• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Advertising
 Calendar
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Florida Association of archite...
 FAA organization chart
 FAA committee personnel and...
 FAA bylaws
 Advertising
 Letters
 Design selected for AIA headqu...
 Advertising
 FAA bylaws
 Fine art and design
 Advertising
 Gala convention gathering
 News and notes
 Profile of our governor
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00128
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1965
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00128
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Calendar
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Advertising
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Florida Association of architects
        Page 9
    FAA organization chart
        Page 10
        Page 11
    FAA committee personnel and duties
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14-15
    FAA bylaws
        Page 16
    Advertising
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Letters
        Page 22
    Design selected for AIA headquarters
        Page 23
    Advertising
        Page 24
    FAA bylaws
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Fine art and design
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Advertising
        Page 37
    Gala convention gathering
        Page 38
    News and notes
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Profile of our governor
        Page 41
    Back Cover
        Page 42
Full Text







Needed: Coordination In


The Construction Industry


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA

President, Florida Association of Architects


In this Organizational Issue of The
Florida Architect it is not inappropri-
ate to discuss one of the basic prob-
Iems of the construction industry in
our State--a problem which affects
thousands of Florida building owners
and the general public vitally.
Stated in briefest terms, my argu-
ment and prophecy is this.
First, the construction industry in
Florida is large and important rep-
resenting annually a $2 billion seg-
ment of our economy but it is
loosely organized and has many di-
verse elements.
Second, the separate segments of
the industry are in the habit of ap-
proaching the Florida Legislature in-
dependently, often with little or no
consultation with other elements.
Third, this involves frequent "fire
fighting" operations in the Legislature
which are needless, expensive, and un-
productive.
Fourth, the interests of building
owners and the general public would
be advanced through the establish-
ment of a comprehensive study com-
mittee of the Florida Legislature to
coordinate the efforts of the diverse
segments of the construction industry.
Having outlined what I intend to
say, let me now proceed to say it.
The construction industry in Flor-
ida ranks with agri-business and tour-
ism as one of the State's largest and
most important economic and social
influences. But the industry is tre-
mendously complex, very loosely or-
ganized, and amazingly diverse in its
interests.
In addition to thousands of own-
ers public and private it in-
volves four other segments. First, the


design professions, including archi-
tects and their co-professionals in en-
gineering, landscape architecture,
planning, and interior design. Second,
the construction elements, including
materials manufacturers, distributors,
general contractors, specialty contract-
ors, and others. Third, the service ele-
ments, including realtors, mortgage
bankers, and others. And fourth, the
regulatory elements, including muni-
cipal building departments and similar
governmental agencies.
Lacking any effective means of co-
ordination, each component of these
diverse segments must of necessity ap-
proach the Florida Legislature indi-
vidually.
Within the design field, architect-
ure and engineering- like law, medi-
cine and most other professions--
have state regulatory acts which pro-
tect the public by requiring high
standards of professional competence
as a prerequiste to practice. At pres-
ent, landscape architecture and plan-
ning have no state regulatory acts in
Florida, although landscape architects
have been seeking such legislation. In
some states, landscape architecture
and planning are regulated as design
professions.
Within the construction field, the
general contractors have been sponsor-
ing a state licensing bill for a number
of years, but opposition from specff-
lator-builders has so far prevented its
passage. There is urgent need in Flor-
ida to protect building owners and
the general public agai t irrespons-
ible persons who masqutade as quali-
fied builders.
At present, there is even a move on
the part of speculator-builders who
seem opposed to all regulation, includ-
ing building codes to legalize their
counterfeiting operations by amending
the architectural registration act to
exempt them from its provisions.
They argue, in effect, that counter-


fcit currency is better than genuine
currency because it is cheaper!
Within the area of municipal and
county regulation of construction,
there is shameful lack of permissive
enabling legislation in Florida. Ade-
quate building codes, planning pro-
grams, zoning ordinances, and subdi-
vision regulations seem less important
in Florida so far than the "fast buck."
Milking the public may be an inalien-
able right, but I submit that it is
neither right nor necessary for govern-
ment to subsidize the dairy.
How much better it would be if
the efforts involved in the ineffective
individual approach to the Florida
Legislature on the one hand, and the
unfortunate "fire fighting" approach
on the other, could be turned to more
constructive uses.
What we need in Florida- and
what we have needed for a generation
- is to establish a creative relation-
ship between government and the
construction industry. Such relation-
ships have long existed in Florida be-
tween government and agriculture,
and between government and the
tourist industry.
These creative relationships have
proven extremely profitable. Govern-
ment-sponsored research in agricul-
ture, for example, produces an amaz-
ing return on the investment, and
government-sponsored promotion in
the tourist industry has brought un-
told profit to our State.
At its 50th Annual Convention in
Jacksonville last November, the Flor-
ida Association of Architects adopted
a resolution urgently requesting the
Florida Legislature to establish a com-
prehensive study committee to co-
ordinate the various segments of the
construction industry so as to further
the best interests of building owners
and the general public.
Why should architects be thus con-
(Continued on Page 36)





P. MIA I WIN 4877, INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH
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February 12



February 14-16


February 24



March 6




March 20



March 23



April 6

April 27



May 22




May 25



June 5



June 14-18




August 21




September 11


CALENDAR
- Broward County, AIA Monthly
Meeting Ocean Manor Hotel,
Ft. Lauderdale Time 12 Noon.

