laws of
the State of Florida.
Section 3. Composition.
a. The Association shall consist of all members of
The Institute in its component chapter organizations in
the State of Florida.


b. The domain of the Association is the State of
Florida.
c. The domain of the Region shall be as designated
by the Institute.
d. The membership is organized into members, Board
of Directors, (herein called the Board), officers and com-
mittees with dues, privileges and classifications of mem-
bership; functions and responsibilities of the Board and
committees; and the qualifications and duties of officers,
all as set forth hereinafter.
ARTICLE II. MEMBERSHIP
Section 1.
a. All Corporate Members and Members Emeritus
of all Chapters or Sections of Chapters of the American
Institute of Architects within the State of Florida shall
automatically be Members of the Association.
b. All Professional Associates and Associates of all
Chapters or Sections of Chapters of the American Insti-
tute of Architects within the State of Florida shall auto-
matically be Professional Associates and Associates of the
Association.
Section 2. Student Associate
a. A student in an architectural school or college in
the State of Florida who is a Student Associate of The
Institute is a Student Associate of the Association.
b. The Association or any Chapter may establish
and sponsor student chapters in schools of architecture in
Florida under conditions established by The Institute.
When sponsorship is by a Chapter, the Student Chapter
is related to the Association through the sponsoring
Chapter. When the Association sponsors a Student Chap-
ter, the relationship will be directly with the Board which
will supervise the preparation of its constitution and by-
laws and obtain approval of them from The Institute.
Section 3. Member Emeritus.
A member, who qualifies for status as Member Emeri-
tus of The Institute, shall be a Member Emeritus of the
Association and shall be exempted from payment of dues,
but his rights and privileges, benefits and obligations of
full membership shall remain unabridged.
Section 4. Honorary Associate.
a. A person of esteemed character who is not eligi-
ble for corporate membership in The Institute, but who
has rendered a distinguished service to the profession of
architecture or to the arts and sciences allied therewith
may become an Honorary Associate.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






FAA BYLAWS

b. The nomination for Honorary Associateship may
be made in writing by any member of the Board at any
regular Board meeting. The written nomination shall be
signed by the nominator and shall give the full name of
the nominee, reasons for the nomination, the biography
of the nominee, a history of his attainments and his
qualifications for the honor. When he is elected by two-
thirds vote of the Board membership, the Secretary shall
ascertain if the nominee desires to accept the honor. If
he accepts, he shall be presented with a certificate of
membership at the next annual meeting of the Associa-
tion.
c. An Honorary Associate shall be privileged to attend
the annual conventions of the Association and speak and
take part in the discussions threat on all matters except
those relating to the corporate affairs of the Association,
but he may not vote threat nor shall he pay dues.
Section 5. Other Membership.
Other types of membership may be created as the
need arises and when permitted by The Institute.
Section 6. Status of Members.
a. The status of a member admitted prior to an
amendment of the bylaws relating to the eligibility or
qualifications for membership shall not be changed be-
cause of the amendment.
b. The grant to and the exercise and use by a mem-
ber of the rights and privileges vested in him by the
Charter and bylaws shall be conditioned upon his pro-
fessional conduct and the payment of dues to his Chapter,
the Association, and The Institute.
c. The secretaries of the Florida Chapters of The
Institute at the beginning of the fiscal year and mid-year
shall file with the Secretary of the Association lists of
their Chapter members in good standing by name and
classification and shall inform the Secretary of the Asso-
ciation at all times of any additions or changes to the lists
filed. The Secretary of the Association shall issue cards
indicating membership in the Association to those mem-
bers who become in good standing.

Section 7. Termination of Membership.
a. A corporate membership shall be terminated by
the death of a member, by his resignation, or by his con-
viction of a felony, or by his default under the conditions
prescribed in these bylaws, and it may be terminated by
action of the AIA Board after it finds him guilty of un-
professional conduct.
b. None of the above Members, Professional Associ-
ates or Associates may resign from the Association, nor
may they resign from the American Institute of Archi-
tects or one of its Chapters or Sections of Chapters and
remain a member of the Association.
c. A Professional Associate or Associate may be sus-
pended or expelled by the Chapter of The American
Institute of Architects of which he is a member and shall
automatically be suspended or expelled by the Association.

Section 8. Privileges of Members.
a. A Corporate Member in good standing may ex-
FEBRUARY, 1966


ercise all the rights and privileges granted him under these
bylaws.
b. A Professional Associate and Associate in good
standing may:
(1) Serve as a member of any committee of the
Association that does not perform any duty of the Execu-
tive Committee or that is not concerned with disciplinary
matters or Institute business or affairs. In addition, the
Professional Associate may serve as chairman of such com-
mittees;
(2) Speak and make motions at any meeting of the
Association and vote threat on any matter that does not
concern the affairs of business of the Institute, or the nom-
ination of a delegate to an Institute meeting;
(3) Not hold office or a directorship of the Associ-
ation.

ARTICLE III. MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1. Annual.
a. There shall be an annual Meeting, herein referred
to as the Convention, which shall be the annual meeting
of the Association and the Florida Region of the Institute.
b. Time and place of the annual Convention shall
be fixed by the Board if not fixed by the preceding Con-
vention.
c. Business of the Convention shall be conducted by
the Officers of the Association and the Chapter Delegates.
d. Delegates to the Convention shall be selected by
each Chapter.
(1) The number of delegate votes entitled to each
Chapter shall be based on its number of Corporate Mem-
bers in good standing with Chapter, Association and
Institute and whose dues have been paid in full to the
Association on or before the first day of October of the
current year, as certified by the Secretary of the Associa-
tion.
(2) Each Chapter shall have two delegate votes for
the first six and one additional delegate vote for each
additional seven (or fraction thereof) such certified Cor-
porate Members.
(3) At the discretion of each chapter, its delegation
may consist of a single delegate, or as many as four dele-
gates for each certified delegate-vote.
(4) Chapters shall be furnished with credential cards
by the Secretary of the Association and these shall be
certified by the President or Secretary of the Chapter that
each delegate is in good standing with his Chapter, the
Association and The Institute.
(5) The Board, at a meeting held prior to the meet-
ing of the Association, shall elect three Corporate Mem-
bers having the qualifications of delegates to act as the
Credentials Committee of the meeting. The Secretary, ex-
officio, shall act as secretary of the credentials committee,
and the committee shall elect one of its members as its
chairman. The term of office of every member of the
credentials committee shall expire when the report of the
committee has been accepted by the meeting.
e. An Annual Report shall be made in writing to the
Convention by each of the following: President, Secre-
tary, Treasurer, Director-at-Large, and Board. The report





of the Board shall include such committee reports and
special reports as the Board deems advisable.
f. Approval by the Convention of the Annual Re-
ports and the recommendations contained therein shall
constitute Convention endorsement of the policies and
proposals reflected by the reports.
g. New Officers for the ensuing year shall be elected
to succeed those whose terms are about to expire.
(1) Nominations shall be made during the first
business session of the Convention.
(2) The nominating committee shall report its
nominations to the Convention following which nomina-
tions may be made from the floor. If the Nominating
Committee finds the member nominated from the floor
eligible to hold office and his nomination is seconded by
two accredited delegates from different Chapters, then
he is nominated for office.
(3) In the event no contest develops, the election
may be declared by acclamation.
(4) For contested elections, voting shall be by
ballots made available to each delegation. A ballot box
shall be open for voting for not less than four hours after
nominations have been closed.
(5) The President shall announce the results of all
balloting at the last business session of the Convention
and declare all elections.
Section 2. Special.
a. A special meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is made by any of the
following:
(1) The Convention, by concurring majority vote.
(2) The Board, by concurring vote of two-thirds of
the Board.
(3) Not less than one-half of the Chapters, provided
each such Chapter has obtained the concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the membership of its gov-
erning body.
(4) Written petition to the Board signed by not
less than twenty-five per cent of the total number of
members in good standing of the Association.
b. Chapter representation shall be by delegate,
under the same rules governing the conduct of the Con-
vention.
c. The number of delegates for each Chapter shall
be the same as for the last preceding Convention.
d. A new Chapter chartered subsequent to the last
previous Convention shall be entitled to delegate votes
in accordance with the Secretary's count of such Chapter's
Corporate Members in good standing fifteen days prior to
the special meeting.

