• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Obligations of professional...
 Legislature adopts FAA resolution...
 Chapter 467.09 of architects registration...
 AGC, Florida east coast chapter,...
 1965 convention program shaping...
 FAA seminar huge success -- summary...
 Florida and its building codes
 UM student honored
 Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA elected...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00133
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00133
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Main
        Main
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Obligations of professional practice
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Legislature adopts FAA resolution to study construction industry
        Page 6
    Chapter 467.09 of architects registration act amended by legislature
        Page 7
    AGC, Florida east coast chapter, adopts resolution deploring action of legislature relating to architects registration act
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    1965 convention program shaping up -- Florida the beautiful
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    FAA seminar huge success -- summary of presentations
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Florida and its building codes
        Page 18
        Page 19
    UM student honored
        Page 20
    Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA elected president AIA
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.









7, 74e Wemwy and f1e's Puposne 4 7T4 ?m% ...


The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


Architecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience . The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W
Goin lived and worked.
The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Archie G. Parish, President
of Women's Auxiliary, 145 Wild-
wood Lane, S. E., St. Petersburg 5,
Florida.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER, AIA.


































BuiEt-ui Antiquity


The authentic look of antiquity is built into Merry's
St. Augustine Antique (9-500) Brick. Here is a happy
combination of new-material strength and the pic-
turesque charm of age. St. Augustine Antique is


available in a pleasing range of browns, in stand-
ard, oversize, or Norwegian dimensions. For more
information, ask the Merry representative who calls
on you, or contact the company direct.


Fhir L IUh 6cid suyw







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS





9n 74 sue ---


Obligations of Professional Practice . . . . . . .
By William T. Arnett, AIA
Legislature Adopts FAA Resolution To Study Construction Industry
Chapter 467.09 of Architects Registration Act Amended by Legislature


AGC, Florida East Coast Chapter, Adopts Resolution Deploring Action
of Legislature Relating to Architects Registration Act . . . 8
1965 Convention Program Shaping Up-Florida the Beautiful . . .11
FAA Seminar Huge Success-Summary of Presentations . . . 15
Florida and Its Building Codes . . . . .. .18-19
UM Student Honored ............ ........20
Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA Elected President AIA . . . . . 21
AIA Elects New Officers .... . .. . . . . . 22
Architects Head CSI, Jacksonville Chapter . . . . . . 22


. 22


FAA OFFICERS 1965
William T. Arnett, President, 2105 N.W. Third Place, Gainesville
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Forrest R. Coxen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahassee
Dana B. Johannes, Treasurer, 410 S. Lincoln Avenue, Clearwater

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: William A. Gilroy, George M. Polk; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Dana B. Johannes, Frank R. Mudano,
William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Earl J. Draeger, Sidney R.
Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Jack Moore; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTHWEST: William
Stewart; FLORIDA SOUTH: James E. Ferguson, Jr., John O. Grimshaw, Earl M.
Starnes; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., Harry E. Burns, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: John B. Langley, Joseph N. Williams;
PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater
Executive Director, Florida Association of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S.W. 8th Street, Coral Gables


PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Verner Johnson, Joseph M. Shifalo


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conofrm to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami. Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year. March Roster Issue,
$2.00 . Printed by McMurray Printers.

FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor


VOLUME 15

NUMBER 7 1 7 965


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 4

6
7


Advertisers Index





CMODIT AICHInCT LA*HMIT4OWNPOLLOCK. AIA WINSTON-SALU. NORTH CAROIUNA. GENIAL CONTRACTOR: REA CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, CHARLOTTI
NORTH CAROUNA. T RA OD CONTRACTOR: CAROLINA MARML TILE CO.. WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA.


TERRAZZO... 12:17... sometime in 1975


o.
JULY, 1965


This picture of the terrazzo floors of the new Forsyth General
Hospital in Winston-Salem was taken last Spring, just before they
started admitting patients. In ten years, even twenty or more years,
the floors will look the same... or better. There will have been
tremendous traffic over them, but terrazzo can not only take it...
it actually improves with age. Continuous traffic combined with
simple basic maintenance have a mellowing effect that heightens
terrazzo's basic natural beauty.
As is so frequently the case with fine terrazzo floors, the contractor
chose Trinity White Portland Cement for the job.

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
Offices: Chicago, Illinois Chattanooga, Tennessee Dallas. Texas Fort Worth, Texas Houston, Texas Fredonla, Kansas
Fort Wayne. Indiana Jackson, Michigan Kansas City Tampa, Florida Miami, Florida Los Angeles, California






'WedPe roem dte Pw44dclt t,,




Obligations


of


Professional Practice

By WILUAM T. ARNETT, AIA
President, Florida Association of Architects


This month, the Message from the
President is based in part upon an
address made recently before a meet-
ing of the Florida Association of Con-
sulting Engineers in Orlando.

*

The practice of architecture has
long been regarded as a profession-
a profession whose continuing object
is to help people achieve a better
human environment.
It was in the 16th century when
the first real professional groups be-
gan to emerge, but it was not until
the rise of new conditions of practice
in England at the end of the 18th
century that private practitioners be-
gan to feel the need for professional
associations.
In 1934 a group of British archi-
tects "of prominent position and un-
impeachable character, educated for
and following their profession" band-
ed together in order that they might
better merit "that implicit confidence
on the part of the public which should
enable a client to regard his architect
not only as his agent, but as his
friend and advisor".
Thus, more than a century ago
emerged the professional concepts of
agency, integrity, and competence.
These identical concepts are embodied
in the current Standards of Profes-
sional Practice of the AIA.


