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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00138
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: December 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00138
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















A CHALLENGE...

For Governor Haydon Burns to call a state-wide
conference on beautification for state and local government
officials, including mayors from every corner of our
state, and for men who are responsible for design and engineering
of our communities . For every mayor to
form a Beautification Committee to combat the ugliness
which has made great inroads over the years . For every architect
to become responsible and demonstrate leadership
in improving the architecture within our state . For investors
to become responsible and think of quality architecture
and quality materials which make up our
structures. Recently, we have heard much about Road
Beautification and the need to beautify the portals which lead into our
state, cities and towns. This is a problem, true, but
only a part of the larger, over-all problem. We cannot afford
to have the Road Beautification Program overwhelm the
problems of our ugly cities. The ugliness of these
cities and the ugliness of the environment are problems requiring
just as much attention as our roads. Let's have responsible
citizens take the bull by the horns and initiate immediate action.!


FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS


































































To your construction site from our Jacksonville
terminal, Merry Brick moves constantly to build a
finer Florida.
You get quality brick by the bargeload (for
economy), delivered by a modern motorized fleet
(for speed and efficiency) throughout Northern
Florida, or by rail to other Florida points.
Wherever in Florida you may be, serving you
is the constant concern of all Merry Brick person-
nel.


HARRY G. MADDEN
District Sales
Manager, Florida


ROBERT J. DICKSON
Sales Representative
St. Petersburg


JOHN C. PREBLE
Sales Representative
Jacksonville


mik&A4Lj TdV 6"tpa

A 4Lda1 EI-bl flniL







the
florida
architect
ollicial journal
of1the florida
associalion
olhe lmericanll
iostilule of
architects


OFFICERS
William T. Arnett, President, 2105 N. W. Third Place, Gainesville
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President,
7500 Red Road, South Miami
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Ave., Clearwater

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County 0 William A. Gilroy / George M. Polk
Daytona Beach David A. Leete
Florida Central Frank R. Mudano / William J. Webber
Dana B. Johannes
Florida Gulf Coast 0 Earl J. Draeger / Sidney R. Wilkinson
Florida North 0 James T. Lendrum / Jack Moore
Florida North Central 0 Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Florida South James E. Ferguson, Jr. / John 0. Grimshaw
Jacksonville 0 A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr. / Walter B. Schultz
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
Mid-Florida 0 John B. Langley / Joseph N. Williams
Palm Beach C. Ellis Duncan / Kenneth Jacobson
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region, American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of American
Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr. / Verner Johnson / Joseph M. Shifalo

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
Eleanor Miller / Assistant Editor
Ann Krestensen / Art Director
G. Wade Swicord / Architectural Photographer
M. Elaine Mead / Circulation Manager

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables 34, Florida;
telephone, 448-7454.

Editorial contributions, including plans and photographs of archi-
tects' work, are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA publications, pro-
vided full credit is given to the author and to The FLORIDA
ARCHITECT for prior use. . Advertisements of products,
materials and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcome,
but mention of names or use of illustrations, of such materials and
products in either editorial or advertising columns does not con-
stitute endorsement by the Florida Association of the AIA. Adver-
tising material must conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material because of arrange-
ment, copy or illustrations. . Controlled circulation postage paid
at Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; subscription, $5.00
per year. March Roster Issue, $2.00. . Printed by McMurray
Printers.


THE EDITOR COMMENTS
by Fotis N. Karousatos
Inside Front Cover

TWO LEADERS BID ADIEU
by Robert H. Levison & William T. Arnett
4

MISTER PRESIDENT
Biography of James Deen
6

RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED
AT THE FAA CONVENTION
7-8

FLORIDA CRATSMAN OF THE YEAR
10

PRODUCT EXHIBIT AWARDS
10

MEET ANN KRESENSEN & G. WADE SWICORD
11

SURVEY OF THE ARCHITECTURAL
PROFESSION IN FLORIDA
15-18

THIS WAS CLEARWATER
Convention Coverage
19-23

ADVERTISERS' INDEX
24

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL!
Back Cover



FRONT COVER The NEW LOOK and a
new magazine "symbol" for The Florida Architect.
Our joyful cover group has gathered here to salute
the just-completed Clearwater Convention and to
wish you the MERRIEST HOLIDAYS EVER!


VOLUME 15 NUMBER 12 1965







PERSPECTIVE...


The Architects-Engineers Liaison
Commission approved jointly-devel-
oped documents on professional col-
laboration and arbitration at its
meeting on October 2. The A/E
Commission represents the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, Consult-
ing Engineers Council and the
National Sopiety of Professional
Engineers.
Representatives of the American
Society of Landscape Architects,
American Society of Civil Engineers
and the American Institute of Plan-
ners participated in editing collabora-
tion of the document originally drafted
by the A/E Liaison Commisison. The
Task Force which edited the
statement was appointed by the In-
terprofessional Commission for En-
vironmental Design. As approved, the
statement covers the relationships of
Architects, Engineers, Landscape Ar-
chitects and Planners.
The statement on "Professional
Collaboration in Environmental De-
sign," which will be presented to the
governing boards in each organization
for official approval, is intended to
provide principles for collaboration
and cooperation of the design profes-
sions. Among the principles stated in
the document: It is impractical to de-
lineate the various design functions
and areas of practice precisely, as they
may overlap to a degree; collaboration
and teamwork throughout the plan-
ning and design cycle is supported
wholeheartedly by the environmental
design professionals in the interests
of their clients; close collaboration
among the design professionals should
begin at the very earliest stages of
research, analysis and design and at
that time the responsibilities of the
collaborating professionals should be
clarified and established; ordinarily
the client's interests are best served
by a single contract with a prime pro-
fessional who is responsible for direc-
tion of the work and for providing
through collaboration the specialized
services that may be needed.
*
The American Institute of Archi-
tects has entered into formal affilia-
tion with a second organization, the
Guild for Religious Architecture.
Prior to this affiliantion which was
approved by directors of both associa-
tions this month, the AIA was affili-
DECEMBER, 1965


