• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Church plant may be planned first...
 Arlinghouse -- elegant apartment...
 You and architecture
 Gateway Arch of St. Louis -- progress...
 Loch Ness monster bobs up in Florida...
 Reward good design with less...
 Key West -- the old island restores...
 UF graduate honored
 Tampa federal office building
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00134
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: August 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00134
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Church plant may be planned first for service role
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Arlinghouse -- elegant apartment complex
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    You and architecture
        Page 11
    Gateway Arch of St. Louis -- progress report
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Loch Ness monster bobs up in Florida waters
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Reward good design with less taxes
        Page 20
    Key West -- the old island restores itself
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    UF graduate honored
        Page 24
    Tampa federal office building
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




the
florida architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFARCHITECTS,-


August, 1965





IIIIIIIH I I ll l UlHIIIIII HIIIIII IIIII HIIIIllHUUll UUUUUUU1 llUU UUL


I Anuniacementt


Seminar

Foundations and Wind Resistive

Building Construction


A seminar on Foundations and Wind Resistive Build-
ing Construction, sponsored by the Florida Association
of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, will
be held at the Dupont Plaza Hotel in Miami on Friday,
September 10, 1965, from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

The program will be presented by a panel of promi-
nent Structural Engineers including MR. NORMAN
DIGNUM of Dignum Associates, Coral Gables, and MR.
JACQUES L. CLARKE of Oboler & Clarke, Inc., Miami
S Beach.

SMore details will be announced later by mail. Please
circle the date and plan too attend. Free Registration.




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74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS





9n 74 I44ue ---

Church Plant May Be Planned First For Service Role

Arlinghouse elegant apartment complex . . .

You and Architecture . . . . . . .
By William T. Arnett, AIA


Gateway Arch of St. Louis Progress Report . .

Loch Ness Monster Bobs Up In Florida Waters . .

Reward Good Design With LI!ss Taxes . . . .


Key West The Old Island Restores Itself
By Mary Wood Malone


. 12

. 17

. 20


. . 21-22


UF Graduate Honored.

Advertisers Index .


Tampa Federal Office Building .


FAA OFFICERS 1965
William T. Arnett, President, 2105 N.W. Third Place, Gainesville
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Avenue, Clearwater

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: William A. Gilroy, George M. Polk; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Dana B. Johannes, Frank R. Mudano,
William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Earl J. Draeger, Sidney R.
Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Jack Moore; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTHWEST: William
Stewart; FLORIDA SOUTH: James E. Ferguson, Jr., John O. Grimshaw, Earl M.
Starnes; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., Harry E. Burns, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: John B. Langley, Joseph N. Williams;
PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Verner Johnson, Joseph M. Shifalo
FRONT COVER
The mural to be placed in the lobby of the Tampa Federal Office Building
is named "The Endless City" and was conceived by Frank Prince, Tampa,
to indicate a growing awareness of the urban growth explosion of our country
and the needs for order and beauty in growth. The mural will be composed
of small, irregular glass moslcs on plate glass sections with a transparent
expoxy adhesive and divided by verticals of walnut and aluminum now in place.
It will be approximately 20 feet long and 6 feet high and the colors will be
predominantly earth tones and black & white, with some brighter accent hues
to provide a glowing color when back lighted by concealed spots in the ce:l-
ing construction. (Add:tional photographs page 25)


25

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year. March Roster Issue,
$2.00 ..... .Printed by McMurray Printers.

FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor




VOLUME 15

NUMBER 819
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 11


































Glad to be here!


Our headquarters office has been moved to your wonderful state.
We love it! We have a host of customers and friends in Florida, and
look forward to serving many new customers and making many
new friends.
Florida is growing. Celotex plans to.grow with it, and with you.


THE CELOTEX CORPORATION, 120 N. Florida Ave., Tampa, Fla. 33602
SUBSIDIARY OF JIM WALTER CORPORATION


CELppTii EX
BUILDING PRODUCTS


AUGUST, 1965


n


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t~t
F






















































Marchesani and Cohen, Architects, Miami Springs, Florida


Hurricane Cleo's 125 mph winds gave this Curtainscreen quite a test, but it sur-
vived handily. The colorful screen was created for solar shielding and decorative
interest over the big glass entrance of Miami Springs City Hall in Florida. The
screen also provided protection against flying debris during the storm. Julius
Blum's Curtainscreen system consists of standard aluminum panels, cut to length
and slip-fit between aluminum mullions. Colors, patterns, shapes and scale can be
adapted for a great variety of custom results allowing the designer complete free-
dom at surprisingly low cost. Write for Bulletins 141A and 3123 and see Sweets
Architectural File 6e/BL or Industrial Construction File 6b/BL for full details.