- State & Chapter Presidents Meet-
ing Octagon, Washington, D.C.

- Miami Chapter Producers Council
Information Meeting Coral
Gables Country Club 6 P.M.

- FAA Committee on Committees
Meeting Palm Beach (Chair-
men of Commissions & Executive
Committee)

- FAA Board of Directors Meeting
-Jack Tar Hotel Clearwater.
-Time 9:00 a.m.

Miami Chapter Producers Council
Information Meeting Coral
Gables Country Club 6 P.M.

State Legislature Convenes

Miami Chapter Producers Council
Information Meeting Coral
Gables Country Club 6 P.M.

FAA Committee on Committees
Meeting Daytona (Chair-
men of Commissions & Executive
Committee)

Miami Chapter Producers Council
Information Meeting Coral
Gables Country Club 6 P.M.

FAA Board of Directors Meeting
-Langford Hotel Winter Park
-Time 9:00 a.m.

AIA National Convention & 11 th
Pan American Congress of Archi-
tects Sheraton Park Hotel -
Washington, D. C.
4
FAA Committee on Committees
Meeting -Vero Peach- (Chair-
men of Commissions & Executive
Committee)

FAA Board of Directors Meeting
-Miami .


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Cp t City of Chipey
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Clemt, Lake Apopla Natural GB District
com, City Gas Co.
Cre-s t City City of Crescent city
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District
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




Thrifty
ideas
begin
with


GAS


FEBRUARY, 1965


Transmlislon Company
WINTER PARK / FLORIDA







74i



Florida Architect


OFFICIAL JOURNAL

IN


OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

7T Issue ---

Needed: Coordination In The Construction Industry
By WiUiam T. Arnett, AIA
Calendar . . . . . . .


. . 2nd Cover


. . . .. 2


FAA Organization Chart . . . . . . . ..
FAA Committee Personnel and Duties for 1965 . . . .
FAA Bylaws . . . . . . . . . .


FAA Honor Awards ...........
Letters . . . . . . . .
Design Selected For AIA Headquarters . .


. 10-11
. 12-15
16 and
25-32


. . . . . 17-19
. . . . . 22
. 23


Fine Art and Design ... .... .. ... .. .... .33
By R. H. Havard
Gala Convention Gathering 38
News & Notes
FAA Awards Architect Sculptor .. .. 39
PCI Award Program..... .. 39
AIA Gulf Coast Chapter .. .... .. ... ....39
University of Florida Student Design Winner 40
Advertisers' Index ... .. .. .. ... ... 39
Profile Of Our Governor 3rd Cover
FAA OFI S 1 5 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
FAA OFFICERS- 1965 the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Inisitute of Architects, Inc., is owned
William T. Amtt, President, 2105 N.W. Th:rd Place, Gainesville and published by the Association, a Florida
James Deen, President Designate-Vice President, 7500 Red Road, South Miami Corporation notfr profit. It is published
Forrest R. Coen, Secretary, 218 Avant Building, Tallahasee monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
Dam B. Johanne, Treasurer, 410 Lincoln Avenue, Clearwater 34, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
DIRECTORS photograhs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
BROWARD COUNTY: William A. Gilroy, George M. Polk; DAYTONA BEACH: expressed by contributors are not necessarily
Francis L Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Din B. Johannes, Frank R. Mu- those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
dano, William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Earl J. Draaer, Sidney reprinted by other official AIA publications,
R. Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Laedrum, Jack Moore; FLORIDA provided full credit is iven to the author
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest L Coxen; FLORIDA NORTHWEST: Brnard W. and to ThFLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
.. Advertisements of products materials and
Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L Ferguson, Jr., John 0. Grimshaw, services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
Earl M. Starnes; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., C. A. Ellingham, come, but mention of names or use of illus-
Walter B. Schulte; MID-FLORIDA: John B. Langley, Joseph N. Williams; trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr. constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
Diector, Florida Region American Institute of Architects aton of Arhite. Advrtisng material mu
conform to standards of this publication; and
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater the right is reserved to reject such material be-
Executive Director, Florida Associat:on of Architects cause of arrangement or Illustration.
S. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Fotes N. Karousatoe, 3730 SW. 8th Street, Coral Gables Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; March Roster Issue,
PUBLICATI$2.00 ..... Printed by McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Verner Johnson, Joseph M. Shifalo FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor



VOLUME 15

NUMBER 219
4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































Wuloi'n CiUyJ....

an tte Anihnt An idtetn M letnhoa


indreds of years before the white man in-
d their land, the Peruvian Incas were expert
tects, their massive stone structures enduring
is day . . The gray hues of stone are
ined for modern tastes in Merry's Peruvian
Face Brick (10-933) pictured above. Peru-
Gray is another of the many popular hues
Jced by Merry Brothers to enable architects
sign with color as well as line.


1. 141 i-, n 4 ,n


* information, ask the Merry ep native who calls on you, or contact the company direct.




























Quarrying limerock at the Dade County Plant, Miami.