ated only with the Producers Council.
Institute officials regard the new affili-
ation is an implementation of AIA's
policy to broaden the base of effective
Institute activities and services into
collateral fields through affiliation and
interchange of kindred concerns with
closely related organizations.
Milton L. Griggs FAIA, member of
the Institute's Committee on Religi-
ous Arcihtecture and immediate past
president of the Guild, explained,
"This affiliation with the Guild for
Religious Architecture reflects the In-
stitute's interest in the broadest shar-
ing of specialized resources with its
entire membership."
*
The AIA has contracted with
Princeton University for a study of
educational programs that will better
prepare the architectural profession
for its expanding national role in design
of the total physical environment. The
Board has appropriated $100,000 for
the initial 18-month phase which
will involve testing of new education-
al approaches by a cross-section of the
professional schools of architecture.
Directors of the study will be Rob-
ert L. Geddes, dean of Princeton's
School of Architecture, and Bernard
P. Spring, senior research architect at
Princeton.
The new programs will be devel-
oped in the participating schools and
will be reviewed by leaders in archi-
tecture, education, engineering and
behavioral sciences.
The project will also study the re-
lationship between education, archi-
tecture, and related fields devoted to
creation of the human environment;
methods of professional internship,
and continuing education for practi-
tioners. Recommended by AIA's
Commission on Education and Re-
search, the project is endorsed by the
Association of Collegiate Schools of
Architecture.
*
Representatives of the American In-
stitute of Architects and the Associ-
ated General Contractors of America
met recently in Washington, D. C.
to discuss matters concerning design
and construction, and particularly the
relationship of the two associations.
The members of this cooperative
committee, formerly referred to as the
AIA-AGC Liaison Commtitee, agreed


on a change of name for this affilia-
tion. The new official title will be the
AIA-AGC Liaison Commission.
The national Commission will
study and make recommendation con-
cerning the relationship between ar-
chitects and building contractors; to
seek equity and uniformity in build-
ing construction procedures and docu-
ments; to promote cooperation and
understanding between respective as-
sociations and their membership.
The Commission will continue as
before to be represented by five mem-
bers each from the AGC and AIA
with selected alternates. AIA co-chair-
man is John Stetson FAIA, Palm
Beach, Florida, and AGC co-chair-
man is James W. Cawdrey, Seattle,
Washington. The AIA also appointed
George E. Kassabaum FAIA, St.
Louis, Missouri, a vice president of
the Institute, as a member of the
Commission. It is anticipated that
officers of the respected associations
will meet periodically to gauge the
progress and actions of the Commis-
sion as well as to advise and recom-
mend future goals and objectives.
The next meeting of the Commission
is scheduled for February 11, 1966,
in ashington, D. C.
*
The appointment of five prominent
architects to serve as the jury for its
1966 Honor Awards was announced
today by The American Institute of
Architects. The Awards are the na-
tion's highest professional recognition
for architectural merit.
The jury comprises David N.
Yerkes FAIA of Washington, D. C.,
chairman; O'Neil Ford FAIA of San
Antonio, Robert G. Cerny FAIA of
Minneapolis, George T. Rockrise
FAIA of San Francisco, and Benjamin
Thompson AIA of Cambridge, Mass.
Willis N. Mills FAIA of Stamford,
Conn., chairman of the 1965 jury,
will serve as adviser.
Now in its 18th year, the AIA
Honor Awards Program was estab-
lished "to encourage excellence in ar-
chitecture and to afford recognition
of exceptional merit in recently com-
pleted buildings."
Judging will be done March 3-5 at
the Institute headquarters here, and
awards will be announced during the
AIA's 98th annual convention to be
held June 26-July 1, 1966, in Denver.

























Robert H. Levison All too
few years ago, you, my col-
leagues, did me the great honor
of electing me your director. Be-
lieve me, the great pride in our
region I express each time the
opportunity presents itself is
justified and most certainly the
fruits of YOUR labors.
It is an easy task to represent
a region so full of the willingness
to give of itself to others.
We have made great strides
within our professional society -
yet more needs to be done, and
I know you will do it. We must
educate, we must research, we
must become public servants,
and we must help each other.
One of my colleagues on the
board, a distinguished Texan, has
said that we need to become
statesmen, decision makers and
be "Invited to the party". To
this I must say, "Amen". But -
in addition, we should become
RESPONSIBLE statesmen and
decision makers -
Responsible for the education
of our profession
Responsible to the public
Responsible for our design
Responsible to government
So now let us rededicate our-
selves to this premise hopefully
making our profession a heard,
admired and virile one for all
who must in the future continue
to build a great and beautiful
America!


:1
^I


EXPLORING THE FUTURE
By William T. Arnett, AIA
President, Florida Association
of Architects

Another year draws to a close.
Another group of officers, an-
other group of commissioners
and committee chairmen, will as-
sume responsibility for leader-
ship at the end of December.
For a professional society like
the Florida Association of Archi-
tects, of the AIA, it is an appro-
priate time to explore the future.
For that reason, I have asked
our Vice President President
Designate to bring you this mes-
sage. No organization ever had
a more able, dedicated, and loyal
officer, and I welcome this op-
portunity to present to you your
incoming President, James Deen
of Miami.