JULIUS BLUM & CO., INC., CARLSTADT, NEW JERSEY
THE MOST COMPLETE SOURCE FOR ARCHITECTURAL METALS
Phones: Carlstadt, New Jersey: (Area 201) GE 8-4600: Philadelphia:
(Area 215) MA 7-7596; New York: (Area 212) OX 5-2236


Church Plant May
For Service Role
Be Planned First
When clergymen and architects dis-
cuss "the church plant," they are not
implying that house of worship arc be-
coming factories of faith. They are
simply recognizing the fact that there
is much more to the modern church
than the sanctuary.
Today's church, in fact, is likely to
resemble a community center-a com-
plex of rooms or even buildings for
recreation, education n, fellowship,
meetings of all kinds, and administra-
toin as well as worship.
The architect's problem, says The
American Institute of Architects, is to
design all of these auxiliary facilities
for efficiency and economy, but to
keep the sanctuary as the focal point.
Changing Role
The growth of the typical "plant"
reflects the changing role of the
church in the community.
Not long ago, as a noted architect
has pointed out, the church was usu-
ally the community's tallest building.
It was, both actually and symbolically,
the center of community life.
In time, the steeple was dwarfed
by the chimneys of industry and the
towers of commerce. As the life of the
community grew more complex, many
clergymen regretfully came to feel that
the church no longer played a central
role-that it was simply a place to go
on the Sabbath day to pay respect to
the Creator.
Their response was to reassert the
relevance of the church to the every-
day problems of the community and
its residents. To practice what they
preached, they expanded the activities
of the church well beyond once-a-week
worship.
Utility Emphasized
This required an expansion of facili-
ties, and it also placed a new emphasis
on the utility of church buildings.
When a church complex is built to-
day, it is not uncommon for a con-
gregation with a limited budget to
put up a social hall first, and hold its
services there until money can be
raised for the sanctuary.
Many clergymen and architects are
stressing "service rather than symbolic
self-importance" in religious buildings,
as one minister put it. The steeple
cannot hope to compete in size with
the skyscraper, but the churches are
being designed for new and meaning-
ful roles in community life.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







4LiiiINATURAL GAS
GASGRAME
mASnaivar i-N'THE HEADLINES

NATGAS AIR CONDITIONING BREAKING ALL RECORDS North, South, East and West all over
Florida special heating-and-cooling gas rates and new equipment are winning converts to nat-
ural gas all-year climate control. Peoples Gas System (Dade, Broward and Hillsborough Counties)
expects to add as much tonnage in 1965 alone as in all previous years. Okaloosa County Gas Dis-
trict (Valparaiso) averaging three residential installations per week. Florida Public Utilities (West Palm
Beach, Sanford) expects 1965 increase of 70% over 1964 total as does Gulf Natural in Panama City.
Big new motels in Panama City (Gulf Natural Gas) and Clearwater (City of Clearwater) will have
all-year heating-cooling. All in all, it looks like a long, cool summer!

CLEARWATER COLLEGE DOUBLES NATGAS AIR CONDITIONING. New Clearwater Ex-
tension Branch of St. Petersburg Junior College has first phase of its natural gas air
conditioning system in service 330 tons covering Administration, Arts and Science
buildings. Additional construction will boost this to 666 tons in July eventually to
V 1080 tons. Architect is K. Whitney Dalzell; Consulting Engineers: Healy, Latimer and
Associates; Supplier: Utilities Department, City of Clearwater.
MORE "BIG NAMES" MAKING BIG NEWS WITH NATURAL GAS! Good advice for individual oper-
ators: Watch what the big chains are doing. They have engineering and testing facilities to check
every angle costs, efficiency, maintenance, everything! Latest guideposts: Ramada Inn going to
gas air conditioning in Panama City. Same chain using gas for boilers in new six-story Gainesville
motor hotel, with natural gas also serving double-deck Wolfie's Restaurant. Gas for air conditioning
in Clearwater's new Holiday Inn, along with lights, laundry, kitchen and pool heating. Howard
Johnson going to all-gas kitchen in new Ft. Walton Beach spread. Mount Vernon Motor Lodge, Ocala,
converting heating, hot water and pool heating from oil to natural gas.

ALREADY BIG ... GETTING BIGGER ... BUT GAS SUPPLY IS NO PROBLEM. Served by a new
Peoples Gas System pipeline extension to Tampa's Port Sutton industrial area, Florida Phosphate
Terminal Company's highly automated drying and storage plant is nearing full capacity operation.
Already one of the State's largest natural gas users, with an hourly load of some 1200 therms,
plans are under way to double the present installation in the near future. PgS engineers anticipate
no problems in meeting the demand.
INDUSTRY LEADER TAKES OVER ST. PETE MUNICIPAL SYSTEM. United Gas Corporation, which
serves more than 630,000 customers in Southern U.S. has taken over the natural gas distribution
system in the St. Petersburg area. Although a newcomer to peninsular Florida, United has long
been established as a major supplier of natural gas in the Panhandle area.

ODD AND UNUSUAL ITEMS IN THE NATURAL GAS NEWS: Ocala reports completely
automated plant which uses natural gas to dehydrate charcoal briquettes after molding.
Daytona Beach's Hawaiian Inn has natural gas fueled steam room and Sauna bath.
Clark Rendering Company, Marianna, uses natural Ras in its Animal Disposal plant, the
end products being feed and fertilizer. Miami's Baker Carpet Co. has a dryer as big
as a two-story house which uses over a million BTU per hour to dry rugs.
JACKSONVILLE RESIDENTIAL GAS RATES SLASHED. Florida's Public Utilities Commission has
approved new residential rates in the Jacksonville district. The voluntary reduction by Florida Gas
will represent a decrease of 17.2% in the Company's total charges for residential gas. Comparison
of typical bills under the new rates with those of 1959, when natural gas was introduced, shows
decreases ranging from 14.2% to 43.9%.

