• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The president's message
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Architectural exhibit awards
 Future town forms
 February seminar
 The editor comments
 Perspective
 Calendar of events
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00139
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1966
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00139
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The president's message
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Architectural exhibit awards
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Future town forms
        Page 12
        Page 13
    February seminar
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The editor comments
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Perspective
        Page 18
    Calendar of events
        Page 19
    Advertisers' index
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.





























































co 6 r
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The President shall be the
administrative head of the Asso-
ciation and shall exercise general
supervision of its business and
affairs, except such thereof as
are placed under the administra-
tion and supervision of the Sec-
retary and the Treasurer, respec-
tively, and he shall perform all
the duties incidental to his office
and those that are required to be
performed by him by law, the
Charter, these bylaws, and those
that are properly delegated to
him by the Board.

The President shall preside at
all meetings of the Association
and the Board and shall be
Chairman of the Executive Com-
mittee.

These few words do more than
express the duties of an officer.
They actually provide a disci-
pline for more than an associa-
tion president. In truth, these
words serve to inspire each new
administration to not only ser-
vice the necessary duties and in-
cidental details, but also to strive
for goals which are very ambi-
tious. Thus, each day must pro-
duce an excellence.

Your Association has presently
assembled its goals for 1966. The
Commissions are staffed and the
Committees are selected. Our
committee system makes a signi-


JAMES DEEN, AIA



THE

PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE


ficant contribution to the vital-
ity of our Association, and so it
is an honor to be selected to
serve. This honor also carries
with it a heavy responsibility for
positive creative production
which will accrue to the benefit
of all individual members.
The success of this production
will depend upon how well each
of us services those duties which
are required of you. I cannot em-
phasize strongly enough that
INDIVIDUAL efforts dictate
our success and these same in-
dividual efforts determine our
success in society.
Society has needs and society
will be served. And Architecture
today is at the threshold of a
golden age. No discipline pro-
vides a better leadership or com-
munication of order.
It is a certainty that we are
products of our own environ-
ment . the city we work in,
the house we sleep in, the space
we live in.
We cannot serve our environ-
ment with any less than a search
and desire for great beauty. For
beauty begets beauty and this
is our heritage.
A new year is beginning. Let
us fill it with ambitions, goals,
dreams, work, cooperation and
achievement.


























































To your construction site from our Jacksonville
terminal, Merry Brick moves constantly to build a
finer Florida.
You get quality brick by the bargeload (for
economy), delivered by a modern motorized fleet
(for speed and efficiency) throughout Northern
Florida, or by rail to other Florida points.
Wherever in Florida you may be, serving you
is the constant concern of all Merry Brick person-
nel.


ROBERT J. DICKSON
Sol* Itrenn.na';..
St Pelarlb.'a


JO"N C. PRESLE
So014 4 prtrewoeivt
Jockson"ilo


nAtxrui BFnwhA

BSid" &*U"L.U 614UaO*U


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OFFICERS
James Deen, President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., President Designate-Vice President
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Ave., Clearwater

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Charles R. Kerley / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central J. A. Wohlberg / William J. Webber
H. Leslie Walker
Florida Gulf Coast Earl J. Draeger / Jack West
Florida North James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / Francis E. Telesca
Earl M. Starnes
lacksonville A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Harry E. Bums, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph M. Shifalo
Palm Beach Jack Willson, Jr. / Jefferson N. Powell
Richard E. Pryor
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Joseph M. Shifalo, /Donald Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Director
C. Wade Swicord / Architectural Photographer
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use.. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. .. Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
E year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. . Printed by McMurray
Printers.


THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
by James Deen
Inside Front Cover


ARCHITECTURAL EXHIBIT AWARDS

6-9


FUTURE TOWN FORMS
A Matter of Choice
12-13


THE FEBRUARY SEMINAR

14


THE EDITOR COMMENTS
by Fotis N. Karousatos
16


PERSPECTIVE

18


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

19


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

20





FRONT COVER This is the 1965 Awards Issue
of The Florida Architect, honoring the outstanding
architectural exhibits which were selected for special
commendation at the 51st Annual Florida Associ-
ation of Architects Convention.




VOLUME 16 U NUMBER 1 U 1966


















asi


newest motel is total electric!


Alachua Lak
Bartow Lak
Blountstown Lee
Bushnell Mo
Chattahoochee ML
Clewiston Ne
Ft. Meade Ne
Ft. Pierce OcN
Gainesville Orl
Green Cove Spring Qui
Havana St.
Homestead Seb
Jacksonville Sta
Jacksonville Beach Tll
Key West Ver
Kissimmee Wa
Lake Helen Wil


PfnTT


eland
e Worth
sburg
ore Haven
Dora
berry
w Smyrna Beach
Ila
ando
ncy
Cloud
ring
rke
ahassee
o Beach
uchula
liston


Located at the junction of Highways 27 and
1-75, the all-new Total Electric Silver Springs
Motor Inn is a dazzling addition to Ocala's
hospitality industry. The Motor Inn, built by
Sneed Brothers of Memphis, Tenn., includes
100 units with individually-controlled electric
heating and air conditioning. Other features
are a modem, total-electric kitchen and res-
taurant; unique Typhoon Cocktail Lounge;
Arnold Palmer miniature golf course; and
swimming pool.


