• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 The editor asks: "Progress for...
 A time for action
 Table of Contents
 News and notes
 Herb Savage and the Florida development...
 Upcoming convention & Governor...
 Salute newly-registered archit...
 Apartments in a hammock settin...
 Fire hazards of windowless...
 Advertisers' index
 FHA's 10-point program
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00135
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00135
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    The editor asks: "Progress for residential design?"
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    A time for action
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    News and notes
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Herb Savage and the Florida development commission
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Upcoming convention & Governor Haydon Burns
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Salute newly-registered architects
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Apartments in a hammock setting
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Fire hazards of windowless buildings
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Advertisers' index
        Page 24
        Page 25
    FHA's 10-point program
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












7"Pe rogFtor Rl ...eside l





"Progress For Residential Design?"


During the recent session of our
State Legislature, Chapter 467.09 of
the Architectural Registration Act
was amended to exclude any restric-
tion for the need of an architect's ser-
vices in the design of one and two-
family houses regardless of the dol-
lar value. This action by our legisla-
ture in essence gave its approval to
give anyone, but anyone, whether
qualified or not, the right to design
and prepare plans for the homeown-
ers of our growing State. This action
was intended to show progress but can
we really and honestly say this is prog-
ress for our Sunshine State? Isn't this
a backward step-a step in the wrong
direction?
Some reasons for the enactment of
this legislation, which was supported
by the Florida Home Builders Asso-
ciation (not 100% concurred), were:

1. The exemption of architectural
services for one and two-family
houses costing less than $10,000
was adopted in 1941 and subse-
quent inflation required us to re-
vise this dollar figure.
True, inflation has occurred in
our economy, but why have a
standard of measurement in dol-
lars to begin with?
The health, safety and welfare
of homeowners are of concern in
$5,000 and $20,000 homes.
2. The Florida State Board of Ar-
chitects was harassing home
builders with injunctions.
True, where a complaint was
filed and investigation proved
architectural services were of-
fered by a home-builder who
was not an architect registered
by the FSBA, an injunction was
served. A state statute without
enforcement is superfluous.

3. The Building Officials of muni-
cipalities and counties are quali-


fied to determine whether
building plans meet Code re-
quirements; therefore, an archi-
tect is not needed for one and
two-family homes.
It is not an argument whether
Building Officials are qualified
or not (some reports indicate
Building Officials are not quali-
fied, and approve building
plans without having adequate
knowledge of reading plans and
specifications), but what is best
for the community and the
homeowner. Some 40 counties
in our State do not have one
of the three building codes
adopted by the other counties.
(See July issue of The Florida
Architect.) So in the county
area where a building code is
not in effect, who will protect
the homeowner? The profes-
sional architect, who has a sense
of relationship with his client,
is needed to protect the general
public.
The Florida Home Builders Asso-
ciation received testimony from the
Jacksonville Branch Office of the
Federal Housing Administration which
gave support to the Home Builders'
position that architects were not
needed for residential design. The
FHA's policy as stated by the Jack-
sonville officials that FHA did not
require an architect was refuted to a
degree by The Florida Association of
Architects of The American Institute
of Architects. The FHA national pol-
icy does not require an architect for
FHA-financed homes, but the FHA
national policy also indicates that the
services of an architect are very de-
sirable and the FHA field personnel
should strongly suggest this fact to
prospective clients. The testimony of
the Jacksonville office of the FHA
was deplorable and these so-called re-
sponsible public officials should never


choose sides where the public's inter-
est is at stake!
Federal Housing Administration
Commissioner Philip N. Brownstein
recently promulgated a 10-point pro-
gram to improve residential design.
(See Page 26.) In essence the Com-
missioner indicated FHA must en-
courage sponsors to employ the pro-
fessional assistance required to pro-
duce sound design and a better en-
vironment. Also, the positive attitude
discussed in the Commissioner's pro-
gram should be firmly expressed by
FHA personnel when they meet with
organized groups. And to effectively
implement the program of the Com-
missioner, there should be at least
one professionally-qualified architect
in every insuring office.
The FAA/AIA salutes Commission-
er Brownstein for his dynamic pro-
gram. It is presumed the attack by the
FAA/AIA upon the testimony by
the Jacksonville office of the FHA led
to this clearcut attitude and program
of the FHA. It was a little ridiculous
to have a title of Chief Architect
within the FHA when the person
holding that position was not an ar-
chitect.
Perhaps it is not too late to salvage
the remains of past years' efforts
which were unglued this year by our
legislature. Perhaps the legislators can
review the current situation to ascer-
tain that the homebuilder is just that
-a builder of homes. His interest
lies in that field, not in esthetics.
Also, the architectural and engineer-
ing professions have a very definite
role in the progress of our State. Let
the building be accomplished by con-
tractors-let the engineering be made
possible by those schooled and quali-
fied, the engineers-and let the de-
sign of our environment remain with
those talented in the architectural
profession who must also show their
qualifications-the architects.
Editor





























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74e Preident's Me44ape .. .