SkgpICAL WHATEVER THE PROBLEMS, NATGAS AIR CONDITIONING HAS ANSWERS. If
proof is still needed that natural gas air conditioning can now meet any demand,
check this rundown: A Baptist Church in Chattahoochee with two 15-ton Arkla
absorption units . a National Bank in Niceville .. Bowling Lanes in Sarasot;
with 80 tons, engine driven . Pioneer Decorating in Ocala expanding an
adding two Arkla units to one already installed . a showplace home on Cul
breath Bayou, Tampa. and one in Country Club Estates. Deland . .10 tons in a
Clearwater Beach Cafeteria. and 20 tons in a new Beach Motel . and so on
down the long, long list.

Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without
restriction by he Florid Natural Gas Associallon. P. Box 3191. Fort Pierce. Fla.


































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Mason's Skill with

Florida

Masonry Cement


Mortar made with Florida Masonry Cement brings
out the best in any mason. Easy to spread and with
exceptional water retaining capacity, this mortar
assures complete workability. And the appearance,
strength and durability of the finished job will make
any craftsman proud. Florida Masonry Cement
mortar joints are highly water repellent, too, so no
waterproofing agents are required. Make your next
job your best job... insist on Florida Masonry
Cement, made in Florida by Floridians.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




7'7*- -


ARCHITECT- ROY M. POOLEY, AIA


Arlinghouse-

Elegant apartment complex-a
new dimension in luxury for the
Jacksonville area.


AUGUST, 1965







Arlinghouse-


The Townhouse-

Designed for elegant living spacious
living dining area. Features beautiful
spiral staircase leading to two large,
comfortable bedrooms. Private balcony.


The Continental-

Of split-level, features high style com-
bined with convenience, comfort and
privacy. Conceived as a three-area plan,
the entry, dining and cooking areas are
on an elevated platform. The sunken
livingroom opens to a private patio or
balcony and a gas log fireplace is avail-
able.


784 square feet


The Executive Suite-

Ultimate in luxury-incomparable tyling for the most
discriminating. Split-level design with a unique entry and
passage hall overlooking an enormous living-dining-
entertaining area is a revelation in elegance. Wood
burning fireplace in the living room-built-in charcoal
grill on the patio--two full baths each with its own
dressing room and two private bedrooms.







THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FOREIGN
PIPE
TODAY...


STEEL'S SYMBOL
OF VALUE,
SERVICE AND


Fir


r


aik


MAYBE
FOREIGN
ORANGES TOMORROW


Imported oranges do hit the American
market now and then. While they could
become a threat to Florida growers, they
haven't-yet.
But you can be hurt by what is happening
in other industries today. Take steel pipe,
for example. Every pound of foreign pipe
brought here costs all of us far more than
it saves. In wages lost to the American
worker who buys the houses, equipment
(and orange juice) that keep all of us in
business. When we hurt him, we hurt the
American consumer-they're the same


fellow every time! When we hurt the basic
industries that employ him, we shrink the
payrolls, taxes and investment capital
that make the economic wheels go 'round
for all of us. Our dollars go abroad.
Our point? That "buying American" isn't
so much an appeal to patriotism as it is to
the most personal kind of basic self-
interest-your interest. Besides, American
manufacturers offer very real advantages
of reliability, consistent quality, flexibility
and service to American customers.
Many a buyer who tried to swap these


considerations for an extra dollar has
found himself flirting with financial
hara-kiri. (And that's another import we
don't need!)
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
manufactures America's finest steel pipe,
used in some of Florida's finest new
buildings. For more information,
contact your J&L distributor in
Florida or write direct.
VJ Jones a Laughlin
Steel Corporation
3 Gateway Center. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania15230
STEEL







Weswage from tde Presadent,,



You and Architecture

By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA
President, Florida Association of Architects


You and your architect have an iden-
tical goal: achieving the best possible
building for you.
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA
*
Architecture, without doubt, is the
least understood of the arts.
When an architect contributes
notably to the public understanding
of architecture, it is an cvent worthy
of attention; it is doubly so when the
architect is a fellow Florida practi-
tioner.
I refer, of course, to a book pub-
lished last month by Delacorte Press,
YOU AND ARCHITECTURE, by
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA, of
Miami.
Al Parker, a 1939 honor graduate
of the University of Florida and a
member of the faculty there from
1940 to 1946--with time out to
serve as a lieutenant in the Navy--
wrote the book "to inform the public
and to stimulate them to an apprecia-
tion of architecture."
"If you have an appreciation of
architecture", says the author, "you
will recognize and demand the best in
building."
This statement not only epitomizes
the philosophy of the architect-author
but also keynotes the meaning, pur-
pose, and content of an infornnative
and illumniating work.
The text is accompanied by over
300 superb illustrations, most of them
by the eminent architectural photog-
rapher, Ezra Stoller.
By way of background, the book
opens with a brief review of the suc-
cesses and failures of man's building
efforts in the past. But architecture,
the author concludes, "must renew
AUGUST, 1965