In the words of Albert W. Jones, vice presi-
dent of Silver Springs Motor Inn:
We considered many factors in our de-
cision to go "Total Electric." Foremost, of
course, was low initial cost and economy
of operation. This- together with safety,
cleanliness, zone temperature control, and
maintenance free operation made the
total electric concept our overwhelming
choice.
Architects, engineers, builders and owners
are sold on "Total Electric" commercial con-
struction. For your next commercial building,
specify ALL-ELECTRIC.


Florida Municipal Utilities Association
Helping you to
live better electrically


IANUARY, 1966 3


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THE PRESIDENTS COMMITTEE ON
EMPLOYMENT OF THE HANDICAPPED


Qttatimt for &Dritfrtunm *rnt
routitll upon
nmlef iu


to apprartattan for txrepttanal rottrtbuttaus in furtbrting
aof thi asubirapprb.


iO TM r GOVUKiL



.^M5inA L&.


t4t trplagmrnt

FOR TH UMWT
// .'/' ,. '* / -: i


four good In the design stages of your next buildings, specify Muzak* sound
systems; scientifically programmed background music by Muzak and re-
reason liable, quality-engineered equipment. 1. Local service and technical as-
toi distance. 2. Tailor-made systems for programmed background music
to specifJ by Muzak and public addressing. 3. Muzak sound systems with music
M uzak by Muzak become acoustical problem-solvers in open and noisy areas.
4. Thirty years of experience. Music by Muzak is designed to extend
und systems a welcome. Muzak equip-
sound system s ment assures that it does. ..











Jacksonwlle: Florida Wired Music Company, 1646 San Marco Blvd.
Orlando: Florida Music Network, Inc., 3107 Edgewater Drive
Tampa: Tropical Music Service, Inc., Post Office Box 1803
Miami Beach: Melody Inc., 1759 Bay Road


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








GASGRAMIZh U
'aA GTURALGAS
JSl^^ yA^'-G II TNHE HEADLINES
MORE AND MORE INDUSTRIES USING MORE AND MORE NATURAL GAS. In Orange City, Florida
Home Gas is supplying gas for processing milk and dairy products, and for manufacturing ice cream
to the big, new Castle Farms Dairy Distributing Center. West Florida Gas is air conditioning (75 tons)
the Panama City plant of Glenn Manufacturing Co. (Ladies dresses). Also on the industrial front,
Orlando Paving Co. converted their 180-ton asphalt dryer from heavy oil to natural gas, with Florida
Gas doing the honors. Result? "Major savings."
iMORE NATURAL GAS ON THE WAYI Florida Gas Transmission Co. started actual con-
struction early in November on 210 miles of 30-inch pipe paralleling segments of the
present 24-inch main line, and is adding 30,700 compressor horsepower. This pipeline
expansion is expected to be completed by mid-1966, and is a part of a continuing
program to maintain a plentiful supply of natural gas for Florida's future needs.
MIAMI BEACH "CHEF'S SHOW" ANOTHER NATGAS WALKAWAY. Again in their 1965 Pan American
Restaurant Exposition, Florida's leading professional chefs turned overwhelmingly to gas for their on-
stage demonstrations. Interesting sidelight: the gas kitchen equipment used in the show was sold to
nearby Hollywood Beach Hotel, where Peoples Gas System will be the supplier.
ITS "ALL GAS" FOR NEWEST SOCIETY SHOWPLACE Latest deluxe oceanfront "villa" in Palm
Beach adds modem touches to traditional elegance: Florida Public Utilities is supplying 103 tons
of gas air conditioning (which includes cooling a bowling alley), pool heating (30' x 70), a laundry
with 4 washers and 4 dryers as well as all-gas kitchen and water heating equipment.
NATURAL GAS STILL WINNING "CONVERTS" FROM OTHER FUELS. Add to the growing number
of changeovers: Sunshine Packers of Fort Meade switching from Bunker C oil for its Feedmill Dryer
and Juice Plant boiler... Coca Cola deserting oil for natural gas in its new Marianna plant
ENGINEERS (WHO SHOULD KNOW) CHOOSE GAS FOR THEIR OWN A/C. Russell & Axon, leading
consulting engineers, have installed 30 tons of absorption type air conditioning in their new office
building in Daytona Beach district of Florida Gas Company.
NATURAL GAS PRAISED FOR CIVIC VIRTUES. Justly proud of their new Community
Building. Eustis citizens are complimenting City Fathers and architect Robert V. Ford
on choice of natural gas for heating, cooking and hot water system. In West Palm Beach,
new Chamber of Commerce building is cooled with natural gas air conditioning and
beautified with entrance gas lighting. And Clearwater's new City Hall boasts 100-tons of
Natgas air conditioning.
MORE ON AIR CONDITIONED SCHOOLS. Following trail blazed by St. Petersburg, which opened
state's first air conditioned public school, Okaloosa County School Board specified natural gas air
conditioning for new elementary school at Eglin AFB.
GASUGHTS PROVIDE BEAUTY. .. SAFETY MARGIN IN EMERGENCIES, TOO. Impressive outside
lighting for Medical Arts Building in New Smyrna Beach is provided by 22 Gaslights but man-
agement also had So. Florida Natural Gas Co. install standby emergency lights in every room ... just
in case. West Florida Natural Gas also reports gaslight boomlet in Panama City area over 100
recent Installations including Cherry Hill, a complete Gaslight Village.
WINTER'S UPON US, BUT NATGAS AIR CONDITIONING STILL ZOOMSI Ramada Inn, Ocala, install-
ing 100-ton gas engine driven chiller with heat recovery as well as gas fired boilers for heating and
hot water. West Florida Natural Gas also reports gas absorption cooling for new branch of First
Federal, and for new home of Associates Discount Corp., Panama City.

TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEMS "A-OK" WHEN POWER FAILED. While the Northeast
L groped through its late lamented blackout, Rochdale Village in Queens. New York,
-.S* ELECTRlIC was lit up like a Christmas tree its natural-gas-fueled total energy system
SL.ITS i supplying not only lights but heating, cooling and power as well to its 20.000
C@IW f residents. Two months earlier, Hurricane Betsy didn't phase the total energy gas
L A turbines of Coral Gables' David William Apartments, first such installation
T in Florida.

Reproduction of infomrtion containd In this dvrtiausnt Is aiuhoril wmsiot imblo
tion b he Florida Natural Gas Auoclaton. 1500 f. Hisr 950, Wintr Gawdn Florida.





ARCHITECTURAL

EXHIBIT

AWARDS


1965

FAA

CONVENTION


THE JURY The three members of
the jury are men of outstanding
reputation as architectural design experts:
Charles Nes, F.A.I.A., chairman, of Baltimore, Manirlnd
S.. 1st Vice President, President-Designate of the
American Institute of Archlitects: Richard Snibbe, A.I.A.,
of New York City; and Robert Church, chief
designer, Mann & llarrover, architectural
firm of Memphis, Tennessee.


Honor
Award

















.,.


I I I' 1< \1, OFIF ICE Bl'LntNCI &)IN(:
Tampa, I lhrndj
Robert Wielage, AIA
II. Leslie Walker, AIA
Associated Architects
Tampa, IF'lunda
Photo by Alexandre Georges
.. the building has dignity .
quality of human scale."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







\lo \\111|1\1i iI \ 1r 1> ( l111( I
South Clampus
I)ade Countv. Florida
l'mlc(st\ I'trctindrii (;raictttl i Skccls. A.\.\
.\rchitect%. Mfiani. Florida
Iu h compplc relationUlp of mant builddinis for variouss
jfunctiuis aI handled with care and ingenuitv."





Honor Award

*, -"


N


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fil il ) \ i I ( )I II( I \\ I \II \ ( ( i)\ll l\ \ 11( \
for .\Mr. and M.rs. Ionald Singer
IFort lauderdale. FIlorida
)onaldl iSncr. .A.\. A.'rcdhitct
IFort l.ideIrdahl. IFlorida
"Build(ini' is (sitn lh handled . a trul
original solutumon.


Honor Award


JANUARY, 1966


p --


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I** %hersT% florida

It. 'ilit'T. Florida
andd

Chicai i t rtat ,IIi/Is
clefinecd cxltcrior spacv(.


Merit Award


Merit Award


RESIDI:NCI': FOR .IR. & MRS. I).A\11) RA.'WIS
acksomiillt, F'lorida
\\ illiam Morgan, AI\, .\rchttect
.tlantlle fac'h. Ilorida
Photo h .\llUandre' (Gcorgcs
.. I lius prtit.s a delilghtfuil air of dititincton
and good( taste i . a. n accepted ca lCical solutiono.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Merit

Award






GARDEN FORECOURT for the
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
St. Petersburg, Florida
C. Randolph Wedding, AIA, Architect
St. Petersburg, Florida
Photo by Bob Christmas
.. .an attractive oasis in the city . thoughtfully
and tastefully done."


BI IT Award


PUBLIC BEACH PAVILION
Manatee County, Florida
Louis F. Schneider, AIA, Architect
and
I. Arthur Miller, Architect
Bradenton, Florida

"A pleasant and well-defined solution
for a shelter in the dunes."


JANUARY, 1966













Space Age

Electronics

at MILGO!

MILGO ELECTRONIC CORPORATION, Miami's No.
1 manufacturer of sophisticated electronic equip-
ment, is another Florida Space Age "success story."
A struggling infant 10 years ago, today it employs 450
people and is hip-deep in America's space explora-
tion program.
Milgo-made computation equipment provides the
data for the tracking system which links Cape
Kennedy, Bermuda and Goddard Space Flight Center.
The company has been a part of Thor, Atlas, Dis-
coverer, Saturn, Titan, Mercury, Gemini programs-
and is now working on the Apollo man-on-the-
moon program.
In the field of electronic commercial devices, Milgo
has several products with business application.
This Reddy-sparked industry uses electric power in
virtually every phase of its work. All essential work-
ing areas in the mammoth plant are air conditioned
electrically. It is lighted to the high degree so essential
to those who work, through microscopes, on minia-
turized circuitry.