FLORIDA'S PROGRESSIVE

PARTNER
From Florida's resources come the raw materials
from which FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENTS 4
are made. Florida Portland, with plans in Tampa ,
and Miami, contributes greatly to Florida's econ-
omy with substantial outlays for payrolls, plant
investments, taxes, operating expenditures and
material purchases.
WHEN YOU SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA -
CEMENTS MADE IN FLORIDA BY FLOR-
IDIANS YOU CONTRIBUTE TO THE VI-
TALITY AND GROWTH OF INDUSTRY AND
IMPROVEMENT OF FLORIDA'S ECONOMIC
CLIMATE. At the Tampa Plant, the largest kiln i



Use Florida Cements Made for You in Florida by Floridians


n the U.S. presently operating.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
OFFICES AND PLANTS IN TAMPA AND MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


E7





A NEW CONCEPT IN LITERATURE,

ORGANIZED BY FUNCTION

TO SAVE YOUR TIME



Partitions, ceiling syems, roof assemblies, structural fire-
proofing, wall furring--United States Gypsum has de-
veloped a practical method to conserve your time in
selecting these important construction systems.
Instead of the old "product line" method of organiza-
tion, U.S.G. has completely reorganized its technical
literature by function and end use!
This means you can quickly and accurately compare
functional properties of construction assemblies. And
then, just as quickly, you can locate the data required
for selection and specification of those assemblies.
For the first time, you will find all U.S.G. product
literature in one place-in Section 12a of Sweet's 1965
Architectural File. Consolidated in this 800-page unit are:
New Construction Selector: Compares func-
tional criteria of all U.S.G. work-together prod-
ucts and systems. Simplifies selection from 140
system variations.
New Systems Brochures: 37 folders provide
exact data, details, and specifications needed
for each basic assembly.
New Product Catalogs: 9 separate folders
supply additional information on components
used in systems.
Your U.S.G. representative will be pleased to explain
this new time-saving literature program in your office.
He also can supply extra folders for your staff. To
arrange for an appointment at your convenience, please
call your U.S.G. district office.



UNITED STATES OYPSUM
101 8. WACKER DRIVE, CHICAGO. ILL. 08060


FEBRUARY, 1965


















































SOLITE AT SAINT ANDREW'S COLLEGE/cAOIN
c.


The vast educational complex of St. Andrew's College
in Laurinburg will represent a 50 million dollar outlay
when complete. Already, millions have been spent on 13
sleekly modem buildings, all beautifully scaled to the low
lying terrain.
Solite-for lightweight structural concrete, masonry
units or both-plays a prominent part in each of these
buildings. And it gets "top grades" for its many contribu-
tions to college life.
Solite's light weight holds down labor and material


costs, speeds upconstruction, sacrifices nothing in strength
and durability. Its built-in insulative value cuts the costs of
heating and cooling, contributes to a pleasant, year 'round
climate. It is sound absorbent-reducing room noise up
to 50%. And it is fire resistant.
These are important features in educational construc-
tion. Equally important, Solite offers the architect classic
beauty and great versatility of design ... the ideal mate-
rial for today's functional and imaginative architectural
solutions.


Ughtwit Masonry Units and Structml Concrte
Altfi Cost Un Building, Jcki ils, Fl.




A REGION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


THE
FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION
OF
ARCHITECTS


Organization Chart
Committee Structure
Bylaws


FEBRUARY, 1965



















PRESIDENT
.William T., Arnett
v 1\xI_


PRESIDENT DESIGNATE
VICE PRESIDENT
James Deen


I

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES
(Chairmen of Commissions)


BOARD

OF

DIRECTORS


TREASURER
Dana B. Johannes


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Fotis N. Karousatos


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
William T. Arnett .... President
James Deen, Pres. Designate-V.P.
Forrest R. Coxen ..... Secretary
Dana B. Johannes ... Treasurer
Robert H.. Levison Dir. Fla. Reg.
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Past President


SECRETARY
Forrest R. Coxen


L


- ---- --




Chairman: C. Ellis Duncan
Vice-Chairman: Frank F. Smith, Jr.

1 . PRE-PROFESSIONAL GUIDANCE
& PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Chairman: Lester N. May
Duties: To encourage and advise chapters in developing pre-
professional guidance and career day programs in local high
schools; to serve as a source for obtaining films, filmstrips, and
related materials on vocational guidance and the work o archi-
tects; to foster closer relationships between schools of archi-
tecture and the profession.

2 .. INTERNSHIP & REGISTRATION FOR PRACTICE
Chairman: Frank E. Watson, FAIA
Duties: To encourage and advise chapters in developing pre-
registration training programs at the local level; to serve as a
source of information on the pre-registration training program
of the institute; to maintain liaison with the Florida State Board
of Architecture and with the National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards with respect to examinations for registra-
tion.

3 . CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR ARCHITECTS
Chairman: Frank F. Smith, Jr.
Duties: To foster and encourage the continuing development of
professional competence within the profession; to encourage
and advise the various commissions and committees in develop-
ing seminars, workshops, and similar educational devices for
architects; to serve as a focus for the Association in develop-
ing techniques for continuing professional education.

4 . RESEARCH FOR ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: Arthur L Campbell, Jr.
Duties: To study and make recommendations to the Board with
respect to the role of the Association in research for archi-
tecture; to develop broader understanding of the purposes of
research and of the necessity for research in this age of accel-
erated change.



C. Commission on Professional Practice
Chairman: Francis R. Walton
Vice-Chairman: Donald R. Edge

1 OFFICE PROCEDURES
Chairman; Jack McCandless
Duties: To assist the architect to perfect himself in his profes-
sion through technical improvement in his office organization
and techniques; to develop seminars and office aids to accomp-
lish this purpose.