Section 3. Notice.
Notice of the Convention or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association by letter or in an official publication of
the Association. Notice of the Convention shall be served
not less than thirty days before the opening session, and
in case of Special Meetings, not less than fifteen days
before such meetings.


Section 4. Rules of Order.
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance with
Robert's Rules of Order.
Section 5. Voting.
a. Voting may be by affirmation, unless a vote by
roll call is requested by a qualified delegate, at which time
a roll call vote of the delegations shall be taken.
b. The Chairman or acting Chairman of each dele-
gation shall cast the votes for his Chapter's delegation,
but Chapters shall not be required to vote as a unit.
c. No Chapter may vote by proxy.
d. An officer of the Association shall be entitled to
vote only as a member of his Chapter delegation except
that the President shall have an independent vote in the
event of a tie.
e. Minimum number of votes required for action.
Unless these bylaws otherwise require, any action or de-
cision of an Annual Convention or other meeting of the
Association shall be by the concurring vote of a majority
of the delegates voting, except that on a roll call vote any
action or decision shall be by the concurring vote of a
majority of those accredited votes which are cast.
f. A quorum for a meeting of the Association shall
consist of no less than 25 Corporate Members, and at
which meeting there is present at least one Corporate
Member from a majority of the Chapters in the State.
Section 6. Letter Ballots.
No vote shall be taken by letter ballot.
Section 7.
Delegates to American Institute of Architects Convention
The Delegate representing the Association at the An-
nual Convention of the American Institute of Architects
shall be the President of the Association.
Section 8. Suspension of Bylaws.
These bylaws may be suspended at any meeting for
the transaction of any special business by a two-thirds roll
call vote of the delegates present. When the special busi-
ness has been consummated, the bylaws shall be immedi-
ately in force again.

ARTICLE IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 1. Membership.
a. There shall be a Board of Directors, in these by-
laws referred to as the Board. The Board shall consist of:
(1) The Officers of the Association;
(2) One or more directors from each Florida Chapter
as hereinafter provided.
(3) A Director-at-Large, who shall be the Director
of the Florida Region of The American Institute of
Architects; and
(4) The immediate past president, who shall be a
member of the Board the year following his term as
president.
b. The Directors, one or more from each Chapter,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting.
(1) An Alternate Director, one for each Director,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its annual meeting
to function for the Director when the Director cannot
attend Board meetings or serve as a Director.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






(2) The number of Directors from each Chapter
shall be based on The Institute membership in the various
Chapters as determined by the current membership roster
of The Institute as follows:
No. of Members in Chapter ,No. of Directors
1 to 19 1
20 to 59 2
60 or more 3
(3) At least one director and his alternate director
shall be members of the Chapter Executive Committee.
c. The Florida Student Associates of Chapters of
The American Institute of Architects shall be represented
on the Board by Student Representatives who shall main-
tain liaison between the Association and their Student
Chapter.
Section 2. Vacancies.
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled as
set forth in the Charter.
Section 3. Authority.
a. The Board shall manager direct, control, conduct
and administer the property, affairs and business of the
Association, and between annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directives and instructions adopted by the Asso-
ciation at a meeting of the Association.
b. The Board shall issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and to others as determined
by the Board.
c. The Board shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations supplementing, but not in conflict with the
Charter and these By-laws, to govern the use of the
property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of the Asso-
ciation and to govern the affairs and business of the
Association.
d. Each Director, and Alternate Director in the ab-
sence of the Director, shall convey to the Board the
actions and requests of the Chapter he represents.
Section 4. Meetings.
a. Regular Meetings: The Board shall hold at least
four regular meetings each year.
(1) Time and place of the meetings shall be fixed
by the Board.
(2) One regular meeting shall be held immediately
preceding the opening of the annual Convention and
another meeting within thirty days after the beginning of
the new fiscal year.
(3) Ten members of the Board shall constitute a
quorum and all decisions shall be made by concurring vote
of not less than a majority of those members present.
(4) Upon the request of the Director-at-Large the
Board shall convene as the Regional Council.
b. Special Meetings: A special meeting of the Board
may be called by the President, or by a written notice by
a majority of the Officers or by six members of the Board.
(1) Time and place for the special meeting shall be
fixed by the person or persons calling the meeting.
c. Notices and Minutes:
(1) Notice of each meeting of the Board shall be
sent in writing by the Secretary to each member of the
Board at least five days before the date fixed for the
meeting.
FEBRUARY, 1966


(2) Minutes of the meetings of the Board shall be
recorded by the Secretary and approved by the Board in
its succeeding meeting.

ARTICLE V. OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1. Election.
a. The Officers of the Association shall be members
of the Board and elected by a majority vote of accredited
delegates present and voting at the annual meeting.
b. The officers of the Association and Board shall
consist of a President, President Designate (Vice Presi-
dent), Secretary, and Treasurer. The officers shall be
Corporate Members and shall be elected by the Member-
ship of the Association at the Annual Meeting, as desig-
nated herein.
c. The President shall not be elected directly, but
shall assume office by automatic succession from the
Office of President Designate (Vice President), except
the President shall be elected when the President Desig-
nate (Vice President) is unable or unwilling to assume
the Office of President.
d. The Secretary and Treasurer shall be eligible for
re-election.
e. All terms of office shall begin with the fiscal year.
f. Any or all officers shall hold office until their
successors have been elected and qualified. If a vacancy
occurs in any office of the Association, other than the
expiration of the term of office, such vacancy shall be
filled as set forth in the Charter.
g. Only such members who have been officers or who
have served on the Board for at least one year are eligible
for nomination for President Designate (Vice President).

Section 2. President.
a. The President shall be the administrative head of
the Association and shall exercise general supervision of
its business and affairs, except such thereof as are placed
under the administration and supervision of the Secretary
and of the Treasurer, respectively, and he shall perform
all the duties incidental to his office and those that are
required to be performed by him by law, the Charter,
these bylaws, and those that are properly delegated to
him by the Board.
b. The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and the Board and shall be Chairman of the
Executive Committee.
c. The President shall serve a term of one year.

Section 3.
The President Designate (Vice President).
a. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
possess all the powers and shall perform all the duties of
the President in the event of the absence of the President
or of his disability, refusal, or failure to act.
b. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
perform other duties that are properly assigned by the
Board.
c. The President Designate (Vice President) shall be
Chairman of the Committee on Committees.
d. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
serve a term of one year.