A Time For Action--Now!


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA
President, The Florida Association of Architects


The condition of our American
communities has become a national
disgrace.
Why should the nation with "the
most advanced technology, the high-
cst living standard, the best program
for mass education, the most success-
ful political system, and the highest
degree of ingenuity in solving scien-
tific problems" have made such a
mess of our physical environment?
The pattern is virtually the same
everywhere. The approaches to our
cities are befouled by billboards, gar-
ish signs, utility poles, overhead wires,
junkyards a n d blighted business
buildings.
Downtown business sections are
congested, rundown, and marred by
profusions of ugly signs, dilapidated
store fronts, and streetscape junk. Our
suburban areas, undisciplined sprawls
of jerry-built developments, are de-
void of interest and vitality. Most su-
burban shopping centers are barn-like
structures in islands of asphalt.
In all things, big and small, there
is blindness to the value of good de-
sign.
What can we do about all this?
The situation isn't entirely hopeless.
The same dedication and ingenu-
ity that "built Greece 2,500 years ago
and is hurling tons of hardware at
2


Mars today" can surely eliminate the
ugliness of the American city.
There arc four stages for effective
community improvement:
(1) AWARENESS. Americans, in
hundreds of communities throughout
the land, are becoming aware that
they are living amid unsavory, un-
pleasant, and largely unnecessary ug-
lincss.
"We are not doomed to sleep this
nightmare out till its end," Lewis
Mumford told members of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects recently in
Washington. "We have only to open
our eves to make it vanish."
(2) COMMITMENT. We are
building a whole new America to
house our exploding population and
replace outworn structures. The ques-
tion is not whether we will build, but
how well; and the answer-for the
first time in history-must come
from individual committed citizens.
"Most of our ugliness," AIA presi-
dent Morris Ketchum reminds us, "is
the result of wealth, not poverty . .
We need to make ugliness unprofit-
able."
(3) PLANNING. In every com-
munity we must demand a long-range
plan for good community design. The
best brains of the community-govern-
ment leaders, businessmen, educators,


architects and other design profession-
als, clergymen, heads of civic organi-
zations must contribute to this
effort.
We are building at a headlong rate,
and there should be a plan to guide
the orderly development of the com-
munity and to provide for orderly
growth beyond its boundaries.
(4) ACTION. We have the tools
and the ability to accomplish the job
now. \ill the destiny of your com-
munitv continue to be detennined by
land speculation, accident, and apa-
thy; or will you and your fellow citi-
zens create a new and beautiful Amer-
ica-prosperous, liveable, and beau-
tiful?
The architects of America--the
members of the American Institute of
Architects in your community-have
embarked on a continuing campaign
to create a community awareness.
Magazines, newspapers, and broad-
casters are beginning to document
our urban ugliness and examine its
causes.
You can lend additional impetus
to this long-needed movement by
writing your mayor, your city and
county officials, and your representa-
tives in Tallahassee and Washington.
The only thing in short supply is
time. Now is the time to act.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









74




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


The Editor Asks .
By Fotis Ka(ro tusaton

A Time For Action . . . .
By William T. Arnett, AIA

News and Notes . .

Herb Savage and the Florida Development Commission

Upcoming Convention & Governor Haydon Burns . .

Salute Newly-Registered Architects . .

Apartments in A Hammock Setting . . . .

Fire Hazards of Windowless Buildings . . .

Advertisers' Index .

FHA's 10-Point Program .. . . . ...


FAA OFFICERS 1965
William T. Arnett, President, 2105 N.W. Third Place, Gainesville
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Avenue, Clearwater


DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: William A. Gilroy, George M. Polk; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Dana B. Johannes, Frank R. Mudano,
William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Earl J. Draeger, Sidney R.
Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Jack Moore; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTHWEST: William
S. Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James E. Ferguson, Jr., John O. Grimshaw, Earl
M. Starnes; JACKSONVILLE; A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., Harry E. Burns, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: John B. Langley, Joseph N. Williams;
PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Verner Johnson, Joseph M. Shifalo

FRONT COVER
The schematic plan on our cover symbolizes Donald Ivan Singer's "apartments
in a hammock setting" . carefully preserving the beauty of nature while
designing apartment units in a most restrictive location. Additional editorial
coverage, photographs and floor plans on pages 16-19.
SEPTEMBER, 1965


Inside Cover


. 11-12


. 13

. 16-19

. .22-23

S. 24


. 26


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. .Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but menti n of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reflect such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
.Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, S5.00 per year. March Roster Issue,
S2.00 .. .. .Printed by McMurray Printers.
FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor
ELEANOR MILLER
Assistant Editor
M. ELAINE MEAD
Circulation Manager


VOLUME 15

NUMBER 91965









News & Notes--


RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE
Three Florida architects have been
accepted into membership of the
Guild for Religious Architecture, with
headquarters in \ashington, D. C.
They are: Frank Folsum Smith of
Sarasota, Frank P. Patterson of Taim-
pa, and Dana B. Johannes of Clear-
water who is also past president of
the Florida Association of Archtiects.
The Guild was founded in 1940 with
the expressed purpose of promoting
excellence in design in religious archi-
tecture and its allied arts.