2 BUILDING CODES 6 HURRICANE STUDIES
Chairman: Ivan H. Smith
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the study of the
principles of design, Including codes and standards, to protect
human life and minimize damage to buildings resulting from
disaster such as fire, flood, hurricane, and deterioration; to es-
tablish productive liaison with other organizations on the state
and local level; to promote uniformity of codes In the interest
of simplifying design procedures and the use of proven new ma-
terials and techniques.


Louis
Wolff







Louis
Wolff








Louis
Wolff







Robert
Sullan













Clinton
Gamble






Robert L
Hansen


Tom
Jannetides







Tom
Jannetides








Tom
Jannetides







ToM
Jannetides













Joseph
Blab, Jr.






Joseph
Blab, Jr.


Horace
Hamlin







H. Leslie
Walker
(Vice-
Chairman)
Thomas V.
Talley




Thomas
V. Talley
Jack
McCandless
(Vice-
Chairman)




Bruce A.
Renfroe, Jr.













Melvin F.
Schiltz
(Vke-
Charman)
Horace
Hamlln
(Vice-
Chairman)


John
Piercy







John
Piercy








John
Plercy







John
Piercy













Tollyn
Twitchell





Tollyn
Twitchell


James L.
Branch
(Vice-
Chairman)


Joe
Clemons


Arthur L. Joe
Campbell, Jr. Clemons


Arthur L
Campbell, Jr.







Frank G.
George













Arthur L.
Campbell, Jr.


Joe
Clemons


Henry
Nichols







Henry
Nichols








Henry
Nichols


John Sweet
(Vice-
Chairman)
Charles
Broward




Clarence
E. Hamer








Earl M.
States
(Vice-
Chairman)
Charles
Broward


Ernest Henry Theodore
Daffin Nkhais Gottfried


Bob
Maybin





Forrest
Coxen


Bib W. Clarence E.
Bullock, Jr. Hamer


James
Mehan







































A. Robert
Broadfoot, Jr
(Vike-
Chairman)


Wythe
D. Sims







Richard B.
Rodgers
(Vice-
Chairman)






Wythe D.
Sims







Joseph M.
Shifalo
(Vice-
Chairman)











Robert B.
Murphy






Robert B.
Murphy


Ken Spina








Ken Span









Ken Spina







Harold
A. Obet
(Vke-
Chairman)











Norman
Robson





John Stetson
(Vice.
Chairman)







3 .. ENABLING LEGISLATION FOR PLANNING
Chairman: Donald H. Forfar
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the study of the
presence or lack of regulation and control with respect to ur-
ban design and development; to study the lack of adequate
planning enabling legislation In Florida and the reasons there-
for; to establish effective liaison with other organizations con-
cerned with urban development, zoning, subdivision regulation,
and related subjects.
4 JOINT COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
Chairman: Donald R. Edge
Dutiest To represent the Association on the Joint Cooperative
Council In order to maintain effective liaison between the de-
sign and construction elements of the building industry; to
foster a cooperative relationship between architects and con-
tractors, producers of building materials and equipment, and
other elements of the building industry.
5 STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: Franklin S. Bunch, FAIA
Duties: To maintain effective liaison between the Association
and the Florida State Board of Architecture; to cooperate in
matters of mutual interest.



D. Commission on Architectural Design
Chairman: William K. Jackson
Vice-Chairman: Mark Hampton
1 . RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE
Chairman: John A. Tripp
Duties: To provide professional leadership in the study of de-
sign principles in planning single family housing, low income
housing, and housing for the elderly, including functional, tech-
nical, economic, aesthetic, financial, and construction require-
ments; to maintain productive liaison with public and private
agencies, organizations, and associations aligned with specific
Interests in the field of residential architecture.
2 . ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Chairman: William B. Harvard
Vice-Chairmen::
Walter B. Schultz (Hospitals)
(Churches)
Robert J. Boerema (Industrial)
John Stetson (Financial Institutions)
C. Ellis Duncan (Schools)
Duties: To provide professional leadership In the principles of
planning of all facilities and their environment, including
functional, technical, economic, and aesthetic requirements; to
maintain effective liaison with governmental and private agen-
cies in matters of mutual interests.
3 URBAN DESIGN
Chairman: Robert C. Broward
Duties: To provide professional leadership, assistance, and direc-
tion to the architectural profession In fulfilling its responsibil-
ity for the design and redesign of urban, metropolitan, and
regional areas; to foster sound community growth throughout
the state; to maintain liaison with allied professions and organi-
tlons In this field.


BROWARD
COUNTY


Robert
E. Todd


















Paul R.
John


DAYTNA


Blu, Jr.







Joseph
Blais, Jr.


















Dave
Leote


William Dave
Crawford | Leete


Polk


FLORIDA
CENTRAL









Frank
Mudane


















Edward H.
Walker, Jr.
IVice-
Chairman)





William J.
Webber
(Hospitals)
Jacob L
Gottfried
(Schools)








H. Dean
Rowe


FLORIDA
GULF COAST

Twrichell







Twitchel


















Frank F.
Smith, Jr.






Frank F.
Smith, Jr.











Frank P.
Smith, Jr.