Section 4. The Secretary.
a. General Duties of the Secretary. The Secretary
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall act as its recording secretary and its corresponding
secretary and as the secretary of each meeting of the Asso-
ciation, the Board and the Executive Committee. He shall
perform the duties usual and incidental to his office and
the duties that are required to be performed by the law,
the Charter, these bylaws and the duties properly as-
signed to him by the Board.
b. Specific Duties of the Secretary.
(1) Custody of Property. The Secretary shall have
custody of and shall safeguard and shall keep in order all
property of the Association, except that property with
which the Treasurer is charged.
(2) Issue Notices. He shall be responsible for the
preparation and issuance of all notices and all calls and
notices of all meetings of the Association, the Board and
the Executive Committee.
(3) Conduct Correspondence and Maintain Records.
He shall conduct the correspondence, keep the member-
ship roll and corporate records, minutes, annual reports.
(4) Affix Seal and Sign Papers. He shall keep the
seal of the Association and affix it on such instruments as
require it and sign all papers that require the attest or
approval of the Association.
(5) Prepare the Board's Annual Report. In collabor-
ation with the Officers of the Association, he shall prepare
the annual report of the Board.
(6) Meetings. He shall have charge of all matters
pertaining to the arrangements for and recording of
meetings.
(7) The Secretary shall obtain from all Chapters of
The American Institute of Architects in the State of Flor-
ida by February of each year the names, classifications and
addresses of all the Chapter Corporate, Professional Asso-
ciates, Associates, and Emeritus Members in good standing
on the first day of January of that year.
c. Delegation of Duties. Delegation of the actual
performance of his duties is the prerogative of the Secre-
tary, however, he shall not delegate his responsibility for
the property of the Association, or affixing the seal of the
Association, or the making of any attestation or certifica-
tion required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
d. The Secretary shall serve a term of one year.
Section 5. The Treasurer.
a. General Duties of the Treasurer. The Treasurer
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs,
keeping the records and books of account thereof. He
shall assist the Finance and Budget Committee to prepare
the budget, collect amounts due the Association and shall
have the custody of its securities, funds and moneys making
the disbursements for the Association therefrom. He shall
have charge of all matters relating to insurance, taxes,
bonds, instruments and papers involving financial trans-
actions. He shall conduct the correspondence relating to
his office. He shall sign all instruments of the Association
whereon his signature is required, and perform all duties
required to be performed by him by law, these bylaws,


and the duties that are properly assigned to him by the
Board.
b. Reports of the Treasurer. The Treasurer shall
make a written report to the Board at its regular meetings
and to the delegates at each annual meeting and other
meetings of the Association if required. Each report shall
describe the financial condition of the Association, a
comparison of the budget to appropriations as of the date
of the report, the income and expenditures for the period
of the report, and the Treasurer's recommendations on
financial matters.
c. Liability of the Treasurer. The Treasurer, per-
sonally, shall not be liable for any decrease of the capital,
surplus, income, balance or reserve of any fund or account
resulting from any of his acts performed in good faith in
conducting the usual business of his office. When a new
treasurer takes office, the retiring treasurer shall turn over
to his successor a copy of the closing audit of the treasury
and all the records and books of account and all moneys,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belonging
to the Association that are in his custody and possession.
The incoming treasurer shall check the same and, if found
correct, shall give the retiring treasurer his receipt therefore
and a complete release of the retiring treasurer from any
liability thereafter with respect thereto.
d. Delegation of Duties. The Treasurer may not
authorize any person to sign any financial instrument,
notice or agreement of the Association that requires the
signature of the Treasurer, unless such delegation or
authorization is expressly permitted by these bylaws or
the Board, but he may delegate to assistants the actual
performance of the clerical, bookkeeping, statistical, col-
lecting, and recording work of his office and may author-
ize designated assistants to sign, under their respective
titles, records, vouchers, receipts and other documents if
such is not prohibited by the bylaws.
e. The Treasurer shall serve a term of one year.

ARTICLE VI.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD
Section 1. Composition.
There shall be an Executive Committee of the Board
composed of the President, the President Designate (Vice
President), the Secretary, the Treasurer, the Director of
the Florida Region and the immediate Past President who
shall serve on the Executive Committee the year following
his term as President.
Section 2. Powers Delegated to the Committee.
The Executive Committee shall have full authority,
right and power to act for the Board during periods be-
tween Board meetings on all matters except that it shall
not:
(1) adopt a general budget;
(2) change the policies, rules of the Board or the
bylaws;
(3) make an award of honor,
(4) purchase, sell, lease, or hypothecate any real
property;
(5) form an affiliation;
(6) fix assessments and annual dues; however, it
shall be allowed to act for the Board on any of the fore-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






going excepted matters which have been delegated spec-
ifically to it by two-thirds vote of the Board.
Section 3. Decisions of the Committee.
a. The President, who shall be the chairman of the
Executive Committee, shall fix the time and place for the
meetings of the Executive Committee.
b. A quorum of two-thirds of its members shall be
necessary to transact business at a meeting. Every decision
of the Executive Committee shall not be less than a
majority of votes.
c. The Executive Committee must actually meet in
order to transact business, otherwise the acts and decisions
of the Executive Committee are not binding on the
Board or the Association.
d. The actions of the Executive Committee shall be
recorded in minutes and ratified by the Board at its
meeting following such action.

ARTICLE VII. ADMINISTRATIVE AND
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
Section 1. Executive Officer.
a. The administrative and executive offices shall be
in the charge of an executive officer, who shall be known
as the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall
be employed by and shall report to the Board.
b. The Executive Director shall be the Assistant
Treasurer and shall perform such duties in this capacity
as the Treasurer may direct and under his direct super-
vision.
Section 2. Duties of Executive Director.
a. The Executive Director shall be and act as the
chief executive officer of the Association, and as such shall
have general management of the administration of its
affairs, subject to the general direction and control of the
Board and the supervision of the administrative officers of
the Association.
b. He shall stimulate programs under the various
departments and coordinate all inter-departmental affairs.
c. He shall be the officer in whom the Board shall
place the responsibility for carrying out its general policies.
d. He shall maintain contacts with other professional
societies particularly those in the fields allied to architec-
ture and with trade associations in the construction indus-
try so that he may be constantly informed as to the activi-
ties in those fields, extending the cooperation of the Asso-
ciation as circumstances may warrant.
Section 3. Functions of Executive Director.
a. Administrative Functions. He shall direct the ad-
ministrative functions of the Association office as provided
in Article VII of the bylaws. He shall serve as Chief Exec-
utive Officer of The Association in charge of the adminis-
trative and executive offices, and shall maintain liaison
with professional societies. The Executive Director will
limit his employment to the Association.
b. Editorial Functions. He shall be responsible for
the publications of the Association, including the official
journal, carrying out Board directives as formulated by the
Publications Committee and the Board.
c. Legislative Functions. He shall establish continu-
ing and effective relationships with the Florida Legislature,
FEBRUARY, 1966


carrying out Board directives as formulated by the Legisla-
tive Committee and the Board. He shall serve as Legisla-
tive Representative for the Association on a continuing
basis, with such specialized legal assistance as may be
necessary from time to time.
d. Legal and Accounting Function. He shall co-
ordinate legal and accounting functions of the Association
as required, acting to carry out directives of the Board.
e. Liaison Functions with State Board. He shall
establish and maintain effective liaison with the Florida
State Board of Architecture subject to the direction and
control of the Board and supervision of the officers of the
Association.
Section 4. Assistants to the Executive Director.
Upon the recommendation of the Executive Director,
the Board may employ assistants to the Executive Director
to perform such duties as may be assigned to them by the
Board and by the Executive Director, including the details
of the administrative work of the Association.