itself out of the here and now" for the
ante-bellum days are over, and we are
only "playacting" if we think other-
wise.
American Traditionists
Emphasis is placed on the work of
three American traditionists: lHenry
Hobson Richardson, Louis lenri Sul-
livan, and Frank Lloyd Wright; and
the reasons are made clear why these
three men played such a vital role in
shaping American architecture.
Because the book is by no means
historical, the author may be forgiven
for selecting Richardson, Sullivan, and
Wright as the sole figures in tracing
the democratic American tradition.
Few, at least, will disagree with the
statement that these three "are the
roots of an original American Archi-
tecturc" and form "a single strong
thread of continuity" in its develop-
ment.
Yardsticks to Value
The major portion of the book is
devoted to a skillful presentation of
yardsticks for the general public to
use in measuring the architectural
value of buildings. These practical and
valuable guides relate to such tangible
attributes as materials, craftsmanship,
and site as well as to such intangible
ones as unity, proportion, and balance.
Says the author: "The cumulative
effect of architecture results from a
building, plus its siting and landscap-
ing, plus its furnishings . Think of
architecture as beautiful, purposeful
space. To enclose this space and to
furnish it so that beauty and utility
become one should be the architect's
and owner's goal."
In the section, Education of the
Architect, the author pays tribute to
his old teacher and mine, the late
Rudolph Weaver, FAIA, who early
developed at the University of Florida
"an integrated system in which each
design project was carefully coordi-
nated" so that the student's work was
"all related to the project."
Are Architects Necessary?
In the chapter headed Architect:
Luxury or Necessity? the function of


the architect is described in some de-
tail, and the cost of his service is
explained.
Of the three individuals involved in
building-owner, architect, and build-
er-cach "must be effective in his
own area or architecture can never
result . Without an intelligent and
understanding client, a capable archi-
tect, and a builder of integrity, crea-
tion of architecture is virtually impos-
sible."
What the architect must do, he
concludes, is to design so that "the
individuals who use the building will
have something to grow into. Ob-
viously, the building should be far
better than they could possibly imag-
ine or plan out of their own knowl-
edge and experience. The architect, by
virtue of his training, education, and
experience, is equipped as no other
person can be to set and accomplish
goals in building far beyond the fond-
est dreams of the average client."
Glimpse of the Future
In the final chapter, Sooner or
Later, the architect provides a tanti-
lizing glimpse into the possibilities of
the future.
Says he: "Change is an inexorable
law of the universe. There is, however,
no need to await it passively . .
Crystal ball gazing concerning the na-
ture of things to come is both a chal-
lenge to our imagination and a neces-
sity for our survival."
Concerning the community which
forms the environment for our build-
ings, the author points to the "inef-
ficiency, confusion, deterioration,
waste, and ugliness" in which we live.
"The architect is the natural selec-
tion, qualified by education and ex-
perience, to assume a larger responsi-
bility in the design of new communi-
ties and the rehabilitation of the old."
YOU AND ARCHITECT is a fasci-
nating, well designed, well written,
well illustrated guide to the best in
building. It is a pleasure to commend
to the profession and public alike this
book by a distinguished Florida archi-
tect.






Prwgrws Reptvt...



Gateway Arch


of


St. Louis


Gateway Arch gets stabilizing strut at 530-
foot mark signaling start of final 100 feet to
topping out.


The gleaming stainless steel legs of
the Gateway Arch were recently con-
nected by a steel, truss-like stabilizing
strut at the 530-foot level. This will
be followed by another 21 triangular
sections to be added to each leg, the
last of which will act as the keystone
section which is expected to be put in
place early this fall when the Arch
reaches its full height of 630 feet.
Weighing some 60 tons, the tem-
porary stabilizing strut, which is com-
posed mainly of tubular and T-1 roll
shaped members, is 255 feet long, 40
feet wide, and 15 feet deep. It was
fabricated in the shop in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania and shipped to the site
where it was erected with field con-
nections being made by A 325 high
strength steel bolts.
With six cables at each end, the
strut was raised by the two creeper
derricks that have been inching their
way up the Arch legs as they raise the
triangular block like sections into
place. The strut is bolted to a T-1
steel collar or harness which had been
previously erected around each of the
two legs.
The actual lifting operation took


Arteaga Photos


less than 30 minutes. But the better
part of a day was required to secure
the strut and to install the four 45-
ton horizontal jacks at the contact
points of the strut and the collars so
that pressure could be applied to make
the brace rigid against the legs.
After the 21 sections have been
added to each leg, the truss will be
lowered to the ground by the creeper
derricks-its mission completed.
The 12-foot high triangular shaped
sections forming the legs of the Arch
have double walls with the space be-
tween them up to the 300-foot mark
filled with reinforced concrete. The
inner skin is 3/8 inch thick carbon
steel except at the corners where 1 3/4
inch thick steel was used for greater
stiffness. The exterior surface of the
Arch is fabricated from 900 tons of
1/4 inch thick polished stainless steel
plates.
Working together, the inner carbon


steel and the outer skin of stainless
steel carry the gravity and wind loads
to the foundation since there is no
structural skeleton. The shape of the
Arch is an inverted catenary (the
shape of a chain hanging freely be-
tween two points of support)-this
is the soundest of all Arch types be-
cause the thrust passes through the
legs to the foundations.
When completed, the Gateway Arch
will tower 630 feet over St. Louis and
the banks of the Mississippi and will
afford visitors an unobstructed view
looking cast and west. Visitors will be
carried to an observation platform in-
side the top of the Arch by a train-
like conveyance system running inside
each leg. The train will be boarded in
the museum area located below the
Arch. The Arch, the Museum and a
park area are all part of the Jefferson
National Expansion Memorial being
developed by the National Park Serv-
ice.
Commemorating the opening of the
West after the Louisiana Purchase,
the giant steel Arch will also serve as
a permanent memorial to the ingen-
uity and resourcefulness of its design-
ers, engineers, and builders.
Conceived and designed by the late
Ecro Saarinen, the Arch is being fab-
ricated and erected by the Pittsburgh-
Des Moincs Steel Company. Struc-
tural engineers for the $12.5 million
monument are Severud, Elstad, Krue-
ger and Associates and the prime con-
tractor is the MacDonald Construc-
tion Company.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