FLORIDA 1 FLA. NORTH FLIA. NORTH FLORIDA JACKSON- I MID-
NORTH CENTRAL WEST SOUTH VILLE FLORIDA


Hal T.
ReMI


















Frank G.







Frank .
George












Dan P.
Branch
(Vice-
Chairman)


Chuck
Kuhn


















Chuck
Kuhn







Heddleten
(Sobools)
Leroy
Alber
(Hospitals)









Chuck
Kuhn


WHllUM
R. Bean



















Wa
Rodsor


Ear M.
Stars
Chairman)





Rusasell T.
Pansea,
FAIA
(Voie-
Chalrman)








Curtis E.
Haley


A. Robert
Broadfoot,
Jr. (Vice.
Chairman)

















St


Robert .
Murphy






Richard
B. Rodgan
(Viea-
Chairman)









Lyle P.
Fugelberg


Huh T. Robet Walter Lyle P.
o uLile Scultz FI vogloees
(Shools) I (Shools) (Hospitals)


Carollon
W. Noble


Joseph 0.
Reutsehler


Warren Lyle P.
C. Hendry Fugloberg


PALM
BEACH
Kenneth
Jacoben
(VIce-
Chabrman)





Stephen
GKinochie



















ObIst






Emily
Obst












Kenneth
Jaeeseen
Chairman)
Rudy
Arsunias




*t .A.InD vW.v i anu Afa I
Chairman: Mark Hampton
Duties: To encourage and strengthen productive interprofes-
sional collaboration with the arts related to architecture; to
recommend procedures and programs toward the end of increas-
ing the inclusion of works of collaborative artists in archi-
tectural projects.




E. Commission on Public Affairs
Chairman: Herbert R. Savage
Vice-Chairman: Sidney R. Wilkinson

1 .. PUBLICATIONS
Chairman: Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Duties: To act as liaison between the editor of the official
publications of the Association and the Board; to be responsible
for publication programs; to recommend publication policies to
the Board.

2 EXHIBITIONS
Chairman:
Duties: To develop exhibition programs of current interest to
the profession; to represent the work of the Association and
the Institute to the general public.

3 . PUBLIC RELATIONS
Chairman: George F. Reed
Duties: To develop the public relations of the architectural pro-
fession; to recommend means by which the national and state
programs can be extended to the maximum at the local level.

4 GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Chairman: Bernard W. Hrtman, Jr.
Duties: To promote the usefulness of the profession and the
Association to the various governmental bureaus and agencies
having charge of the planning and designing of public build-
Ings and monuments and their environment; to promote the
employment of architects in private practice to plan and de-
sign such public works; to maintain liaison with the Florida
Legislature to forward statewide and local legislation that will
promote the welfare of the architectural profession and the
construction Industry and the public health and welfare; to co-
operate with the Commission on Public Affairs of the Institute.

5 HISTORIC BUILDINGS
Chairman: F. Blair Reeves
Duties: To collaborate with allied organizations and chapters
In identifying historic buildings of architectural significance; to
foster the preservation and care of such buildings In appropri-
ate Instances.

6 . INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Chairman: Robert M Little, FAIA


Thor
Amile


George
Stoerb






Anmso









courtney
Stewaer


Dave
Leete





















W. R.






Janetides
s^..^.jnUm^


Frank Frank F. Hal T. Chester
Prine Smith, Jr. Reid Craft


I. Blaunt
Wagner
(Visa-
Chairman)



John R.
H"wey


Sid






Sidney J.
Collns
bm, J.


Frank G.
Schmid, Jr.
Chairman)


Willam I. I Frank I Sidney I Frank B.
Gomon I McLnen Wilkison I Schmlit


M. M.
Griffin


Dana B.
Johannes
(Vice-
Chairman)
Gene
Thompson


Sid
Collins


Warren
Dixon





Forrest L.
Coxen
(Vice-
Chairbman)


Ellis W.
Bullock, Jr.
(Vice-
Chalrmaa
Jame
Kendrek


eorge
Arango













Vermei
Johnson
(Vieo.
Chairman)





Victor
DeKonwshin





C. Framer
Knight


Samel M. Walter
Marshall IKlements


F. Blair Warren Wiliam S. Melvin
Reeves Dixon Morrion Grossman


Roy M.
Pooly, Jr.
(Vke-
Chairman)
Franklin S.
Bunch
FAIA






Heschel E.
Shepard, Jr.
(Vice.
Chairman)
Charles
Pattlo


Lyle P. Gerhrd
Fuhebeg j Sewer


Joseph M.
Shifalo
IVie-
Chairman)





John B.
Langley
(Vie-
Chairman)
shmo
Dave


Joseph M.





Richard B.
Rodgers


Gerhard
Selzer





Gerard
Seler





Richard
Pryw


Frank Reed
Sheehy Fuller





Pages
14-15
Missing
From
Original







BY LAWS


FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.



As adopted by the Membership at the 1964 Convention.