SENIOR CITIZENS GROUP
Edward G. Grafton of Miami,
Architect with Pancoast, Ferendino,
Grafton and Skels, has been appointed
Chainnan of the Senior Citizens
Steering Commltitee of the Welfare
Planning Council. The Committee is
composed of 22 top-level community
leaders who actively participate in
planning and coordinating services for
Dade County's Senior Citizens. Mr.
Grafton has been active in many
civic duties: United Cerebral Palsy
Association, Miami Slum Clearance
Committee, consultant to the Nation-
al Public Iousing Authority, and
member of the Quality Education
Committee of the Dade County Board
of Public Instruction.


August 3, 1965
FR: Raymond L. Gaio, Director
State and Chapter Affairs
The 97th Annual Convention, held here in
Washington, 13-19 June, approved a recom-
mendation by The Board of Directors that the
period of suspension for default be abandoned.
The Bylaws change reads as follows:
"If an unassigned member, professional
associate, associate or student associate is
in default to the chapter for non-payment
in full of his dues and assessments at the
end of the fiscal year, such member shall
have been given a written notice of im-
pending termination at least sixty days
prior to date of termination, during which
period he may cure his default and main-
tain membership in good standing.
"If an assigned member is in default to
the chapter for non-payment in full of his
dues and assessments at the end of the
fiscal year, the Executive Committee shall
so advise The Institute's Board, and re-
quest the termination of his membership."
Effective the date of the above-mentioned
Convention action, members in default for
non-payment of dues will be terminated
rather than, as in the past, suspended. Con-
sequently, future Chapter requests for suspen-
sion will not be considered by The Institute.
It is, therefore, suggested that each chapter
give such individuals a reasonable period of
time (a maximum of 60 days) and then pro-
ceed to terminate his membership for default.
National policy will become fully implement-
ed on 31 December 1965.
Each chapter is strongly urged to fully notify
their membership accordingly, in order that
the 31 December termination can be held to
an absolute minimum.
As of interest to you, those members whose
membership is in jeopardy will receive a final
1965 Institute billing on 1 November 1965.
This will be sent by registered mail with a
letter from the Secretary of The Institute, in-
forming them of impending termination 60
days hence. Return receipt will be requested.


IT IS
MODE"
ION 01-


NOW


4 ... -K -EBUILT






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CKLE BROS. DIVISION
DELTONA CORPORATION



Governor and Mrs. Haydon Burns officially re-opened the Mackle Brothers World's
Fair House, then toured the Deltona Display with Herbert Rosser Savage, chief architect.
4


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SEPTEMBER, 1965 7







Savage Reappointed By Governor


Architect Herbert Rosser Savage of
the Deltona Corporation was recent-
ly reappointed by Florida's Governor
Haydon Bums to his second 4-year
term on the Florida Development
Commission.
Savage serves as the member repre-
senting the 12th District (generally
South Dade and Monroe Counties)
of the State of Florida.
Chairman of the Florida Develop-
ment Commission, which meets at
least once a month in Tallahassee, is
Charles Campbell, former executive
of Prudential Insurance Company,
whose offices were in Jacksonville.
Savage serves as the Florida Devel-
opment Commission's chairman of
the state program for overall growth
planning.


He pointed out that the Florida De-
velopment Commission is charged by
law primarily to promote tourism and
industry, as well as handle planning
for aid to counties and communities
in matters of workable programs.
In addition, this group acts as fis-
cal agent for the state in selling
bonds; assists counties in recreational
planning for Florida; promotes and
publicizes the state of Florida; and
handles over 1V2 million inquiries
yearly about the state.
Savage, former president of the
Florida South Chapter of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, is also the
current chairman of the Commission
on Public Affairs of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects.


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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








FOREIGN
PIPE
TODAY...