TWO hEADERS

BID RDIEU


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























dJMES DEER


James Deen, AIA, is a red haired,
quick to smile, many faceted
architect with knowledge and
concern of his profession. He was
born in Miami in 1927, attended
Ponce de Leon High School in
Coral Gables and graduated
from the University of Florida in
1950 with highest honors and a
Bachelor of Architecture degree.
James Deen lives in Coconut
Grove beside the bay, with his
wife, Patricia, and young daugh-
ter, Amy Lynne. His home is an
early Florida Spanish residence
recently purchased for conversion
to his contemporary environ-
ment.
His activities in social, civic,
and professional life have been
varied:
former member Kiwanis Club
/ former member Jaycees /
former member Housing Code
Committee Coral Gables /
co-chairman Coral Gables
Planning Board / Architec-
tural Advisory Board for Cape
Florida / former director Flor-
ida Association of Architects /
former director Florida South
Chapter American Institute of
Architects / former design in-


structor at University of Mi-
ami / treasurer Florida Associa-
tion of Architects 1963 and
1964 / instructor adult educa-
tion University of Miami /
vice president p r e s i d e n t
designate Florida Association
of Architects
In 1953 James Deen received
his registration in Florida as an
architect and opened his office
for practice in Miami the same
year. Early commissions were
augmented by teaching in the
Architectural School at the Uni-
versity of Miami.
His major architectural com-
missions:
Life Science Building, Univer-
sity of Florida / International
Design Centre / First Ponce
ZA Insurance Building / Red
Road Corporation Office
Building / Town House
Apartments / Grove Hill
Apartments / Governor's
Lodge / Key Islander / Cha-
teau Riviera / Kendall House
Apartments / Robert Graham
residence / George Coury res-
idence
His interests are also varied.
Business ventures have led him
to expansions of architecture.
Apartment, office, and various
other real estate investments
keep him abreast of client prob-
lems. He has been a guest lec-
turer at the University of Miami.
His concern of historical land-
marks found him leading the
movement to preserve the Doug-
las Entrance Building in Coral
Gables. James Deen now serves
as the president of the corpora-
tion renovating this building in
order to retain its cultural influ-
ence on the community.
He is a collector of local and
European art and painting. His
travels have recently taken him
throughout the United States
and into Canada and Mexico. A
camera is his constant compan-
ion searching for his record.
He considers his philosophy
to be traditional. Traditional in
the respect of the heritage given
him by experience in beauty. He
believes beauty comes from beau-
ty. To create beauty you must
experience beauty.


DECEMBER, 1965





"A Golden Age A TIME FOR BEAUTY" . President Arnett, of the Association; Vice
of Beauty President Nes, of the Institute; fellow architects from Florida: ladies and guests
I would hope my words will have the strength to express my intense emotion
and Power of pride in rising to the honorable office of president of the Florida Association
of which of the American Institute of Architects. For many years this office has been
this noon served by men who have given unselfishly of themselves to the cause of great-
ness of this assembly. It is this legacy that I accept this inheritance of
is the beginning successes.
of the hour."
In preparing these words for you this evening, I have researched this legacy
of previous presidents. Each year our magazine, The Florida Architect, has
published each new president's goal for the association. These men and their
goals have served us well. I will not tell you of their success. These are our
greatness. Each man, however, faced similar thoughts in providing continuity.
Perhaps you remember these words through the programs for the year;
1955 Clint Gamble called for a year of consolidation / 1957 Edgar Wortman
called for a year of action / 1958 Sam Kruse called for a year of destiny / 1960
John Stetson called for service for success / 1961 Robert Levison called for
making things happen / 1963 Roy Pooley called for a new venture / 1965 Bill
Arnett called for ever-increasing service to society.

These programs have given us the base for a strong Florida association.
We must continue to put the public interest ahead of the immediate self
interest of the members of the profession. We must seek to develop in each
member an attitude of mind and an approach which will place the greatest
emphasis on excellence of service in meeting the needs and requirements of
his client and the public. Service and Action.

But what for 1966 I challenge you to a "A Time For Beauty". The chal-
lenge set for us at this convention. The most important single action and
service of architects. The association must aspire to excellence and project for
each architect a stimulus to excell. Similar to a building of good function and
good structure, our association must have good function and good structure -
not forgetting the third quality of beauty. We are in the midst of the war on
ugliness with the tools for victory, but let us not lose the peace or our efforts
will be in vain.

To win the peace we need to reconfirm the quality of beauty in our structure
and function of the association. To do this we must delineate the association.
Our colors must be established. I will ask the board in January to approve an
inquiry and evaluation of the association so that we may examine our purpose
and objectives. We must resolve a philosophy. This scrutiny and appraisal will
establish our path for the greatest strength of function.

Our structure has recently been re-established into a commission system. We
need to relate this to ourselves. A strong and expanded membership can only
be accomplished by relationship.

The individual, the chapter, the association must have a continuing vitality.

Finally I re-issue the challenge of our age. Truly a time for beauty. Robert
Frost did not finish his poem for late president J. F. Kennedy at his inaugura-
tion but this is perhaps now appropriate A golden age of beauty and power
of which this noon
is the beginning of the hour".
JAMES DEEN


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED
BY THE FLORIDA ASSOCIA-
TION OF ARCHITECTS IN
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA,
NOVEMBER 19, 1965.