ARTICLE VIII. COMMISSIONS
Section 1.
The Association shall establish commissions to act as
supervisory and liaison agents for the Board and the Asso-
ciation.
Section 2.
Each commission shall consist of a Commissioner-
elected by the Board at the post-convention Board meeting
and at least one member who shall be the Vice-Commis-
sioner appointed by the President with the concurrence
of the Board at its first regular meeting. At least one mem-
ber of each commission shall be a member of the Board.
Section 3.
The term of office of the members of a commission
shall be one year and that term shall coincide with the
term of the President.
Section 4.
The number and type of commissions shall be similar
in title and functions to those of the national commissions
of The Institute which presently include the Commission
on the Professional Society, the Commission on Education
and Research, the Commission on Professional Practice,
the Commission on Architectural Design and the Commis-
sion on Public Affairs.
Section 5.
a. The Commission on the Professional Society shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate
to the administration of Association affairs or business.
b. The Commission on Education and Research
shall have jurisdiction over committees and its functions
relating to architectural education, pre-registration train-
ing, the registration or licensing of architects, continuing
adult education of the practitioner and research as a source
of knowledge to be integrated with educational con-
stituents.
c. The Commission on Professional Practice shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate to
the practice of architecture.






d. The Commission on Architectural Design shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate
to architectural design.
e. The Commission on Public Affairs shall have
jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate to
public affairs or governmental relations.
f. A list of Commission Committee jurisdiction shall
be published in the Rules of the Board or in a supple-
mentary publication thereof.

ARTICLE IX. COMMITTEES
Section 1. Structure.
a. The Association Committees shall consist of Re-
gional Committees, of Special Committees required for
specific short term activities of the Association, and Stand-
ing Committees, established by these bylaws, of two types:
(1) FAA Standing Committees which serve the spe-
cial needs of the Association and cooperate with similar
committees of the Chapters or Sections of Chapters of
The Institute located in the State of Florida.
(2) Standing Committees which are equivalent to
those Chapter and Institute committees with similar titles
and duties.
b. Regional Judiciary Committee. The Regional Judi-
ciary Commitee shall conduct initial hearings on charges
of unprofessional conduct against a Corporate Member of
the Association which have been referred to it by The
Institute and which hearings shall be conducted according
to the bylaws and Rules of the Board of The Institute.
The Regional Judiciary Committee shall be com-
posed of three Corporate Members, elected to serve stag-
gered three year tarms, and an Alternate, elected to serve
a one year term. Members and Alternate shall be members
in good standing in The Institute, shall be from different
chapters in the Region, and shall not be the Regional
Director nor Officers of the Chapters, The Association or
The Institute.
c. Special Committees may be created by the Presi-
dent or by the Board. When created by the President,
the Board, at its next meeting thereafter, shall review
such action and may continue or discontinue such Com-
mittees, or make changes in personnel as it may deem
proper.
(1) Special Committees shall expire with the fiscal
year, but may be recreated to continue to function into
the following fiscal year.
(2) Chairman and members for special committees
shall be appointed from the membership and their terms
shall expire with the committee.
d. FAA Standing Committees shall be a Nominating
Committee, Committee on Finance and Budget, Commit-
tee on Governmental Relations, Committee for Publica-
tions, Committee for Conventions, Committee for Joint
Cooperative Council.
(1) The membership of these committees shall be
selected by the President from the membership according
to those bylaws and policies established by the Board.
e. The President Designate (Vice President's) rec-
ommendations for committee Chairman for the following
fiscal year shall be presented to the Board at its regular
meeting immediately prior to the Convention of the


Association for Board approval and advice. The committee
chairman for the subsequent fiscal year shall be announced
at a business session of the preceding Convention.
f. The President may, at any time, discontinue spe-
cial committees, alter classification, or make any changes
in the personnel of Special and FAA Standing Commit-
tees and report such action to the Board at its next
meeting.
g. Other Standing Committees shall be the chairmen
of the Chapter Committees performing the same functions
of the Association Committee at the Chapter level.

Section 2. Nominating Committee.
a. There shall be a Nominating Committee whose
duty shall be to nominate members in good standing with
The Institute, the Chapter and the Association, qualified
to become Officers in the Association for each of the
offices about to be vacated.
b. The Board, at least sixty days before the Conven-
tion of the Association, shall elect the committee com-
posed of a chairman and four members from separate
geographical areas of the Region. Chairman and members
shall be Corporate Members.
c. The Committee shall apprise the membership of
their nominations prior to the convening of the Conven-
tion and shall report their nominations to the Covention
at the first business session.
d. The powers of the Committee shall terminate with
the adjournment of-the Convention.

Section 3. Committee on Finance and Budget.
a. There shall be a Committee on Finance and
Budget whose duty shall be to prepare the annual budget
for the Board and to recommend fiscal policies for
adoption by the Association.
b. The Committee shall consist of five members who
are serving or have served as a Director or who have held
office in the Association, appointed by the President with
the Board approval, to serve for the initial year terms as
follows: 2 members for one year; 2 members for two years;
1 member for three years. As their terms expire appoint-
ments shall be made for three year terms. The President
annually shall designate one of the senior members to act
as chairman.
c. The annual budget for the fiscal year following
the annual meeting shall be presented in draft for the
Board meeting immediately before the Convention for
its comments and report to the Convention.
d. The final recommended budget shall be prepared
for the Board approval at the first meeting of the Board
in the new fiscal year.
e. The Committee shall provide for long-range fiscal
planning for the Association and recommend policies
related to funding, investments, travel and expense ac-
counts, control of service projects, supplemental income
and other financial matters which will enhance the Asso-
ciation's financial stability and accrue benefits to the
members and the total profession, present and future.
Section 4. Committee on Governmental Relations.
There shall be a Committee on Governmental Rela-
tions consisting of one member from each Chapter of the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Region, either Corporate or Professional Associate. It shall
be the duty of this Committee to promote the usefulness
of the profession and The Association to the various gov-
ernmental bureaus and agencies having charge of the plan-
ning and designing of public buildings and monuments
and their environment; to promote the employment of
architects in private practice to plan and design such pub-
lic works; to maintain liaison with the legislature of the
state to forward statewide and local legislation that will
promote the welfare of the architectural profession and
the construction industry and the public health and wel-
fare. It shall cooperate with the national Commission on
Public Affairs of The Institute.
Section 5. Committee on Publications.
a. There shall be a Standing Committee for Publica-
tions consisting of 3 Corporate Members. Terms of mem-
bers shall be such as to assure one retiring member per
year.
b. It shall be the duty of the committee to act as
liaison between the editor of the official publications of
the Association and the Board, be responsible for publica-
tion programs, and recommend publication policies to the
Board for its consideration.
Section 6. Committee on Conventions.
a. There shall be a standing Committee for Con-
ventions consisting of 4 Corporate Members, one of which
shall be the Host Chapter Committee Chairman of the
Convention immediately past. Terms of members shall be
such as to assure one retiring member per year.
b. The duties of this committee shall be to recom-
mend convention policies to the Board for its consideration,
to develop convention format and organization consistent
with the professional and educational needs of Florida
architects and consistent with good public relations, and
to act for the Board with Host Chapter Committees in
coordinating programs in harmony with the Association
interests and policies.
Section 7. Committee for Joint Cooperative Council.
a. There shall be a standing Committee on Relations
with the Building Industry, consisting of 4 Corporate
Members and 4 Professional Associates.
b. It shall be the duty of the committee to foster a
cooperative relationship between architects and contractors,
producers of building materials and equipment and other
elements of the building industry. It shall cooperate with
the national Commission on Professional Practice of The
Institute.
Section 8. Operations.
a. The Secretary shall notify the chairmen and mem-
bers of the various committees of the names and addresses
of their respective committee members and their various
assignments.
b. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all
committees, and the Secretary may act as secretary for
the committee if so selected by the committee.
c. Committees have the right to request and receive
all information and records in possession of the Association
and necessary to discharge the duties assigned them.
d. Committees shall act as advisors to the Board and
shall report their findings, recommendations and actions
to the Board except the Regional Judiciary Committee
FEBRUARY, 1966