- - M w


A CRISP DESIGN FOR CLEARWATER, FLORIDA


Sleek and crisply designed, with wide areas of glass,
Clearwater's new City Hall Administrative Center is
an excellent example of the outstanding modern archi-
tecture to be found in Florida today.
The three-story Administrative Center is constructed
of Solite lightweight structural concrete. Economy is


inherent in lightweight concrete construction, with
substantial savings in materials, time and labor. Per-
haps even more important, it offers today's archi-
tects a flexible medium for the fresh, creative de-
signs that are fast becoming the "new face" of
America.


Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Atlantic Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Fla.



















the growing number of new homes & apartments
that feature flameless YEAR-ROUND electric


AIR CONDITIONING


COOLS WARMS
SIN SUMMER IN WINTER

...because It's the big "comfort-plus"
benefit that boosts sales and rentals.



or14 s E FLORIDA ARC HIEC

14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



























Th~-l


Year-round electric air conditioning is one of
the basic requirements in homes and apart-
ments awarded the GOLD MEDALLION
for the ultimate in electrical excellence.


AUGUST, 1965








for maximum efficiency

...lowest installed cost

specify Borg-Warner ALFOL

the original multi-layer aluminum foil building insulation
with the "air-wall" that snaps into place


Architect, Builder, ALFOL is your an-
swer to the demands today's buildings
place upon insulation. ALFOL cuts heat.
ing costs in winter, cuts air-conditioning
costs in summer and provides year
'round protection against moisture con-
densation, rot and mildew.
ALFOL is fast and easy to apply with the
lowest installed cost and provides those
merchandising extras that sell your
buildings faster. Write now for your
free literature.


ALFOL is better 3 ways
A Multiple aluminum foil sheets re-
flect 95% of all radiant heat.
B Reflective air spaces minimize
thermal convection and eliminate
thermal conduction.
C Separate and positive vapor barrier
for permanent protection against
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Loch Ness Monster Bobs



Up In Florida Waters


Dubbed, "Sea Scrpent Rampant,"
by its creator, Peter Nicholson, a 25-
foot long denizen of the deep has
been causing many to pause as they
pass through the mall of the newly-
erected Hollywood Center, Holly-
wood, Florida.
Mr. Nicholson, whose previous
commissions include a fountain sculp-
ture for the Carlton Beach Hotel,
Bermuda, a colored bas relief for
American Airlines Terminal, Kennedy
International Airport, New York, and
a monumental cast bronze sculpture
and fountain for Sheraton Hotel, San
Juan, Puerto Rico, has this to say


about his latest creation, "When I
was commissioned by Herbert II.
Johnson, the architect, to create a
piece for the mall of the Hollywood
Shopping Center, I immediately vis-
ualized a sculpture that would por-
tray the motion of many people pass-
ing through the mall, as well as some-
thing that would have the feel of
Florida about it. The wriggling sea
monster in the form of a fountain
seemed to me to be the answer. It
would be both a foil for, and a com-
plement to, the water sculpture, the
curving copper forms reflecting and
echoing the scintillating water form.


"Starting with plain sheets of 16-
ounce copper made by Revere Copper
and Brass Incorporated, I beat and
shaped the 'monster' into submis-
sion," Mr. Nicholson explained, with
a twinkle in his eyes, "using the an-
cient repouss6 method of creating
three-dimensional forms . assisted
by the greater flexibility given by us-
ing an oxyacetylene burning process
to give varying textures."
In commenting on the "Sea mon-
ster", Mr. Johnson, the architect,
pointed out the fast growing trend
toward the use of sculpture in modern
(Continued on Page 18)


Peter Nicholon (left) and Herbert Johnson, AIA (right) discuss the unusual fountain located
in the mall of the new Hollywood Center, Hollywood, Florida.


AUGUST, 1965







Sea Serpent Fountain . .
(Continued from Page 17)

highrise buildings and shopping cen-
ters. Said he, "The regional shopping
center which developed after World
War II offers a perfect setting to dis-
play work of art, particularly sculp-
ture. In the mall of the average center,
th sculpture will get greater exposure
than in any park or museum. low-
ever, the realization of this was a long
time in coming. It was only with the
designing of such large centers as
Northland in Detroit and others that
there was any use of sculpture at all.
"It appears that there is a new
feeling among the developers at this
point, perhaps partly because of more
awareness of art in the United States;
and perhaps partly because of the at-
tention that sculpture has been get-
ting in the centers. I feel that from
now on we will be able to use more
and more."
At the present time, we have four


major regional centers on the boards,
all of which are committed to one or
more pieces of art in the enclosed air-
conditioned malls with which all new
centers are being built."
Estclle Dodge of Estelle Dodge
Associates, Inc., consultants to archi-
tects and builders for the commission-
ing of art works, who has worked with
many of the country's leading sculp-
tors, had this to say, "There is a
noticeably marked and increasing
trend in recent years to coordinate
sculpture or other art works with the
design of buildings. This development
has now reached the point where few
public buildings of note do not in-
clude as part of their overall design
- one or more commissioned art cre-
ations. Such art is included, not as
mere decoration, but as an integral
part of the architectural concept of
the buildings themselves."