WHEREAS, the American Institute
of Architects is conducting a War on
Community Ugliness which is a con-
certed effort towards creating an aes-
thetic environment in our communi-
ties; and,


WHEREAS, planning for logical
growth and economical development
must be a collaborative effort of busi-
ness, government and the design pro-
fessionals; and,


WHEREAS, constructive proposals are
needed to effect a change in order to
create an atmosphere in which quality
of aesthetics is possible; and,


WHEREAS, the State of Florida will
double in population and its building
construction in the next decade; there-
fore be it


RESOLVED that the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects direct and imple-
ment the following recognition on state
and community levels:


1) that a citizens' committee dedi-
cated to a development of better en-
vironment be established to coordinate
our future growth;


2) that the architectural profession
be directed to participate in the en-
deavors of governmental and private
agencies encompassing the planning of
all phases of our environment;


3) that the architectural profession
promote an awareness of our environ-
ment in the present framework of our
educational system, which will thus
promulgate an awareness in our future
generations.


WHEREAS, the Florida Association
of Architects regularly assembled in
its Fifty-First Annual Convention in
Clearwater, Florida; and,


WHEREAS,
have become
tional policy;


Aesthetic and Quality
major objectives in na-
and,


WHEREAS, it is the concern of the
architectural profession to alert, chal-
lenge and stimulate the "War on
Community Ugliness"; and,


WHEREAS, this purpose can best be
accomplished through seminars bring-
ing together people of concern who
have public responsibility; and,

WHEREAS, the panelists, guest and
architects assembled here have set forth
our Aesthetic Responsibilties and have
aroused a public awareness of Quality
over Mediocrity; therefore, be it RE-
SOLVED that this Convention ex-
press its sincere thanks and appreciation
to Matt M. Jetton, Norman Davis,
Eve Proctor, R. D. Hill, Jack L. Mul-
lin, Haley Sofge, Harrison Covington,
Philip Hiss, Robert F. Cochrane and
Bernard Shiell, the panelists, Richard
W. Snibbe, moderator, and the indi-
vidual participating guests who have
given of their time so freely, thus
showing their concern and thereby con-
tributing to the success of this sem-
inar.

OFFICERS

WHEREAS, the Florida Association
of Architects has made tremendous
progress in its organizational structure
and has enjoyed a productive and suc-
cessful year; and,

WHEREAS, this success has come
about through the diligent leadership
of its officers and commission chair-
men; and,

WHEREAS, each Officer and Com-
missioner has given of his time, talent
and energy in an unselfish manner,
now therefore, be it


RESOLVED, that this Convention ex-
presses its appreciation and sincere
gratitude to these men for their out-
standing leadership and active interest
in the affairs of the Association.

WHEREAS, The Annual Meeting of
The Florida Association of Architects
is for the purpose of governing the
affairs of the members, establishing
policy and selecting officers to repre-
sent the members; and,

WHEREAS, the annual meeting is
also for the purpose of educational
growth through discussion and pro-
grams; and,

WHEREAS the fellowship of the
members assembled is of benefit to all
attending; and,

WHEREAS the Bylaws of the Associ-
ation contained in Article III Section
1 c. is not clear as to the extent of
Participation of all members; now,
therefore, be it

RESOLVED that this convention
herein assembled establishes the policy
that all members in good standing are
encouraged to participate in the discus-
sions of business before the convention
and that this policy does not change
the bylaws as to voting; and further,
be it

RESOLVED that the committee on
rules prepare a bylaws change for the
next annual meeting to incorporate
the intent of this resolution into the
bylaws of the Association.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

WHEREAS, the affairs of the Florida
Association of Architects as conducted
by its Officers and Board of Directors,
have been executed and implemented
in a capable, diligent and efficient
manner; and,

WHEREAS, the graphic presentation
of the Association's affairs has been
excellent; and,


DECEMBER, 1965












WHEREAS, The Florida Architect has
had a successful year; and,


WHEREAS, Fotis N. Karousatos has
served as Executive Director for the
Florida Association of Architects dili-
gently and above the call of duty and
with a cooperative and sincere atti-
tude, now, therefore, be it


RESOLVED, that this Convention
representing all members of the Asso-
ciation expresses its deep appreciation
to Fotis N. Karousatos and his staff,
Thanks.


IIOST


WIIEREAS, the Florida Association
of Architects has held its Fifty-first
Annual Convention in Clearwater,
Florida; and,


WHEREAS, the Association has made
strides forward through the work of
this Convention; and,


WHEREAS, the members and guests
have enjoyed the activities and have
benefitted greatly from its program;
and,


WHIEREAS, the Florida Central Com-
mittee has acted as Host of this Con-
vention in grand style and expended
long hours of hard labor to make this
Convention the tremendous success,
now, therefore, be it


RESOLVED, that the members here-
in assembled express to the Florida
Central Chapter our heartfelt appreci-
ation for a job well done.


PRODUCT EXHIBITORS


WHEREAS, The Florida Association
of Architects has held one of its most
successful Conventions; and,


WHEREAS, one of the objectives of
this Convention is to gain knowledge
of new products, techniques and mate-
rials; and,

WHEREAS, the Product Exhibitors
at this Convention with well-planned
displays and informative literature,
have accomplished this purpose; and

WHEREAS, these Exhibitors have
contributed greatly to the social spirit
and fellowship of this Convention,
now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, that this Convention
here assembled express its sincere ap-
preciation to each Exhibitor and Spon-
sor.


