• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Business at hand
 "Quality or mediocrity"
 Advertising
 A letter from Washington
 Greetings to the FAA conventio...
 Convention schedule
 Seminar with Florida's outstanding...
 Craftsmen of the year
 Convention banquet
 Advertising
 Products exhibits
 Advertising
 11th annual salute to our 1964-65...
 Architectural exhibit jury
 Advertising
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00137
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00137
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Table of Contents
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Business at hand
        Page 10
    "Quality or mediocrity"
        Page 11
    Advertising
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    A letter from Washington
        Page 18
    Greetings to the FAA convention
        Page 19
    Convention schedule
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Seminar with Florida's outstanding citizens
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Craftsmen of the year
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Convention banquet
        Page 31
    Advertising
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Products exhibits
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Advertising
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    11th annual salute to our 1964-65 advertisers
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Architectural exhibit jury
        Page 48
    Advertising
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Advertisers' index
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Page 53
        Page 54
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.





the florida architect
CONVENTION GUIDE / NOVEMBER 1965


OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.


BINn\r.C, COP(









STREffS
-- INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1000 N.W. 57th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA / TELEPHONE: 666-8555


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to look in, too. Why not make it as interesting as possible?
Shown here, and described in captions, are a few of the
many kinds and uses of L-0 F glass in interior glazing. For
more, refer to Sweet's Catalog File 26A. Or call your L- O F
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lounge from an exhibit area in the Lake Meadows Club House, ment the masculine decor of this restaurant. The Grace E. Smith
Chicago, 11I. Architects: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Chicago. Co., Toledo, Ohio. Architects: Richards. Bauer & Moorhead, Toledo.


For decoration. L-O F Patterned Glass not only decorates but For privacy. Office partitions and doors are glazed with L-O-F
provides privacy. Shown here is our new Grassweave pattern at Rough Grey Plate Glass to blend with fieldstone facings. IBM -
Detroit Bank & Trust. Partitioning designed by Frank P. Farina, Thomas i. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, N. Y.
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The structure is striking, yet tastefully modern . with 22 classrooms, cafetorium, library and
administrative spaces. For 35,210 square feet, the bid price was $398,390, or $11.32 per square foot.
The precast concrete folded plate roof, supported on prestressed columns of concrete, provided
not only an outstanding design feature, but brought important economy. Walls are concrete masonry,
stuccoed on the exterior, plastered inside for decorative effect. And included in the modest cost is
the elegance of terrazzo floors in the cafetorium.
For school boards seeking, at realistic cost, aesthetically pleasing facilities that are also durable,
firesafe and easy to maintain, concrete offers the ideal solution. Portland Ceawnt Associatein
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6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
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6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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NOVEMBER, 1965








74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS




In 7Tds 4ss ---

"Business At Hand" .........
by Fotis N. Karousatos
"Quality or Mediocrity" .
by William T. Arnett, AIA
A Letter from Washington . .
Greetings to the FAA Convention ..
by Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA
Convention Schedule .
Seminar with Florida's Outstanding Citizens .
Craftsmen of the Year .
Convention Banquet .
Products Exhibits .
11th Annual Salute to Our 1964-65 Advertisers .
Architectural Exhibit Jury .
New Officers, State Board of Architecture .
Advertisers' Index .


FAA OFFICERS 1965
William T. Arnett, President, 2105 N.W. Third Place, Gainesville a
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami n
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee c
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Avenue, Clearwater

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: William A. Gilroy, George M. Polk; DAYTONA BEACH: r
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Dana B. Johannes, Frank R. Mudano, p
William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Earl J. Draeger, Sidney R.
Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Jack Moore; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTHWEST: William c
S. Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James E. Ferguson, Jr., John 0. Grimshaw, Earl t
M. Starnes; JACKSONVILLE; A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., Harry E. Burns, Jr., c
Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: John B. Langley, Joseph N. Williams; a
PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of Architects
Fots N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Verner Johnson, Joseph M. Shifalo

FRONT COVER
Our cover symbols are actually Roman and Gothic stonemason signs, originated VO
many centuries ago so that these craftsmen could proudly distinguish their
finished work. Cover graphics created by The Brothers Bogusky. NU

8


10

11


18
19

20-22
23-25
28-30
31
38-41
46-47
48
48
52

HE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
he Florida Association of Architects of the
merican Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
ind published by the Association, a Florida
corporationn not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
lation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
.4, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
ut publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
hose of the Editor or the Florida Association
if Architects. Editorial material may be freely
printed by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
ind to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
ome, but mention of names or use of illus-
rations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
institute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
tion of Architects. Advertising material must
onform to standards of this publication; and
he right is reserved to reject such material be-
ause of arrangement copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
aiami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
cription, $5.00 per year. March Roster Issue,
2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.
FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor
ELEANOR MILLER
Assistant Editor
M. ELAINE MEAD
Circulation Manager


UME 15

ABER 11 9
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















Your
competition:


Our
competition:


Foreign vacations Foreign pipe








But in fact, both competitors hurt both of us. And all Americans. D Florida industry loses heavily when foreign
travel promoters lure American tourists overseas. Fewer Florida vacationers mean fewer new hotels and motels;
less renovating and expansion of those already built. And, American steel producers and workers get hurt when im-
ported pipe tries to price-cut its way into this country, finding some people happy to "save a few bucks". D But hard
logic says that these small, short-term gains aren't worth a big, long-term loss. Especially when, as in steel and tour-
ism, important American money flows overseas at an ever-increasing rate. This hurts all of us, directly and personally;
it's no abstract, remote theory! It explains Washington's recent efforts to curb foreign travel enthusiasm among
Americans. O There's another point to be made, too. The reliability, flexibility, service and high uniform quality
provided by American firms doesn't always cross the ocean with foreign imports. O Come to think of it, foreign
tourists don't make the trip too often, either! O Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation manufactures America's finest
steel pipe, used in some of Florida's finest new buildings. For more information, contact your J&L distributor
in Florida or write direct. Jons & Laughlin 8tI Corporation a gateway Center. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania 15230
MILr











Business



At



Hand


T


The professional portion of our forthcoming conven-
tion will certainly be a success and generate vigorous action
on the part of the leaders in the cities of our State.
There is other business at hand during the business ses-
sions of our convention which requires prudent attention
by even' AIA chapter in order to properly instruct the
chapter delegates who will have the voting power.
Shortly after publication of this November issue, every
member will receive by mail the 1965 Annual Board
Report. The Board Report will contain a new look with a
professional touch.
Of the many matters to be discussed and acted upon
at the business sessions, there are three which I believe
are of great importance and will require prudent con-
sideration.
A Bylaw change has been suggested (the October issue
IIA) to change the name of our Association from The
Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute
of Architects to The Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects. For 51 years, our organization has
been known as the FAA which is a region of the AIA.
A change in name would, in my judgment, accomplish
very little, if anything, and would require a tremendous
informational effort to acquaint the populace of this
change. The FAA has existed over one-half of a century.
The decision would be yours, but I ask your careful con-
sideration.
Our Budget and Finance Committee has formally pre-
sented its 1966 Budget which calls for increased expendi-
tures and, of course, income to support the program of
your State Association. We have taken a step forward and
must continue our pace. The entire activity of your Asso-


ciation has taken on a new look and will continue to do so.
\ith your Annual Report, you will receive a Seminar
Report, "Prevention of Water Penetration in Buildings."
This is not a mimeographed report but a professional bro-
chure which you will be proud of and will keep in your
files for reference. This Report is the first of many to
come next year and will be distributed to engineers, con-
tractors, bankers and others as well as a service to archi-
tects. I want to see our Association move forward and this
can be accomplished with your support of the 1966
Budget.
The FAA Executive Committee has recently adopted
a Statewide Recommended Fee Schedule for Architects
which will be distributed shortly. State agencies have re-
quested a Fee Schedule for some time and recent discus-
sions between Architects-Engineers Committee with the
Architects office of the Board of Regents necessitated a
special meeting of the Executive Committee for this pur-
pose. This brochure is a preliminary Recommended Fee
Schedule to serve our immediate purpose with the State
Agencies. Immediately following our Convention, with
your adoption, the FAA will publish a complete brochure
including additional facts of the Architect's Services,
Compensation and Payment of the Architect, Architect-
Client Relationship, etc. The Executive Committee has
taken another step forward, long overdue, which every
architect should support.
\Ve arc on the right path. We now have to place our-
sclves in high gear. See you in Clearwater.
Fotis Karousatos
Executive Director


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







74e yse44ated4 ?'ew44e . .



Quality or Mediocrity -- & Who Cares?


Why should Quality or Mediocrity
concern the members of the FAA/
AIA?
Why should architects choose Qual-
ity or Mediocrity as a theme for a
convention?
If we examine the aims and pur-
poses of our professional society, the
AIA, the reasons may become clear.
The objects of The American Insti-
tute of Architects shall be to organize
and unite in fellowship the architects
of the United States of America, and
to combine their efforts so as to pro-
mote the aesthetic, scientific, and
practical efficiency of the profession.
In Chicago an architect was paid
$2 a day to make plans for a group
of builders who theretofore had drawn
their own.
In Philadelphia an architect's wife,
to supplement the family income, ad-
vertised for sale "a generasi assort-
ment of millinery and ladies' morning
dresses."
It was 1857. James Buchanan was
the new President.
Architecture, said Charles Badcock
who had started his practice that year,
"was almost, if not quite, at its lowest
ebb." Architects were at best unap-
preciated by the public. Worse, they
competed so fiercely with themselves
and with amateur designers that they
certainly did not appreciate each
other.
For the American people "the re-
sult was an architectural chaos which
still haunts our cities and which one
critic described as 'the mess that is
man-made America.'"
That year in New York a small
group of architects-thirteen in num-
ber, to be exact-got together to ex-
plore a way out of the sorry state of
their profession. Their efforts led to
the formation of a professional society,
The American Institute of Architects.
Their meeting took place in a Broad-
way building near New York's famous
Trinity Church, designed by the Insti-
tute's first president, Richard Upjohn.
Today there are more than 17,000
corporate members of the AIA, or-
ganized into 17 regions and some 150
local chapters. In Florida there are 11
local chapters and two student chap-
NOVEMBER, 1965