*big



begin


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Bartow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
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Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahoochee, Town of Chattahoochee
Chipley, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
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Cutler Ridge, City Gas Co.
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Madison, City of Madison
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Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
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Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
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Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
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Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
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Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
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St. Petersburg. City of St. Petersburg
Sanford, Sanford Gas Co.
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Tampa, Peoples Gas System
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West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park. Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Shoppers pause to wonder at the Sea Serpent Fountain.






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AUGUST, 1965







Reward Good Design With Less Taxes


The new president of the American
Institute of Architects (AIA) has a
new approach to America's quest for
good design-pay for it.
Morris Ketchum, Jr., of New York
thinks a few bucks will accomplish
more for the beauty of U. S. cities
than all the preaching in the world.
The problem, as Ketchum sees it,
is simple. We reward people for build-
ing junky buildings and we penalize
them for fine ones.
Example: The Seagram Co., hired
some of the best architects in the
country and used some very expensive
materials for its beautiful new office
in New York. The company set the
building well back from the street,
Park Avenue, in order to have a nice
plaza with trees and a fountain in
front.
This setback meant giving up a lot
of rents in a very high-rent part of
New York.
What did the city do? It slapped
a tax rate on the Seagram Building


50 per cent higher than the rate it
was applying to inferior speculative
buildings in the same neighborhood.
The city explained to the company
that it ought to pay higher taxes be-
cause it had a "prestige building."
The state courts upheld this judg-
ment and went so far as to say that
the high-cost Seagram building "does
not do much credit to the sagacity of
the corporate managers."
Meanwhile, slum dwellings in New
York or any other city are getting
taxed at much lower rates than beauti-
ful buildings. After all, they're run
down. And should a slum owner in-
stall new plumbing or apply a coat of
paint, up go his taxes.
In other words, those who build
well get soaked for their pains, those
who let their property go to pieces arc
rewarded.
In order to turn this situation
around, Ketchum proposes that cities
give tax rebates to people who put up


well-designed buildings. He would do
the same for those who rehabilitate
run-down structures.
Ditto for owners who donate some
of their land for public use as the
Seagram Co., did when it set its build-
ing back from Park Avenue. On sunny
days, the plaza in front of it is full
of office workers and others relaxing
and eating their lunch.
In addition, Ketchum would like
the federal government to subsidize
interest rates for people who construct
beautiful buildings financed with fed-
erally-insured mortgages.
As he sees it, rewarding beauty in
these ways would not be charity. In
the long run it will pay big dollar divi-
dends to cities, Ketchum says.
That's because well-designed build-
ings keep their tax value longer than
junky ones. And slums, quite aside
from their cost in human misery, take
extra dollars for police and fire pro-
tection and health and other services.


No matter how you look at it,

phone wiring still looks best

when you can't see it.

So plan ahead

for plenty of telephone outlets

and enough public phones.

Call our Architects'

and Builders' Representative

while you're still in

the blueprint stage.

Southern Bell
... Serving You


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECi








Cke West...




The Old Island Restores Itself


By MARY WOOD MALONE
Publicity Chairman
Old Island Restoration Foundation, Inc.


Key West's golden era was the 19th
century. Its earliest houses were pre-
fabricated in the Bahamas. English
immigrants brought their houses with
them, in schooners or barges, and
many of these seagoing houses are
still in use, in spite of time, fire and
hurricanes.
As Key West prospered (in 1832 it
was the richest city per capital in the
United States) ship's carpenters were
kept busy building fine residences of
lignum vitae and what is now called
Dade county pine, fitted together with
mortise and tenon joints and wooden
pegs. Mahogany was used for fences
and outhouses.
Mitchell Wolfson, a Key West boy-
made-good as a financier, quietly
bought a house that had been con-
demned, and entrusted its restoration
to A. Herbert Mathis. Frederick Rand
furnished it.
Old Key West was fast disappear-
ing from neglect and tasteless 'mod-
ernization' which meant disguising
fine buildings with false fronts of


glass and neon, covering ship-lap sid-
ing with perma-stone and replacing
lead glass with metal jalousics.
The beauty of the Wolfson restora-
tion of the Audubon house inspired
twelve people to form a society to pre-
serve the unique architecture and her-
itage of Key West. The Director of
the National Trust came to give ad-
vice; a charter was drawn up, and Old
Island Restoration Foundation, Inc.,
was born with no money and no
idea what to tackle.
Two of the members happened to
drive past Key West's worst ruin, the
old Mallory Docks, and had a simul-
taneous inspiration. "Wouldn't this
be a wonderful location for a civic
center?"
It is an area 250 ft. deep with 450
ft. of waterfront on the Gulf of Mex-
ico. The wooden wharf had a sign
"Fish at Your Own Risk," but there
were three old warehouses, one of
brick and two of stone, that seemed
still sturdy, amid a welter of shacks
and refuse. The City of Key West had


bought the area in 1952 for $150,-
000.00, but had done nothing with it
beyond renting warehouse space in
buildings where the leaks were not
too bad.
Spanish explorers landed there. Pir-
ates had used the anchorage. In 1823,
it was tle base of Commodore David
Porter's Anti-Piratical Sq u a d r o n,
which destroyed piracy in the West-
ern Hemisphere. Expeditionary forces
in five wars had assembled there. It
was the commercial heart of Key
West in the days of its maritime
glory.
Old Island Restoration Foundation
had found its first goal and the
time was opportune. A bond issue
was in the making for a convention
hall, an 18-hole golf course and other
civic improvements.
The fledgling Foundation tried out
its power of persuasion on the City
Commission and the Board of Public
Works empowered it to build the im-
provements. There was a period of
(Continued on Page 22)


Photos: Don Pinder


The Audubon House was the first restoration
in Key West, Florida, completed in 1960, by
Mitchell Wolfson. Audubon was a guest here
in 1832 while he worked on his "Birds of
America". The house is furnished with fine
English antiques, and contains the four great
Audubon folios, all a gift to Key West from the
Wolfson family.