Ethical and Professional Standards
A member of the American Insti-
tute of Architects is a professional
man in every sense of the word, be-
cause when an owner puts up his hard
earned cash for a building, he must
be able to repose confidence in some-
one who represents his interests and
his interests alone.
Every member of the AIA is bound
by Standards of Professional Practice
that forbid him to receive a fee or
monetary compensation on a given
project from anybody but his client.
He may not profit from the sale or use
of building products, materials, pro-
cesses, or people on the job site.
There are certain types of building
organizations with design services -
commonly known as speculator build-
ers or package dealers that play it
both ways. That is, they offer a
building to a client, take a profit on
the materials and products used in it,
get a fee on a percentage of the con-
tract, and guarantee a price either by
padding cost estimates or using infer-
ior materials when the budget gets
squeezed.
An architect who belongs to the
AIA is bound to represent only his
client's interests. His job is to solve
the client's problems and to use com-
petitive bidding between contractors,
or negotiation with a single contrac-
tor, to get the client the best possible
break on price.


The architect who is a member of
the AIA has to swim in a stormy sea
to survive. He has to compete against
cut-rate design services that purport
to offer the same thing but of course
do not; to compete against just plain
apathy and ignorance or what his
professional services can do for a
business or for individuals; and to
compete against architectural bu-
reauacracies in government agencies.
But the AIA member survives. One
way he does this is to stay abreast of
the times. Like a physician, he has to
know the latest operations and cures
for the public's ailments. Another way
he survives is by demonstrating his
proficiency. Time after time, archi-
tects who are members of the AIA
have proved that independent archi-
tectural services provide better and
less expensive buildings than package
dealers and captive architects.

Integrity and Competence
What are the instruments for the
assurance of professional integrity and
competence?
It is very difficult for laymen to
judge professional qualifications. For
this reason the public must rely pri-
marily on the professional group to
establish and maintain criteria in
these matters. Society has come to
recognize each professional group as
arbiter of its own standards of prac-
(Continued on Page 5)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





President's Message...
(Continued from Page 4)
tice, and in return for this socially
useful control, confers upon the
group the status and privileges of a
profession.
Among these privileges is freedom
to determine for itself, with a mini-
mum of external interference, the
means and methods of fulfilling its
own highest professional objectives.
The development and maintenance
of standards of professional practice
require the establishment of condi-
tions of service which are conducive
to the greatest degree of social bene-
fits. As long as the relationship be-
tween individual practitioners remains
at the level of ruthless unbridled com-
petition, low quality tends to drive
out high, and unsuspecting clients
discover too late the penalties of in-
adequate service.
Under such conditions, the compe-
tence of all practitioners becomes sus-
pect, and soon the whole profession
forfeits the public confidence on
which its very existence depends.
Therefore, for their own survival as
well as the best interests of the public,
the members of the profession must
create and maintain conditions which
permit the most effective service.
The Maintenance of Standards
The first and foremost function of
the AIA is to maintain the ethical
and professional standards of the pro-
fession of architecture. The AIA
Standards of Professional Practice date
from 1909, and the latest revisions
were made in 1964. For AIA mem-
bers, these standards are enforced
through the National Judiciary sys-
tem. The AIA is thereby the sole
guardian of the ethical status of the
profession of architecture as viewed
by the public.
The 1927 Gold Medalist of the In-
stitute, Howard Van Doren Shaw,
FAIA, summed it all up when he said,
"Be a gentleman if you can, but for
God's sake be an architect".


*We


Specialize


in


Construction


LOANS


For information contact Dick Martin, our Construction
loan man. Write him c/o American National Bank of Jackson-
ville, 2031 Hendricks Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida or Call him
Collect at 398-8661.

*AMERICAN

NATIONAL BANK

OF
JACKSONVILLE
2031 HENDRICKS AVENUE, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32207


JULY, 1965







Legislature Adopts FAA Resolution



To Study Construction Industry





m et Amendment


To include the nursing home industry but to be studied separately from the construction industry.


A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION directing the
legislative council to make a study of the construction in-
dustry and to make recommendations for coordinating
the activities of the various segments of the construction
industry and the nursing home industry; authorizing the
establishment of a select committee and appointment of
members; authorizing the establishment of advisory com-
mittees; requiring a report be made to the 1967 legisla-
ture; providing for the payment of expenses of commit-
tee members.
WHEREAS, the construction industry annually repre-
sents a two billion dollar segment of the Florida economy,
establishing it with agri-business and tourism as one of
the state's largest and most important economic influ-
ences, and
WHEREAS, many other businesses and professions
are directly affected, economically and socially, by the
impact of construction on the everyday life of Florida's
citizens and visitors, and
WHEREAS, the physical safety, the human environ-
ment, and the real estate investment security of all resi-
dents of the state are directly affected by the quality of
the construction industry's product, and
WHEREAS, the explosive growth of the state con-
tinually imposes a threat to the orderly growth and health-
ful, physical and economic development of the state, which
development is inextricably dependent upon a well organ-
ized and coordinated construction industry composed of
such allied groups as mortgage bankers, insurance under-
writers, design professions, general contractors, specialty
contractors, heavy construction contractors, materials
manufacturers and distributors, home builders, building
and zoning officials, sanitation and health regulatory
agencies, and others similarly necessary to an organized
effort, and