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA
President,
The Florida Association of Architects

ters. These are united in the Florida
Association of Architects of the AIA,
one of 20 state societies in this
country.
The objects of The American In-
stitute of Architects shall be to ad-
vance the science and art of planning
and building by advancing the stand-
ards of architectural education, train-
ing, and practice.
Raising the ethics, standards, and
competence of the architectural pro-
fession in the United States was not
an easy task.
It began amidst many quarrels over
style with the systematic exchange of
technical information at "a time when
there were no architectural schools,
few available books, and no means of
adult education for the young practi-
tioner."
The Institute's steady stream of
technical publications was soon sup-
p!cmcnted by standard documents on
such important matters as contracts
and owner-architect agreements. In
1912, the first Journal of the AIA ap-
peared.
Following personal study of archi-
tectural schools in Europe by the
AIA's Board of Trustees, the first
school of architecture in this country
was established in 1868 at Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology.
By 1964 there were some 75 schools


of architecture, 57 of which were ac-
credited by the National Architectural
Accrediting Board which the AIA
helped organize in 1940.
The 1,500 or so young men and
women who graduate from these
schools each year now enter a pro-
fession whose ethical standards and
professional conduct are second to
none. But before they can practice
architecture, they must pass an ex-
amination and obtain a license from
an Architectural Registration Board,
now established in every state in the
Union. The existence of these boards
is undoubtedly among the most sig-
nificant achievements of AIA.
The objects of The American In-
stitute of Architects shall be to co-
ordinate the building industry and the
profession of architecture to insure the
advancement of the living standards
of our people through their improved
environment, and to make the profes-
sion of ever-increasing service to
society.
"The architect today should find
it impossible to miss the significance
of his position. He stands," says Aug-
ust Ilecksher, a distinguished lay ob-
server, "at the center of almost every
development in our society. The
changes which are acting most power-
fully upon the American people, ...
are his immediate concern.
"He provides the setting for fam-
ily life, and the visible substance of
cities. By his art he opens before the
public new choices of how they shall
spend their dollars and their leisure.
In the deepest sense he lays out the
paths which will determine, also, how
they spend their lives.
Little wonder it is, then, that the
architects of Florida, gathering in
Clearwater for the 51st Annual Con-
vention, have chosen for study and
exploration Quality or Mediocrity.
Little wonder it is, also, they
have invited interested and concerned
citizens from the towns and cities of
'lorida to gather with them to par-
ticipate actively in the discussion.
Each AIA member in Florida is re-
solved, as the by-laws of the Institute
phrase it, "to make the profession of
ever-increasing service to society."










































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















































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H HOUSING AND HOME FINANCE AGENCY
OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR WASHINGTON, D.C. 20410


Federal Housing Administration
Public Housing Administration
Federal National Mortgage Association
Community Facilioti Administration
Urban Renewal Administration


Mr. Fotis N. Karousatos
Executive Director
Florida Association of Architects
The American Institute of Architects, Inc.
3730 S.W. 8th Street
Coral Gables 34, Florida

Dear Mr. Karousatos:

The President has asked me to reply to your letter regarding the upcoming
meeting of the Florida Association of Architects on November 17-20 in
Clearwater.

As I have indicated in earlier correspondence with Morris Ketchum, President
of the Institute, it is most gratifying to see the enthusiasm of the AIA and
its leading chapters as they prosecute the "War on Ugliness." Certainly this
war cannot be won without the responsible leadership of professionals, and
the President's goal of "a civilization for the flowering of man" is brought
that much nearer because of this leadership.

Your comments concerning the President's responsibilities and concerns for a
staggeringly broad range of international and domestic problems are most to
the point. Still, I would repeat for you his remarks at the White House
Conference on Natural Beauty:

"Today I worked and thought about problems in Viet Nam and the
Dominican Republic.

I had to consider decisions which might affect the security of
this country, the lives of Americans, and the destiny of other
nations. Yet this may be the most important thing that I have
done and am doing today, and I am confident this is the most
important group that I will see. For this is part of what all
the rest is for."

The President has asked me to transmit his warmest personal wishes for a
successful conference, and to emphasize again how heartened both he and
Mrs. Johnson have been by the enthusiasm of the AIA to win the War on Ugliness.

Sin Ely yours,



ber C. Weaver
Administrator
















THE
PRESIDENT'S
GREETINGS
to the
FIl )RIDA RI. (;I NAL CON\ IENI'ION
Clearwater, Florida
November 17-20, 1965

My greetings and best wishes to the architects of the Florida Region, AIA,
on the occasion of your annual regional convention.
Your theme "Quality or Mediocrity" poses an implied question and
demands an answer.
Knowing the architects of Florida as well as I do, I realize that there is only
one answer they will give or I would give "Quality".
Your regional and national honor awards, your deep concern with the
Institute's "War on Community Ugliness", your professional leadership in the
redevelopment of the urban waterfront of Jacksonville, and many other pro-
grams and projects all prove that you will never neglect the eternal search for
the best in architectural achievement.
Craftsmanship will always be one of the most vital elements in architecture.
We must, therefore, constantly practice and perfect it in the design of the single
building, large or small. We cannot stop there. The single building will never
be complete and will lack a proper setting if we don't apply design craftsman-
ship to the space around and beyond the building. We must exert control over
the environment of buildings, their landscaping and outdoor furniture, the
pedestrian and motor traffic which serve them and the community of which
they are a part. It is the only way to achieve total architecture.
That is why your Institute is helping to forge a new and better partnership
with the related design professions, the enlightened leaders of business and
industry and the public men who direct our local, state and national govern-
ments. The prime objective of this grand alliance is to rescue and renew the
hearts of our cities, to plan and build better satellite communications and to rid
our countryside of the man-made eye-sores which blight "America the Beautiful".
In this campaign and in every other objective of the Institute, we will count
on the vital support of your region and every other region, state association and
chapter of our professional society.
Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA


NOVEMBER, 1965







51st Annual Convention


of the Florida Association of Architects of the AIA




Aesthetic Responsibility




the theme... Quality or Mediocrity


Beauty in nature, the cities and
in and along highways became a
major objective of national policy for
the first time in history on February
8, 1965, when President Lyndon B.
Johnson sent a special message to the
Congress calling for a "new conserva-
tion" to save our cities and country-
side from continuing blight.
Covering a wide range of ills de-
stroying our environment, the Presi-
dent said, "there is much the federal
government can do, through a range
of specific programs, and as a force
for public education. But a beautiful
America will require the effort of gov-
ernment at every level, of business and
of private groups."
"Above all," he asserted, "it
will require the concern and
individual action of individual
citizens, alert to the danger, de-
termined to improve the quality
of their surroundings, resisting
blight, demanding and building
beauty for themselves and their
children."
AIA Past President Arthur Gould
Odell, Jr., FAIA, challenged the pro-
fession: "We are witnessing an ex-
plosion of feeling of national urgency
to improve our environment. Now we
must take constructive action and pro-
duce the leadership on the chapter,
state and national level. This is our
greatest challenge and opportunity.
Our task is a big one, but if we, as
architects, don't take up the challenge,
we will have lost by default our role
as shapers of a better American en-
vironment, a role which we have said


is our right. But our right is not a
divine one; it must be earned. It must
be demonstrated that we not only care
about our physical environment but
are eager and willing to contribute our
talents towards its improvement. This
must be the goal and pledge of all
members of the Institute."
Vice President Robert L. Durham,
FAIA, outlined plans for the "War on
Community Ugliness." He noted that
"the public has become apathetic to
the ugliness around us. Too many peo-
ple are interested only in where they
live and where they work, and are im-
mune to the remainder of our environ-
ment. It is our duty to make them
aware." He also called attention to the
fact that "ugliness is not merely
trash or slums, but can be new items
which have been carefully laid out by
non-architects. Not during our life-
time will we see victory, but the war
must be started now."
This is the backgorund for the 51st
Annual Convention of your profes-
sion. The intent of the Seminar on
Aesthetic Responsibility is to awaken
State interest in its aesthetic condition
and to stimulate community leaders
to work with architects in improving
it.
We are fighting the pressure for
cheapness in the midst of our greatest
period of prosperity. We have never
been richer and poorer at the same
time. More production and consump-
tion seems to lead to lower standards
of workmanship instead of longer-last-
ing and more beautiful products and
buildings.
We believe that broad Citizens'


Committees on Aesthetic Responsibil-
ity must be established throughout
the nation to arouse public awareness
of aesthetics, to re-educate people to
see, to bring pressure on everyone re-
sponsible for our visual environment
to stop this desecration of our country.
Let us remember QUALITY in it-
self does not only mean beauty -
QUALITY signifies safety, conven-
ience, local character and planning.
The Seminar will consist of two
blue ribbon panels, comprised of
OUTSTANDING CITIZENS select-
ed by the AIA chapters and with
superb guest panelists. (See pages 23-
25.) These panels will present sem-
inar papers on the questions, "Who Is
Responsible For Quality Or Medi-
ocrity In Our Cities?" and "How Is
Mediocrity Eliminated And Quality
Achieved In Our Cities?".
The diversified experience and
knowledge of the Seminar Panelists
will certainly bring forth controversial
matters to be considered by the in-
vited citizens and architects in at-
tendance.
Architects are citizens first and
architects second. As design profes-
sionals, we have a major responsibility.
And as citizens of this great nation,
we have a responsibility also. "The
American people," writes Richard
O'Neil, ". . are the customers and
the trustees of an environment. To-
day, in a democracy, the man in the
street has the power and responsibility
for deciding what his environment
will be like, and he will undertake a
good one only if he knows what has
brought him an ugly one."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









CONVENTION CO-CHAIRMEN


William J. Webber
J. A. Wohlbrg
Mark Hampton


7:30 A.M.
to
4:30 P.M.

7:30 A.M.
to
4:30 P.M.

11:00 A.M.
to
8:00 P.M.

12:00 noon

12:00 noon



1:30 P.M.
to
3:00 P.M.


3:00 P.M.
to
4:00 P.M.


Installation of Product Exhibits-
Fort Harrison East & Hibiscus Room


Installation of Architectural Exhibits
-Colonial Room, Blue Room & Sun
Lounge

Registration for Members, Exhibit
Personnel, Students & Guests-
Lobby

Ladies' Lounge-Sun Lounge

Buffet Luncheon for FAA Officers,
Board of Directors, AIA Chapter
Officers-Japanese Gardens, Poolside

Board of Directors Meeting, President
William T. Arnett Presiding
(FAA Members Invited to Attend) -
Zephyr Room

State and Chapter Coordinating Com-
mittee, AIA Chapter Presidents, Pres-
idents-Elect & Chapter Officers-
Zephyr Room


6:30 P.M. Ribbon-Cutting Ceremonies Officially
Opening Building Products Exhibits
and Architectural Exhibits, President
William T. Arnett Officiating-Pinel-
las Lobby
NOVEMBER, 1965


7:00 P.M.
to
8:30 P.M.


President's Reception-Pinellas
Lobby (Black tie preferred. Product
and Architectural Exhibits will be
open for visitation during reception.)


8:30 P.M. Hospitality Suites Open

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18


8:30 A.M.
to
6:00 P.M.

8:30 A.M.
to
5:00 P.M.

8:30 A.M.


8:30 A.M.

9:30 A.M.
to
12 noon

10:00 A.M.
to
12 noon

11:30 A.M.


Registration-Lobby



Ladies' Lounge-Sun Lounge



Product Exhibits-Fort Harrison East
& Hibiscus Room

Architectural Exhibits--Colonial
Room, Blue Room & Sun Lounge
Student Seminar, "What Is The Pro-
fession?"-Skyline Room


Ladies' Champagne Breakfast & Wig
Show-Crystal Room


Sandwich Luncheon Served-Fort
Harrison East & Hibiscus Room


2:30 P.M. Ladies' Greek Dessert Party, with
Tarpon Springs Greek Folk Dancers
-Crystal Room


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17


I
_~~II ~_ ~ ~_~____~_________~_____~






2:30 P.M.
to
5:00 P.M.