Electric lighting perfection is
as essential as air to those who
work on miniaturized circuitry.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









































































ri.L


Florida's Electric Companies... Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


JANUARY, 1966


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A MATTER OF CHOICE
FUTURE TOWN FORMS will be what we
make them by action or inaction. Phy-
sical technology broadens the range of
goals to choose from. Social technology
strengthens and multiplies means for
reaching goals. Rising economic levels
make it possible to pay the bills.
Concern over the growing gap be-
tween physical and social sciences and
arts obscures the rapidity of social ad-
vances. For example, we communicate
faster with a higher proportion of the
population than ever before. We edu-
cate, condition, propagandize, advertise
more effectively, preserving or changing
attitudes and values. This could be im-
portant in making planning work.
To take another example, govern-
ment, responding to the growing com-
plexity and interdependence of our
time, takes forms far more sophisti-
cated than those of a couple of genera-
tions ago, and performs functions
which would amaze our grandfathers
(sometimes performing them in ways
which would have induced widespread
grandfatherly apoplexy). Health, edu-
cation, welfare, commerce and indus-
try, transportation, communication, fi-
nance, housing, agriculture, urban af-
fairs, working conditions, income, rec-
reation, the kind, quantity and price of
the food we eat and the drugs we take,
and so on and on are controlled by
governmental legislation, judicial inter-
pretation, administrative mandate, tax-
ation, the giving or withholding of
grants and loans, and a wide variety of
other gentle or ungentle persuasions.
In both physical and social fields,
we produce tools and techniques faster
than we learn to use them wisely. It
has always been so. Man burned his
hand before he learned to roast other
forms of meat, and kings and chief-
tains governed selfishly before they
discovered that survival required a
broader view (a lesson learned first in
terms of personal survival, and extend-
ed later to include survival of the
tribe).
Government has lately bestowed in-
creasing powers on planners. With
power comes responsibility to use
power wisely, for the benefit of all
the governed. And because of the na-
ture and effect of planning, we must
use these powers not alone for our
time, but for time to come. Choosing
the right goals for neighborhood form,
for town form, for the metropolitan
and megalopolitan form which grows
from neighborhoods and towns and
cities, is an appalling responsibility,
particularly when we consider the mag-
nitude of urban growth just now be-
ginning.
"As the twig is bent, so is the tree
inclined." We deal with twigs. Those
who follow will deal with fast-growing
trees. If we mishandle our twig-bend-


ing, the maturing forest will be very
difficult to manage.
We are putting the brakes on popu-
lation growth, but not in time to make
much change in the outlook for 75
million more urban people between
1960 and 1980 (15 million of them
are already here, four times that num-
ber will be added in the next 15
years). Suppose we hold growth down
to another 75 million between 1980
and 2000. That makes 150 million
newcomers well within the remaining
lifetime of many of us 35 years,
about as far ahead as the Depression
is behind. That isn't long, certainly.
For scale, we would need 3,000 new
cities of 50,000 each to house that
nfany new people. We now have about
350 cities in the U.S. with 50,000 or
more. Or we could put them in 150
new cities of a million each. We now
have only half a dozen with popula-
tions over one million.
That's for scale, but that isn't the
way growth will come. The vast major-
ity of the added population will go to
existing urban concentrations, not new
ones. To be realistic and practical, we
must discuss both. What forms should
new neighborhoods and towns take,
particularly in metropolitan areas? And
how can existing towns, under tre-
mendous growth stresses, achieve some
of the advantages of new towns? Are
we headed in the right direction with
current development policy? Or are we,
as pilots, using our powers and skills
to drive our ships forward with match-
less swiftness and efficiency onto the
rocks?
PLANNING FOR OR AGAINST
THE FUTURE
Consider three parables and what they
teach:
In Virginia, the Powhatan Planning
Commission at a meeting in 1610 is
concerned about threats to the public
welfare including disease, extermina-
tion and graver disorders including
land speculation. The Commission
drafts policies in accordance with a
comprehensive plan. Major emphasis
is on preservation of open space and
protection of the character of existing
neighborhoods. This excellent state-
ment is adopted by the Algonquin
Regional Planning Council as a model
for emulation throughout its jurisdic-
tion. Jamestown is eliminated in a
slum clearing program, and when the
Pilgrims arrive they are denied build-
ing permits. Where are we now?
A couple of centuries later, the
North Manhattan Grange Planning
Board views with alarm the disrupt-
ing influence of urbanization spread-
ing from New York City, rapidly be-
coming a mess as its population soars
to the unwieldy total of 100,000. Zon-
ing is adopted permitting only agri-
cultural uses from Harlem north, with
minimum farm size set at 160 acres.
Where now is New York City?