WHEREAS, since the earliest times in the state's
history, the promotion and development of agriculture
and its allied businesses, as well as the orderly develop-
ment of tourism into an important economic factor has
evolved from continuing study and attention of the Flor-
ida legislature, NOW, THEREFORE,
Be It Resolved by the Senate of the State of Florida, the
House of Representatives Concurring:
Section 1. The Legislative Council is directed to
make a comprehensive study of the construction industry
and the nursing home industry and to recommend mea-
sures to be taken to further the best interests of building
owners and nursing home operators and patients and the
general public through the coordination of the activities
of the various segments of the construction industry and
the nursing home industry. The studies of the two (2)
above mentioned industries shall be conducted separately.
Section 2. The Legislative Council is authorized and
directed to establish a select committee pursuant to sec-
tion 11.21 (3), Florida Statutes, to conduct the study
authorized by this resolution; provided, however, that the
limitation on the number of noncouncil members as speci-
fied in the above section shall not apply, and said com-
mittee shall have the authority to appoint an advisory
committee to assist in this study as provided by section
11.285, Florida Statutes. Provided further, that the mem-
bers of such advisory committee must have been actively
engaged in the construction industry for a period of at
least five (5) years prior to the appointment as a mem-
ber of the advisory committee.
Section 3. The expenses of the members of the
select committee shall be paid as provided by law.
Section 4. A report of the findings of this compre-
hensive study shall be made to the 1967 session of the
legislature.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Chapter 467.09 of Architects Regis-



tration Act Amended by Legislature




One & two family residences can be designed by any person without requirement to show compe-
tence ..
Building codes, zoning laws or ordinances now or hereafter enacted which are or shall be more
restrictive shall not be affected . .
Building officials shall not issue building permits when permit discloses violation of 467.09.


AN ACT relating to the practice of architecture in
this state; amending section 467.09, Florida Statutes, by
exempting all one- or two-family residences from regula-
tion under state laws regulating the practice of architec-
ture; providing that the general law shall not override
more restrictive local laws or ordinances; providing for the
withholding of building permits where certain provisions
of the state law regulating the practice of architecture
have not been met; and providing when said act shall
take effect.
Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Flor-
ida:
Section 1. Section 467.09, Florida Statutes, is
amended to read:
467.09 Certain persons exempt from registration;
inter-professional privileges between architects and pro-
fessional engineers defined.-
No person shall be required by this or any other state
law regulating the practice of architecture to qualify as
an architect in order to make plans and specifications for
or supervise the erection, enlargement or alteration of any
building upon any farm for the use of any farmer, irre-
spective of the cost of such building, or any one- or two-
family residence building or any domestic out-building
appurtenant to any such one- or two-family residence, re-
gardless of costs, or of any other type building costing less
than five thousand dollars (except schools, auditoriums,
or other buildings intended for the mass assemblage of
people). Nor shall anything in this or any other state law
be held to prevent registered professional engineers or
their employees or subordinates under their responsible
supervising control from performing architectural services
which are purely incidental to their engineering practice
or registered architects or their employees or subordinates
under their responsible supervising control from perform-
ing engineering services which are purely incidental to
JULY, 1965


their architectural practice. Provided that no profes-
sional engineer shall practice architecture or use the desig-
nation "architect" or any term derived therefrom, and
no architect shall practice professional engineering or use
the term "engineer" or any term derived therefrom. Oth-
erwise, any person who shall be engaged in the planning
or design for the erection, enlargement or alteration of
buildings for others or furnishing architectural supervi-
sion of the construction thereof shall be deemed to be
practicing architecture and be required to secure a cer-
tificate and all annual renewal thereof required by the
laws of this state as a condition precedent to his so
doing.
The term "building" in this chapter shall be under-
stood to be a structure, consisting of foundations, walls
and roof, with or without the other parts. Nothing con-
tained in this chapter shall be construed to prevent any
employee of an architect from acting under his instruc-
tion, control and supervision, in any capacity whether
paid by the architect or the owner.
Section 2. Nothing contained in this chapter shall
be construed to repeal, amend, limit or otherwise affect
any county, metro or municipal building codes or zoning
laws or ordinances now or hereafter enacted which are or
shall be more restrictive with respect to the services of
registered architects in their operation and effect than
the general law regulating the practice of architecture.
Section 3. In counties or municipalities which now
or hereafter have a system of issuance of building permits
such permits shall not be issued in any case where the
application for said building permit discloses that the
provisions of this chapter have been violated; provided,
however, this shall not authorize the withholding of
building permits in any cases within the exempt classes
set forth under Section 1 of this Act.
Section 4. This act shall take effect upon becoming
a law.









Florida East Coast Chapter

The Associated General Contractors of America, Inc.




RESOLUTION



WHEREAS, there has been passed by the Legislature of the State of Florida an act which substantially reduces the legal
requirement of Architectural talent in the design of residential construction, and,

WHEREAS, this legislation is not, in the opinion of this AGC Chapter Membership, in the best interest of the public
and the Construction Industry as a whole in that

A. It represents a down-grading of an important professional segment of this industry.

B. It will open the general and unknowing public to the mercy of many unprincipled
and mercenary elements solely interested in the sale of a residence, with secondary
regard for safety, quality and assurance of investment.