AUGUST, 1965


111111:1141111111






Key West...
(Continued from Page 21)

frustration and ridicule, but in the
end the City Commission was con-
vinced that the Old Mallory Square
idea had merit.
Rader & Associates of Miami had
charge of the entire redevelopment.
The costliest item was a reinforced
concrete wharf to replace the ruined
wooden one, at $163,133.00 It
promptly became the focal point of
Key Vest. Fishermen are shoulder
to shoulder, and the fishing is good.
Visitors gather to sun themselves, to
enjoy the view of the Gulf, and to
watch the shipping glide by, close
enough to converse with the crews.
Instead of building a convention
hall in some outlying salt pond, it
was decided to utilize the largest
warehouse. Built in the early 1800's
of red brick made in Pensacola, the
walls are a series of graceful arches,
whcrc salvaged cargoes were sold at
auction in the days of the wreckers.
In the year 1846, $1,600,000.00 was
realized at the sales, divided by the
Admiralty Court among the wreckers,
owners and insurance agencies.
It cost $68,281.00 to transform the
brick warehouse into an extraordi-
narily handsome Community Center,
which is in constant use.
Landscaping the Square cost $13,-
630. The large open area had been
paved and ornamental lighting in-
stalled. It is a free parking lot for
188 cars, much appreciated by tour-
ists.

Community Cooperation
The Key West Players were given a
token lease on a stone warehouse, and
raised $30,000.00 to make it into the
Waterfront Playhouse. It is a gem of
a theatre, with air conditioning, com-
fortable scats and excellent stage
equipment.
Two organizations occupy the third
warehouse. The Chamber of Com-
merce spent $12,000.00 on its quar-
ters. It moved from offices on the
main business street in 1963, and im-
mediately its membership increased
by one-third and its work load doubl-
ed. In 1964 the Chamber opened an
exhibit of mounted fish that is second
only to the collection in the Smith-
sonian Institution.
The other half of the warehouse
is called the Market Place, a modified
Women's Exchange.


The only other building worth sal-
vagc was the quaint frame ticket
office of the Mallonr Steamship Co.
It became headquarters for Old Island
Restoration Foundation, called Ilos-
pitality House.
By finding new uses for what it


already had, Key West revitalized a
decayed area, dramatized its history,
and provided a prime tourist attrac-
tion at a total cost, including the
land, of $210,110.00 less than the
cost of building a new convention
hall.


- I


Above: The restored concrete wharf, 450 feet long, is always crowded.
Old Mallory Square has free parking for 188 cars.


Above: The abandoned store warehouse was trans-
formed inside and out to become the Waterfront
Playhouse.

Below: Wreckers auctions were held in the 1800's in the
then brick warehouse which has been restored and now
is the Community Center, Old Mallory Square.







Tampa Federal Office Building


Architects: ROBERT WIELAGE, AIA and

H. LESLIE WALKER, AIA,
Associate Architects, Tampa


Mural Artist: FRANK PRINCE, Tampa


General
Contractor:


ARTHUR VENNERI CO.,
Westfield, N. J.


The Federal Office Building lo-
cated in Tampa, Florida, is a $2,400,-
000 structure of some 117,000 square
feet in eight stories. Constructed in
1963-64, it incorporates some of the
most advanced planning and design
now being utilized by the General
Services Administration.
Almost all of the Federal Agencies
located in the Tampa Metropolitan
Area are housed in this building. It is
planned to accommodate many vary-
ing functions for governmental serv-
ices, from the F.B.I. and Border Pa-
trol to the U. S. Coast Guard; Depart-


ment of Health, Education and Wel-
fare; and the Department of Internal
Revenue, to name a few.
To orient its sub-tropical environ-
ment, the building incorporates a
unique "solar wall" of precast, insu-
lated curtain wall panels and sun
shades cast as an integral unit. The
combination of vertical "channel sec-
tion panels" and the "sun shade"
panels creates not only the anticipated
reduction in air-conditioning require-
ments, but the extra bonus of a con-
stantly changing facade design which
has proven to be a real favorite of