FUTURE


TOWN


FORMS
These things couldn't have happen-
ed, partly because social technology
hadn t as yet produced the controls.
The controls are here now. The third
parable reflects what is happening in
many towns in the metropolitan areas
where our future growth must come.
Suburbia Village Planning Commis-
sions adopt policy expressed in lan-
guage, but with the uniform intent of
assuring that the only newcomers to
be welcomed will be like persons al-
ready there, housed in single-family
detached residences like those already
there on large lots in subdivisions like
the ones already there. No apartments.
No town houses. No mobile homes.
No housing which doesn't look like
present housing, or is likely to appeal
to renters, or costs less. No increase in
density.
At meetings, there is applause for
staff reports on the advantage of plan-
ning, particularly as applied to new
neighborhoods and new towns. Turn-
ing to unfinished zoning business,
commissions reject proposed amend-
ments permitting planned unit devel-
opment, indicating that less extreme
forms might be given favorable con-
sideration. Changes required? Well, ex-
isting low densities must not be ex-
ceeded and perhaps should be lowered.
Street and lot patterns must conform
to existing zoning and subdivision reg-
ulations. Housing must be exclusively
single-family, with yards to match.
And of course, troublesome common
open space must be eliminated. With
these minor changes, planned unit de-
velopment -might be acceptable.
Such actions by Suburbia Villages
ringing our metropolitan centers may
set the future form of both the towns
and the metropolis. Is the pattern
good, in the long run, for Suburbia
Village? For metropolis? Where does
the great mass of newcomers go?
Where do all the people go who need
forms of housing other than single-
family detached at some stage of their
lives?
If our new controls are used to de-
fend the past against the requirements
of the future, to hold the line for
lesser publics against the needs of the
greater, planning may well do more
harm than good.
The town planner (layman or pro-
fessional) must of course look at the
town as it is. If he is true to his call-
ing, he cannot stop at this. He must
look behind him, to see how it got
that way. He must look around him,
to see what the greater public interest
demands of his town. He must look
ahead, to see what his town is likely
to become and what it should become.
After he has done these things, if he
is a wise planner, he will be guided in
what he proposes by a simple rule: No
town is an island, no time is forever.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Reprinted from Florida Planning &
Development, Oct. 1965. A speech by
Fred H. Bair, Jr., at the Planning for
Modem Living Conference, 27th An.
nual Planning Institute, New York
State Federation of Planning Officials,
Oct. 18, 1965.

The job is to guide change to fit
need not to stop change. The change
should be staged and ordered to be as
painless as possible, but if general pub-
ic need demand change, the planner
who blocks change betrays his trust.
WHO ARE WE PLANNING FOR?
Before making broad sweeps with
pastel crayons, there are some ques-
tions to answer. Who are we planning
for? Keep it simple and short-range,
we are planning for our retirees, our
middle-aged generation, our children
and their children. This carries us to
the year 2000. What does it mean in
numbers in age groups, and in housing
demand?
In 2000, the retirement crop will
have doubled to about 37 million, as-
suming retirement then at age 60. A
third of these (12 million) will be 75
or over, again doubling present num-
bers. Most of the older retirees would
be glad to find suitable apartments, or
small houses, or congenial retirement
homes and few will want or be able to
maintain the larger residences in which
they raised their families. If possible,
they would like to stay in their own
communities within the circle of old
friends.
Stay-at-homes in the newly retired
crowd will want to stay at home. A
lot of the more venturesome or less
labor-loving would like to get into
smaller quarters, including apartments
and mobile homes. Most of the young-
er retired would also prefer to remain
in their communities if they can find
the right living facilities. If they stay,
they are a rich resource for public
duties, a powerful force for stability.
The next group, from 30 to retire-
ment age (best prospects for single-
family housing) will rise by only half,
going up from 75 million now to
around 110 million in 2000. These
are the relatively settled breadwinners
with children from ages where they are
starting to school through the leaving
of the nest.
In the 20-30 age group are the new
family-formers with starry eyes, pre-
school children, high mobility and low
income. Now there are 24 million of
them. In 35 years, their number will
about double, rising to over 45 mil-
lion by 2000. For this group, rented
small houses, apartments or mobile
homes make a good start. Mobile
homes are attractive to young family
former not so much for their mobility
as for the fact that housing, furniture
and major appliances all come in one
payment package at a current price of
about $10 per square foot.
(For those who wonder why mobile
homes are mentioned as housing pos-
sibilities for retirees and for young mar-
rieds, it should be pointed out that
mobile homes are now an element in
the new housing supply which cannot
JANUARY, 1966