First Business Session, President
William T. Arnett Presiding.
Invocation by Reverend Robert E.
Coleman Jr., D.D., Minister of the
First Christian Church of Clearwater.
Welcome by Mayor Joe Turner.
Fort Harrison West.


5:30 P.M. Product Exhibit Hall Closes.


6:30 P.M.
to
7:15 P.M.


Cocktail Party (Cash Bar)-
Japanese Gardens, Cabana Area


1:00 P.M. Outstanding Citizens Awards
Luncheon Robert H. Levison, Re-
gional Director, Presiding-
Fort Harrison East
1:00 P.M. Balloting for Outstanding Product
Exhibitors closes.


3:00 P.M.
to
5:15 P.M.


7:30 P.M. "Second Annual Florida Craftsman of
the Year" Award Dinner, Vice-Presi-
dent James Deen Presiding.
Speaker-Governor Haydon Burns-
Fort Harrison West
9:30 P.M. Hospitality Suites Open.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19
8:30 A.M. Final Registration-
to Lobby
3:00 P.M.
8:30 A.M. Balloting for FAA Officers-
to Pinellas Lobby
1:00 P.M.


8:30 A.M.

8:30 A.M.



9:00 A.M.
to
11:30 A.M.
10:00 A.M.
to
12:15 P.M.


Product Exhibits-
Fort Harrison East & Hibiscus Room
Architectural Exhibits-
Colonial Room, Blue Room &
Sun Lounge
Ladies' Poolside Continental
Breakfast

Aesthetic Responsibility Seminar-
"Quality Or Mediocrity"
William Webber, Convention Program
Chairman, Presiding.
Richard W. Snibbe, Seminar
Moderator.
Panel #1: "Who Is Responsible for
Quality Or Mediocrity In Our Cities?"
Matt M. Jetton Chairman, Hills-
boro County Planning Commission
John R. Harrison President & Pub-
lisher, The Gainesville Sun
Norman Davis Public Affairs
Editor, WJXT Jacksonville TV
Eve Proctor Chairman, Winter
Park's Downtown Beautification
Committee
R. D. Hill Division Manager, The
Florida Power & Light Company
Roundtable Discussion and Question-
Answer Period-
Fort Harrison East


4:30
6:45


P.M.
P.M.


Aesthetic Responsibility Seminar -
"Quality or Mediocrity"
Richard W. Snibbe, Seminar Moder-
ator.
Panel #2: "How Is Mediocrity
Eliminated and Quality Achieved in
Our Cities?"
Haley Sofge Executive Director,
Miami Housing Authority
Malcolm B. Johnson Editor, The
Tallahassee Democrat
Philip Hiss President-Elect, The
Florida Arts Council
Robert Cochrane Sr. Vice President,
Donnelly Advertising Corporation
Bernard Shiell President, Mortgage
Bankers Assn. of Florida
Roundtable and Question-Answer
Period-
Fort Harrison East
Product Exhibits Officially Close.
Cocktail Party
Japanese Gardens, Poolside


7:30 P.M. Annual Banquet -
William T. Arnett, President, Presid-
ing (Black Tie or Business Suits)
Speaker Charles M. Nes, FAIA,
First Vice President President
Designate of AIA
Anthony L. Pullara Awards
Product Exhibit Awards
Architectural Exhibit Awards
Architectural Student Solite Awards
Announcement of Newly-Elected
FAA Officers
Dancing Jack Golly & His Orchestra
Free Bar During Banquet
Fort Harrison East

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20


7:30 A.M.
to
4:00 P.M.
10:00 A.M.
to
12 noon


Continue to Dismantle Product
Exhibits

Final Business Session -
President William T. Arnett Presiding
-51st Annual Convention's Official
Adjournment


1:30 P.M. Post-Convention Board Meeting -
(New Boards Invited to Attend)
Crystal Room
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Seminar of Outstanding Citizens


The seminar sessions at the FAA Convention
are excellent opportunities to hear outstanding
experts offer their opinions and experiences in the
"war on community uglincss." Yet these are more than
'talking experts'- because we have gathered
together at this 51st Annual FAA Convention
a superb group of 'doers.' These are the Out-
standing Citizens of our state- each one selected
by the FAA chapter in their area and each one a
magnificent example of what an individual
citizen can do to make America more beautiful.
These Outstanding Citizens also represent the
architectural profession's close liaison with government,
civic and cultural leaders in efforts to constantly
improve and upgrade the beauty of our nation.
Through constant efforts and via their own
particular media, our FAA Outstanding Citizens
offer a shining example for all to follow! Whether
as newspapermen, a utility expert, a business
woman, a housing expert, an insurance man-
each has charged into battle in this "war on
community ugliness." It's a war that must
be fought and must be won. Only with such
dedicated citizens to join the forces of the
architectural profession can we hope
to wage a successful campaign.


RICHARD W. SNIBBE, A.I.A.


An architect of world-renown, Mr. Snibbe opened
his own offices in 1961. He had previously participated
in the design of the United States Embassy at New
Delhi, India, which received the AIA gold medal
award. He is currently designing a Comprehensive
Campus Plan at the State University College at
Geneseo, New York, and is writing a book on
aesthetic awareness. He is a popular guest lecturer and
visiting critic at schools across the country and is
frequently a guest speaker at AIA functions. He
is the author of "Small Commercial Buildings" and
has contributed articles to the finest magazines
in our professional field. In 1962, he conceived and
executed the First Conference on Aesthetic
Responsibility in New York City as Chairman
of the Design Committee of the New York Chapter,
AIA. He is a member of the jury for the medal of
honor and also a member of the National
Committee on Aesthetics.


Guest Panelists


ROBT. COCHRANE


PHILIP HISS


BERNARD SHIELL


NOVEMBER, 1965
































LARRY DeVINE, selected
by Broward County...Cur-
rently drama critic and en-
tertainment-arts writer for
The Miami Herald. For last
3 years was real estate editor
of The Herald's Fort
Lauderdale and Broward
County edition. During that
time, he wrote regular arti-
cals and pictorial features
on architecture. He initiated
the unique program "Brow-
ard's Best Buildings of the
Year" which annually se-
lected the outstanding archi-
tecture done in that area.
He was a leader in the fight
to promote selection of
architects for city and
county jobs on singular
merit.


MATT M. JETTON, se-
lected by Florida Central...
President of Sunstate Build-
ers Inc. and Sunstate Air
Condition Company. He
has played an important,
continuing role in commun-
ity development and has
promoted the inclusion of
planning and building pro-
gram professionals as part of
his design team. He has
long been active on local
and national levels in the
Home Builders Association.
He was selected a juror in
"House & Home" Maga-
zine's Better Living Design
Awards Program. His resi-
dential communities have
won national awards and
recognition for design ex-
cellence. He is presently
chairman of the Hillsbor-
ough County Planning
Commission.


JACK L MULLIN, select-
ed by Daytona Beach . .
Mortgage broker, Lloyds of
London broker and insur-
ance agent. He believes Am-
erica is facing the greatest
challenge in its history ...
and we must preserve its
natural beauty to inspire a
better way of life for our
youth.


DAVID COHEN, selected
by Florida Gulf Coast . .
Mayor of Sarasota, and
president of Smith Special-
ty Co. Under his direct in-
fluence, Sarasota has en-
joyed a spectacular period
ofbeautification and growth.
He also organized the Sym-
phony Chamber Music So-
ciety and the Allied Arts
Council.


NORMAN DAVIS, select-
ed by Jacksonville . Pub-
lic Affairs Editor of Station
WJXT Television. He in-
augurated a series of hard-
hitting, half-hour docu-
mentary programs concern-
ing our physical environ-
ment. He is also a frequent
panel member on the week-
ly discussion program, Jack-
sonville Forum.


EVE PROCTOR, selected
by Mid-Florida . presi-
dent of Proctor's Casuals
dress shops, construction su-
pervisor of new buildings in
her expanding business em-
pire, she also serves as chair-
man of Winter Park's
Downtown Beautification
Committee. Her work is
coming to fruition m "Op-
eration Foresight."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























JOHN R. HARRISON,
selected by Florida North
S. President and Publish-
er, "The Gainesville Sun";
president, "The Fort Pierce
New Tribune"; Vice Presi-
dent, Indian River Land In-
vestments Inc. Winner of
1965 Pulitzer Prize for Ed-
itorial Writing for his series
on the need for minimum
housing code in Gainesville.
Through his newspapers
and through his many civic
activities, he has contrib-
uted mightily to the crea-
tion of an atmosphere for
good design. He was direc-
tor of the Ft. Pierce-St.
Lucie County Industrial De-
velopment Council, is chair-
man of the Board of Di-
rectors of the Ft. Pierce
Art Gallery.


MALCOLM B. JOHN-
SON, selected by Florida
North Central . Editor,
"The Tallahassee Demo-
crat". As an outstanding
journalist, he has done
much to create among lay-
men an awareness of good
design. He has won two
Florida Bar Awards for his
journalistic contributions.


EARLE BOWDEN, se-
lected by Florida North-
west ... Editorial page Ed-
itor, "Pensacola News-Jour-
nal," also political cartoon-
ist. He is chairman of the
Pensacola City Council's
Historical Advisory Com-
mittee and works tirelessly
to enhance the city's image.


R. D. HILL, selected by
Palm Beach . Division
Manager, Florida Power &
Light Company. He has
served as president of West
Palm Beach Chamber of
Commerce and as a busi-
ness Administration Com-
mittee Member for Florida
Atlantic University. He re-
ceived an RCA Distin-
guished Citizens Award.


HALEY SOFGE, selected
by Florida South . Exe-
cutive Director of Miami
Housing Authority. Has
long been a leader in dra-
matic development, archi-
tectural innovations and
practical designs in public
housing projects. He cur-
rently administers 11 proj-
ects, with many more in
various stages of completion.


PRE-CONVENTION
COVERAGE
CONTINUED
ON PAGE 28


NOVEMBER, 1965










Electric Power

makes the


BIG DIFFERENCE!

The dangerous, back-breaking work of handling heavy logs and timbers is a thing of the past
in the Arnold Lumber Company sawmill at Caryville, Florida. Today, this successful,
completely electrified sawmill is producing annually some 12 million board feet of quality
lumber from native pine and cypress and a variety of hardwood logs.

PRODUCTION WENT WAY UP!
MAINTENANCE COSTS CAME WAY DOWN!
"By replacing diesel power with versatile electric motors we now can
produce twice as much as before... with substantially less man-hours,"
says Fern Arnold, president of the company. "We've done away with
fuel storage tanks and cut maintenance expense. The greater safety
of electrically-driven machinery is another desirable factor."

A "FOUND" *100,000
"Our electric powered chippers and blowers now make it profitable
to salvage and sell to a nearby paper mill approximately $100,000 worth
of sawmill chips annually that were formerly a complete waste," says
Fred Baldwin, the sawmill's general manager.