HOTEL

WHEREAS, the Florida Association
of Architects has held its Fifty-first
Annual Convention in the beautiful
city of Clearwater; and,

WHEREAS, the Jack Tar Harrison
Hotel, through its management and
staff, has contributed to this Conven-
tion with its facilities and services cre-
ating a most successful assembly, now,
therefore, be it

RESOLVED, by the members herein
assembled, that the Florida Association
of Architects express its appreciation
for the effort and courtesy extended
to them by the management and staff.

WHEREAS, The Supreme Architect
-has seen fit to call from earthly
labors the several members of the Flor-
ida Association, this year, who have
well served their fellow beings and
their chosen profession with diligence,
honor and skill, let it be known that
the Florida Association of Architects
expresses and ercords its sincere loss
and feeling of sorrow at the pasisng
of our valued members, and be it,

RESOLVED that the convention
herein assembled expresses to the asso-
ciates and families of these architects
its sincere and heartfelt sympathy.


WHEREAS, The Florida Association
of Architects is in convention in Clear-
water, Florida this 20th Day of No-
vember 1965; and,

W"HEREAS, Robert H. Levison has
faithfully and diligently served his
chapter as its President; as chairman
of many committees; and in the lesser,
more menial, but important routine
tasks of daily chapter obligation in all
levels of committee structure; and, -

WHEREAS, Robert II. Levison has
effectively conducted the affairs of
this association as its president in 1960-
61, Demonstrating effective leadership;
and,

WHEREAS, Robert IH. Levison for
the past three years has served as di-
rector of the Florida Region on the
Board of Directors of The American
Institute of Architects; and,

WHEREAS, the dynamic personality,
effective leadership and hard work
through long hours, have endeared Bob
to all our hearts; and,

WHIEREAS his contribution by ex-
ample, by deed and good will, has con-
tributed greatly to our profession; and,

WHEREAS, the tireless efforts, con-
structive programs and endless con-
tributions to the profession by Robert
HI. Levison have been recognized by
leaders in our State and Nation; and,

WHEREAS, a job well done as Reg-
ional Director is recognized by the
Institute; and,

WHEREAS, the eleven chapters of
the Florida Region have endorsed the
nomination of Robert H. Levison for
Vice President of The American In-
stitute of Architects; now therefore,
be it

RESOLVED, that the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects urges all mem-
hers to actively support Robert H.
Levison's candidacy for Vice President
of The American Institute of Archi-
tects.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















Your
competition:


Our
competition:


Foreign vacations Foreign pipe










But in fact, both competitors hurt both of us. And all Americans. D Florida industry loses heavily when foreign
travel promoters lure American tourists overseas. Fewer Florida vacationers mean fewer new hotels and motels;
less renovating and expansion of those already built. And, American steel producers and workers get hurt when im-
ported pipe tries to price-cut its way into this country, finding some people happy to "save a few bucks". El But hard
logic says that these small, short-term gains aren't worth a big, long-term loss. Especially when, as in steel and tour-
ism, important American money flows overseas at an ever-increasing rate. This hurts all of us, directly and personally;
it's no abstract, remote theory! It explains Washington's recent efforts to curb foreign travel enthusiasm among
Americans. Ol There's another point to be made, too. The reliability, flexibility, service and high uniform quality
provided by American firms doesn't always cross the ocean with foreign imports. El Come to think of it, foreign
tourists don't make the trip too often, either! ED Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation manufactures America's finest
steel pipe, used in some of Florida's finest new buildings. For more information, contact your J&L distributor
in Florida or write direct. Jones I Laughlin Steel Corporation 3 Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
STEEL


STEEL' S SYMBOL
OF VALUE,
DEPENDABILITY.










THE ~,, T
FAA'S

CRAFTSMAN

OF THE

YEAR!I ,

ALBERT LANG

7~








BUILDING PRODUCT
EXHIBITS
WINNERS!
PITTSBURGH
TI~pj~ PLATE I
GLASS
Best Exhibit for
"Educational Value
of Display"
UNITED '
STATES
STEEL
Best Exhibit for
,"Display Excellence"

Ad -


Editor's Note: Architectural Exhibits will be pictured and reported in The Florida Architect's January Honors Issue.
10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ANN KRESTENSEN
If creativity and artistry are
inheritable qualities, then our
Art Director, Ann Krestensen
comes by her outstanding talent
quite naturally. Born in
Maryland 26 years ago, Ann
was destined for the arts. Her
mother is an artist and
jeweler. Her father is a writer
and newspaper reporter. Ann was
graduated from the Maryland
Institute of Art in 1960 -
already recognized as a great
talent in the graphics. Her
work took her to top studios in
Washington and the Virgin
Islands. She accumulated many
honors for her varied artistic
endeavors some creative
painting, printmaking, graphic
designs. She exhibited and won
awards at several Baltimore
Art Directors Club shows . .
the New York Type Directors
show . the C.A. Spectra
show . the Miami Art
Directors competition. She won
a memorial award
from the Baltimore Museum
of art, and her work is currently
on display in a Miami gallery.
In just the past year, Ann has
moved to Miami and gained
much recognition for her work
here. She is a new bride -
and she and her husband Kris
Krestensen call a sailboat at
Dinner Key "home." A special
project now is the remodeling
of a houseboat. So much of
The Florida Architect's "New
Look" is an Ann Krestensen
creation the delightful front
cover of this issue, our interior
layout designs, the new
Association signature, the
distinctive programs that graced
our 51st Annual Convention.
And this is just the beginning!
Our new Art Director has
become a most important and
integral part of The Florida
Architect's "New Look Team"
and the fruits of these
labors can be harvested
in the pages herein.
DECEMBER, 1965