Tampa inhabitants.
Dark grey plate glass windows and
a use of both rough textured and
polished black granite veneer compli-
ment the exposed white quartz aggre-
gate prec a s t panels on the upper
stories of the building.
A stone-colored, two-part polysul-
fide liquid polymer base sealant was
used in sealing the precast panels and
rough textured granite mosaic veneer.
A black sealant of the same type was
used to seal the polished granite sec-
tions used on the columns. All pivoted
aluminum sash were also sealed with
the stone-colored sealant.
The building is planned on a five-
foot square module for all office areas,
and each module has a triple connec-
tion for electric, telephone and inter-
com, as well as a dual purpose floures-
cent light fixture and conditioned air
supply.
The plan of the building locates all
three elevators, toilets, stairways and
service facilities in a "central core
area", allowing the use of the entire
perimeter of each floor as unrestricted
office space. All interior office parti-
tions are the removable type, provid-
ing maximum flexibility of occupancy.
Heating and air-conditioning high ve-
locity ducts rise in the central core area
and branch out to individual mixing
boxes serving separate thermostatic
controls in each bay of office areas.
Local Tampans have been well
pleased with the project as a con-
temporary building providing func-
tional restraint and a sense of dignity.
23


Photo: Alexandre Leeorges












UF Graduate Honored

Chris Charles Benninger, a grad-
uating senior in the University of
Florida College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, recently was awarded a
certificate of merit from Regional
Manager A. R. Brickler, of the Port-
Cement Association for placing sec-


ond in PCA's southeastern regional
architectural scholarship program.
Benninger's father, Dr. L. J. Ben-
ninger, is a professor of accounting in
the University's College of Business
Administration. Benninger's entry was
titled "Student Housing."


by PRESCULITE
MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
1251 Doolittle Dr., San Leandro, Calif.
FACTORIES: San Leandro, California
Warminster, Penna., El Dorado, Arkansas


Scale model of the entry of Chris C. Benninger. The entry was titled 'Student Housing'


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Celotex Corporation 3
Florida Foundry
& Pattern Works 26
Florida Gas Transmission 18-19
Flor:da Investor Owned
Electric Utilities . 14-15
Florida Natural Gas
Association 5
Florida Portland Cement
Division . 6
Jones and Laughlin
Steel Corporation .9-10
Julius Blum & Co.. . 4
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 1
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. 24
Reflectal Corporation . 16
Robb'ns Manufacturing Co. 24
Solite Corporation. 13
Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co. 20
Super Sky Products, Inc. . 25
F. Graham Williams Co. 25








































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3,200 Square Feet and More
If Needed Has Been
Allocated For The


ARCHITECTURAL
EXHIBITS

During the 51st Annual
Convention of The Florida
Association of Architects,
November 17-20, 1965,
Jack Tar Hotel,
Clearwater


Return Your Entry Form
Promptly


Custom-Cast


Plaques


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


"''"


I







7. 7?& tema# 4d ee~eb pdla6oae * 7? of& &x...


The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


Architecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience . The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W.
Goin lived and worked.
The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Archie G. Parish, President
of Women's Auxiliary, 145 Wild-
wood Lane, S. E., St. Petersburg 5,
Florida.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER, AIA.
01, 11.












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Is it possible to wave the flag too much? Provided, of course, that you wave it with integrity?
Is it possible to study Lincoln or Shakespeare too much? Is it possible to read the Bible too
much The great, the good, the true, are inexhaustible for inspiration, example and strength.
I believe that we are not waving our flag enough, not nearly enough It.seems to me that
we are developing a tendency to be timid or even apologetic about waving the stars and
stripes. Walk up and down the streets on July 4th and count the flags. It is our nation's
birthday, a sacred day in world history, the most important day of America. Why isn't the
flag flying on every rooftop and from every home and building? This complacent attitude is
strong evidence of cancerous patriotic decay. The flag is a symbol of our national unity. It is
the spirit of our undying devotion to our country. It stands for the best that is in us .. for
loyalty, character, and faith in democracy Isn't our flag a synonym of the United States of
America? Does it not represent man's greatest, noblest, most sublime dream? Is it not the
zenith of achievement, the goal to which generations have aspired? Ladies and gentlemen,
I believe it is time for us ... for the mad, rushing Twentieth Century American ... to stop
for a moment and think. Let us arrest our near reverential admiration of material success and
return to the spiritual and ethical values. Let us imbue and rekindle in ourselves and our chil-
dred the so-called old-fashioned way of patriotism, a burning devotion to the principles and
ideals upon which our country was founded Should not every home own and proudly dis-
play the colors on holidays and other such occasions? Isn't the flag Patrick Henry, Jefferson,
Franklin, Washington, Nathan Hale, Gettysburg and Valley Forge, Paul Revere, Jackson and
other great men and women who have given us our heritage. When you look at the flag can't
, you see the Alamo, Corrigedor, Pearl Harbor, The Monitor, The Merrimac, Wake Island,
and Korea? Lest we forget, isn't the flag Flanders Field, Bataan, Iwo Jima, Normandy, Babe
Ruth and Davy Crockett? The great events of our past and present are wrapped up in our
flag It is a symbol of this blessed nation, a giant in industry, education and commerce. Mil-
lions of fertile square miles, wheatlands, coal mines, steel plants. Our great republic, the
chosen infant destined to be man's last and remaining hope for suffering humanity, a shining
beacon of light, noble and glorious, the haven for the oppressed and persecuted and truly
God's gift to mankind *
That is what the flag means to me. Can we wave it too much? I don't think so.





Dr. DeLove is the author of The Quiet Betrayal and president of Independence Hall of Chicago.
Reply of S. L. DeLove on the Know Your History Hour, December 30th, 1956, to a listener who
wrote as follows: "Your programs are wonderful especially the no commercials- but you are
waving the flag too much."
The above has been reprinted annually in many national magazines, newspapers and radio
stations, and is a part of the Congressional Record.
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