ARTICLE 1. THE ORGANIZATION
Section 1. Name.
a. The name of this organization is the FLORIDA
AssOCuATIrO OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS, INC., a non-profit incorporated, State or-
ganization chartered by The American Institute of Archi-
tects and the State of Florida.
b. In these bylaws the corporation is called the Asso-
ciation, the American Institute of Architects, The Institute,
and the Articles of Reincorporation, the Charter.
Section 2. Purposes.
a. The purpose of the Association shall be to orga-
nize and unite in fellowship the architects of the State of
Florida to combine their efforts so as to promote the
aesthetic, scientific and practical efficiency of the pro-
fession; to advance the science and art of planning and
building by advancing the standard of architectural edu-
cation, training and practice; to coordinate the building
industry and the profession of architecture to insure the
advancement of the living standards of our people through
their improved environment; and to make the profession
of ever-increasing service to society.
b. The Association shall function as the statewide
representative of and unifying body for the various Chap-
ters and Sections of Chapters of The American Institute
of Architects chartered within the State of Florida, on
matters of statewide and regional interest affecting the
interests of such Chapters and Sections of Chapters.
c. The Association may borrow and lend money and
own property of all kinds, movable or immovable, and
engage in other activities which may be incidental to any
of the above purposes.
d. The Association may act as trustee for scholar-
ships, endowments or trusts of philanthropic nature.
e. This enumeration of purposes shall not be con-
strued as limiting or restricting in any manner the powers
of this Association but the Association shall have all of the
powers and authority which may be conferred upon non-
profit corporations under the provisions of the laws of
the State of Florida.
Section 3. Composition.
a. The Association shall consist of all members of
The Institute in its component chapter organizations in
the State of Florida.
b. The domain of the Association is the State of
Florida.


c. The domain of the Region shall be as designated
by the Institute.
d. The membership is organized into members, Board
of Directors, (herein called the Board), officers and com-
mittees with dues, privileges and classifications of mem-
bership; functions and responsibilities of the Board and
committees; and the qualifications and duties of officers,
all as set forth hereinafter.

ARTICLE II. MEMBERSHIP
Section 1.
a. All Corporate Members and Members Emeritus
of all Chapters or Sections of Chapters of the American
Institute of Architects within the State of Florida shall
automatically be Members of the Association.
b. All Professional Associates and Associates of all
Chapters or Sections of Chapters of the American Insti-
tute of Architects within the State of Florida shall auto-
matically be Professional Associates and Associates of the
Association.
Section 2. Student Associate
a. A student in an architectural school or college in
the State of Florida who is a Student Associate of The
Institute is a Student Associate of the Association.
b. The Association or any Chapter may establish
and sponsor student chapters in schools of architecture in
Florida under conditions established by The Institute.
When sponsorship is by a Chapter, the Student Chapter
is related to the Association through the sponsoring
Chapter. When the Association sponsors a Student Chap-
ter, the relationship will be directly with the Board which
will supervise the preparation of its constitution and by-
laws and obtain approval of them from The Institute.
Section 3. Member Emeritus.
A member, who qualifies for status as Member Emeri-
tus of The Institute, shall be a Member Emeritus of the
Association and shall be exempted from payment of dues,
but his rights and privileges, benefits and obligations of
full membership shall remain unabridged.
Section 4. Honorary Associate.
a. A person of esteemed character who is not eligi-
ble for corporate membership in The Institute, but who
has rendered a distinguished service to the profession of
architecture or to the arts and sciences allied therewith
may become an Honorary Associate.
(Continued on Page S5)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










ARCHITECTURAL AWARDS PROGRAM


Members of the Florida Association of Architects re-
cently participated in the annual Architectural Exhibit
Program during the 50th Annual Convention. Sixty-six
entries were submitted.
The submissions were judged by Morris Ketchum, Jr.,
FAIA, Charles Pulley, AIA and John L. Cameron, Hon.
AIA.


The jury commented, "In terms of creative design,
adaptability to regional character and climate, and total
craftsmanship, the smaller projects submitted, including
residences, housing, small banks and office buildings, were
outstanding. The larger projects, although well planned
and built, lacked the sparkle and imagination of the
smaller entries."


Photos by: Alexandre George


Honor Award


Dr. Good Dental Building
Jacksonville, Florida
Hardwick 6 Lee, AIA, Architects

lury Comment: Site and building plan, structure and mater-
ials, landscaping, craftsmanship all of a high order pro-
duce a building with great regional character and appropriate
residential scale.


FEBRUARY, 1965








Honor Award


Residence for Dr. & Mrs. Daniel A. Osman
Masta Island, Key Biscayne, Florida
George F. Reed, AIA, Architect

fury Comment: Three houses tied into one living room,
master bedroom, children's bedrooms resemble a Sooth
Sea island village in modern dress set on raised land-
scaped podium elevated living units on piles protect
each unit from hurricanes well adapted to orientation
and seaside views unusual and appropriate adaptation
to climate, site and region.










Award of Merit

Residence for Major & Mrs. Dan H. Williamson
Ponte Verda Beach, Florida
Willim Morgan, AIA, Architect

Jury Comment: A project logically adapted to site and
climate flemble interior living -dining space privacy
for seeping units clever detailing of jalousies for hot
son protection and security when house is not in use -
elevated main floor creates well fit lower level.










Award of Merit

Wesley Manor Retirement Village
St. Johns County, Florida
Robert C. Broward, AIA
and
Robert A. Warner, AIA, Architects

lay Comment: A one story building group of great char-
acter and distinction site plan produces privacy for
central outdoor living- spacious indoor recreational areas
- appropriate structure and materials well preserved
natural setting.