G. WADE SWICORD
This self-portrait
also explains
how G. Wade Swicord
first entered
the field of
architectural
photography -
through his
great interest
in light
and shadow.
Mr. Swicord,
a well-known
photographer
who has
combined
a creative eye
and rare
technical skill,
was educated
at the University
of Florida.
He credits
much of his
interest -
and success -
in photography
to Dr. Guy Miles
and the books
of Ansel Adams.
What essentially
is an
architectural
photographer?
Mr. Swicord
himself explains
thusly . .
"a technically
good photographer
who has
a feeling for
light
and shadow,
mass and form,
and some
understanding of
the structure
and function
of the
three-dimensional
work which he
is to interpret
in a
two-dimensional
media."
An unusually
good description
of G. Wade Swicord.










MERIT










ARE CLEAN, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL


ROSS CHEVROLET of ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA. A 10-acre
multi-building complex that combines all its sales and service
facilities. It meets the highest standards of electrical design .. in
year-round air conditioning for cooling and heating, high quality
lighting, flameless water heating, and full capacity wiring.

ONE ENERGY SOURCE... Electricity! It means savings because
it's cheaper to go ALL electric than to use it in combination with
flame-type fuels.
ECONOMY! All-Electric design results in lower initial invest-
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by-products, buildings stay new-looking longer. Redecorating
costs are cut. STILL MORE SAVINGS!


In accepting the All-Electric Building Av
from W. B. Shenk (left), Florida Power Co
ration vice president in charge of sales, M
Ross (right), president of Ross Chevrolet, s
"We decided to make our new headquar
for Ross Chevrolet all-electric because we
that an all-electric building is a hallmark
excellence and prestige ... of modern c
fort and efficiency. In meeting the qualify
tions for the All-Electric Building Award,
are assured that our Chevrolet dealership
truly progressive place of business.. .equip
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12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























&


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light ing, lh lv l Iu h i.. l, .. ...., ,, ,,, .. .. . -n : ...I I ndles,
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A c.-..n. In fljII. rr,


'I. JI**I** '-I.' jul ii *j..r.-. .-..r


i iJ


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r,: ,-r-,.. J, [,. .,.. li2 I-,.,. [;n'; un;'l- l',jl ,-r -r i 11 jw i
building In outhr parLt of the comiplx, ImJdnidal room
units provide year-round comfort.


Electric Paint-drying Oven with 144 heat lamps, timer-
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automatic return switch.


Electric Companies... Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


DECEMBER, 1965 13






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the benefit ofmusic masks noise and complements design. You ben-
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system s for complete Muzak sound
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No matter how you look at it,
phone wiring still looks best
when you can't see it.
So plan ahead
for plenty of telephone outlets ,
and enough public phones.
Call our Architects'
and Builders'Representative
while you're still in
the blueprint stage.

Southern Bell


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






THE PROFESSION IN FLORIDA 1964


A WHOPPING $2.07 billion construction volume was reflected by plans from the
drafting boards of architects in Florida in 1964. And the $103.5 millions
which flowed through their offices in salaries, expenses and earnings gave Flor-
ida's economy a $725 million boost, since each dollar spent can be traced through
at least seven transactions within the state, according to authoritative economists.
These are highlights of this report.
Early in 1964 the FAA Board of Directors authorized an economic survey
of the Architectural Profession in Florida. It was apparent no conclusive data
on the profession's financial health existed nor its importance to Florida's
economy. Hopefully, the survey would delineate the answers to these broad
questions in some depth.
Questionnaires were developed, studied and redesigned. Arrangements were
made for computer programming and analysis. Testing techniques were reviewed.
Late in the year it was decided to delay the survey until early 1965 in order
to examine the more current year, 1964, rather than 1963 as originally planned.
Finally, in February, 1965. the questionnaires were distributed with a reply
deadline of March 31st. Response was exceptional. Replies were received from
50.5%' of Florida's resident registered architects.
It must be admitted that two basic errors crept into the questionnaire forms.
A typographical error resulted in omission of a critical income bracket, and a
gremlin made its presence known when the tabulated gross construction values
for firms stopped at 3 million per year. Adiustments have been made based on
limited resampling and a very cautious application of knowledgeable judgment.
Based on the exceptionally broad sampling and meticulously checked and
cross-checked analysis of the returns, this report offers the most conclusive
statistical data currently available on the design segment of Florida's gigantic
construction industry.
It is commended to your thoughtful consideration.








SURVEY OF THE ARCHITECTURAL PROFESSION FOR YEAR 1964



CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONSES: REGISTERED ARCHITECTS/36.4% GRADUATE NON-REGISTERED ARCHITECTS.'7.9 :c SENIOR
DRAFTSMEN, 19.7% 0 JUNIOR DRAFTSMEN.'14.2% m ENGINEERS, 12.4% SECRETARIES/7.2% m OTHERS 2.2%

STATISTICAL DATA ON INDIVIDUALS RESPONDING TO SURVEY


AGE % YRS. EMPLOYMENT STATUS % INCOME 01 $




2 POSITIONS 5 2 6 1. 1 45 W. 24 4 ". 6- 4. I5 1.8 .5 1>
04 4 _4 0! 0.0


127 Secretaries 83.8 23.6 30.8 7.1 4.7 37 100. 26.0 67.7 6.3 -- -- .- 4.220
20 Jr. Draftsmen 60.4 22.4 12.8 3.6 .4 .4 31 98.4 .4 .4 .8 13.2 51.2 35.2 .4 .,925