be ignored. Last year one new dwelling
unit in ten was a mobile home. One
mobile home was produced for each
two and a half new apartment units-
and for each five new single family
dwellings.)
As to our children's children, the
group under 20 in 2000, barring un-
expected developments in population
control, will number about 100 mil-
lion, just under three times the 37
million on hand now. This will come
as little comfort to those who have
been school board members recently,
and neither will the word that educa-
tional costs are rising rapidly and
should continue to rise, or that children
are remaining in school longer, a trend
which should also continue. To this,
too, we are adjusting, particularly in
the manner in which we spread the
load for school support to county,
state and federal levels.
That's who we are planning for be-
tween the present and the year 2000
-ourselves and enough newcomers to
equal total U.S. population in 1950.
Now we have some policy changes to
make.
POLICY CHOICES
Do we want communities or com-
partments? In the long run, segregation
by housing types creates compart-
ments rather than communities, and
one-class housing may mean prema-
ture obsolescence and decay. These
things are likely to happen to single-
family detached Suburbia Villages as
time passes:
Retirees, treasurers of tradition,
move elsewhere for lack of housing
suited to their needs. As children
reach adulthood, their loyalties and
friendships may incline them to stay,
but they too must find housing else-
where to fit their needs and pocket-
books. Having -formed new friendships,
they are unlikely to return to take
over family-raising homes left vacant
as retirees move out.
Since Suburbia Village has driven
away replacements who might have
come from within its own borders, it
must attract outsiders. But in most
cases, the old Suburbia Village does
not attract the same class of people
who settled in when it was new. The
new crowd moves to the latest devel-
opments to keep up with the current
crop of Joneses. Suburbia Village must
settle for what it can get, which usu-
ally means a filtering down of housing.
Of Suburbia Villages started in the
last three or four generations, few re-
tain position as prestige communities.
Most have deteriorated in appearance
and spirit. Some have disappeared al-
ready under the slum clearance bull-
dozer. Out ahead, pressures piling up
are likely to turn the cycles more rap-
idly unless communities are built to
stay communities.


To help keep communities from be-
coming deteriorating housing compart-
ments, provide a range of housing en-
couraging community continuity. This
does t mean a conglomerate jumble
of single-family detached residences,
apartments and mobile home parks. It
does mean careful planning and intel-
ligent development control.
Higher density or more sprawl? We
will have higher densities within pres-
ent metropolitan borders, and the bor-
ders will spread out. The question is
how much of each, and how to avoid
the liabilities of each.
Urban sprawl is getting a bad name.
It increases travel time and raises costs
of public and private facilities and ser-
vices. Temporary advantages of fringe
dwellers next to open country disap-
ears as waves of development move
beyond them. Since controls don't
move as fast as urban fringes, we ap-
pear to have built hundreds of square
miles of single-family detached slums.
High density has had a bad name
for a long time, and is equated in
many minds with teeming tenements,
sordid apartments, blight, crime, dis-
ease, high governmental costs and all
the rest of it. Lately it is also equated
with footloose renters with no feeling
of responsibility to the area in which
they live, bad people, strange people
who do not want to live like civilized
folks and forty year mortgages on homes
built to last thirty years( with exten-
sive maintenance).
If we learn to use land efficiently,
we can extend our urban areas at far
less cost than has been typical recently,
and can avoid some of the disappoint-
ments which have come to fringe
dwellers in the past. If we control high
density developments wisely, we can
gain rather than lose amenities, par-
ticularly in urban open space which
is not just a patchwork of fragmented
small yards, but is big enough to have
real meaning, landscaped enough to
provide functional green area.
In choosing policy, most people with
a real concern about what lies ahead
will vote for communities rather than
compartments, higher density if it can
be achieved without loss of amenities,
containment of urban sprawl by more
efficient use of fringe lands, and mini-
mized private and public costs in pro-
viding necessary services and maintain-
ing necessary facilities.
If that is what we vote for, and if
we are agreed that population will be
coming along in total numbers and
age group proportions about as indi-
cated, we have both outlined the size
of the job in the next 35 years and
set some standards on how it is to be
done. A few tentative brush strokes
are now in order.
(Part II of "Future Town Forms" in
February issue of The Florida Architect)
















A one-day seminar, scheduled for
February 4th at Gainesville's Ramada
Inn, should prove especially interest-
ing to Florida's architects, builders,
mortgage bankers, insurance men,
contractors, public officials and hotel
and motel owners.

The seminar, entitled "Structural
Consideration of Multi-Story Build-
ings," is sponsored by the Florida
Association of the American Institute
of Architects. The program will be
presented by a panel of prominent
Structural Engineers including Nor-
man Dignum of Dignum Associates,
Coral Gables, and Mr. Jacques L.
Clarke of Oboler & Clarke, Miami
Beach.

The two-part seminar will cover
the structural aspects of multi-story
buildings for architectural preliminary
design purposes, covering: N1-Foun-
dations, 3%2-Framing Systems.

(a) Need for a valid soil explora-
tion program
(b) Economics of foundations

(c) Specific foundation require-
ments dictated by wind-resist-
ive systems and space alloca-
tion requirements

The morning session will begin at
9:30 a.m.

The afternoon session will offer in-
formation and suggestions regarding
statewide study of storm damage and
ways to improve building standards.

Main cause of widespread glass
breakage by Hurricane Betsy a few
months ago, according to glass and
aluminum industry spokesmen, was
use of low-strength materials in wrong
places ,and faulty glazing and frame
installation. The insurance bill for
14


38,000 damage claims came to $25
million.
At a recent Insurance Information
Council demonstration, H. Samuel
Kruse, FAIA, blamed mounting public
emphasis on quantity rather than
quality. He flayed poor workmanship
and cost-cutting practises. Kruse also
attacked undercutting of specifica-
tions by builders. He called for build-
ing departments to designate the ar-
chitect as inspector for his own struc-
ture, since the professional architect
is tested and registered as competent.
The February seinmar in Gaines-
ville will further pursue this vital sub-
ject and will be of considerable in-
terest to everyone in the field.