Florida's Electric Companies ... Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


f--------------~---`
























00'


NOVEMBER, 1965


AWL


AWARD
MERIT











For the second consecutive year, the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects will choose one craftsman from
among its Chapter nominees to be Florida Crafts-
man of the Yearl Seven chapters participated in this
program this year and all seven craftsmen's work
is displayed on these three pages. This particular
program has proven most popular and successful,
and it is certain to be one of the most interesting
highlights of our entire convention.
We are especially honored because the winner of
the Craftsman of the Year Award will be announced
by Governor Haydon Burns of Floridal
Last year, Larry Abbate, a Broward County stone-
mason, received the top craftsman award. This year,
he will be succeeded by one of the following highly-
talented professionals of the allied building arts. WVe
HAYDON BURNS of the architectural profession salute these skilled
Governor of the State of Florida men-and all the superior craftsmen they represent.






DONALD W. PETERS
Finish Carpentry

Nominated by Broward County
Chapter
Employer: Cuomo Construction
Company
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Project: Charles E. Allen residence
Fort Lauderdale, Florida






JULIUS POOLE
Millwork

Nominated by Daytona Beach Chapter
Employer: Daytona Beach, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
Project: Trinity Lutheran Church
Holly Hill, Florida


28 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















ROBERT M.
POFFENBARGER
Carpentry & Millwork
Nominated by Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter
Employer: Logan and
Currin
Sarasota, Florida
Project: Shepley
residence
Casey Key, Florida










ORLANDO FORGE,
INC.
Handcrafted Aluminum
Nominated by
Mid-Florida Chapter
Project: Florida
National Bank
Orlando, Florida







I JAMES ALONZO
YOUNG
b Marble Mechanic
Nominated by
Jacksonville Chapter
Employer: Steward-
Mellon Company
Jacksonville, Florida
Project: Vollkswagen
Southeastern Distri-
butor Building
Jacksonville, Florida


NOVEMBER, 1965 29







CHARLES A. PARKER
Bricklayer
Nominated by
Palm Beach Chapter
Employer: Richard
Cate, Masonry
Contractor
Palm Beach, Florida
Project: J. Sam Johnson
residence
Lake Worth, Florida










ALEX J. LAING
Carpenter Foreman

Nominated by Florida
South Chapter
Employer: Avant
Construction Co.
Miami, Florida
Project: J. Deering
Danielson residence
Coconut Grove, Florida














Which of these seven outstanding AIA Chapter Nominees

do you think will receive the coveted

"Florida Craftsman of the Year Award"?


30 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






4 9aF4 6'e#ovkp 7,


Remeksc U


The Annual Festive FAA Banquet


SPEAKER

Charles M. Nes, Jr., FAIA


1st Vice President
and President-Designate
of the A.I.A.


A wonderful evening of fine food and excellent entertainment will begin with a cocktail party,
which will be held poolside in the handsome Japanese Gardens. A sumptuous dinner menu has been
prepared, featuring a sirloin strip steak entree. There's a free bar during the banquet and, from 8 p.m.
to midnight, you can listen and dance to the "swinginest sound in the South"-the inimitable Jack
Golly and his orchestra. Keynote of the evening will be an address by Charles M. Nes, Jr. This will
lead off an award-filled Banquet Program.

BANQUET PROGRAM

Anthony L. Pullara Awards to:
a) Outstanding Architect of Florida Central Chapter.
b) Outstanding Architect in the State.
c) Outstanding AIA Chapter.
Product Exhibit Awards for:
a) Educational value of display.
b) Display Excellence.
Architectural Exhibit Awards
Architectural Student Solite Awards -
four awards for academic excellence in studies of Architectural
Construction and Architectural Structural Design.
Announcement of Newly-Elected FAA Officers


PRE-CONV
NOVEMBER, 1965


MENTION COVERAGE CONTINUED ON PAGE 38
31


































































The colorful, lightweight Albinson stacking chair is a well designed solution to a variety of residential and commercial seating problems. May we send you a brochure






KNOLL ASSOCIATES INC. I 111 NORTHEAST 40 STREET, MIAMI






Showrooms In: New York Atlanta Boston Chicago Cleveland Dallas Detroit Los Angeles New Orleans Philadelphia St. Louis San Francisco Seattle Washington, D.








Dstin nctive


DOORS of Selective Quality


MONOLITHIC ALUMINUM FACINGS
IMPREGNATED HONEYCOMB CORE
SHOCK PLATES

THE

ENDURE-A-DOR
A FULLY GUARANTEED PRESTIGE DOOR
THAT INSURES TOP ARCHITECTURAL RATING
A full 67 County Planning Service immediately
available to all Florida Architects and Engineers.
COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS, TEST REPORTS, AND ENGINEERING DATA AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
ENDURE-A-LIFE PRODUCTS, INC., 2375 N. W. 75th ST., MIAMI, 33147, FLORIDA


S I! I I I IT IILI ..T I I L
II :I I]l! I [ I ll*l ll'lIlll 1,I llllll lll:


A THICK SKIN AND
A ROCK-HARD BODY
There are no short cuts to quality.
That's why Gory concrete roof
tiles are made of Hi-Early Type
Portland Cement to assure a
strong set, topped with the best
white cement available and coat-
ed with our patented Poly-Glaze finish. Quality control is
maintained by electronic moisture meters and beam scales.
Gory tiles are designed to withstand the ravages of weather.


EYE-APPEALING COLORS, SHAPES AND SIZES
Gory offers a rainbow selection of 90 different colors
in a variety of attractive, functional shapes and sizes
for any architectural motif. The colors are an integral
part of the Gory roof tile and will not fade under the hot
Florida sun. The foundation of Gory roofing tiles is the
best. Here is roofing beauty that will last a lifetime with
a minimum of maintenance . the next time you speci-
fy roofing, remember Gory Roofing Tile.


THE LARGEST AND FINEST MANUFACTURER OF QUALITY TILE IN FLORIDA

ROOFING TILE
GORY INDUSTRIES INC. P.O. BOX 490 135 N.W. 20th ST. BOCA RATON 395-1770
GORY ROOFING TILE MFG., INC. 1773 N. E. 205th ST. NORTH MIAMI 945-7691


NOVEMBER, 1965






RESIDENCE/LOYD FRANK VANN.. A.I.A.


Serving architect

RICHARD PLUMER and client. RICH4RD PL/ ER
BUSINESS INTERIORS ,'a ding Interior de
of the South"
155 N. E. 40th St. Miami Tel. 751-9775


LOUKIVA POWtK & LIUMI (L./WttU-JUHNSON ASSOC.
34


BLACK-BAKER PHOTOS
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















'V


. L..


k.'


u-P Pecan witn Walnut Inlay

For your most selective clients



You can now select from 11 elegant Inlaid Panelings!
Here's the decorative flair of Inlaid Paneling! Now available in a wide range of beautiful hardwoods!
At a new low price! Turn the page and see G-P's exciting new panelings for 1965!


GEORGIAPAC I F I C




bee reverse side of this page or color illustration


Four now Georgla-Pacmlc decorator panelings for 19651


9-P Inlaid Paneling
The custom look of hand-craftsmanship . at a new low price!
Only $24.95 to $31.95 (retail) for 4' x 8' V-grooved panels. The beauty
of the hardwood face veneers and inlays is protected with G-P's
Acryglas" catalyzed resin finish. This posh paneling is ideal for both
home and institutional installations. Eleven combinations: Pecan with
Walnut inlay (as featured on the reverse side of this page), Walnut
with Pecan inlay, Elm with Walnut inlay, Distressed Heirloom Cherry
with Walnut inlay (antique appearance), Select White Birch with Red
Birch inlay, Select Red Birch with White Birch inlay, Inlaid Figured
Red Gum, Fawn Amazon Maple inlay, Golden Amazon Maple inlay,
Nutmeg Amazon Maple inlay, and Autumn Amazon Maple inlay.

6-P Gold Crest Paneling
Use it the way it comes! Or stylize the panels by filling the half-inch
channels with colored tapes and metallic strips. Only $26.95 to $29.95
(retail) for 4'x8' panels. The panels have one-half inch channels
spaced between the random planks. You can fill these channels with
colored tapes or metallic strips. Metal strips slotted for shelf brackets
are also readily available. The extremely rugged Acryglas* finish re-
sists scuffs and stains--and polishes like new with a damp cloth.
Veneer patterns available are American Walnut, Distressed Heirloom
Cherry (antiqued), Golden Elm, and Pecan.


G-P Chateau Paneling
For walls higher than 8 ft.! The groove patterns run perfectly from
floor to ceiling! Only $13.44 to $21.44 (retail) for 4'x8' panels. The
vertical grooves on every panel are extra wide-and perfectly matched.
Result: You can stack them one on top of another and have a flawless
groove from floor to ceiling. G-P's lustrous "Family Proof" multi-coat
finish protects the woods against wear. The panels are as easy to
maintain as fine furniture. Veneers feature nature's warm and beau-
tiful growth characteristics. Available in Natural or Antique Birch,
Select or Knotty Cherry, Select or Knotty Elm, Select or Knotty Oak,
Select or Knotty Pecan, Select or Knotty Walnut, and Cypress.

G-P Stile IV Paneling
Last year this effect called for hand-made craftsmanship! G-P's new
Style IV Paneling is available in elegant American Black Walnut. Only
$25.98 (retail) for a 4'x8' panel. The panel creates the effect of
four-inch planks separated by "V" grooves. This effect used to call
for hand-craftsmanship--as each four-inch plank had to be installed
individually. But Georgia-Pacific has devised a new production tech-
nique that captures this traditional beauty in an easy-to-install regular
hardwood panel. And the Acryglas' finish will keep this paneling
beautiful through years of hard use.


Call for information
at following GP distribution centers All new G-P panelings are 3-ply 1/4" hardwood plywood, conforming
to requirements of CS 35-56. Sealed to minimize moisture absorption.
JACKSONVILLE MIAMI You can see Georgia Pacific's complete line of panelings at your
building material dealer or nearby G-P distribution center.
1333 Haines St. 77 N. W. 72nd St.
356-4833 758-7616

ORLANDO TAMPA
2721 Regent St. 3701 E. Columbus Drive GEORGIA- PAC I F I C
293-5781 626-6107 THE GROWTH COMPANY



































nowv... L!

now . L....


S ..


boldly for beauty
with

extra safety..

Ordinary glass was never like this. Permaglass Safeglaze has
5 to 8 times greater strength than ordinary sheet or plate ...
and fail-safe breakage characteristics. Should breakage occur
there are no sharp daggers-just harmless pebble-like parti-
cles. This means greater protection against human accidents,
flying objects and high winds.
Safeglaze quality introduces characteristics and tolerances
previously unavailable. It is flat and distortion-free, even in
large sizes. Its technical excellence encourages the use of
tempered safety glass in architectural sections, patio doors,
tub enclosures, and other functional and decorative applica-
tions in homes, hotels, apartments, schools, hospitals and
office buildings.
Examples of recent 100% Safeglaze installations in Florida
are shown here. There's a generous use of %" gray tint Safe-
glaze sections in the 100 Biscayne Tower Building, distin-
guished newcomer to Miami's skyline. At Pompano, the
impressive new Race Track Pavilion provides safe viewing
behind a broad expanse of 8 ft. x 10 ft. sections of %" clear
Safeglaze Tempered Safety Glass.
Availability. Leading glass distributors and contract gla-
ziers who supply Permaglass have standard sizes in stock.
Clear sheet, clear plate, gray sheet, gray plate, bronze plate,
heat absorbing plate, or patterned glass. Can be custom tem-
pered in thicknesses of X," to 1"; maximum size 96" x 120".
Meets Federal Specification DD-G-451-a. Write or call for
further details.