whose reports are confidential and required by The Insti-
tute to be made directly to the Executive Director thereof.
e. The majority of members of a committee shall
constitute a quorum. Findings, recommendations and
actions of a committee shall be made according to the
concurring vote of the majority of members present at a
committee meeting or a concurring majority vote of
letter ballots.
f. The chairman of any committee requiring an
appropriation shall submit a written request to the Board
for the amount required and reasons thereof, and if
granted, file with the final report of the committee a
detailed accounting of moneys appropriated and expended.
(1) Expenses of the members of the Regional
Judiciary Committee attending meetings shall be reim-
bursed by The Institute in the manner and amount as
prescribed by the Treasurer of The Institute.
g. No committee nor any member or chairman
thereof shall incur financial obligations unless funds are
available in its appropriation and it is authorized to do so
by the Board. No committee nor any member or chairman,
shall commit the Association, orally or otherwise, on any
matter unless specifically authorized to do so by the
Board.
h. When their terms expire, committee chairmen
and members shall transmit to their successors all informa-
tion and records necessary to continue the work of the
committees.

ARTICLE X. FINANCIAL
Section 1. Fiscal Year.
The fiscal year of this Association shall be the calendar
year.

Section 2. Dues.
a. Annual dues equal to the pro-rata share required
to defray the expenses of the Association for the ensuing
fiscal year shall be recommended by the Board and deter-
mined and fixed by the Convention.
b. Each member shall contribute annual dues in an
amount determined by the Convention.
c. Dues shall be for the Association's fiscal year and
shall be due and payable on the first day of the fiscal
year, January 1st.
d. Any member, whose dues and assessments are not
paid in full at the end of the fiscal year, is in default to his
Chapter and Association, and his membership may be
terminated.
e. The Secretary shall send sixty days prior to the end
of the fiscal year a written notice, by registered mail, to
each such member who has not paid his dues and assess-
ments by that time, with a copy to the Secretary of his
Chapter, warning such member of pending termination
date.
f. The Board may terminate the membership of all
types of Associate Members for non-payment of dues and
assessments any time after the end of the fiscal year for
which the Associate Member is in default. The Secretary
shall remove from the rolls of the Association, the name
of any Associate Member upon receiving notice of termi-
nation of membership from the Board, from his Chapter,
31





or by other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or his Chapter.
g. If a Corporation Member is in default to his
Chapter and the Association for non-payment in full of
his dues and assessments at the end of the fiscal year, the
Secretary shall so advise the Institute, and request the
termination of his membership. Copies of such notice and
request shall be sent to the delinquent member and to the
secretary of his Chapter.
h. Termination of membership for any Corporate
Member shall be only by action of The Institute.
i. Each Chapter treasurer shall collect dues from each
member assigned to his Chapter and shall promptly remit
dues collected to the Treasurer of the Association at the
office of the Association. At the option of any component
Chapter of the Association, the Treasurer of the Associa-
tion will collect Chapter and Association dues from each
member of the Chapters which elect the option, and shall
promptly remit dues collected for the Chapters to their
respective treasurers.
Section 3. Contributions.
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefor, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend, or terminate the
privileges and rights of any member.
Section 4. Funds and Securities.
a. All moneys received by the Association shall be
promptly deposited, in their original form, in a depository
approved by the Board.
b. Every disbursement of money, except for petty
cash, shall be by check of the Association, signed by the
Executive Director and countersigned by the Treasurer
or by another officer designated by the board.
c. The Treasurer shall establish petty cash accounts
as authorized by the Board. These funds shall be disbursed
for the usual petty cash purposes, by the person named
in the Board's authorization of the account. Statements of
expenditures shall be duly recorded and the expenditures
approved by the Treasurer before the account is re-
plenished.
d. Reserve or funds in excess of required operating
funds shall be deposited by the Treasurer in an interest-
bearing depository approved by the Board. Or when
authorized by the Board, such funds may be invested in
short term government or municipal bonds or equivalent
securities.
Section 5. Annual Budget.
a. The Board shall adopt an annual budget at its
first meeting each year, by a concurring vote of not less
than two-thirds of its membership present. The Budget
shall show in detail the anticipated income and expendi-
tures of the Association for the fiscal year.
b. Unless authorized and directed to do so at a
Convention or special meeting of the Association, the
Board shall not adopt any budget, make any appropria-
tions, or authorize any expenditure or in any way obligate


or incur obligation for the Association, which, in the
aggregate of any fiscal year, exceeds the estimated income
of the Association for such year.
c. Each expenditure of money and each financial
liability of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher,
or persons authorized to incur the expense or liability,
except petty cash expenditures which shall be subject to
the approval of the Treasurer, and shall be accounted
against appropriated and/or budgeted items.
Section 6. Audits.
The Board shall authorize employment of a Certified
Public Accountant to audit the books and accounts of
the Association for report at the first Board meeting of
each fiscal year.

ARTICLE XI. AMENDMENTS
Section 1. By Meetings of the Association.
The Charter and Bylaws of the Association may be
amended at any annual or special meeting of the Asso-
ciation provided:
(1) Written notice stating the purpose and reason
for each proposed amendment is sent to each Corporate
and Associate Member not less than thirty days
prior to the date of the meeting at which the proposed
amendment is to be voted on. A copy of the proposed
amendments shall be included with the notice circulated
as set forth in the Charter.
(2) Voting shall be by roll-call only and shall
require the concurring vote of not less than two-thirds
of the total delegates-votes present at the meeting.
(3) Every resolution or motion of this Association
amending its Charter or Bylaws shall state that it will
become effective only if and when it is approved by The
American Institute of Architects.
(4) Immediately following adoption of such reso-
lution or motion, the Secretary shall submit a copy of
the amendment and the resolution to the Secretary of The
Institute requesting Institute approval. Upon receipt
of such approval, the Secretary shall enter the amendment
and record its approval in the proper place in the docu-
ments with the date of the amendment and its approval.
Section 2. By The Institute.
The Institute, unless the statutes forbid, may amend
any provision of these Bylaws when the Association fails
to enact amendments properly requested by The Institute.
Each amendment made by The Institute shall have the
same force and effect as if made by the Association, and
shall be effective immediately on receipt of the notice
of the Secretary of The Institute containing the amend-
ment. The Secretary shall enter such amendment in the
proper place in these Bylaws and notify the Chapters
of the change.
Section 3. Title and Numbering.
The Secretary may rearrange, retitle, renumber or
correct obvious errors in the various articles, sections and
paragraphs of these Bylaws as becomes necessary.