FINANCING

IS PART OF

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Bautow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Bleuntst City of Blountstown
Boca Raten, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bqynton Beadc, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahooche, Town of Chattahoochee
Chlpley. City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Cleront, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
Coral Gables, City Gas Co.
Crescent City, City of Crescent City
Cutler Ridp, City Gas Co.
Daytona Beach, Florida Gas Co.
Deland, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delray Beach Florida Public Utilities Co.
Eau Galle, City Gas Co.
Eustis, Florida Gas Co.
FPrt Lauderdale, Peoples Gas System
Fort Meade, City of Fort Meade
Fort Pierce, City of Fort Pierce
GaIneille, Gainesville Gas Co.
Geneva, Alabama, Geneva County Gas
District
Haines City, Central Florida as Corp.
Hialeah, City Gas Co.
Hollywood, Peoples Gas System
Jacksonville, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake Alfred, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake City, City of Lake City
Lake Wales, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Lakeland, Florida Gas Co.
Leesburg, City of Leesburg
Live Oak, City of Live Oak
Madison, City of Madison
Marianna, City of Marianna
Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
Mount Dora, Florida Gas Co.
New Smyrna Beach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
North Miami Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Opa Locka, City Gas Co.
Orlando, Florida Gas Co.
Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
Palm Beach Gardens
Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Pensacola, City of Pensacola
Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
Port St. Joe, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
St. Petersburg, United Gas Co.
Sanford, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Sarasota, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Starke, City of Starke
Tallahassee, City of Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Tavares, Florida Gas Co.
Titusville, City Gas Co.
Umatilla, Florida Gas Co.
Valparaiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park, Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








super ioeas

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with

GAS
NEW GAINSVILLE MOTEL COMPLEX SELECTS NATURAL GAS!
"When it comes to heating and cooking, we have found there is no substitute for NATURAL
GAS," says Mr. Alex L. Frank, Jr., General Manager of the new Ramada Inn and Wolfie's Res-
taurant in Gainesville. "We chose NATURAL GAS as opposed to other methods of heat
because it is safe, convenient and very economical. You can't beat it for cooking, either,"
Mr. Frank added. "And our gas-heated swimming pool allows our guests to enjoy year-round
swimming comfort. We have received superb service from the personnel at Gainesville
Gas Company, and have had great pleasure in working with them and NATURAL GAS,"
Mr. Frank concluded. Need we say more? Your local NATURAL GAS Utility can give you this
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New Year's Resolution of 19661













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serving 34 Natural Gas Distribution Companies in over 70 communities throughout the state.



WINTER PARK / FLORIDA
JANUARY, 1966


















THE NEW LOOK


The cover of our October 1965 issue was a
beautiful indication of the change that was beginning to
take place inside the pages of The Florida Architect.
The format of our magazine and its design have
continued to expand in the subsequent months.
With the December issue, we unveiled even greater changes- the
completely new look of your publication that begins
with the specially-designed covers and flows through the pages.
Yet this is just the beginning. We intend to continue
to upgrade the editorial content of The Florida Architect, and to
bring you many guest articles on a variety of subjects
of great interest to you and our profession.
The new look has been made possible by the addition of an
Assistant Editor and an Art Director. They bring to The Florida
Architect their professional 'know-how,' experience and skills.
We hope you like our new look. We certainly invite
your comments, criticisms and suggestions.


FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


_.____ __






they left the flooring to us...


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for low maintenance

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
Offices: Chicago llinois Chattanoopwa Tennes-
see Dallas. Teas Fort Worth, Texas
Houston, Texas Fredonia. Kansas* Fort Wayne,
Indiana Jackson MichIn Kansas ty
Tampa. Florida Miami, FlorsdaLS Ans
JANUARY, 1966 1








PERSPECTIVE


During the second weekend in December, many
leading national educators and architects gathered
in Sarasota's Colony Beach Resort to participate
in a seminar sponsored by the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects.
Subject of the seminar was "Continuing Educa-
tion of Architects," with the announced goal of
developing a program in Florida for the mid-
career continuing education of state architects. It
is hoped this would help achieve the aim of having
these architects assume an increasingly important
role in the building of a better physical environ-
ment for the citizens of Florida.
Participants in the seminar included: Charles R.
Colbert, FAIA, former dean of Columbia Uni-
versity's School of Architecture; James Deen, AIA,
president of the FAAIA; Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.,
AIA, vice president of the FAAIA; Philip Hiss,
president of The Florida Arts Council; Robert L.
Geddes, AIA, dean of Princeton's School of Archi-
tecture; Miami Herald editorial writer Fred Sher-
man; and many more.

Here are the 1966 AIA Chapter Officers:
BROWARD COUNTY
President Robert E. Hall
Vice President Paul Robin John
Secretary Charles McAlpine, Jr.
Treasurer Donald H. Moeller

DAYTONA BEACH
President William R. Gomon
Vice President F. Wade Tye
Secretary Joseph R. Blais, Jr.
Treasurer Walter K. Smith, Jr.