* POMPANO BEACH. FLA Race Track Pavllon.
Archilact Robel E Hanon.
Glu erl Cmword Glas Corp







Product Exhibits Will Be


A Convention Highlight


#47 ALDORA ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
48 Division of Architectural Glass Prod. Inc.
552 NW 5th Street
Miami, Florida
ALUMINUM ENTRANCES, SLIDING
MIRROR DOOR AND ARCHITECTURAL
SHAPES: ARCHITECTURAL GLASS, HEAT
ABSORBING, GLARE REDUCING
Representatives:
Dudley Munger Ned Bleeker
0. C. Kelly W. R. Stern
#21 AMERICAN OLEAN TILE COMPANY
1000 Cannon Avenue
Lansdale, Pennsylvania
A COMPLETE LINE OF QUALITY
CERAMIC TILE FOR WALLS AND FLOORS
Representatives:
George W. Thorpe, 3rd
Paul W. Horton Frank J. Jones
#66 BECKER COUNTY SAND A GRAVEL COMPANY
Specialty Products Division
P. O. Box 596
Bennettsville, South Carolina
COLORFUL NATURAL HARD
AGGREGATES FOR EXPOSED AGGREGATE
CONCRETE AND EPOXY PANELS
Representatives:
John D. Nock John W. Justice
#26 BIRD AND SON, INC.
Box 4336
Charleston, South Carolina
SOLID VINYL SIDING AND ARCHITECT
MARK 25 ASPHALT ROOFING SHINGLES
#22 BRADLEY WASHFOUNTAIN COMPANY
W142 N9101 Fountain Drive
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53055
GROUP WASHING EQUIPMENT -
SHOWERS WASHFOUNTAINS
Representatives:
John W. Holian, Sr. Jack Holian
#53 CADILLAC ENGRAVERS, INC.
P.O. Box 23098
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
INTERIOR DIRECTIONAL SIGNS, ROOM
AND DOOR NUMBERS, BUILDING
DIRECTORIES, BULLETIN BOARDS,
DONOR BOARDS
Representative: M. H. Braden
#24 THE CELOTEX CORPORATION
25 120 N. Florida Avenue
Tampa 2, Florida
CELOTEX, CELO-FLOW AIR DISTRIBU-
TION CEILINGS; ACCOUSTIFORM
MEDIUM-DENSITY ACOUSTICAL CEILING
PANELS; PROTECTONE U.L. RATED CEIL-
ING SYSTEMS; ACOUSTICAL TILE AND
PANELS
Representatives:
F. S. Burgen J. P. Steams
J. D. Wilkin K. C. Lindley
S. J. Day J. H. Kleinschmidt
#17 CLEARVIEW CORPORATION
3318 SW 2nd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
SOLAR SHADE WINDOWS,
LOUVERED WINDOWS


Representatives:
Arthur W. Korfage
J. R. Patterson L. DuBois
#69 CLINE ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
112 32 Avenue, West
Bradenton, Florida
ALUMINUM DOORS
Representative: Robert S. Cline
#3 CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC.
P.O. Box 130
Brunswick, Georgia
POREX ROOF DECKS, PYRITE FORMING
SYSTEMS, PORETE CHANNEL SLABS
Representatives:
Jack Torbett
T. R. Bryan John E. Custer
#13 DIMENSIONAL PLASTICS CORP.
1000 East 26 Street
Hialeah, Florida 33013
KRINKLGLAS STRUCTURAL PLASTIC
Representative: S. Ronald Barnette
#74 FREDERIC N. DODGE
Manufacturers' Representative
LAMINATED GLASS CORPORATION
SUPER SKY PRODUCTS, INC.
2648 Marion Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
ARCHITECTURAL LAMINATED SAFETY
GLASS, SKYLIGHTS
Representative: Frederic N. Dodge
#40 EDGAR BRICK COMPANY
Edgar, Florida 32049
BRICK (CLAY)
Representatives:
John H. Heard Henry C. Croom
#38 ELECTRIC HEATING ASSOCIATION
750 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10017
ELECTRICAL ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN--
HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS
Representatives:
W. F. Boyle W. G. McGarry
#45 ENDURE-A-LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INCORPORATED
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami, Florida
FLUSH ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB CORE
DOOR; FLUSH STEEL PLASTIC LAMINATE
HONEYCOMB CORE DOOR; ALUMINUM
DOOR FRAMES
Representatives:
Arthur A. Kimmel
Alan E. Jones John Mathis
#59 EXECUTONE DISTRIBUTORS OF FLORIDA
404 Eunice Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
INTERCOMMUNICATION AND SOUND
SYSTEMS AND POCKET PAGE
Representative: Mr. R. T. Chamberlain
#42 FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC
UTILITY COMPANIES
43 1213 16 Street, North
44 St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
GULF POWER COMPANY






ELECTRICAL DISPLAY
Representatives:
H. H. Williams J. M. Windham, Jr.
G. F. Gramling, Jr. J. N. Cheney
H. L. Rhodes C. W. Martin
#9 FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 330
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
NATURAL GAS APPLIANCES FOR HOME
AND INDUSTRY
Representatives:
W. Harold Duguid Dan Ruffier
Bill King
#4 FORMICA CORPORATION
3008 Coral Way
Miami, Florida
FORMICA PRODUCTS
Representatives:
John H. Stockhauscn James N. Grant
Robert E. Clune George K. Haas
#68 LLOYD A. FRY ROOFING COMPANY
Jacksonville, Fla. Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
3 PLY COATED BASE SHEET FOR BONDED
B.U. ROOFS, COMPLETE LINE BONDED
PURE ASPHALT SHINGLES, 15-20-25-YEAR
BONDS
Representatives:
F. R. Bennett L. H. Holmes
R. B. Degcner N. B. Heflin
#78 H. B. FULLER COMPANY
St. Paul, Mninesota
TUFF-LITE EPOXY MATRIX, FUL-O-MITE
CONSTRUCTION ADHESIVES
Representatives:
William W. Denes Edward Hammerstein
James F. McCann George A. McDougall
#39 GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
P.O.. Box 1259
Lake Worth, Florida
ALUMINUM DOORS, ALUMINUM FRAMES
Representatives:
James H. Henry Tom Stone
E. W. Yordy Karl Kate
V. H. Order Jack Dew
Reginald Sheppard Lou Bruckman
Joe Q. Henry Allen Greer
R. R. Schier
30 GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION
3701 East Columbus Drive
Tampa, Florida
INLAID PANELING, GOLD CREST
PANELING, STYLE IV WALNUT,
CHATEAU PANELING
Representatives:
Bill Moore Ed Kagermann
Tom Kenyon Bob Johann
#63 HARRIS PAINT COMPANY
P.O. Box 1381
Tampa, Florida
HARRIS PAINTS AND COLORS FOR
INTERIOR EXTERIOR DECORATION
Representatives:
Walter Thomas Paul Clark
Elizabeth Kagey M. V. Catena
Ed Thompson Douglas G. McCoy
#67 HOTPOINT
A Division of General Electric Company
P.O. Box 2971
Jacksonville, Florida
RANGES, REFRIGERATORS,
DISHWASHERS, DISPOSERS
Representative: John A. Hyman


#41 HOUDAILLE-DUVAL-WRIGHT COMPANY
1000 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
HOUDAILLE-SPAN MACHINE
EXTRUDED, PRESTRESSED CONCRETE,
HOLLOWCORE SLABS
#37 INTERSTATE WATERPROOFING COMPANY INC.
Florida Paint & Coatings Inc.
7217 Central Avenue
St. Petersburg, Florida
COCOON, HARDWALL COATINGS,
FLOORING
Representative: Joseph C. Morse
#27 JIFFY BLUEPRINT SERVICE INC.
411 So. Garden Avenue
Clearwater, Florida
KEUFFELL & ESSER CO.;
EUGENE DIETZGEN CO.;
B. K. ELLIOTT CO.;
GENERAL ANILINE & FILM CORP.
Representatives:
John P. Hannigan Richard E. Dermond
Robert W. Sherman
#6 KENTILE FLOORS INC.
58 Second Avenue
Brooklyn, New York 11215
KENTILE FLOORS, AVAILABLE IN SOLID
VINYL; CRYSTALITE VINYL, CORK AND
RUBBER TILE; VINYL ASBESTOS AND
ASPHALT TILE
Representatives:
Jack Moore J. M. Rojas
S16 KNIGHT & WALL COMPANY
Flooring Division
P.O. Box 31
Tampa, Florida 33601
ROBBINS FLOOR PRODUCTS,
SOLID VINYL FLOOR COVERING,
FLOORING SUNDRIES
Representative: F. M. Cooper
S19 LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
A Subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings
2125 W. Central Boulevard
Orlando, Florida
PAINTS, WATERPROOFINGS,
SEALANTS AND RELATED ITEMS
Representative: V. L. Sinisi
60 LCN CLOSER
Princeton, Illinois
LCN DOOR CLOSER; BROOKLINE
BUILDERS HARDWARE; DETEX CORP.
DOOR ALARMS
Representatives:
Gordon V. Astle
Tom Lasier Carl Underwood
#62 LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS COMPANY
1819 Peachtree Road, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
FLAT GLASS PLATE GLASS -
PATTERNED GLASS
Representatives:
Russell F. Snyder
Art Kutsche Paul W. Christie
#29 mcPHILBEN LIGHTING, INC.
P.O. Box 217
Mount Dora, Florida 32757
COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL
INCANDESCENT LIGHTING FIXTURES
Representatives:
Daniel J. Greancy
Ken H. Hill Fred Emmett