Photo by: SwicoM


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Award of Merit


The Legal Center Office Building
Tampa, Florida
Robert Wieldge, AIA, Architect

jury Comment: Appropriate design of concrete structure, sun
protective louvers and canopies enclose office space arranged for
flexibility mechanical and elevator core is tight package suit-
ably located integration of structure and materials produces a
regional solution.


Photo by: A. C. McCrthy


FEBRUARY, 1965


Ilk

















































































`i)r
; :'


TI;; ; 'i."'
i':
*~~;* ; ii. i
I; 't"'''
..:"~
:I
'"'''
t~";
+ ~
*i
i:8t::-
:.I


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


i,..I












;; rT. itGj~
"I


















some people think he has



nothing on his mind but women




THEY COULD BE RIGHT!


He knows that modem women not only like living
electrically they want more of it! Women want it
by the house-full.
And by the same token, the woman-pleasing answer
to a new home or apartment is one that merits the
MEDALLION award.
Buyers and renters have been pre-sold that the
MEDALLION offers the most in Better Living Elec-
trically. They look for it.
Successful builders know from experience that all.
electric homes sell faster ... all-electric apartments
rent easier.
Realtors recognize that the MEDALLION is a power-
ful selling aid... today's "best seller" in the new
home market.
Architects are fully aware that MEDALLION HOMES


permit the utmost flexibility in design. In kitchen
and laundry, flameless electric appliances are tops
in space-saving.
Electrical Contractors know that MEDALLION
HOMES with major electric appliance installations ...
and modern lighting.. and Full Housepower wiring
...just naturally add up to more business.
Every segment of the building industry benefits by
the trend to all-electric living .. and by the tremen-
dous, multi-million dollar, national advertising program
for MEDALLION HOMES, backed up locally by
Florida's electric companies.
You can profit by participating in the MEDALLION
HOME program. For full details, call your electric
utility company ... always at your service!


More and More it is Recognized that
A "MEDALLION" ON THE OUTSIDE MEANS BETTER LIVING INSIDE
Basic requirements for homes or apartments certified for the
MEDALLION HOME AWARD are:


* ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN includ-
ing electric range, electric water
heater, and other major electric
appliances.
* FULL HORSEPOWER 100-200
amp. service entrance and enough


Florida's Eectric Companies
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
GULF POWER COMPANY


switches and outlets for modern
convenience.
* LIGHT FOR LIVING ample
illumination for comfort, safety,
and decorative beauty.


STampaying, Investor-Owned
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY


FEBRUARY, 1965









JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pros. & Tresumr
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vio-Prou.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Seetary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, VicPrs.


Letters ..

To THE EDITOR:

It is customary, I believe, for the
recipient of a gold medal to make a
speech of appreciation. However, I
think the designated recipient of such
an honor usually has some foreknowl-
edge of the event; enough, at least,
to allow him to be prepared to receive
the award gracefully.
As the recent banquet was the fifti-
eth anniversary of the founding of the
Florida Association of Architects, I
had expected to hear a certain amount
of history spoken, perhaps even in-
cluding some mention of the small
part I had been permitted to play in
the organization. But I was totally
unwarned and unprepared to receive
the most undeserved honor which the
1964 Board of the FAA awarded me.
I, who am not always inarticulate, was
so completely overcome that I found
it impossible to say anything intelli-
gent, if, in fact, I said anything at
all by way of thanks.
In order that I may not appear to
be a complete, unappreciative boor,
and to try to express my feelings to
the members and friends of the FAA,
especially to those members and their
guests who were present at the pre-
sentation, I would appreciate your
conveying these thoughts to them in
one of the issues of The Florida Arch-
itect. For I do appreciate the gift and
the honor, and I want to say that it
has been a wonderful experience to
have been premitted to serve in, with
and for the profession in Florida.
Thank you, and I dearly love you all.
MELLEN C. GREELEY, FAIA


UTABLMD 191

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
8ICORPORATED


"Beausiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TmINITY O04


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OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
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PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

MACK E. PALMER
P. O. Box 5443


Jacksonville, Florida 32207


Telephone: 398-7255


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.










The AIA has announced the selec-
tion of the architectural firm of
Mitchell/Giurgola Associates to de-
sign its new headquarters building.
The design concept blends con-
temporary architectural with the
Georgian style of the historic Octa-
gon House on the same site. The
architects envision a five-story, red-
brick structure featuring a semi-cir-
cular wall, with liberal use of glass,
embracin the gardens and the Octa-
gon House. The structure will enclose
approximately 50,000 square feet of
usable floor space.
The new headquarters building will
be erected at an estimated cost of
$1,500,000. An additional $30,000
has, been allocated for the use of
sculpture or other fine arts.








WOOD is Stronger

for Longer,

for Less












FLORIDA WOOD
COUNCUIS


FEBRUARY, 1965









































































Complete 1964 catalogue avail-
able from Blumcraft of Pittsburgh,
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh 13, Pa.