MAYBE
FOREIGN
ORANGES TOMORROW


Imported oranges do hit the American
market now and then. While they could
become a threat to Florida growers, they
haven't-yet.
But you can be hurt by what is happening
in other industries today. Take steel pipe,
for example. Every pound of foreign pipe
brought here costs all of us far more than
it saves. In wages lost to the American
worker who buys the houses, equipment
(and orange juice) that keep all of us in
business. When we hurt him, we hurt the
American consumer-they're the same


fellow every time! When we hurt the basic
industries that employ him, we shrink the
payrolls, taxes and investment capital
that make the economic wheels go 'round
for all of us. Our dollars go abroad.
Our point? That "buying American" isn't
so much an appeal to patriotism as it is to
the most personal kind of basic self-
interest-your interest. Besides, American
manufacturers offer very real advantages
of reliability, consistent quality, flexibility
and service to American customers.
Many a buyer who tried to swap these


considerations for an extra dollar has
found himself flirting with financial
hara-kiri. (And that's another import we
don't need!)
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
manufactures America's finest steel pipe,
used in some of Florida's finest new
buildings. For more information,
contact your J&L distributor in
Florida or write direct.
m Jones A Laughlin
Steel Corporation
3 Bat.ewy Center, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvanit 15230
mIL


sT[tL'| SYMBOL
OF VALUE.


fJ

^ J


































Governor Haydon Burns


KEYNOTE SPEAKER at the 2nd ANNUAL

FLORIDA CRAFTSMANSHIP AWARD DINNER

November 18, 1965

JACK TAR HOTEL
Clearwater, Florida

A Highlight of the 51st Annual Convention of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


SEPTEMBER, 1965










51st Annual FAA Convention


November 17-20, 1965


A salute to the 1965 Convention Committee
Program Co-Chairmen-William Webber, J. Arthur
Wohlberg and Mark Hampton who have been
diligently working to put together this interesting
convention program for every architect as well as
for community leaders throughout Florida. The
theme of this year's FAA convention is "QUALITY
OR MEDIOCRITY."

Wednesday, November 17

Ribbon-cutting ceremonies will officially open
the Educational Display area that evening. To date,
almost 60 manufacturers have reserved space for
this outstanding presentation. Two awards will
be made to exhibitors-one for exceptional educa-
tional value in the display, and the second award
for overall display excellence.

Following the ribbon-cutting ceremonies, every-
one is invited to the complimentary, gala Presi-
dent's Reception.

Thursday, November 18

Opportunity for all convention delegates to view
the Educational Displays, and to attend the com-
mittee meetings and student seminar. A free sand-
wich luncheon will be served to everyone in the
Exhibit Hall.

Afternoon-First FAA Business Session

Evening-Governor Haydon Burns is keynote
speaker at the "Second Annual Florida Craftsman
of the Year Award." This program has been de-
signed to recognize exceptional craftsmanship in
any phase of construction. Craftsmen nominees
from all the AIA Florida Chapters will be present
and announcement will be made at this time of
the 1965 winner.

Friday, November 19

Two Seminars: "Quality or Mediocrity"

We have long recognized our profession's re-
sponsibility to educate the layman to recognize


* Clearwater, Florida


and demand good design, and thus create a better
climate for this good design. The architectural pro-
fession and the leaders of the community must get
together and discuss how to successfully carry forth
such a program. With this in mind, we have re-
quested each Florida Chapter to select a layman
within its area who has been outstanding in devel-
oping an atmosphere for good design. He may be
a building program chairman for his church, a cru-
sading newspaper editor, a zoning board member,
or she may be an active clubwoman whose group
has worked to build an art center or preserve an
historical monument.

The layman selected by each Florida Chapter
will be present at the Convention. Several will ap-
pear on a panel. All will be honored and presented
with awards.

Additional speakers and moderators for this
seminar period are being arranged and will be an-
nounced to all architects through the mail and in
the October issue of Florida Architect.

Afternoon-Honor Awards Luncheon

At this luncheon gathering, the two Exhibitor
awards will be presented, along with the awards
for outstanding Architectural Exhibits.

Over 3,500 square feet of space has been de-
voted to these Architectural Exhibits. The award-
winning panels and several other merit winners will
comprise a state-wide traveling exhibit. We urge
the prompt return of the entry forms you recently
received for this most worthwhile project.

Evening-Annual Architects Banquet

Mr. Charles M. Nes, FAIA, First Vice President
of AIA, will be the honored banquet speaker. All
exhibitors are invited to this gala gathering. Danc-
ing and free bar.


SEE YOU AT THE CONVENTION IT'S AN
INFORMATIVE, FUN-FILLED GATHERING YOU
WON'T WANT TO MISS!