#54 MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
55 P.O. Box 48-877,
International Airport Branch
Miami, Florida
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
~31 BENJAMIN MOORE & COMPANY
P.O. Box 1107
Jacksonville, Florida
MOORGARD LO LUSTRE LATEX
HOUSE PAINT
Representatives:
M. L. Fisher
James Partin E. P. Anderson
#8 THE MOSAIC TILE COMPANY
55 Public Square
Cleveland, Ohio 44113
CERAMIC TILE FOR FLOOR AND WALL;
QUARRY TILE; CONDUCTIVE
CERAMIC TILE
Representatives:
Allen Kern
R. C. Ferrell F. C. Burt
#28 MUZAK CORPORATION
FLORIDA WIRED MUSIC COMPANY
1646 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville 7, Fla.
MELODY, INC.
1759 Bay Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
FLORIDA MUSIC NETWORK INC.
3107 Edgewater Drive, Orlando, Fla.
TROPICAL MUSIC SERVICE, INC.
P.O. Box 1803, Tampa 1, Fla.
PROGRAMMED BACKGROUND MUSIC
Representatives:
Irving L. Wexler
Glen Tanner Warren Coughlin
#65 NuTONE, INCORPORATED
Madison & Red Bank Roads
Cincinnati 27, Ohio
NuTONE VENTILATORS, RANGE HOODS,
HEATERS, BUILT-IN APPLIANCES, MUSIC
AND INTERCOM SYSTEMS, RANGE OVENS
AND VANITORIES
Representatives:
Charles Zahler Walter Kelly
William Beidler Marty Schneidman
Robert Branch Pat Windham
James Hart
#75 PALM BEACH CLAY TILE COMPANY
P.O. Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Florida 33404
CLAY SHINGLE & BARREL ROOFING TILE;
HAND-CRAFTED CLAY FLOOR TILE;
CLAY DECORATIVE SCREEN BLOCKS
Representatives:
Rafael L. Compres
Frank R. Wynn Joseph M. Scmidt
$57 PERMAGLASS, INC.
3060 SW 2nd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315
TEMPERED SAFETY GLASS
Representatives:
Ted Kruper R. E. (Bob) Brown
#58 PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
SOLABRAN WINDOW, HI-FIDELITY
MIRRORS, PITTCO METAL, HERCULITE K,
PITT-GLAZE, DECORATIVE GLASS,
FIBER GLASS
Representatives:
E. A. Lundberg
Norman P. Owen J. V. Lamb


W76 PORCELAIN ENAMEL INSTITUTE, INC.
1900 L Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
ARCHITECTURAL PORCELAIN ENAMEL
PANELS ILLUSTRATING NEW
NATURETONE COLORS
Representatives:
John C. Oliver
William Weeks Robert L. King
#71 PORTLAND CEMENT CORPORATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
CONCRETE FOR SCHOOLS
Representatives:
J. C. Bennett R. W. Jones
W. N. Hollman R. A. Ramsey
*56 PREMIX PRODUCTS, INC.
300 NE 72 Street
Miami, Florida 33138
MARBLECOTE STUCCO ACOUSTICOTE
PLASTER MARBLECRETE STUCCO -
PUTICOTE PLASTER BEDDINGCOTE
FOR ROCK DASH FINISHCOTE PLASTER
Representatives:
E. Manny Rothbart
Vivian Rothbart H. Merton
S50 RAJAC, INCORPORATED
616 Drew Street
Clearwater, Florida 33517
DURA-GEMS, DURA-FLAKE
Representatives:
Joe Coroneos Ralph Smith
George Bickerstaff Jack A. Smith
Don Morrison Frank Etscorn
Leland (Pop) Drew "Butch" Davenport
James V. Southall Maradene Hermann
220 REFLECTAL BORG-WARNER CORPORATION
1000 West 120 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60643
BORG-WARNER ALFOL INSULATION
PRODUCTS
BORG-WARNER ASBESTOS
BORG-WARNER DRYFOL
BORG-WARNER POLYETHYLENE FILM
Representatives:
M. R. McLary D. A. Milne
C. F. Bowlin A. N. Hightower
J. R. Devitte E. M. Burke
#72 RHEEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY
73 7600 S. Kcdzie Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60652
PLUMBING FIXTURES, WATER HEATERS,
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
Representatives:
George E. Brauer
Hal Groninger Robert (Bob) Spurrier
R. G. Nichols Harry Kossbroeck
#11 ROHM & HAAS COMPANY
Washington Square
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19105
PLEXIGLAS FOR ARCHITECTURAL
APPLICATION
#52 ROWELL-VAN ATTA, INC.
273 E. Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
GENERAL ELECTRIC SILICONE,
CONSTRUCTION SEALANTS
Representatives:
John Raffa
Nelson Romero Charles Boogher






#34 RUBBER PRODUCTS
P.O. Box 13471
Tampa, Florida 33611
TUFLEX LIVE RUBBER FLOORING
Representatives:
Dean Turley R. Perry Frankland
#14 THE RUBEROID COMPANY
733 Third Avenue
New York 17, New York
T/NA 200 ROOFING
Representative: R. L. Noojin
#70 RUUD MANUFACTURING COMPANY
DIVISION OF
RHEEM MANUFACTURING COMPANY
7600 S. Kedzie Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60652
WATER HEATERS
Representatives:
Jim Henderson Jim Holland
#1 SCHLAGE LOCK COMPANY
2 2201 Bayshore Boulevard
San Francisco, California
DOOR LOCKS AND BUILDERS'
HARDWARE
#46 THE STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY
2130 W. 110 Street
Cleveland, Ohio 44102
STANLOCK NEOPRENE STRUCTURAL
GASKETS, STANPRO SINGLE-
COMPONENT URETHANE SEALANTS
Representatives:
Stephen I. Hall C. W. Dixon Jr.
Jack Parker Elias I. Kelsey
#15 STANLEY BUILDING SPECIALTIES
Division of The Stanley Works
1890 NE 146 Street
North Miami, Florida 33161
ARCHITECTURAL ALUMINUM WINDOWS
#23 STERNER LIGHTING, INC.
Winstead, Minnesota 55395
UNIQUELY STYLED OUTDOOR
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Representatives:
George Nye Bob Peacock
Les Hartman Bob Hoyerman
John Hartman
#36 STRESSCON INTERNATIONAL, INC.
1000 NW 57 Avenue
Miami, Florida
PRECAST UMBRELLAS WITH COLUMNS,
JOB PICTURES, 9' x 18" SAMPLES OF
VARIED EXPOSED AGGREGATES
Representatives:
A. Bulla J. B. Ross
B. Brown H. Roloff
R. Diago I. Walters
#49 SUNCOAST WOOD COUNCIL, INC.
1019 Regent Avenue
Clearwater, Florida
WOOD
Representative: Henry McWhorter, Jr.
#33 TECO SOUTHERN, INC.
P.O. Box 61
Largo, Florida
MAROLF SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS
AND LIFE STATIONS: GORMAN-RUPP
PUMPS
Representatives:
Roger Teague
Farley Pearson James Creiner
Howard Wood Waddell Wallace


/S TERRAZZO & MARBLE SUPPLY CO. OF FLORIDA
P.O. Box 9027
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
EXPOSED AGGREGATE SAMPLES,
TERRAZZO SAMPLES,
TERRAZZO-EXPANSION FLOOR STRIP
Representatives:
Clifford A. Meyer James Robinson
#77 BEN THOMSON, INC.
P.O. Box 6248
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
GLAZED CEMENT, VITREOUS WALL
SURFACING, "ARMOBOND" WALL
SURFACING FIBERGLASS REINFORCED
WITH 100% SOLID EPOXY
Representatives:
Ben Thomson Joseph Quesnel
Elliott Lewis Don Haverty
#10 UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORPORATION
5510 North Hesperides
Tampa, Florida 33614
ARCHITECTURAL, PERMAGARD
PANELING
Representatives:
Tom Attaway Clyde Hindman
Frank Bleuel Tom Howze
#12 UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION
525 William Penn Place
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
EXPOSED USS COR-TEN AND CARBON
STEEL IN ARCHITECTURE
Representatives:
C. C. Caskadon
D. A. Fisher E. D. Hunter
#35 WELLS TELEVISION, INC.
212 East 54 Street
New York, New York 10022
COORDINATED HOSPITAL COMMUNI-
CATIONS, INCLUDING TELEVISION,
NURSES' CALL, CLOSED CIRCUIT,
DOCTORS' REGISTER AND POCKET
PAGING
Representative: Orville Fry
#7 WESTERN WATERPROOFING COMPANY, INC.
424 So. MacDill Avenue
Tampa, Florida
WATERPROOFING
ENGINEERS/CONTRACTORS
Representative: Denton I. Albertson
#51 F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO., INC.
1690 Monroe Dr, NE
Atlanta, Georgia
PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING
ROOF AND WALL SLABS
#32 WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.
Gainesville, Florida
VERSA-TEC TECHNICAL FURNITURE AND
CASEWORK FOR SCHOOLS AND
HOSPITALS
Representatives:
Fred Bullard, Jr. Estes Perry
Grant G. Glider Sid Hulslander
#61 ZONOLITE DIVISION, W. R. GRACE & CO.
P.O. Box 67
Boca Raton, Florida
ZONOLITE PLASTER AGGREGATE, MONO-
KOTE FIREPROOFING, ZONOLITE
CERTIFIED CONCRETE, MASONRY FILL
INSULATION, DYFOAM POLYSTYRENE
INSULATION, GLASS FIBER BLANKETS,
ACOUSTICAL PLASTIC
Representative: C. S. Breslauer












































I II I I


Photography by Hedrich-Blessing


GLENBROOK SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
GLENVIEW, ILLINOIS
ARCHITECT:
NICOL & NICOL


24 from within ...
. "b -


Engineering Features
Continuous ridge skylight, 24' by
60' with glazed gable ends.
Ridge curbs, rafters and cross
bars of extruded aluminum alloy
6063-T6.
Continuous extruded neoprene
sealing gaskets.
Laminated safety glass.
Center ridge expansion joint.
Self-supporting.


XM O.4.


Super Sky puts the accent on Nature through bold, functional sky-
lighting . helps you relate indoors to outdoors with form and
beauty... provides a brilliant new dimension in architectural lighting.
Let Super Sky's engineers work on your next project. From your
plans, we design, fabricate and erect the skylight . and even
guarantee it! Write today for detailed drawings, engineering data,
estimates and suggestions. No obligation, of course.


from without

with Super Skylightinj


hS#Ub A New Concept inDimenadNI ons,~ ,
toquea. Write Super Sky Products.'
Box 113F.2r~g~' i~v~xi 'W


~__I_~_ _N__


'f:
i:
'~'


r








now...


wyer kitchens


in dramatic, new porcelain colors

Dwyer kitchens are available for the first time, in a choice of
six dramatic new porcelain colors that offer wide flexibility
in planning room decor! Colors include CORAL, SPRAY GREEN,
SAND, YELLOW, COPPERTONE, and CLASSIC WHITE to match or
contrast contemporary or traditional motif. And, these new
colors are permanent because they're porcelain-will never
require refinishing.


CORAL YELLOW COPPERTONE SAND SPRAY GF


THE DWYER SERIES 84, shouwn in Cla.sic
I'hit,, provides unmatched capacity
and convenience i n a foot kitchen. Full
rcce-si 10 net cubic foot refrigerator has
rill-out shelves, full-idtlth freezer,
cri..pcr, and seamless, acid-resistant in-
terior. Has -iurface cooking init. nnd
full-sizc oven. Deep bowl sink ,'et in
seanrnles;, one-piece countertop. 41
qu are feet of cabinet storage.


a lifetime of sparkling beauty... ease of maintenance


Dwyer porcelain enamel finish should not be con-
fused with baked enamel or other painted finishes.
Porcelain is mineral fused to special steel under
intense, penetrating heat of a 16000 furnace. This
extremely hard, durable surface is literally "burned
into," not "baked onto" steel.
Porcelain colors are permanent... never discolor,
stain or fade. Food spills and grease wipe off easily,


quickly. Porcelain can't burn, blister, or peel. A non-
porous, non-absorbent surface, it is odor-free, germ-
free, scratch and shock-resistant. A special type
acid-resistant porcelain is used for Dwyer counter-
tops and refrigerator interiors. Thanks to porcelain,
the entire front of the Dwyer kitchen is perfectly
matched when new and ... thanks to porcelain...
it will stay that way indefinitely.