C. It will place design services on a non-professional standard of deportment, com-
pletely contrary to the best interest and welfare of the public which is not cogni-
zant of the many technical aspects of modern day construction, methods, materials
and performance.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the membership of this Chapter of the Associated General Contractors does
hereby go on record as to the inadvisability of this action by the Legislature and, does further caution the general public
of the danger inherent in having its design services for new construction performed by individuals, firms or others not
qualified by the Florida State Board of Architecture for such design work, as well as the imprudence from an economi-
cal standpoint, and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that those municipalities which now require public protection through the requisite of Profes-
sional Architectural design retain such ordinance for the protection of its citizens, and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a copy of this Resolution be placed in the Construction Reporter and as well distributed
to the Press for the edification of the General Construction Public.

ADOPTED by the full membership and Associate Membership of the Florida East Coast Chapter of the Associated Gen-
eral Contractors of America, Inc., this 2nd day of June, 1965.

W. G. Lassiter, Jr., President

ATTEST: William P. Bobb, Jr., Exec. Manager


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








FOREIGN
PIPE
TODAY...


'A


B J


MAYBE
FOREIGN
ORANGES TOMORROW


Imported oranges do hit the American
market now and then. While they could
become a threat to Florida growers, they
haven't-yet.
But you can be hurt by what is happening
in other industries today. Take steel pipe,
for example. Every pound of foreign pipe
brought here costs all of us far more than
it saves. In wages lost to the American
worker who buys the houses, equipment
(and orange juice) that keep all of us in
business. When we hurt him, we hurt the
American consumer-they're the same


fellow every time! When we hurt the basic
industries that employ him, we shrink the
payrolls, taxes and investment capital
that make the economic wheels go 'round
for all of us. Our dollars go abroad.
Our point? That "buying American" isn't
so much an appeal to patriotism as it is to
the most personal kind of basic self-
interest-your interest. Besides, American
manufacturers offer very real advantages
of reliability, consistent quality, flexibility
and service to American customers.
Many a buyer who tried to swap these


considerations for an extra dollar has
found himself flirting with financial
hara-kiri. (And that's another import we
don't need!)
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
manufactures America's finest steel pipe,
used in some of Florida's finest new
buildings. For more information,
contact your J&L distributor in
Florida or write direct.
J Jones a Laughlin
Steel Corporation
3(3laway Center, Pttsburgh, Pennhlvlna 15230
STEEL


TIL' I*YML
Or YIIU1.
IIY(e~ **D
D~~~*01llm+






1965 Wonentuon Proram Shaprin Zp...


Florida



The



Beautiful


"Every Litter Bit Hurts" is a slogan
that even our small children have be-
come familiar with, thanks to the ef-
fectiveness of mass advertising. It
refers to little bits of litter papers,
banana peels and beer cans that
people feel free to strew about our
highways and parks. Now there is be-
ginning concern for a much larger
type litter the billboards, junk-
yards, automobile graveyards, sloppy
shops, weeded lots and slummy build-
ings. This concern has been felt most
keenly by no less a person than the
President of the United States, who
has made it a policy of his adminis-
tration.
It has been generated in large part
by the American Institute of Archi-
tects in the form of Regional Semi-
nars dn Design. These conferences
have involved civic, cultural, financial
and political leaders from various geo-
graphical areas. It is now felt that
similar meetings on community levels
will aid and abet this war on Com-
munity Ugliness.
Florida's part in this battle will
take place at the Clearwater Conven-
tion of the Florida Association of
Architects this November 17-20. The
theme of our three-day meeting will
be "Quality or Mediocrity."
The theme was chosen to drama-
tize our State's plight. "Florida the
Beautiful" is fast becoming a tropical
growth of cankerous sores. We might
compare it to what is happening in
Italy. Tourists are quick to contrast
the beauty of that land and its Archi-
tecture with the garbage on the


streets, the stupid signatures on the
frescoed walls, the street hawkers with
their carts of souvenirs and junk, and
the general cheap tawdriness of mod-
ern-day Italy. This ugliness upsets
most Americans because it is occur-
ring in a historically beautiful coun-
try. We should wish they could show
as much concern for what is happen-
ing at home. "It Can't Happen Here"
is already happening. Our cult of
mediocrity has given birth to ram-
pant ugliness. The two-headed mon-
ster can yet be destroyed if we foster
a new birth of quality.
Architects cannot do this alone.
The help of the layman is desperately
needed. He must be convinced that
mediocrity is not only ugly but ex-
pensive. He must see that his "bar-
gain" has many hidden closing costs.
He can be made to understand that
the desecration of our State will re-
sult in the annihilation of all he has
worked for -for himself and his
heits.
The layman's presence at the Con-
vention is of such importance that the
program will be valueless without
him. Every Chapter in the State has
been requested to bring a layman as
guest to the Convention. This man
will typify the conscientious, aware,
crusading laymen without whose ef-
forts good design would not be pos-
sible.
These outstanding laymen, together
with nationally prominent speakers
and state architects, will hold open,
round-table discussions on the theme
(Continued on Page 14)


JULY, 1965






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...plus pleasant warmth in winter
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Now reverse-cycle models cost little more than straight cooling units, so the desirable
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Saves usable floor space and the extra cost of installing separate cooling and heating
systems.
Flues and vents are not required.
9 Construction cost is lowered; upkeep is simplified.
Clean, flameless electricity leaves no combustion by-products; cuts redecorating costs.
Consult your electric utility company for money-saving facts, without obligation.