348 Sr. Draftsmen 20.9 31.0 29.9 12.4 5.5 .3 40 94.3 2.0 .8 .3 2.6 .6 5.5 56.5 34.9 1.1 1.4 ie- 7,240
143 Grad. Architects 31.5 48.9 11.2 7.0 1.4 35 88.9 4.9 3.4 .7 2.1 6.3 52.5 38.4 1.4 .7 Z.7 7,450

647 Reg. Architects 6.8 42.8 26.9 13.3 7.0 3.2 38 26.0 8.4 22.7 35.6 1.7 3.7 1.9 1.9 3.9 12.6 41.6 12.9 18.0 5.1 2.5 .4 1.1 12,020


220 Engineers 5.0 27.2 37.6 19.4 9.5 1.3 45 75.0 8.4 14.3 .5 .9 .9 .9 2.3 17.4 43.7 16.8 14.6 .5 1.8 .5 1.3 11,460

39 Other 12.8 30.8 30.8 17.9 7.7 43 95.0 2.5 2.5 10.3 35.9 30.8 ..- 2.5 6,725

1,774 TOTALS 38 8,940

Note: Income level 10 15M was not listed on questionnaire. Above chart reflects responses received. Profile is adjusted.


DATA ON ARCHITECTURAL FIRMS
(As Reported Without Projection)
Total Firms Responding
Sole Proprietorships
Multiple Principals (2 to 9)
Total Principals In Above -
Architects, Engineers, Accountants
Incorporated Firms
Partnerships
Architect- Engineer
General Practice
Residential


71%
29%

3.5%
26%
19.7 r
91%
3.5%


Commercial
Public
Institutional
Religious
Total Employees Reported
Architects
Engineers
Sr. Draftsmen
Jr. Draftsmen
Secretaries
Accountants
Specification Writers


3.79%
.89%
.5%
.5%
7.3/F


14
3
2
2
2,723
522
259
501
368
357
74
70





PROFILES OF INDIVIDUALS (FROM CARD NO. 1)


: 0
90

o

r 70
20
Z 60
0
02 50

40
0


20

10


i


AGE OF ARCHITECTS












M 70N







2O
90
80
g4 70
02
z
o 60
30
W 0


40


20

10


PRINCIPALS
PER FIRM


wd 1 P: X u :D A
N E- N N? c N
1:- 4-Z-Z-'--N- 0
.u 0<






-- ----&-i- -
m -











EMPLOYMENT STATUS
ARCHITECTS


EMPL(
PER


THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS


2 1 t
B --!~.


INCOME


PROFILES OF FIRMS (FROM CARD NO. 2)


_I --- THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS


-0-- 0--- _-. ,- ,



















)YEES CONSTRUCTION GROSS FEES IN GROSS FEES
FIRM VOLUME STATE WORK OUT OF STATE











HIGHLIGHTS & SIDELIGHTS


SURVEY SAMPLING
AND RETURN


Two questionnaire cards were utilized. They were distributed to a roster of
1280 resident Florida registered architects. Of 7100 cards for individuals. 1775
were returned (25%). Of 1093 cards for architectural firms, 374 were returned
(34 c). A response was received from 647 of the 1280 architects (50.5%). 784
architects were FAA members. 496 were not. Florida registered, out-of-state
architects were not included.


CONSTRUCTION A projection based on percentage of responses received from Registered Archi-
VALUES INDICATED tects residing in Florida indicates a total construction volume of $2.07 billion.
This represents $1.6 million per architect.


FLORIDA
ARCHITECTURE
EXPORTED



ECONOMIC
VALUE TO
THE STATE







PROFESSIONAL
SOCIETY
AFFILIATION


Of the total construction volume, nearly $200 million represents construction
outside Florida.
The survey was not designed to reveal construction volume in Florida designed
by out-of-state architects. It is felt the balance is favorable to Florida Architects.

In terms of fees earned and spent in Florida's economy. activity of architectural
firms accounted for approximately S103.5 million.
The average firm was a pretty good neighbor It brought professional competence
to the design and construction of some $2.76 million in buildings. It was owned
by 1.56 professionals and also directly supported 7.3 professional and clerical
employees in addition to its technical consultants. Of its $138,000 earned fees,
$79,000 went to salaries and profits while the remaining $59.000 was paid to
consultants and for operating expenses.
Florida Architects apparently take their professional society obligations seri-
ously. In view of the very substantial percentage who are not in private practice,
the following tabulation is remarkable: i e, of responses)
American Institute of Architects, 73.55%; Society of American Registered
Architects, 1.55cr,; Other or none, 24.90%.


Copyright, The Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1965
%-______^___________a___












4

QUALITY

NOT

MEDIOCRITY!