DWYER PRODUCTS CORPORATION MICHIGAN CITY, INDIANA
















complete kitchen facilities in
compact space...

Dwyer designs and manufactures porce-
lain-on-steel kitchens forrental properties
-apartments, motels, hotels, retirement
and other types of housing. Also for
schools, churches, offices, institutions and
other applications. By providing full
kitchen facilities in a single, compact
unit, the Dwyer kitchen adds rentability
and livability to properties.
Select from more than 40 models from
89" to 87" in length, in six attractive
porcelain colors, for against-wall or
recess installation behind closures.
Installation is fast, economical, and
heavy-gauge construction assures lasting
durability: keeps maintenance costs low.







Gentlemen:
Send me full information on Dwyer
Kitchens now available in attractive por-
celain colors.
Full color, 20-page catalog of all
models
Architects Data File-including de-
tailed specifications, roughing-ins
and dimensional drawings.
"Color Selector"-containing indi-
vidual color sheets of each of the
six new porcelain colors in which
Dwyer kitchens are available.

FIRM:
INDIVIDUAL:
ADDRESS:
CITY & STATE:

DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
Suite 921, Dupont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Boulevard Way
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33131

DWYER PRODUCTS CORP. MICHIGAN CITY, IND.


SERIES 60 and 69 The answer for apartments, retirement and college housing,
and other rental properties. Both the Series 60 and 69 kitchens match usable
capacity and convenience of many larger kitchens. Choice of 5 or 7 cubic foot
refrigerators with roll-out shelves and freezer. Full-size gas or electric oven and
surface cooking units, deep bowl sink. Up to 20 square feet of built-in storage.


SERIES 51 Here's solution for converting marginal, low income hotel and motel
rooms, and apartments into profitable rentals. The Series 51 provides full
kitchen facilities -surface cooking units, oven, with broiler, refrigerator, sink
and storage-in just 4 ' of space. Installation is fast, economical, and kitchens
can be recessed and concealed behind closures when not in use.


SERIES 39 Perfect for the office or school lounge, college dormitory, church
meeting room, nursery, garden apartment, or home game room. The Series 39
takes less than J13' of space, yet provides gas or electric surface cooking units,
roomy 5 cubic foot refrigerator with freezer (plenty of ice cubes), deep bowl
sink, ample worktop area and storage. Appliance outlet on control panel.





No matter how

your roof shapes up...


...RUBEROID T/NA 200 roofing (with DuPont TEDLAR*) ill fit its shape


From folded plate to compound curve-Ruberoid
T/NA 200 fits them all. A combination of
DuPont Tedlar and Ruberoid Asbestos Felt
makes it chemical and weather resistant... pro-
vides longer life, trouble-free protection.
Lightweight and gleaming white, T/NA 200
is easy to apply with conventional roofing tech-
niques. Also available in green or gray pastels.
*DuPont's registered trademark


Makes any shape roof look shipshape for years.
Get complete facts on Ruberoid T/NA 200
roofing for industrial, commercial, and institu-
tional designs. Write to:


RUBEROID
The RUBEROID Co., TECHNICAL SALES & FIELD ENGINEERING DEPT.
Madison Ave. & U.S. Route 41, Tampa, Fla.






Alger-Sullivan Company
Century, Florida
WOOD PRESERVATIVE PROCESS
Agency -Dodson, Craddock and
Born Advertising, Inc.
Mutual Federal Building
Pensacola, Florida 32501
American National Bank of
Jacksonville
2031 Hendricks Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
CONSTRUCTION LOAN SPECIALISTS
Agency Lewis Advertising
10114 Fort Caroline Road
Jacksonville 11, Florida
Julius Blum & Co., Inc.
Carlstadt, New Jersey
ARCHITECTURAL METALS
Agency Seery 6 Company
Commonwealth Building
Louisville, Kentucky 40202
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh
460 Melwood Street
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania
ALUMINUM RAILINGS, WOOD
TRIMMED ALUMINUM RAILING
POSTS, ALUMINUM GRILLES
The Colotex Corporation
120 North Florida Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33602
BUILDING PRODUCTS
Agency Marsteller Inc.
One East Wacker Wrive
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Clearview Corporation
3318 SW 2nd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
Compressed Concrete Corporation
1800 North 4th Avenue
Lake Worth, Florida
MANUFACTURERS OF SHADOWSTONE,
COTICO STONE, COTICO TILE,
FACINGS FOR PANELS
Cut 'N Care, Inc.
2615 DeLeon Street
Tampa, Florida 33611
LANDSCAPE ARTISTS
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
1001 SE 11 Street
Hialeah, Florida
DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc.
921 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami, Florida
MANUFACTURER OF KITCHENS FOR
MOTELS, RESORTS AND HOTELS
Agency Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd at Harrison
Elkhart, Indiana
Endure-A-Lifetime Products, Inc.
2375 NW 75 Street
Miami 47, Florida
MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH QUALITY
ALUMINUM BUILDING SPECIALTIES
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works
3737 NW 43 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
CUSTOM-CAST PLAQUES


Florida Gas Transmission Company
Orlando and Orange Avenues
Winter Park, Florida 32790
GAS COOING AND HEATING
Agency Fry/Hammond/Barr 6
Rollinson Inc.
600 East Washington
Orlando, Florida 32801
Florida Home Heating Institute, Inc.
2022 NW 7 Street
Miami, Florida
OIL HEATING
Agency -Bevis Associates,
Advertising
2020 SW 1 Street
Miami. Florida 33136
Florida Industries Exposition
Exposition Park
Orlando, Florida
Agency Alfred L. Lino 6
Associates
1327 9 Street, South
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
Florida Investor-Owned Electric
Utilities
ELECTRIC UTILITY
Agency Bishopric/Green/
Fielden, Inc.
3361 SW 3 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
Florida Natural Gas Association
1500 E. Highway S50
Winter Garden, Florida
GAS COOKING AND HEATING
Agency-Palmer Tyler and
Company
Biscayne Plaza Building
Biscayne Blvd. at 79 Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Florida Portland Cement Division
General Portland Cement Company
P. O. Box 1528
Tampa, Florida 33601
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency Byington-Reed 6
Taliaferro, Inc.
Riverside Professional Building
205 W. Brorein Street
Tampa, Florida
Florida Wood Councils
National Lumber Manufacturers
Association
6957 Lillian Road
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
WOOD AND LUMBER PRODUCTS
Formica Corporation
Subsidiary of Cyanamid
Cincinnati 32, Ohio
FORMICALAMINATED PLASTIC
PRODUCTS
GEM Aluminum Products, Inc.
715 Barnett Drive
Lake Worth, Florida
ALUMINUM DOORS AND FRAMES
Georgia-Pacific Corporation
1333 Haines Street, Jacksonville,
Florida
77 NW 72 Street, Miami, Florida
2721 Regent Street, Orlando, Florida


Listed here are firms which have
helped this Official Journal of the
FAA grow during the past year.
All services, materials

3701 E. Columbus Drive, Tampa,
Florida
PLYWOOD AND PANELING
Gory Roofing Tile Manufacturing,
Inc.
1773 NE 205 Street
North Miami, Florida
CONCRETE ROOFING TILES
Agency-E. J. Scheaffer and
Associates
1090 NE 79 Street
Miami, Florida
Herpel, Inc.
6306 Georgia Avenue
West Palm Beach, Florida
TILES AND PATIO STONES
Agency Gaskill-Oertel Advertis-
ing Agency
P.O. Box 206, Boynton Beach,
Florida
Houdallio-Duval-Wright Company
A Division of Houdaille Industries,
Inc.
1000 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PRODUCTS
AND SERVICES
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
3 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230
MANUFACTURER OF STEEL
Agency Palmer Willson 6
Worden Inc.
660 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10021
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corporation
of Florida
1220 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33132
FINANCING FOR CONSTRUCTION
Knoll Associates, Inc.
111 N. E. 40 Street
Miami, Florida
320 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10022
FURNITURE AND FABRICS
Lambert Corporation of Florida
2125 West Central Avenue
Orlando, Florida
WATERPROOFING MATERIALS,
CONCRETE
Agency- McClellan 6 Associates
740 Clay Street
Winter Park, Florida 32789
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Annual

Advertisers

Honor Roll


and products which they make
or sell are of quality to merit
specification. They seek
your approval.

Libbey Owens Ford Glass
Company
811 Madison Avenue
Toledo, Ohio
GLASS PRODUCTS
Agency -Fuller 6 Smith 6 Ross
55 Public Square
Cleveland, Ohio 44113

Merry Brothers Brick and Tile
Company
Augusta, Georgia
STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS
Agency Withers 6 Carson
700 Security Federal Building
Columbia, South Carolina

Miami Window Corporation
5761 NW 37 Avenue
Miami, Florida
ALUMINUM AWNING WINDOWS
Agency E. J. Scheaffer and
Associates
1090 NE 79 Street
Miami, Florida

Muzak Corporation
1646 San Marco Boulevard,
Jacksonville 7, Florida
1859 Bay Road, Miami Beach, Florida
3107 Edgewater Drive, Orlando, Fla.
P.O. Box 1803, Tampa 1, Florida
PROGRAMMED BACKGROUND MUSIc
Agency Marsteller Inc.
800 2nd Avenue
New York 17, New York

Permaglass, Inc.
215 W. Main Street
Woodville, Ohio 43469
SAFEGLAZE TEMPERED SAFETY
GLASS
Agency Beeson-Reichert, Inc.
1806 Madison Avenue
Toledo 2, Ohio

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
1 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
PLATE GLASS
Agency Ketchum, MacLeod 6
Grove, Inc.
4 Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
NOVEMBER, 1965


Richard Plumer Business Interiors
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
INTERIOR DECORATORS
Agency Blackwood Advertising
155 NE 40 Street
Miami, Florida 33137
Portland Cement Association
1612 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
PORTLAND CEMENT AND PRODUCTS
Agency J. Walter Thompson
410 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 11, Ililnois
Prescollte Manufacturing
Corporation
1251 Doolittle Drive
San Leandro, California
LIGHTING FIXTURES
Agency Lennen 6 Newell
248 Battery Street
San Francisco, California 94111
Reflectal Corporation
Subsidiary of Borg-Warner
Corporation
1000 W. 120 Street
Chicago, Illinois 60643
ALUMINUM FOIL BUILDING
INSULATION
Agency The Biddle Company
108 East Market Street
Bloomington, Illinois 61702
Rheem Manufacturing Company
7600 South Kedzie Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60652
PLUMBING FIXTURES, WATER
HEATERS, HEATING AND AIR
CONDITIONING
Agency Bronner 6 Haas, Inc.,
Advertising
35 E. Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Robbins Manufacturing Company
P.O. Box 437, Tampa, Florida
P.O. Box 477, Lockhart, Florida
PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER
Agency Louis Benito, Advertising
507 Morgan Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
The Ruberold Company
733 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10017
ROOFING FOR INDUSTRIAL,
COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL
DESIGNS
Agency Kastor Hilton Chesley
Clifford 6 Atherton Inc.
575 Lexington Avenue
New York 22, N. Y.
Shelton, Ullmann, Smith & Streich,
Inc.
600 SE 2 Court
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
CONTRACT AND COMMERCIAL
INTERIORS