Florida's Electric Companies

12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



























a a
a

a a 'r



id 'r


JULY, 1965 i1






Convention ...
(Continued from Page 11)
"Quality or Mediocrity." Members of
housing and redevelopment boards,
planning commissions, art societies,
museum boards, sculptors' guilds,
civic clubs, architectural students, uni-
versity faculties and others will be in-
vited to attend.
You can do your part in assuring
the success of this program by invit-
ing your clients and contacts to take
part.
To add visual appeal to the pro-
gram we anticipate a large number of
Architectural Exhibits. The high qual-
ity of exhibits in past years leads us
to hope that this year's entries will
dramatically illustrate our campaign
for good design. Applications for ex-
hibits will reach you this month.




Manufacturers have


reserved as of


now some 60%


of the available


Product Exhibit


space...


Manufacturers, do


not miss this


opportunity ...


reserve your


exhibit booth now.


~------I


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Prs. & Tronsur
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Prs.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Seortary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.






4AA4 Semian uge Sucese


The FAA Seminar on Prevention of
Water Penetration in buildings was
held at the Langford Hotel in Winter
Park on Friday, June 4, 1965. Regis-
tration for the Seminar totaled eighty,
with a good representation from all
parts of the state. The presentations
of the various speakers were well re-
ceived by those in attendance, with
much interest being shown in the
question and answer periods.
Participating in the Seminar were:
Mr. Jack Dupler, Construction Serv-
ices, Thiokol Chemical Corporation;
Mr. Norman P. Owen, Architectural
Representative, Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Company; Mr. T. W. Reichard, Phy-
sicist, National Bureau of Standards;
Mr. John Monroe, Regional Built-up
Roofing Manager, The Ruberoid
Company; Mr. C. H. Wells, Regional
Manager, W e s t e r n Waterproofing
Company; and Mr. Victor Sinisi,


President, the Lambert Corporation.
Arrangements are being made to
publish the various presentations in
detail. Some of the principal points
discussed are outlined below.
The total cost of caulking, sealants,
waterproofing and dampproofing in a
building is relatively low, usually V2 to
1 percent of the cost. Since leaks and
dampness are so troublesome in a
completed building more attention
should be given to their prevention.
This can be done without substanti-
ally adding to the cost of the job. It
was recommended by the participants
in the Seminar that consideration be
given to grouping caulking, sealants,
waterproofing and dampproofing in a
single section of the specifications.
This could establish a single responsi-
bility for these items and make pos-
sible the issuance of a guarantee,


which usually covers a five year
period.
-o-
Polysulfide base sealants are liquids
which cure at ambient temperatures
to form a tough, flexible, adherent
rubber. Two-component systems were
the original form. There are various
formulations adapted to different re-
quirements. One-component systems,
more recently developed, have similar
properties but take somewhat longer
to cure. Minimum recommended
joint size is 4" x V4". Masking tape
should be used to protect adjacent
areas. Masking should be applied
prior to priming. Sealant should bond
to two opposing surfaces only, espe-
cially where appreciable structural
movement is expected. A bond break-
er such as a strip of polyethylene film
or masking tape should be used back
(Continued on Page 1S)


No matter how you look at it,

phone wiring still looks best

when you can't see it.

So plan ahead

for plenty of telephone outlets

and enough public phones.

Call our Architects'

and Builders'Representative

while you're still in

the blueprint stage.

Southern Bell
...Serving You


JULY, 1965






Seminar ...
(Continued from Page 15)

of the joint. Where sealant is ad-
hered to three sides movement intro-
duces internal strains which may con-
tribute to sealant failure. All joint
surfaces should be tooled, dry or using
plain wanted. Use of water promotes
surface curing and makes the sealant
non-tacky. Since the cured sealant is
a solid excessive compression should
be avoided.
-0-
Cavity walls with vented air spaces
are a good protection against water
penetration, in part due to the fact
that air pressures within the wall are
equalized. The same principal can be
applied to curtain walls by use of
properly placed and protected vents
and weeps.
-0-
Required glazing procedures should
be detailed at two to four times full
size in step by step fashion. Specific
provision should be made for sealants,
shims, setting blocks and other glaz-
ing accessories. One recommended
method of glazing involves use of a
vulcanized glazing sealant in tape
form. This is applied continuously to
the fixed side of the glazing rebate,
after placement of shims and setting
blocks.
The glass is then placed and pres-
sed against the tape sealant. The
outer removable stop is next secured
in place and the glazing completed by
driving a continuous neoprene wedge
between this stop and the glass, cen-
tering the glass and compressing the
tape sealant. The sealant adheres im-
mediately, requiring no curing, and
full depth of seal is assured.
--0-
The National Bureau of Standards
conducts tests of building materials
and assemblies, including exterior wall
systems, principally for other Govern-
ment agencies. Tests are run under
carefully controlled conditions so that
results can be compared. Results of
tests are printed in publications avail-


able from the Superintendent of
Documents, Washington, D.C.
-0-
It is almost impossible to construct
a true dead flat roof. Roofs should be
sloped to drains, which of course
should be at the low points. Provide
drains under cooling towers. If water
collects plant life may start and the
root systems of the plants can destroy
the roof. Felts once applied should be
protected by gravel or slag surfacing
within 48 hours. Surfacing should
always be applied in a pour coat of
bitumen, not a mopped coat. Provide
wood nailers at root edges, pitch pans,
etc. Do not mix pitch and asphalt
products in the same roof construc-
tion. Architects should indicate neces-
sary provision for expansion and con-
traction. Do not leave up to roofer.
Protect finished roof from damage
during remainder of construction.
-0-
Consideration should always be
given as to whether a basement is
feasible on a particular site. It may
prove economic to eliminate basement
areas entirely. Metallic waterproofing
is usually the most successful for be-
low grade work. Being applied to in-
side surfaces it is readily accessible
both in new construction and repair
work. It can be applied to damp or
dry surfaces, or even against a run-
ning head of water. Membranes are
subject ta tear or puncture during
construction and since they are ap-
plied to the outside surface must be
carefully protected during backfill
operations.
-0-
Colorless silicone or stearate surface
sealers are of little value as damp-
proofers because they depend on ex-
tensive preparation by pointing, caulk-
ing, ett. They are helpful in minimiz-
ing soiling and staining of light
colored masonry.
-0-
Integral waterproofing introduced
into the concrete mix for slabs on the
ground provides valuable protection
against dampness at small cost.