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






NEWLY-REGISTERED ARCHITECTS IN THE STATE
OF FLORIDA BY CHAPTER AREA
JUNE 1965


DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER
Rudolph J. Fletcher
FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
Howard J. Audibert
Willard N. Bowman, Jr.
Thomas F.'Bridges
Aldo Lastra
Rick J. Rados
Letterio S. Scarfone
George D. Smith
FLORIDA GULF COAST CHAPTER
Richard G. Allen
I. T. Moore
Raymond E. Pigott
Francis T. Pinard
Edward S. Reeves
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
John Hodge, Jr.
Maxsis Lucs


FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL CHAPTER
Paul E. Reilly
Robert L. Woodward
FLORIDA NORTHWEST CHAPTER
John J. Baradell
William D. Simpson
Mandeville Smith
K. D. Hamilton
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
Roberto G. Campoamor
Robert L. Dykes
George R. Geldbaugh
Carlos E. Marvez
Claudio G. Mendoza
William D. Richardson
Philip Solomon
Samuel B. Spence, Jr.
Donald R. Vizza
JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER
Childs A. Horton
Larry N. Ponder
Lynn M. TenEyck


MID-FLORIDA CHAPTER
Richard D. Arner
Dale Freelove
David L. Goodwin
Hans D. Schweizer
Claude M. Shivers
PALM BEACH CHAPTER
Robert J. Bridges
Thomas W. Claridge
OUT-OF-STATE
Richard L. Bowen,
Cleveland, Ohio
Stephen H. Horton,
Bedford, Texas
Arthur Lutzker,
Long Island, N. Y.
Fred G. Sigg,
North Augusta, S. C.


No matter how you look at it,

phone wiring still looks best

when you can't see it.

So plan ahead

for plenty of telephone outlets

and enough public phones.

Call our Architects'

and Builders'Representative

while you're still in

the blueprint stage.

Southern Bell
...Servhig You


SEPTEMBER, 1965







S Thi All-Electric Bay Center Building, offering. 0Q64I of approximately
400 square feet and up. is deigned for co nii~tCfN i ii nd maximum space
utilization. The 15.000 square foot Kogerema offmr mn unusual solution to the problem of
S: housing companies with limited space requirement. Thia AllElectric building is designed
for utility. .
S. -.....
~. n ."..."
..,*:. ~I ...
.. *i : 'i "


Office interiors in both buildings are spacious,
light and airy in aspect. Flexibility of
layout allows each company leasing the space
to create "tailor-made" offices to specifically fill their
needs. The Kogerama's circular shape provides
bright, attractive exterior offices -
each looking out on its own private "garden."


Florida's Electric Companies .
Taxpaying, Investor-Owned


14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT I

14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














SLIVE BETTER
"We have found that those who C'RIC
lease our office space prefer the
All-Electric Concept over all others.
It is clean, safe and economical And
with planned lighting and year-round
air-conditioning, employees are
Happier and much more efficient,"
says Albert E. Balboni,
vice president of the 0. P. Woodcock Company -
builders of the Bay Area Executive Center in Tampa.
a* ma M, an 6% so *#*.m~p


SEPTEMBER, 1965 1i


I
I















































Hammock Setting For Apartment Living

designed by architect DONALD IVAN SINGER, AIA
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida


Architecture begins with purpose, is
born in conceptual form analysis and
given shape based on an understand-
ing of the purpose and the concept
(or form).
The purpose of any apartment
building, no matter the size, should
be to give shelter and comfort to sev-
eral different groups of people gath-
ered in a high density living situation,
while at the same time affording all
a sense of individuality and privacy
often lost in today's building but so
necessary for the integrity of man. If
this building is not our purpose, we
are not being true to the nature of"
things most especially ourselves.
16


Man gathers in groups as he does (or
should do) anything of his own voli-
tion, not as a requirement for in-
stinctive well begin. As such, his
nature demands the freedom of
choice.
The concept or form is evolved as
the "what to build" for a particular
set of circumstances and will establish
itself different for every project. This
is the true creative endeavor in Ar-
chitecture-the "spirit" so to say, tak-
ing Architecture up and above mere
interior or exterior decoration! In this
case the purpose and the nature of the
site were wedded to bear the form.
A growth, in organic progression out


of the ground, around and between
four venerable live oaks giving added
meaning to nature rather than insult-
ing or destroying it in a very beautiful
hammock setting. Only refinements
were necessary to bring the form idea
to reality as a building-some sympa-
thetic detailing.
How satisfying the prospect of
working totally in the abstracts of
positive and negative space.
In the main house, work and fam-
ily are one, integrated ,the only sep-
aration being space and time-no
walls. Family work is below, studio
work above, in full view of each other
-both more meaningful-also in full
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


L 20-


Oki:!
MOP-~



































focus with the area set aside for the
child--all combining for a more sen-
sitive whole. The relaxing area of the
house is up and away but still visu-
ally related to the two separate work
areas so as not to forget how impor-
tant the work. The second floor is
nestled between the mass of the two
larger trees and the fenestra extends