This was the answer resound-
ingly heard at the 51st Annual
Convention of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects. As Gover-
nor Haydon Burns so aptly said,
"We must make a choice. We
can either be content with Medi-
ocrity or strive for Quality . .
You can only attain success as
an architect if you insist on
Quality. Very frankly, the com-
petition between you and your
colleagues will allow you to settle
for nothing less. And this is the
way it should be."
A Convention highlight was
the Seminar Program, which
thoroughly delved into the ques-
tion of Aesthetic Responsibility.
From every corner of our State
and from every walk of life came
* a group of experts on Quality-
a superb group of doers. Archi-
tect, builder, advertising man,
mortgage banker, educator, civic
leader, newspaperman ALL
deeply concerned and all deeply
engaged in our "War Against
Community Ugliness."
We salute Seminar moderator
Richard W. Snibbe and his pan-
elists: Matt M. Jetton / Norman
Davis /Eve Proctor / R. D. Hill
/ Jack L. Mullin / Haley Sofge /
Harrison Covington / Phillip
Hiss / Robert E. Cochrane /
Bernard Shiell.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: A specially-
prepared Seminar Report, cover-
ing the Program theme and
speeches, will soon be in your
hands.)


DECEMBER, 1965













RIGHT: A salute to the women
of the Clearwater Convention Bureau
who efficiently handled registration
of over 1000 people!
BELOW: An official welcome
to the Convention from
co-chairmen William Webber,
Mark Hampton and Jack Wohlberg.
BOTTOM LEFT:
President William T. Arnett
chatting with the
ever-gracious Mrs. Charles Nes.


.4 K


ABOVE: Our Executive Director Fotis
Karousatos happily sharing receiving line duties
with his lovely wife at the opening night's
Presidents Reception.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


20






LEFT: Our State Board
of Architecture executives:
Harry Burns, president;
William Webber, vice, president;
and W. Richard Glavin,
executive secretary of the Board.
BELOW: Star-studded head-table
at Florida Craftsman of the
Year Award Dinner, including
Governor Haydon Burns
and Clearwater Mayor Joe Turner.
BOTTOM LEFT: Mayor
Turner officially welcomes
the FAA Convention to his
fair city. BOTTOM RIGHT:
real belle of the Convention was
ever-smiling Amy Deen,
who brought along her father
and mother for the festivities.





I
,'" I '


2 ~


DECEMBER, 1965


^1 I)





















RIGHT: One of the lighter moments
as Bill Arnett clowns with statuesque lady
of the United States Steel's exhibit.
BELOW: Roy Pooley narrated
"Florida 1 he Beautiful"
post-film presentation of AIA Citation
for Excellence in Community
Architecture to City of Jacksonville.
BOTTOM LEFT: FAA Regional
Director Robert Levison looks on
as 3 men share the Jacksonville
award W. 0. Mattox,
Governor Burns and
Jax Mayor Louis Ritter.


BELOW: Craftsmen awards were
presented to each of the 7
nominees by the chapter president
of their area. Here, Hilliard
Smith hands certificate to Palm
Beach's happy choice, Charles
A. Parker. BOTTOM RIGHT:
Greek Dance party was just one
of many gatherings planned for
the women by Mrs. Joan Jennewein.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






BELOW: Dance floor was
most popular spot during
closing evening's banquet
soiree. The Jack Golly Orches-
tra provided great listening
and dancing tunes.


TOP CENTER: Handsome
display booth belonging
to Becker Sand 65 Gravel Co.,
and there were 76
more exhibits like this!
Just below is one of the
prize-winning architectural
exhibits. BOTTOM LEFT:
Another exuberant and
talented Greek dancer.


, &7k














BELOW: Handsome lineup of our new leaders,
including President James Deen, H. Samuel Kruse,
Hilliard T. Smith, Forest Coxen, Dana Johannes, r
and Walter Schultz. BOTTOM CENTER:
Florida South chapter president Don Boerema v
presenting Outstanding Citizens award to
Haley Sofge. BOTTOM RIGHT:
Winners of the Solite Archtectural Sudent awards,
presented by James Lendrum at left, are James
Anstis, David Gleason and R. H. Stipe -
all of the University of Florida.


DECEMBER, 1965


ANTHONY L. PULLARA AWARDS
Honored for service to the profession
and the Institute by an individual in
the Florida Central Chapter -
James Jennewein.
Honored for service to the profession
and the Institute by an individual
within the Florida region Ivan Smith.
Honored for the most vital program
of a Chapter Gulf Coast Chapter.










AN

APOLOGY


.. to G. Wade Swicord.

In the mass of details in-

volved in publishing the

November Convention Is-

sue of The Florida Archi-

tect, we neglected to in-

clude a credit line for the

superb pictures of our 7

Outstanding Craftsmen

Nominees. These photo-

graphs, which so graphi-

cally captured the quality

of the work created by our

Craftsmen, were taken by

G. Wade Swicord.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works
26
Florida Gas Transmission Co.
24, 25
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities
12,13
Florida Portland Cement
Division
Inside Back Cover
Jones & Laughlin Steel
Corporation
9
Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co.
1
Muzak Corporation
14
Robbins Manufacturing Co.
24
Shelton, Ullman, Smith &
Streich
26
Southern Bell
Telephone & Telegraph Co.
14
F. Graham Williams Co.
26


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

MACK E. PALMER
P. 0. Box 5443


Jacksonville. Florida 32207


Telephone: 398-7255


Custom-Cast

Plaques


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs

FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.


SHELTON

ULLMANN

SMITH &

STREICH

INC.

DESIGNERS
& FURNISHERS
of
Contract and
Commercial Interiors
in
Association
with Architects

600 S.E. 2nd COURT
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
522-4779










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r Ingt
LViuan this J


Holi
I-


'e think oJ t


and ish you eVe
no and in


)ao Season . _


rmn appreciation
ry happiness
the coming year.


FLORIDA PORTLAND


CEMENT


DIVISION


General Portland Cement Company
OFFICES AND PLANTS IN TAMPA AND MIAMI


DECEMBER, 1965








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