ARTICLE XII. RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any vote
or statement of its officers or members nor be pledged or
bound in any manner except by the approval of the Board,
in conformity with these Bylaws.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































Stevens & Wilkinson, A.I.A., Atlanta, Georgia, Architects
Jack K. Wilborn, Atlanta, Georgia, Engineer


perfect meld at Methodist College
Fayetteville, N. C.

The new Methodist College in Fayetteville, N. C., gives an
effect of airy spaciousness, of melding perfectly with the at-
tractive, open site on which it is located.
Like so many leading educational projects, it employs light-
weight concrete construction for both building economy and
design versatility. All buildings are of reinforced concrete frame
construction, employing Solite lightweight structural concrete
in floors and roof deck. Its combination of beauty, economy
and functional efficiency is another tribute to the imagination
and skills of today's architects and the construction trades that
serve them.




Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
















(This is Part II of our two-part re-
printing of "Future Town Forms."
Part I was featured in the January issue
of Florida Architect.)
DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
Planned unit developments are a
good source of ideas about desirable
town form for the future. Already
there are some details from planned
developments which can be used to
make improvements as our existing
neighborhoods and cities fill out and
.are rebuilt.
The planned unit approach has revo-
lutionary advantages over conventional
lot-by-lot development. Perhaps we
should make most of them by requir-
ing that any sizable open tract suitable
for development should be developed
only as a planned unit, rather than sub-
divided into conventional lots for sale.
To launch a limited discussion, here
is a definition of a planned unit hous-
ing development. There are of course
planned developments for commercial
and industrial uses-the planned shop-
ping center and the industrial park-
and as we become more expert we will
evolve means to handle all these things
in combination, coming up with regu-
lations guiding development of whole
new towns. Aside from its emphasis on
housing, the following would fairly
well describe any of these:
"Planned uit development for housing:
(a) Land under unified control plan-
ned and developed as a whole,
and
(b) In a single development operation
or definitely programmed series of
development operations including
all lands and buildings, and
(c) For dwellings and related facilities,
and
(d) According to comprehensive and
detailed plans including not only
streets, utilities, lots or building
sites, and the like, but also site
plans, floor plans, and elevations
for all buildings as intended to be
located, constructed, used, and
related to each other, and detailed
plans for other uses and improve-
ments on the land as related to
buildings, and
(e) With a program for provision, op--
eration and maintenance of such
areas, improvements and facilities
as will be for common use by
some or all of the occupants of
the development, but will not be
provided, operated, or maintained
at general public expense.
Unified development with approved
detailed plans and construction sched-
ules, distinguishes the planned unit ap-
proach from present general practice
under which land is subdivided and re-
quired improvements installed before
lots are sold. After the lot is sold, some
kind of a house will be built, perhaps.
Since we don't know how its interior


functional areas will be related by win-
dows to houses on either side, our
regulations are clumsy and wasteful.
We establish lot width and area and
yard requirements and limitations on
height to keep the worst from happen-
ing and the worst doesn't happen.
The best doesn't happen either. nl
rows of lookalike houses, living room
picture windows frame principal vistas
composed of identical front yards, side-
walks, streets, passing traffic and park-
ed cars.
F u t u r e neighborhood and town
forms possible through good planned
unit development have streets which
serve rather than dominate. Land area
in streets is kept to a minimum, with
loops or cul de sacs holding down traf-
fic in low density areas. The dominant
design feature is the parklike common
open space system, continuous through
superblocks and threaded with walk-
ways (well away from streets) leading
to schools and other principal destina-
tions.
Detached single-family residences
and town houses are oriented toward
the interior parks and away from
streets, grouped in clusters on lots
smaller than has been customary, but
with increased utility and a feeling of
greater space rather than less. Careful
design and siting of individual resi-
dences make excessive side and front
yards unnecessary.
Medium to high density facilities are
separated from low-density by the
parks, and have direct but controlled
access to collector and arterial streets
without pouring traffic through low-
density neighborhoods.
The result is a great deal more
amenity than is common in usual sub-
divisions, considerably higher density,
a designed mixture of housing types
and major economies in land, improve-
ment, service and maintenance cost per
unit.
IMPROVEMENTS IN
OLDER AREAS
Some devices used in planned de-
velopments can be adapted for use in
partially built-up sections and in re-
building older areas. In zoning for indi-
vidual residential lots, we can shift
from present crude flat specifications
to performance-related standards giving
equal or better protection of public in-
terest, but allowing improved land use
and more flexible residential design.
On individual lots, required visibility
triangles protecting traffic safety and
view might replace usual front yard
requirements. Instead of side and rear
yard minimums (with rear yards hope-
lessly confused by usual permission of
accessory buildings but not portions of
principal structures), we could move to
limitations assuring safety and access,
requiring portions of buildings to be
separated as necessary for safety and
access-and that's all.
As to privacy and relation of interior


FUTURE


TOWN


FORMS
function to open space on the lot, we
can do much better than at present.
From housing codes we have indica-
tions as to amount of glassed area re-
quired in relation to floor area in
rooms used for specific purposes. Using
the approach of some planned develop-
ment regulations, we might say that
where 75% or more of required glassed
area of a living room or bedroom is
involved, one set of dimensional mini-
mums applies to related open space;
where less than 25% of such required
living room or bedroom glassed area or
windows for kitchens, baths and other
interior space is involved, a second set
of related open space minimums ap-
plies, and where no, glassed area is in-
volved the only requirement is for
building separation for safety or access.
These approaches leave much more
of the lot available for buildings than
at present, allowing more flexible de-
sign, but creating the danger that too
much of the lot may be covered. Here
again the regulatory approach is related
to performance, with a figure set on
maximum lot coverage by buildings or
with floor area ratio established. When
the site designer has met other open
space requirements, land left over as a
result of maximum building coverage
limitations must be used for courts,
patios and the like, but it can be used
flexibly.
Height regulations are primarily to
assure adequate light and air. Make
them do it by leaning suitable light
planes inward over the lot from above
its boundaries or buildable area limits.
with lower portions of buildings near
the neighbors, higher portions toward
the center of the lot. This is better
than the usual flat limit applying any-
where over the buildable area, and
often too high at its edges.
On streets in existing subdivisions, we
can make some improvements. Traffic
diverters at strategic intersections allow
local drivers to get home, but make
routes unattractive to short-cutting out-
siders. We can't do much about exces-
sive street lengths which waste land
and raise maintenance costs, but we
might reduce excessive right of way
widths on minor streets by giving strips
to adjoining owners. In the course of
building or rebuilding, the added area
available in the lots would allow more
flexibility in structural location and. in-
crease potentials for more useful ar-
rangements of open space on the lot.
TOWARD THE PUBLIC LAND
NET AS A KEY ELEMENT
Moving from details to the total
urban scene, what steps can we take
toward gradual betterment, particularly
in suburban sectors? We can practice
more assiduously what we have been
preaching-that planning is an instru-
ment for coordinated and efficient
development.
Out ahead, we take many public and
quasi-public actions involving major
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






printedd from Florida Planning &
development Oct. 1965. A speech by
'red 11. Bair, Jr., at the Planning for
modern Living Conference, 27th An-
inal Planning Institute, New York
itate Federation of Planning Officials,
let. 1S. 1965.