SEPTEMBER, 1965




































the interior space giving the aware-
ness of "up", so very enlightening to
Florida living. The use of glass makes
possible great extension of space from
inside to outside-all tied together
by the eye. Great distance is achieved
and the scope of understanding in-
S.creased even though the envelope is
. small in volume. The entire site is
S. only 60' x 110', but every foot of
-' length and breadth is used. Garden
walls become part of the building and,
as such, increase the expanse of each
room. Glass walls, define only the in-
side/outside line; the true total space
goes beyond to the property line.
The smaller apartments are all on
or just below grade level (this pos-
sible hanks to a high, fast draining
site) and have completely private ac-
cess each from a different side of the
building. The comer site allowed each
unit to face its own way, all sound
and light being focused away from
other occupants. Block walls aid in
-'" the sound suppression. Inside the
smaller units, the flow of space
around, down and out offers a
thoughtful repose with always a new
point of view.
Economy limited use of materials,
but the desired plastic quality was
achieved with construction familiar to
Florida for no less than thirty years.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




































The angular shape of the plan was
a result of the requirement to utilize
as much of the ground area within the
building line as possible. Second floor
area would have destroyed foliage.
Merely turning the major axis of the
building forty five degrees to that of
the property allowed a wonderful flow


through and around the massive
trunks of the live oaks.
All that followed purpose, concept
and form was academic by compari-
son. The result is a fascinating mar-
riage of man and nature and a strong
integration of the beauty of each.
Each complements the other, making


it more than would be possible alone.
This, of course, must recall the previ-
ous definition of purpose regarding
Architecture in general . the pur-
pose of creating beauty in harmony
with nature and the nature of man.

*


I. .. "^ [..,


SEPTEMBER, 1965





























Beauty and the budget get together in this all-concrete school



The Avocado Elementary School in Homestead, Florida, demonstrates again the advantages of
concrete in even a small size plant.
The structure is striking, yet tastefully modern . with 22 classrooms, cafetorium, library and
administrative spaces. For 35,210 square feet, the bid price was $398,390, or $11.32 per square foot.
The precast concrete folded plate roof, supported on prestressed columns of concrete, provided
not only an outstanding design feature, but brought important economy. Walls are concrete masonry,
stuccoed on the exterior, plastered inside for decorative effect. And included in the modest cost is
the elegance of terrazzo floors in the cafetorium.
For school boards seeking, at realistic cost, aesthetically pleasing facilities that are also durable,
firesafe and easy to maintain, concrete offers the ideal solution. Portland Canent Assocation
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
Aawp es e kUw m amrpi'smt mh domuat ads. ae /Me y tie fiaaddau Awat d uat mspedv nowst emsfaclewa ble UatdSmr taa aSd Cdae


I classroom. Avocado Elmentary School with adcent "patio" cas sac. Architect: Robert B. Brow. Miagml; eoor F.. Reed Associate. MML Structural
er: Walter C. Harry & Associates Fort Ludrdale. Contractor. Stob Brothers Contructlon Company, Miami. Owner. Dade Countiy Board at Pubc Instructon.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







for maximum efficiency

...lowest installed cost

specify Borg-Warner ALFOL

the original multi-layer aluminum foil building insulation
with the "air-wall" that snaps into place


Architect, Builder, ALFOL is your an-
swer to the demands today's buildings
place upon insulation. ALFOL cuts heat-
ing costs in winter, cuts air-conditioning
costs in summer and provides year
'round protection against moisture con-
densation, rot and mildew.
ALFOL is fast and easy to apply with the
lowest installed cost and provides those
merchandising extras that sell your
buildings faster. Write now for your
free literature.


ALFOL is better 3 ways
A Multiple aluminum foil sheets re-
flect 95% of all radiant heat
B Reflective air spaces minimize
thermal convection and eliminate
thermal conduction.
C Separate and positive vapor barrier
for permanent protection against
,moisture and condensation.


Reflectal Corporation 1000 W. 120th Street, Chicgo, Illinois 60643. Code 312/CO 47800 SUBSIDIARY OF BORG-WARNER CORPORATION

builder ~R M E
produs OHIi


SEPTEMBER, 1965








Fire Hazards of Windowless Buildings


By ERNEST E. JUILLERAT
Manager, Fire Record Department
National Fire Protection Association


-; 4*(

> ~ :
*1~"- *'.


Large windowless wall was pulled down to give access to the fire, but winds whipped fire into uncontrollable intensity.