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Bartow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Blountstown, City of Blountstown
Boca Raton, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Boynton Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahoochee, Town of Chattahoochee
Chipley, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
Crescent City, City of Crescent City
Cutler Ridge, City Gas Co.
Daytona Beach, Florida Gas Co.
Deland, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delray Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Eu Gallie, City Gas Co.
Eustis, Florida Gas Co.
Fort Lauderdale, Peoples Gas System
Fort Meade, City of Fort Meade
Fort Pierce, City of Fort Pierce
Gainesville, Gainesville Gas Co.
Geneva, Alabama, Geneva County Gas
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Haines City, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Hialeah, City Gas Co.
Hollywood, Peoples Gas System
Jacksonville, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake Alfred, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake City, City of Lake City
Lake Wales, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Lakeland, Florida Gas Co.
Leesburg, City of Leesburg
Uve Oak, City of Live Oak
Madison, City of Madison
Marianna, City of Marianna
Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
Mount Dora, Florida Gas Co.
New Smyrna Beach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
North Miami, Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Opa Locka, City Gas Co.
Orlando, Florida Gas Co.
Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
Palm Beach Gardens
Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Pensacola, City of Pensacola
Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
Port St. Joe, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
St. Petersburg, City of St. Petersburg
Sanford, Sanford Gas Co.
Sarasota, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Starke, City of Starke
Tallahassee, City of Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Titusville, City Gas Co.
Umatilla, Florida Gas Co.
Valpiraiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park, Florida Gas Co.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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FLORIDA AND ITS BUILDING CODES

IVAN H. SMITH, A.I.A., Chairman
Committee on Building Codes & Hurricane Studies


The committee was advised by Francis Walton, Chairman
of Commission on Professional Practice, that architects,
engineers and others in connection with the construction
industry have expressed considerable interest in what is
termed a State Building Code. The apparent desire is for as
much code uniformity as possible, state-wide coverage and
satisfactory provisions for environmental conditions peculiar
to Florida including hurricane forces and damage.
As a prerequisite for any kind of a study and recommenda-
tion, it was obvious some basic fact finding was in order.
Accordingly, the following projects were set:
A. Present status of building codes in the State.
B. Experience of other states relating to state-
wide coverage.
C. Whether existing "standard" codes have been
generally acceptable or whether developing a
special state code is worth the effort.
Report on the Fact Finding Phase
The accompanying map is self-explanatory as to the "where"
and "what" of building codes in Florida for 1965. The data
recorded is as accurate as are the replies received from
questionnaires sent to county engineers and/or county
clerks. Where information on municipalities was not includ-
de in the county replies, similar questionnaires were sent
to municipalities. Replies were received and are on file from
all counties and/or listed municipalities.
In addition, many counties have county officials
to enforce State Board of Health sanitary require-
ments plus special county regulations.
The following counties indicated special enforce-
ment of electrical regulations: Brevard, Charlotte,
Duval, Manattee, Nassau, Orange, Pinellas, St.
Lucie, and Seminole.
The following counties, without County Building
Codes, indicated county zoning regulations are en-
forced: Alachua, Duval, Indian River, Leon, Marion
and St. Johns.
As to experience in other states relating to efforts for state-
wide building code coverage, we are advised that New York,
North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin have gone this route
along with an attempt to write a state code. Only New York
claims much satisfaction with results of the special code
which in its case required twelve years and $800,000 to
develop. New York reports 80% of the municipalities that
have codes have adopted the State Code. Not included are
New York City, Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and other of the
major cities, although suburban committees surrounding
some of these have. The 1963 building code map of New


York State municipalities and counties that have adopted
the State Code shows less coverage for the code than does
the present Florida code map.
Other states which are reported to have adopted standard
codes with varying degree of local adoption are Alabama,
South Carolina and Tennessee; Southern Standard Building
Code: California, Nevada, New Mexico; Uniform Building
Code: Connecticut; BOCA Code.
What Then Is Desirable and Reasonable
To Attain in Florida
The committee at this writing has not had the time or oppor-
tunity to formulate recommendations. It frankly needs the
counsel and advice of the FAA Board and the thinking of
architects throughout the State. The following comments
are for the purpose of stimulating such comment:
1. Florida may be much nearer in its component
parts to a state-wide coverage of building
codes regulation than most of us has suspect-
ed. The large urban counties are well on their
way to uniform coverage in their immediate
areas. Dade, Broward and Collier Counties
have the South Florida Building Code. Jack-
sonville, Tampa and Pensacola have the Na-
tional Building Code (NBFU) modified. Duval
County is reported on its way to conform with
the Jackonsville Code. The remaining muni-
cipalities with sufficient government and paid
officials to administer codes are almost 100%
covered by the Southern Standard Building
Code. A surprising number of counties also
have adopted this code.
2. In consideration of the experience in other
states as to the time and cost necessary to
compile a special state code and get it adopt-
ed, it would appear this route in Florida
would at best delay for several years any pro-
gram that proponents could present and it
would be very costly. State-wide adoption of
such a code would probably require many
additional years to be followed by local adop-
tion "if and when", possibly resulting in just
another code in partial use to add to the three
already in use.
3. Careful consideration should be given by archi-
tects to an expenditure, requiring much less
over-all time and expense, of becoming more
actively identified with code advisory boards
and work toward up-grading existing codes
with special attention to the hurricane
aspect.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

































