land acquisition: building interstate
highways, major expressways and other
large-scale automotive arteries; provid-
ing mass transportation; extending
trunk sewer, water, gas and electrical
systems; building new schools, colleges,
universities, public administration and
public service buildings; adding new
parks and recreation areas; building
new churches; adding new cemeteries.
We have tended to plan for these
things separately. Perhaps we should
begin to plan for them together, wher-
ever "togetherness" can be made ap-
propriate. The new (and much need-
ed) coordinating planning concept pro-
posed is the public land net. If we
make a continuing effort to relate pub-
lic and quasi-public actions to building
the public land net, in the years ahead
we can multiply benefits (and particu-
larly amenities), reduce costs, mini-
mize the effects of errors in foresight,
and provide for both present and fu-
ture needs.
The public land net is a system of
interconnected wide webs, usually cen-
tered on limited-access traffic arteries.
Within these webs, as a basic develop-
mental objective, public and quasi-
public uses which can properly be
located there are grouped in such a
way as to provide continuous open
space under public or quasi-public con-
trol, with landscaped areas, merged to-
ward the center, buildings grouped at
the edges.
We cannot now provide established
residential areas with a system of con-
tinuous interior parks like those possi-
ble in planned developments. As the
next best thing, we might surround
neighborhoods with a reasonably con-
tinuous system of exterior greenbelt of
parklike character-largely as a divi-
dend for doing intelligently what we
must do anyway . .
Within the net, islands for private
uses are se r v e d, interconnected,
shielded and buffered by the threads
which set them apart. The existence of
the net as a preferable location for
land-consuming public uses gives pri-
vate areas within the meshes security
against disruption by unpredictable
public action. This net makes logical
major land use divisions easier-within
one reticulation may be a regional
commercial center; within another, an
industrial park.
In most suburban areas, space within
the meshes may be used for balanced
residential communities with support-
ing commercial and service facilities.
Here the net provides access and a peri-
meter greenbelt, and the location of
principal entries to community from
outside traffic arteries and mass trans-
port facilities sets the destination for
internal collector streets and begins to
establish a desirable internal pattern of
land use.
. Holding this principle in mind for
a moment, what do we do about
streets? The minor and collector system
EBRUARY, 1966


within the community may already be
set, and may not fit the peripheral
highways which have been or will be
established around it. Here too there
is a practical solution which depends
on the net, to be broadened from
highway rights of way by other public
and quasi-public uses by land acquisi-
tion programs which will frequently
involve non-park facilities but which
can be run together with relatively
limited purchase in advance of need or
outright purchase for park purposes to
fill in gaps. If our planning is working
right, buildings for public and quasi-
public use can be aligned along the
outside edge of the net, with their
open space concentrated toward its
center to merge into (or in some cases
supply) the greenbelt. A collector belt-
line might well be established for such
buildings, between them and the rest
of the community, on land which in
many cases could be acquired in con-
nection with a specific public use, and
would thus not be directly chargeable
to the greenbelt scheme ...
If medium to high density resi-
dential facilities are somewhat further
into the community from these com-
plexes, their residents can enter and
leave the community without congest-
ing traffic on streets farther toward its
center, and are close to schools and
shopping facilities. Buffering may be
needed between areas for apartments,
town house and mobile home parks
and single-family detached districts.
The best way to provide it is by exten-
sions inward from the peripheral green-
belt. Another course is to require wide
yards or vegetative or other screening
where medium to high density uses
adjoin single-family detached. Where
high-rise can be encouraged in such
areas, requirements for low ground
coverage and extensive landscaped
open space, for location adjacent to
the surrounding greenbelt, and for
pedestrian easements to the greenbelt
might both build toward continuity of
open space and provide buffering.
Even in neighborhoods already de-
veloped, these things are possible, but
only over the long pull, and usually
only if the public land net is used as
a major factor in public policy. The
results are worth working for.
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
To sharpen focus and tie things
more closely together, these main
points are emphasized:
1. To a degree never before possible,
we have the power to shape future
urban form, and to influence the
wishes of men as to what they want
cities to be. Persuasion may be neces-
sary for those who are reluctant to
leave the past.
2. With these powers comes respon-
sibility to act wisely and in the general
public interest. The general public in-
terest is broader than our towns or
time.


3. Ahead of us is massive urban
growth which cannot be ignored and a
change in the age structure of popula-
tion which demands a shift in housing
mix. Between 1960 and 1980 we will
add as many people as there were in
the country fifteen years ago, but the
balance between age groups in this
population will not be what it is now.
Retirees will double. The number be-
tween 30 and retirement age will in-
crease by only half. The family-forming
20-30 age group will double. The chil-
dren will triple. There is evident need
for proportionately more apartments,
town houses, mobile homes in the new
housing supply.
4. Adding more housing of this kind
in our towns seems likely to strengthen
them as long-lived communities, to pro-
tect them from becoming deteriorating
housing compartments. The increased
density makes possible limitation ol
excessive urban sprawl, which is the
inevitable alternative if present subur-
,ban densities are maintained, and sets
the standards for new suburbs farther
out.
5. Planned unit developments, with
higher densities, improved housing mix
and increased amenities, are a major
advance over the current urban pat-
tern, where they can be required or
encouraged. They should be.
6. Within existing suburbs and new
ones not built on planned development
principles, we can at least encourage
slow improvement. We can amend our
crude zoning ordinances to permit
greater freedom in the use of lots to
permit departure from building forms
which set a rectangle crossways within
a rectangle, to allow more effective use
of the now-fragmented open space
around buildings, to set more sensitive
and functional height limitations. We
can relieve some of the discomforts
and hazards of through traffic in resi-
dential neighborhoods.
7. At larger scale, the public land
net has great promise as a planning and
development tool, with patient and
persistent application offering numer-
ous and substantial rewards. Combin-
ing public and quasi-public activities
requiring extensive open space to
broaden major traffic arteries into park-
ways for multipurpose present use cre-
ates greenbelts around neighborhoods,
buffering and shielding for major com-
merical and industrial complexes, and
a land reserve for adaptation to unfor-
seeable needs of the future.
8. Predominantly residential areas
within the meshes of the net are help-
ed by its effects to evolve into more
pleasant, convenient and intelligent
patterns.
We have the power to shape the
future of urban America. We have the
responsibility to use it unselfishly and
wisely. The rewards for success are
great, the penalty for failure incalcul-
able. We must not fail our own time,
or time to come.










POSTSCRIPTS


Palm Beach Installation: past president Jack Willson,
president John Marion, and FA/AIA president James Deen.

PALM BEACH CHAPTER
ANNOUNCES NEW OFFICERS
Installation of 1966 officers of the Palm Beach
Chapter was held January 8 at the Raquet Club. The
affair was also attended by James Deen, president of
the Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects, and FAA/AIA executive director Fotis N.
Karousatos.
New Officers
John B. Marion, President
Richard E. Pryor, Vice President
Howarth Lewis, Secretary
Rudolph M. Arsenicos, Treasurer
Executive Committee Members
Kenardon M. Spina
Chuck Toth
FAA Directors
Jack S. Willson (Past President)
Richard E. Pryor
Jefferson Powell
John Marion has set the following course for the
Chapter for the coming year:
"That the Palm Beach Chapter and its
members can produce a better product,
increase the public demand for architec-
tural services, and to strengthen the Palm
Beach Chapter so as to achieve these
goals. We will also continue our war on
community ugliness."