Windowless buildings are fast gaining prominence in
contemporary architecture. Their advocates hold that they
are less costly to build, heat, cool and maintain; they lend
themselves to better utilization of interior space; they have
a certain austere beauty; and they somewhat limit the
attention of the occupants to tasks at hand. To some
extent, the windowless building probably is also a current
fad in architecture. Many owners of older buildings are
sealing up the windows and covering the outside of the
buildings with veneering of one kind or another to give
the structure a new, modern appearance. Solar screens
and window louvers, recent developments to protect build-


ing occupants from the heat of the sun, introduce many
of the adverse effects of windowless construction.
There are, no doubt, economic inducements for con-
structing a building without windows, and there may also
be aesthetic and psychological advantages. What, how-
ever, are the effects of windowless construction on the
life safety from fire of the building occupants, on the pos-
sible extent of fire damage to the building and its con-
tents, and on the probable efficiency of the fire depart-
ment operations?
LIFE SAFETY
Windows are not a recommended escape route from


*Excerpts reprinted from the NFPA Quarterly, copyrighted by the National Fire Protection
Association, reproduced by permission. Copies of this complete article in pamphlet form are
available from the Association, 60 Batterymarch St., Boston, Mass., 02110, at 25c per copy.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






buildings on fire. Fire experience, however, shows that
windows are frequently vital for rescue even though inter-
ior exits comply with minimum requirements of recog-
nized codes. Sometimes, corridors become involved in
fire . sometimes an enclosed stairway becomes im-
passable . and sometimes even properly designed exits
will be damaged and made unusable by an explosion.
Although many of the new windowless buildings are
of fire-resistive construction, giving the builders, owners
and occupants a sense of security, experience has proven
many times over that there is a gross lack of understand-
ing, from architects to occupants, of what constitutes a
fire-safe building.
INCREASED DAMAGE AND FIRE-FIGHTING PROBLEMS
Confinement of heat and smoke helps to spread the
fire within the building and it interferes with access to
the building. It is for these reasons that ventilation is
one of the first steps taken by fire fighters on arrival at a
burning building. The more heat that is ventilated from
a burning structure, the less water is required in the form
of hose streams to complete extinguishment of the fire.
Windows are the primary means of ventilating buildings
of heat and smoke. Windowless buildings often demand
longer hose lays through corridors and up stairways . .
laying the hose lines through thick smoke and intense heat
inside a windowless building sharply increases the life
safety hazards to fire fighters.
SMOKE AND WATER DAMAGE
As the windowless department stores, clothing stores,


supermarkets, warehouses, and similar buildings grow big-
ger and bigger, the losses from smoke and water damage
also increase, because smoke and heat can't get out and
the fire fighters can't get in. The sprawling, undivided
suburban discount clothing and department stores, some
of which are acres large, are especially vulnerable to huge
dollar losses from smoke and water damage, which may
be the result of a relatively small, isolated fire.
It is obvious that if windowless buildings are not to
become ovens when a fire starts inside, they must be
properly arranged, adequately protected by automatic ex-
tinguishing systems, and provided with automatic equip-
ment for ventilating smoke and heat from the building.
SOME POINTS TO CONSIDER
If windowless buildings continue their upward trend
in contemporary architecture, designers, builders, regula-
tory agencies, and all others influential in construction
and operation must give careful consideration to fire prob-
lems, which are multiplied by the absence of numerous
openings through which occupants can escape or be res-
cued, through which the building can be vented of smoke
and heat, and through which hose streams can be directed
at flames. Knockout panels for access by fire fighters
should be considered . a working knowledge of the
interior arrangement of the building and its contents on
the part of the local fire department will enable fire
fighters to locate specific rooms more quickly if the build-
ing becomes filled with smoke. The occupants of window-
less buildings will do well to be aware of the location of
all exits and the routes to those exits.


Typical windowless supermarket building. Walls are concrete block, rear openings were padlocked, and only entry was from front.


SEPTEMBER, 1965








ADVERTISERS' INDEX


REMINDER
November 1st is the fast-approach-
ing deadline for entry forms to be re-
turned to us for the 1965 Awards and
Exhibition Program.



*



POSTPONEMENT
The Seminar on "Foundations and
Wind-Resistive Building Construc-
tion," which was announced in the
last issue of Florida Architect and
scheduled for September, has been
postponed until early next year.


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


Celotex Corporation . 6

Dunan Brick
Yards, Inc. . 3rd Cover

Florida Gas Tranmission 4-5

Florida Investor Owned
Electric Utilities 14-15

Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing, Inc. . 8

Jones and Laughlin
Steel Corporation . 9-10

Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 1

Portland Cement Association 20

Reflectal Corporation . 21

Solite Corporation .. 25

Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co. 13

Trinity White General
Portland Cement Co. . 7

F. Graham Williams Co.. 24


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complete information, samples and prices.