FLORIDA CENTRAL
President J. Arthur Wohlberg
Vice President James J. Jennewein
Secretary Jack McCandless
Treasurer James R. Dry


FLORIDA GULF COAST
President Tollyn J. Twitchell
Vice President Douglas E. Croll
Secretary Frank Folsom Smith
Treasurer Joseph E. Blacker


FLORIDA NORTH
President J. Vance Duncan
Vice President Lester N. May
Secretary John L. R. Grand
Treasurer Dan P. Branch
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL
President Joseph N. Clemons
Vice President William H. Guerin
Secretary Warren A. Dixon
Treasurer LeRoy K. Albert
FLORIDA NORTHWEST
President Hugh J. Leitch
Vice President Richard L. MacNeil
Secretary Roger G. Weeks
Treasurer William R. Bean
FLORIDA SOUTH
President Robert J. Boerema
Vice President George F. Reed
Secretary Walter S. Klements
Treasurer Donald H. Forfar
JACKSONVILLE
President John Pierce Stevens
Vice President Walter B. Schultz
Secretary Allen D. Frye
Treasurer John P. Graves
MID-FLORIDA
President Harold W. Johnson
Vice President Wythe D. Sims
Secretary Don Hampton
Treasurer Cliford W. Wright.


PALM BEACH
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer


Tr.


John B. Marion
Richard E. Pryor
Howarth L. Lewis
Rudolph M. Arsenicos


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Calendar

of Events

January 11-13
AIA "Grass Roots" Meeting of
State and Chapter Presidents -
Octagon, Washington, D.C.

February 4
Hurricane Seminar, sponsored by
the FAAIA . 9:30 Morning Ses-
sion, "Structural Consideration of
Multi-Story Buildings" . After-
noon Session, "Upgrading of the
Industry" Ramada Inn, Gaines-
ville, Fla.
February 5
Dedication of the School of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.

February 5
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting
- Ramada Inn, Gainesville, Fla.

April 2
Council of Commissions meeting
-Jacksonville, Fla.

April 23
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting
--Robert Myer Hotel, Orlando,
Fla.
May 21
Council of Commissions meeting
Tampa, Fla.

June 4
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting
Sarasota, Fla.

June 28-July 1
AIA National Convention- Den-
ver, Colo.
July 30
Council of Commissions meeting-
Miami, Fla.

August 13
FAAIA Board of Directors meeting
Tallahassee, Fla.

October 5-8
52nd Annual Convention, Florida
Association of the American Insti.
tute of Architects Deauville Ho-
tel, Miami Beach, Fla.
JANUARY, 1966


ioPeoiy ueuon,
The remarkable CELLON process, recently developed
by Koppers Company, Inc., has proven this century's
giant step in the advancement of wood preserving tech-
niques. Requiring eight hours of pressure on any lumber
or wood product, CELLON treatment uses liquid petro-
leum gas as the carrier and plants the preservative
deeper and into more wood cells than any other process.
Following treatment, products emerge dry, odorless,
paintable and without variations in dimension or weight.
They are free from raised grain, can be made water
repellent and may be laminated immediately. No other
type treatment can surpass CELLON for providing en-
durance against rot, decay and insect attack.


eellon Treled Alger Produck:
LONGLEAF LUMBER
Some of the very finest dense old-growth pine is produced by Alger
at its Northwest Florida plant. This means a minimum average count
of six annual growth rings per inch and not less than 1/ summer-
wood. Although FHA accepts a 1200 "f" rating minimum in the #2
grade yellow pine dimension, Alger consistently supplies its dis-
tributors with stock graded at a minimum of 1750 "f" rating or above,
by SPIB standards.
ALGER-DECK
Edge grain, longleaf yellow pine, electronically laminated from finger-
jointed strips, can be formed into most any width for bleacher seats,
truck and boxcar decking, loading ramps and flooring planks for
auditoriums and stages. Order Alger-Deck with or without CELLON
treatment.
ALGER BOWLING ALLEY FLOORING
Alger is the world's largest producer of dense, longleaf pine bowling
alley flooring as used in Brunswick and other bowling lanes through-
out the world. Only the finest longleaf yellow pine is selected and cut
to expose the dense edge grain as a wearing surface.
For more information on CELLON orAlger products, write or call collect
"Bull" Dozier, (904) 256-3456 in Century, Florida.

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V CELLON is a registered trademark of Koppers Company, Inc.










JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pros.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Alger-Sullivan Company
19
Dunan Brick Co.
Inside Back Cover
Florida Gas Transmission Co.
14, 15
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
10, 11
Florida Municipal Utilities Corp.
3
Florida Natural Gas Association
17
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida
14
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co.
1
Muzak Corporation
4
Shelton, Uullman, Smith & Streich
20
Trinity White General
Portland Cement Co.
5
F. Graham Williams Co.
20






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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.,..
'-~-`- ~


J




















)rnamental

Barandas


hese are the grille tile
F hard. fired clay we
port from Venezuela
they're somewhat lighter
i color and more
slicate in scale than
lose from Panama.
ut they have the same
>rt of slight color
3riations and occasional
iln markings that
take for a really
sautiful texture in
ie finished wall.


:1.


0S
S .5




hr


.. *-~:








s.
.s S


* S*


S.i
* g..


!x; ;...~
5...
Si
K ':~I


BRICK


)UNAN BRICK YARDS,
INCORPORATED
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