qc- P L 0
N, .;BI ..*'.-, E*




~rv m LUNl 0/f~


4 AA R D E



I H D

D JF s.0 r 0
I~A$r4; DSOTO i


BUILDING CODES (APRIL 965)

CITY COUNTY



i SOUTHERN STANDARD ILO. COOE


C**


NATIONAL BUILDING CODE (NIFU)


SOUTH FLORIDA BUILDING CODE



t j COUNTY CODE IN PROCESS


UNIFORM BUILDING CODE *


PALM BEACH
SBELLE GLADE
OCA RATON
SOYNTON BEACH
BRINY BREEZES
S LRAY BEACH
SOLFyIEW
ULF STREAM
JUPITER
JUPITE INLET COLONY
SLAE CLARKE SHORES
LAKE RTH
OCEAN RIDGE
PALM BEACH
ROYAL PALM BEACH
STE(UESTA
NEST PALM BEACH
SBROWARD

ERFIELD BEACH OAKLAD PARK
FT. LAUOERDALE PEMBOKE PINES
HALLANDALE PLANTATION
HILLSBORO OMPA 0 BEACH
HOLLYWOOD SUNRISE OELF L IL.
SLAOERDALE.BY-THE-SEA, ST HOLLYWDO
LIfHTHOUSt POINT WILTON MAJORS
MARGATE


PDADE
BAL HAROU I MIAMI BEACH
SBA HAiBOUR ISLANDS MIANI SHORES
S8ISCAYBE PARK N IANI SPRINGS
SCORAL SBLES NOR1 I BAT VILLAGE
EL PORTAL N RTH1 MIANI
SFLORIDA CITY NORTH MII BEACH
SOoLDEN BEACH OPIALOC
HIALEAH PEMSUCO
* YIALEAN GA ENS SOUTH MII
SHONESTEAD SU FSIDE
INDIAN CREEK SWEETATER
SISLAr OA VIlGINIA G OENS
MEDLEY E ST NIAMI


-6~iEE~


VOLUS I A
* AUINDA BEACH
SDATTONA BEKM SNORES
* DELAND
* EDEWATER
* "DLLY HILL
* LAKE HELEN
*NEW SMYRNA BEACS
* ORANGE CITY
* OMOND BEACH
* PIERSON
* PORT ORANGE
* POLICE INLET
* SOnTH DAYTONA


BREVARD
' CAPE CANAVEML
* COCOA
* COCOA BEACN
* EAU GALLIE
* INDIALATIC


PINELLAS
* BELLEAll
* BELLEAI BEACH
* BELLEAIR BLUFFS
* BELLEAIB SNORES
* CLEAR NATER
* DUNEDIN
* GULFPORT
SINOAN ROCKS BEACH
* XKENETH
* LAROO
MADEIRA BEACH


' TREASURE LAND






UM Student Honored
Thomas F. Rochon, University of
Miami architecture major, has re-
ceived a $200 prize as UM winner
of the Reynolds Aluminum Prize
competition.
The 23-year-old fourth year student
submitted the "best original design
of a building component in alumi-
num, a small arched roof of inter-
locking sections.
W. A. Zinzow, Reynolds Metals
regional representative for industrial
and architectural sales, made the re-
cent presentation. Also present were
School of Engineering Dean T. A.
Weyher and James E. Branch, archi-
tecture chairman.
Rochon's design, intended for such
structures as auditoriums or aircraft
hangars, was entered in the Reynolds
national competition, administered by
the American Institute of Architects.
The UM winner is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Carl F. Rochon, 13052 Cor- Left to right Rochon and Zinzow, front
bett, Detroit, Michigan. He is a 1958 Weyher and Branch, rear
Servite High School graduate and for-
merly attended the Detroit Institute
of Technology.

This book offers general principles and practices for more effective
performance of both present and future architectural services. It
brings together fact-filled articles from AIA Journal-articles by
A n im portent architects and other experts-which discuss means for meeting the
challenges ahead in this increasingly complex field. The nature
of comprehensive architectural services is treated as well as sug-
n w book gested methods of compensation. You are shown how to prepare
for these services, and how they are to be performed, coordinated,
and unified. The book covers such helpful topics as AIA Stan-
for today's dards of Professional Practice, legal status of the architect,
shopping centers, colleges and universities, cost control, building
and tomorrow 's programming, and more.

architects COMPREHENSIVE

ARCHITECTURAL

SERVICES
Prepared by the American WILLIAM DUDLEY HUNT, Jr.
Institute of Architects Editor
256 pages, 8V2 x 11, 128 illustrations, $8.00
Please send your check with your order.
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
Dept. A
3730 S. W. 8th St.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
20. THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Ketchum Elected President