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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HAPPY HARBOR


FOR RETIREMENT LIVING


Located on 16 of the most beautiful acres in America, Plymouth
Harbor is truly a haven for delightful retirement living. Imagina-
tive planning by the architects has preserved the natural beauty
of the site, taken advantage of a breathtaking view, and main-
tained a park-like atmosphere throughout the project. To accom-
plish this and still provide the 350 units needed, a single high-rise
building was designed. Within the building itself, a unique "com-
munity system" prevails. Impersonal corridors are eliminated. All
apartments are entered from interior balconies, with each colony
grouped around an attractive lounge. In addition, each has its


own gathering space, complete with kitchenette and spacious
balcony overlooking the gulf. Thus, Plymouth Harbor ingeniously
combines every advantage of modern living with the warmth and
charm of a small community.
We are indeed proud that Solite, both as lightweight
structural concrete and masonry units, was selected for
use in Plymouth Harbor. The 25-floor tower building is of
reinforced concrete, the wings are post tensioned con-
crete construction.


Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Fla.













FHA Outlines 10-Point Program


Federal Housing Adminstration Commissioner Philip N. Brownstein


recently promulgated a 10-point program to improve
The commissioner outlined the program in a letter to


residential design.
FHA field offices.


1. In new subdivisions or in new
sections of existing subdivisions each
proposal should be examined with the
purpose for its creation firmly in mind
and considering how this purpose is
to be fulfilled. Sprawl, monotony and
shabbiness must be discouraged. We
must encourage sponsors to employ
the professional assistance required to
produce sound design and a better
environment. The production of any
form of new housing involves many
disciplines which must be employed
and rewarded. These disciplines in-
clude architecture, planning, econom-
ics, transportation, landscape archi-
tecture; the related arts of painting,
sculpture and decoration, and the be-
havioral fields of psychology and so-
ciology. Whether they are provided
by one person or a group of special-
ists, consciously or unconclously, these
disciplines must be taken into account
in creating a be p environment.
2. In new subdivision proposals
that do not specify underground elec-
trical and telephone distribution sys-.
tems, the sponsor must prove to the
satisfaction of the Chief Underwriter
that underground residential distribu-
tion is economically unfeasible.
3. Valuators and architectural ex-
aminers should view each property
with a critical awareness of design. In
proposed construction the architec-
tural comments on design quality
should be related by the valuator to
the environment beyond the property
lines and translated in terms of value.
Processing personnel are under obliga-
tion to recognize good design and to
recommend improvements in poor de-
sign.


4. In multifamily housing, sponsors
can be shown by dramatic means the
effect improved design can have on
rents, expenses, net income and value.
The harmonious integration of such
projects into the neighborhood to
achieve relationship with distinctive-
ness should be a serious consideration.

5. We must recognize the qualities
and values well-designed older prop-
erties often possess. Imaginative reha-
bilitation can restore properties and
neighborhoods to new peaks of lasting
appeal and value.

6. When FHA personnel meet with
organized groups in the exercise of
their official functions, the positive
attitude discussed here should be
firmly expressed. The industry and
the public are looking for leadership.
They should be aware that FHA has
accepted that role as it has done in
the past.
7. To effectively implement the
program outlined here, there should
be at least one (and preferably more
than one) professionally qualified
architect in every insuring office. He
is needed to advise sponsors and their
technicians in preliminary stages of
proposals when the encouragement of
better design and planning will be
effective. He is also needed to advise
and guide valuation and architectural
personnel in good design concepts,
and to assure the Director that posi-
tions taken involving design are based
upon competent and professional ad-
vice. Recruitment of professional arch-
itects should take place as vacancies
occur.
8. Recognizing the need for train-


ing our staffs in design and esthetic
judgment, the central office is pre-
paring a training program directed to-
ward educating FHA people, the in-
dustry, and ultimately the consumer to
recognize the elements of good design.
This effort will take some time to
reach final realization. In the mean-
time you are urged to view with an
open mind new or untried proposals
of recognized architectural firms, or
of responsible, progressive and for-
ward-looking sponsors.

9. Great progress has been made in
environmental design, but much more
should be encouraged. In place of lot
by lot development, many plans com-
prise the total design of planned-unit

developments, both large and small.
The larger ones encompass a whole
new city, while smaller plans are suit-
able for management and mainten-
ance by a homes association. Such
total design should provide for all of
the needs of the daily life of the resi-
dents. Areas for individual use can be
purposeful and adequate, and the
land area is conserved to find space
for open areas and recreation facilities
for use in common. Thus, urban
sprawl can be avoided, and the mo-
notony of repetitive structures can be
relieved by a varied relationship in
building masses and open spaces.

10. In proposals involving new or
unfamiliar design concepts, or where
a genuine difference of opinion ex-
ists between a sponsor and the field
office in matters relating tp design
(as in any other problem), you are
encouraged to submit all information
to the central office for advice and
guidance.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






CV DURATHIN


vc44f% sesee


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA 887-1525



































QUALITY OR MEDIOCRITY




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