Solite Corporation
Richmond, Virginia
LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS AND
STRUCTURAL CONCRETE
Agency Cabell Eanes Inc.
509 West Grace Street
Richmond 20, Virginia
Southern Bell Telephone and
Telegraph Company
Atlanta, Georgia
COMMUNICATIONS
Agency Tucker Wayne 6
Company
2700 Peachtree Center Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Stresscon International, Inc.
1000 NW 57 Avenue
Miami, Florida
PRECAST AND PRESTRESSED
PRODUCTS
Super Sky Products
Thiensville, Wisconsin 53092
GEOMETRIC DOME SKYLIGHTS
Agency Maercklein Advertising
4887 North Green Bay Avenue
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53209
Trinity White, General Portland
Cement Company
111 West Monroe Street
Chicago, Illnois
PORTLAND CEMENT
Agency Harris, Wilson 6 Bauer
110 North Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60606
United States Gypsum Company
101 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60606
PARTITIONS, CEILING SYSTEMS,
ROOF ASSEMBLIES, STRUCTURAL
FIRE-PROOFING, WALL FURRING
Agency Geyer Morey Ballard
645 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Wels-Fricker Mahogany Company
Pensacola, Florida
MAHOGANY AND LUMBER PRODUCTS
Agency Dodson, Craddock and
Born Advertising, Inc.
Mutual Federal Building
Pensacola, Florida 32501
F. Graham Williams Co.
1690 Monroe Drive, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
MASONRY BUILDING MATERIALS,
PRODUCTS
Wood Products, Inc.
3310 No. Main Street
Gainesville, Florida 32601
TECHNICAL FURNITURE AND
CASEWORK
Zonolite Division, W. R. Grace & Co.
135 So. LaSalle Street
Chicago, Ililnois
LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING FII.L
Agency- Fuller 6 Smith 6 Ross
410 No. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611




































Newly-Elected

Officers, State

Board of

Architecture

Harry Bums-President

William Webber-Vice President

Herbert L. Anson-
Secretary-Treasurer

Full story in our December issue.


Move then
afely and
qulekly
with our
rovoeltioary
mow tree
mover.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


SAVE THE TREES


Architectural Exhibit

Jury Selected

Charles Moore-Chairman of
Department of Architecture,
Yale University

Robert Church-Chief Designer,
Mann & Harrover,
Memphis, Tennessee

Charles M. Nes Jr., FAIA-
Ist Vice President, AIA

Richard Snibbe, New York City


This wonderful new tree mover is the only one of its kind in
Florida that is available for public use. It will dig a tree, pick
it up and transplant it in less than one hour-all automati-
cally. It is the safest and surest method yet devised to trans-
plant trees or palms with trunks up to 12" in diameter and
heights to 35 ft. It will move most kinds of trees or palms
(even slash pines) growing in most soil conditions.
The per tree price for moving is reasonable.
For Information Contact
LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS
A L CONTRACTORS
GARDENERS
2615 De Leon rdeners for Bsch Gardens Tmpe 33609


ROOF DECK

FOR THE

LIGHT MINDED

Zonolite* Insulating Concrete in roof
decks weighs up to 50% less than gypsum
... 1/6 as much as structural concrete.
It's applicable with form boards, galva.
nized centering, or pre-stressed concrete
systems.You get incombustible, perma-
nent monolithic decks plus insulating
value which saves money on heating,
cooling equipment.
Another happy thought.We certify it will
be applied as you specify-exactly. Call
your Zonolite representative for details.

ZONOLITE
SS O W. L .A RLL. IT. CMEICAO.
I30 SO LA SALL6 ST. CMICASO. ILL

% _j






NOW--ARCHITECTS


Sf cc

a concrete floor treatment with

CONFIDENCE ASSURANCE

POSITIVE RESULTS:


7ke prposa e...


c M ........


774 Pwetuct...




4ppt/eation ....


to achieve this objective the LAMBERT
CORP. OF FLORIDA has developed a
REALISTIC process.
Application of SOLIDUS actually "case hard-
ens" concrete floor surfaces resulting in dust-
proofing resistance to wear and abrasion.
SOLIDUS LIQUID CHEMICAL HARD-
ENER exclusive use of PENETREL -DP
in formulation insures maximum DEPTH of
penetration and DEPTH of Hardness below
surface level.
By factory-trained field engineers of the LAM-
BERT CORPORATION Job Site Super-
vision backed by a FIVE YEAR PERFORM-
ANCE GUARANTEE


SOLIDUS CHEMICAL HARDENER

CERTIFICATE NO
NAME. ---
ADDRESS ---
NO. OF SQ. FT. TREATED -- AT-
ADDRESS & CITY-- --
JOB COMPLETION DATE CONTRACT PRICE--
This is to rertify that Solldo Chenlcal Hadener has been applied In strict eccordanre with Lamboe spwdel-
aimons on the ae mentioned job and the beare of is cerhifte ts entitled to te ganta a ootlrd
helow.
LAMBERT CORPORATION
President
The lambert Cosptt ,. Houston T and/or Ordo. Forid. ants that a sote flon
heated by o undar the Cp them Coap with Sol.c l loor
ardener, will not dut or dow Msening within ye rohm the de job mmpletL Now, t he
event there b a urf failure within te guarantee period, the Lambert Corporati r t the ura
areas that are dusting or show signs of softening. furnish all labor and material required to complete the job.
LAMBERT CORPORATION
Date-.---- yPresldent


WRITE FOR TECHNICAL AND INFORMATIVE DATA
LAMBERT CORPORATION of FLORIDA
Plant and offices: 2125 '. Central Blvd. P. O. Box 2226 0 Orlando, Florida
Manufacturers of: Paints Lacquers Waterproofings Architectural Coatings
Plants in: Orlando, Fla. Houston, Tex. Grand Rapids, Mich. High Point, N.C.
A subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings, Inc.
NOVEMBER, 1965


There's Still Time

To Register

For The

51st ANNUAL

FAA

CONVENTION!




Deadline is

November 8th!!


SHELTON, ULLMANN,

SMITH & STREICH mc.


DESIGNERS
AND
FURNISHERS
of
Contract and
Commercial Interiors
in
Association
with Architects


600 SE 2nd Ct.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
522-4779







Here's a new approach for architects:
Start at the swimming pool and
WORK BACKWARDS I


A swimming pool represents a major invest-
ment for your client. Yet it's useless half the
time unless it's heated. So don't waste it .
warm it! With fuel oil? Too messy, too many
odors! LP gas? Storage problems, forget to
reorder, run out! Electricity? Not unless the
guy is rich! No, the ideal fuel is natural gas,
and a whole new breed of high efficiency,
easily concealed, easily installed natural gas
heaters is now available.

And now, here's the real payoff . STEP
RATES! Once you've got natural gas on the
premises you may as well use it for all it's
worth. Because the more natural gas your
client uses, the lower his rate! For water heat-
ing ... really dependable! For clothes drying


S. miles ahead! For cooking ... like the
pro's do it.
And the big payoff will come with natural
gas air conditioning .. not just a volume
step rate, but a special preferential rate year
round! So working backward from a swim-
ming pool heater actually makes pretty good
sense, doesn't it? Might be a good idea to
pursue the matter further with the natural
gas folks in your area.

NATU RAL

GAS L
NOW FLORIDA'S
LARGEST SOURCE
OF ENERGY!


FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION 1500 E. HIGHWAY 50, WINTER GARDEN, PLORIDA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Eliminate


Mediocrity


Thru Responsibility


in Planning


Specify


en Door

Quality


UCEI' -L'I 3 MU .N LA NI ONA JULNIUN MHIHM bLHMUUL
Arch.teict S .'ITH & SELZER Lake WGorTh


Extruded Aluminum

DOORS and FRAMES
Heliarc Welded


VISIT US
AT
BOOTH 39


715 Barnett Drive
NOVEMBER, 1965


inIUUL PRODUCTS, INC.
Lake Worth, Florida Telephone 585-1766


4 JI:
v;~r
I:


I


Ilc








ADVERTISERS' INDEX


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Prs.


I
Jl
\


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Prs.


UTABLIED Itis

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCOd Pe nO Bui


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-00435 Of A
G-






FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


LI I. 1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD
La






STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

MACK E. PALMER
P. O. Box 5443


Jacksonville. Florida 32207


Telephone: 398-7255


Clearview Corporation ______ 16
Cut N' Care, Inc. -______ 48
Dunan Brick
Yards, Inc. __Inside Back Cover
Dwyer Products
of Florida, Inc. ------43-44
Endure-A-Life Products, Inc.- 33
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities ------___26-27
Florida Natural Gas
Association --------_ 50
Formica Corporation _______ 17
Gem Aluminum Products, Inc. 51
GeorgiaPacific Corporation_ 35
Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing, Inc. --____ 33
Houdaille-Duval-Wright Co.,
Division of Houdaille
Industries, Inc. ________ 14
Jones & Laughlin Steel
Corporation---------- 9
Knoll Associates, Inc. --____ 32
Lambert Corporation of
Florida ---------- 49
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co. 2
Merry Brothers Brick
& Tile Co. -------____ 3
Muzak Corporation _______ 13
Permaglass, Inc. _________ 37
Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Company ____-------- 7
Richard Plumer Business
Interiors ___-------- 34
Portland Cement Association 6
Reflectal Corporation ___ 4
Rheem Manufacturing
Company ____________ 1
The Ruberoid Company ____ 45
Shelton, Ullman, Smith
& Streich -- --__ _--- 49
Solite Corporation ---____ 5
Southern Bell Telephone &
Telegraph Co. ________ 13
Stresscon International,
Inc. ---__ Inside Front Cover
Super Sky Products, Inc.__ 42
Trinity White, General
Portland Cement Co. 12
F. Graham Williams Co.-_- 52
Wood Products, Inc. ____ 15
Zonolite Div.,
W. R. Grace & Co. ______ 48


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLr A 1wTA






This Is Zyrian Stone ...


This is an angle photograph of an actual panel 17' wide.


It began over 500 million years ago . in a quarry outside Min-
eral Bluff, Georgia. Through the ages, it adapted to a multitude
of earth changes. Today, It is a fine-grained mica schist that has
remained remarkably adaptable. It breaks into slabs of any desired
thickness (stocked only in 2" thickness) . or cut and saw it
to any shape. Variety is infinite. No two slabs show the same color
shades . they range from greens and bluish-greens through yel-
lows, browns and chocolate tones. Blend them to produce striking,
artistic effects. This unusual stone is ideal for veneering .. future
uses are unlimited. It took over 500 million years for Zyrian Stone
to reach such perfection of beauty and facility. It was worth the wait.


IuUA


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA TUXEDO 7-1525




Architeture and Allied Arts Library
inTverslty of Florlda
Gainesville, Fla. 10 THI

IF Accepi


QUALITY OR MEDIOCRITY




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