"Architecture, Religions and Relevance" has been
adopted for the theme of the 1966 annual conference
of the American Society for Church Architecture, Don-
ald Sunshine, AIA, General Conference Chairman, has
announced.
Attendance at the session, scheduled for the Con-
rad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, May 10th, llth and 12th,
is expected to be in excess of 600, divided equally
among the three basic categories of membership, Mr.


Sunshine stated. The Society's membership is com-
posed of the leading architects in the field of religious
building design, including not only sanctuaries but
educational facilities as well; members of the clergy
with special interests in the design and construction of
religious buildings; and laymen who serve on the vari-
ous boards and committees which assume responsibil-
ity for design and construction of new churches for
their congregations.
The program will include seminars, general sessions
and official association meetings. Emphasis will be
placed on two phases of religious construction; first,
on the practical matters of developing plans, selecting
and using materials and in the construction process,
and, second, on the design problems concerned in re-
lating ritual and worship procedures to the architecture
and layout of the building.
Assisting Mr. Sunshine as members of the Confer-
ence Planning Committee are: Architects; Norman
Abplanaly, AIA, Donald Anderson, AIA, Donald Bill-
man, AIA, Leroy Bonesz, AIA, Charles Cedarholm,
Morris Hertel, AIA, Donald Patton, AIA, Charles
Rowe, AIA, Charles Stade, Robert C. Taylor, AIA,
D. Carr Whitehead, AIA, Clergy; Reverend William
Allen ,Vicar, St. Anselm Episcopal Church, Reverend
Richard J. Douaire, Assistant Pastor, Our Lady of the
Angels Church, Laymen; William Shubert and Ellis
Murphy, general conference manager. Mrs. D. Carr
Whitehead will develop the ladies program.
*
CORPORATE MEMBER TO THE FHA
S. Porter Driscoll, until recently a Corporate Mem-
ber of the Jacksonville Chapter, has accepted the posi-
tion of Assistant Director for Design, Federal Housing
Administration, Washington, D. C.

JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER OFFICERS
Officers for 1966 were announced by the Jackson-
ville Chapter: J. P. Stevens, President; Walter Schultz,
Vice-President; Allen Frye, Secretary; and J. P. Graves,
Treasurer.

Allen Frye, Secretary; J. P. Stevens, President; J. P. Graves,
Treasurer.


6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















DAYTONA ON THE MOVE


The recently-held annual convention of the FAAIA
adopted a resolution charging the Association to
implement the project calling for "Citizens Committee
for a Better Environment."
The Daytona Beach chapter of the AIA is to be congratulated
for its foresight in implementing this project in their area.
This chapter and some 15 Daytona businessmen formed a
planning committee whose goal is to propose improvements
in the downtown block bounded by Orange Avenue,
Beach Street, Magnolia, and Palmetto Avenues -an area
now being discussed for urban renewal.
The planning committee will study the community block-by-block
and submit suggestions to the real estate owners.
This action by the Daytona Beach chapter dictates responsible
community leadership by architects.
Concerted action by local architects and responsible businessmen will
in time bring about complete elimination of our ugly cities.



FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS


FEBRUARY, 1966













CALENDAR
February 4
"Weather Resistance" Seminar,
sponsored by the FAAIA. Morn-
ing and afternoon sessions.
Luncheon speaker is Broward
Williams. See Page 16 for further
story. Holiday Inn, Gainesville,
Florida.
February 5
Dedication of the School of Arch-
itecture and Fine Arts, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
2:30 p.m.
February 5
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing 9 a.m. Holiday Inn,
Gainesville, Fla.
February 21
FAAIA Exhibitors Committee
meeting-Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach-Regency Room--10 a.m.
April 2
Council of Commissions meeting
-Jacksonville, Fla.
April 23
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing Robert Myer Hotel, Or-
lando, Fla.
May 21
Council of Commissions meeting
-Tampa, Fla.
June 4
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing Sarasota, Fla.
June 28- July 1
AIA National Convention-Den-
ver, Colorado.
July 30
Council of Commissions meeting
-Miami, Florida.
August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meet-
ing-Tallahassee, Fla.
October 5 8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla.
38


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efficient heating and air conditioning systems.
So when it comes time to cut corners don't
cut out the Zonolite Masonry Fill Insulation.
It's only expensive when it's left out.
For more information consult your Zonolite
representative.


ZONOLITE



ZONOLITE DIVISION W. R. GRACE & CO.
135 SO. LASALLE ST., CHICAGO, ILL.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Custom-Cast


Plaques


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


ATT ANTA


TRINITY 5-0043
G1





FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


L.
A


.L 1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
L OFFICES AND YARD






STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Our new Florida representative will be announced soon.
If any information is needed before this announcement is
made, please contact our Atlanta, Georgia office, P. O. Box
13406, Station K, Zip Code 30324, or through our tele-
phone number 875-0043, Area Code 404.


FEBRUARY, 1966










































M uzak sound Muzak sound systems provide building-wide commu-
syste s nications. Speakers are balanced for full range reproduction of
Syste programmed background music and voice-paging or public
-desi ned addressing. Your local Muzak franchiser can provide
are designeU expert assistance in placing speakers for exact cover-
f r voice age according to size, ambient noise, and special needs of
for VOI w the areas to be installed. Whenever you need versatile sound
and m music systems, call your local /
and m usic Muzak franchiser. MI b /














Jacksonville: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Miami Beach: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road

n THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Florida Caterpillar Dealers
Inside Back Cover
Florida Foundry & Pattern
Works
39
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
14, 15
Florida Municipal Utilities
Association
3
Florida Portland Cement
Association
13
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
39
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co.
1
Muzak Corporation
40
Robbins Manufacturing Co.
40
Shelton, Ullmann, Smith
& Streich, Inc.
4
Solite Corporation
33
F. Graham Williams Co.
39
Zonolite Division,
W. R. Grace & Co.
38






..... Ur I C TB I UP



INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS FOR CAT-BUILT EQUIPMENT

IC~llf;P~~~77- -W I-.-- -T~;


TOTAL ENERGY FROM CATERPILLAR


Total energy explains the system of providing
the total power requirements, exclusive of out-
side power sources, for a building, plant or
facility from a single source of fuel. Energy
requirements usually include heating, lighting,
power and air conditioning.
The fuel or energy source might conceivably
be natural gas, fuel oil or other fuel capable of
being converted into heat and electric power.
In Florida, schools, apartments, plants and
offices are moving in "on-site" generating units
for low-cost electric power where dependa-
bility can't be overlooked.


Caterpillar engines and electric sets for
prime power and standby generation are your
key to increased profit. Whatever your require-
ments large or small you can benefit
from low-cost total energy.
If you are building, expanding or modern-
izing, let your Caterpillar dealer show you the
advantages of low-cost packaged electricity
for prime and standby power.
Call your Florida Caterpillar deal . he's
in the Yellow Pages. He'll be glad to show you
how total energy from Caterpillar can generate
more profits for you.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


JOS. L. ROZIER
MACHINERY CO.
ORLANDO TAMPA


KELLY TRACTOR
COMPANY
MIAMI WEST PALM BEACH CLEWISTON


RING POWER
CORPORATION
JACKSONVILLE TALLAHASSEE OCALA


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.




Return Requested
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
3730 S. W. 8th Street
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulatic
Publication at Miami, Fla.



Mr. Willlam K?. Hunter, Jr.
606 NE I St.
Gainesville, Fla. : INPA




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