American Institute of Architects


Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA, of
New York City, was elected president
of The American Institute of Archi-
tects.
Mr. Ketchum was installed in his
new office at the close of the five-day
joint AIA Convention and Pan Ameri-
can Congress of Architects which was
attended by more than 4,000 archi-
tects and guests from many parts of
the Western Hemisphere.
He succeeds Arthur Gould Odell,
Jr., FAIA, as head of the 17,000 mem-
ber AIA. For the past year, Mr. Ket-
chum has been AIA's First Vice
President.
A native of New York City, Mr.
Ketchum is a graduate of Columbia
College, the Schol of Architecture of
Columbia University, and the School
of Fine Arts, Fontainebleau, France.
He is a past member of the Board
of Governors of the New York Build-
ing Congress; a past trustee of the
National Institute for Architectural
Education; a past president of the


Architectural League of New York;
president of the Columbia Architec-
tural Alumni Association; director of
the Municipal Art Society of New
York; a member of the executive com-
mittee of the Architectural League of
New York.
Mr. Ketchum has also been a mem-
ber of the architectural design facul-
ties of Yale University, New York
University, Pratt Institute, and the
Cooper Union.
Among his major architectural proj-
ects are the U.S. Embassy in Rabat,
Morocco, an office building campus
for the State of New York in Albany,
N.Y., and buildings for Queens Col-
lege, New York, Rutgers University,
New Brunswick, N.J., and the Jack-
sonville Downtown Center, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
In 1950, Mr. Ketchum won an AIA
First Honor Award for design of a
department store in Augusta, Ga. In
the same year he won an AIA Award
of Merit for design of another store.


T I II T IN COI'R!
ROO TI L S IN 9i CILD IN D


DAZZLING WHITE OR THE
BEAUTY OF COLOR The good
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S stay, because the beauty is literally
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resistant, with colors impregnated
n the fabrication . whites stay
white and colors retain their
beauty. Gory roofing tiles are produced specifically for
Florida climate to withstand the ravages of weather.


Beware of beauty that's only skin deep . roofs
that are only painted or sprayed require constant
care and expense. But a Gory roof is virtually
maintenance-free! The whites and colors are an
integral part of Gory tiles and with our Poly-Glaze
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JULY, 1965 21







AIA Elects New Officers
The recent AIA Convention elected the following officers to provide
leadership during the coming year:

President Morris Ketchum, Jr., FAIA

First Vice President Charles M. Nes, Jr., FAIA

Vice President- Rex W. Allen, FAIA

Vice President- Robert L. Durham, FAIA

Vice President -George E. Kassabaum, FAIA

Treasurer Daniel Schwartzman


Fred W. Buckley, Jr.,
AIA, President of CSI
Jacksonville Chapter
Fred W. Bucky, Jr., AIA, a Jack-
sonville architect, was installed last
night as president of the Jacksonville
Chapter of the Construction Specifi-
cations Institute. Other officers instal-
led were:
A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., AIA, vice
president; Robert W. Coyle, secre-
tary; J. Velma Lamb, treasurer; and
Ralph W. Heim and Norman E.
Washer, architect, directors. The offi-
cers were installed by Roy M. Pooley,
Jr., AIA, past president of the chapter
and immediate past president of the
Florida Association of Architects.
Joseph J. Flanagan of Passaic, N.J.,
presented a talk and film on the con-
struction of the recently opened Ver-
razano Narrows Bridge over the Hud-
son River in New York. Flanagan is a
technical service engineer with the
manufacturer of a chemical mixture
being used in the construction of the
Commodore Point Bridge across the
St. Johns River.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX

American National Bank
of Jacksonville . . 5

Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover

Florida Gas Transmission 16-17

Florida Investor Owned
Electric Utilities .. 12-13

Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing, Inc. 21

Herpel, Inc ..... . 22

Jones and Laughlin Steel
Corporation . . 9-10

McGraw Hill Book Co., Inc. 20

Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 1

Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co. .. .15

Trinity White-General
Portland Cement Co. . 3

F. Graham Williams . 14


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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to your specifications
When you want to create expansiveness with continuity of color tones,
merge gleaming interior tiles with roughly textured patio stones-
custom made by Herpel to conform with your color and texture speci-
fications. Complete selection of stock colors and surfaces too. Color
fast... durable .. AND far less expensive than you'd think. Whether
for interiors, patios, balconies, or decks, your client will be delighted
you specified HERPEL ... you will be too!
Phone or Write for Complete Information




M enp LINC

6306 Georgia Ave. West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone: 305 582-2561





We We #* 0...


Our Three Ingredients...

Concrete, Imagination, Know-How...

STOCK DECORATIVE MASONRY
AS WELL AS CUSTOM UNITS


Wfe &a o er ...


CLAY-FACE-FIRE AND GLAZED
BRICK OF ALL TYPES



NATURAL STONES FROM
MANY QUARRIES


CERAMIC VENEER



METAL UNITS FOR FIREPLACES
AND BARBEQUES


7f we don't rame te mateal yeu waaet-- we'le tery mad e .or et t/


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA 887-1525


DUNI







Next In


November...


QUALITY


OR


MEDIOCRITY


Headquarters of the FAA's
Convention will be the Jack
Tar Hotel, the largest and
finest of Florida's West
Coast. The new convention
hall features the finest facili-
ties--exhibits and meetings
in one area. Best of all, a
complete downtown resort,
comfortable and inexpensive


IAL FAA CONVENTION
20, 1965-JACK TAR HOTEL CLEARWATER


Ila i .




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