*Trdemark 0 1964 Blumcraft of Pittsburgh





FAA BYLAWS_______________
(Cotinued from Page 18)
b. The nomination for Honorary Associateship may
be made in writing by any member of the Board at any
regular Board meeting. The written nomination shall be
signed by the nominator and shall give the full name of
the nominee, reasons for the nomination, the biography
of the nominee, a history of his attainments and his
qualifications for the honor. When he is elected by two-
thirds vote of the Board membership, the Secretary shall
ascertain if the nominee desires to accept the honor. If
he accepts, he shall be presented with a certificate of
membership at the next annual meeting of the Associa-
tion.
c. An Honorary Associate shall be privileged to attend
the annual conventions of the Association and speak and
take part in the discussions threat on all matters except
those relating to the corporate affairs of the Association,
but he may not vote threat nor shall he pay dues.
cSwim 5. Otler Membershp.
Other types of membership may be created as the
need arises and when permitted by The Institute
Seetdon 6. sMlem of Members
a. The status of a member admitted prior to an
amendment of the bylaws relating to the eligibility or
qualifications for membership shall not be changed be-
cause of the amendment.
b. The grant to and the exercise and use by a mem-
ber of the rights and privileges vested in him by the
Charter and bylaws shall be conditioned upon his pro-
fessional conduct and the payment of dues to his Chapter,
the Association, and The Institute.
e. The secretaries of the Florida Chapters of The
Institute at the beginning of the fiscal year and mid-year
shall file with the Secretary of the Association lists of
their Chapter members in good standing by name and
classification and shall inform the Secretary of the Asso-
ciation at all times of any additions or changes to the lists
filed. The Secretary of the Association shall issue cards
indicating membership in the Association to those mem-
bers who become in good standing.
Sectlon 7. Termination of Membership.
a. A corporate membership shall be terminated by
the death of a member, by his resignation, or by his con-
viction of a felony, or by his default under the conditions
prescribed in these bylaws, and it may be terminated by
action of the AIA Board after it finds him guilty of un-
professional conduct.
b. None of the above Members, Professional Associ-
ates or Associates may resign from the Association, nor
may they resign from the American Institute of Archi-
tects or one of its Chapters or Sections of Chapters and
remain a member of the Association.
c. A Professional Associate or Associate may be sus-
pended or expelled by the Chapter of The American
Institute of Architects of which he is a member and shall
automatically be suspended or expelled by the Association.
Scdlen 8. Privilege of Members.
a. A Corporate Member in good standing may ex-
FEBRUARY, 1965


ercise all the rights and privileges granted him under these
bylaws.
b. A Professional Associate and Associate in good
standing may:
(1) Serve as a member of any committee of the
Association that does not perform any duty of the Execu-
tive Committee or that is not concerned with disciplinary
matters or Institute business or affairs. In addition, the
Professional Associate may serve as chairman of such com-
mittees;
(2) Speak and make motions at any meeting of the
Association and vote threat on any matter that does not
concern the affairs of business of the Institute, or the nom-
ination of a delegate to an Institute meeting;
(3) Not hold office or a directorship of the Associ-
ation.

ARTICLE III. MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Seelio 1. Annual
a. There shall be an annual Meeting, herein referred
to as the Convention, which shall be the annual meeting
of the Association and the Florida Region of the Institute.
b. Time and place of the annual Convention shall
be fixed by the Board if not fixed by the preceding Con-
vention.
a. Business of the Convention shall be conducted by
the Officers of the Association and the Chapter Delegates.
d. Delegates to the Convention shall be selected by
each Chapter.
(1) The number of delegate votes entitled to each
Chapter shall be based on its number of Corporate Mem-
bers in good standing with Chapter, Association and
Institute and whose dues have been paid in full to the
Association on or before the first day of October of the
current year, as certified by the Secretary of the Associa-
tion.
(2) Each Chapter shall have two delegate votes for
the first six and one additional delegate vote for each
additional seven (or fraction thereof) such certified Cor-
porate Members.
(3) At the discretion of each chapter, its delegation
may consist of a single delegate, or as many as four dele-
gates for each certified delegate-vote.
(4) Chapters shall be furnished with credential cards
by the Secretary of the Association and these shall be
certified by the President or Secretary of the Chapter that
each delegate is in good standing with his Chapter, the
Association and The Institute.
(5) The Board, at a meeting held prior to the meet-
ing of the Association, shall elect three Corporate Mem-
bers having the qualifications of delegates to act as the
Credentials Committee of the meeting. The Secretary, ex-
officio, shall act as secretary of the credentials committee,
and the committee shall elect one of its members as its
chairman. The term of office of every member of the
credentials committee shall expire when the report of the
committee has been accepted by the meeting.
e. An Annual Report shall be made in writing to the
Convention by each of the following: President, Secre-
tary, Treasurer, Director-at-Large, and Board. The report
(Ceostmnud on Page Se)





of the Board shall include such committee reports and
special reports as the Board deems advisable.
f. Approval by the Convention of the Annual Re-
ports and the recommendations contained therein shall
constitute Convention endorsement of the policies and
proposals reflected by the reports.
a. New Officers for the ensuing year shall be elected
to succeed those whose terms are about to expire.
(I) Nominations shall be made during the first
business session of the Convention.
(2) The nominating committee shall report its
nominations to the Convention following which nomina-
tions may be made from the floor. If the Nominating
Committee finds the member nominated from the floor
eligible to hold office and his nomination is seconded by
two accredited delegates from different Chapters, then
he is nominated for office.
(3) In the event no contest develops, the election
may be declared by acclamation.
(4) For contested elections, voting shall be by
ballots made available to each delegation. A ballot box
shall be open for voting for not less than four hours after
nominations have been dosed.
(5) The President shall announce the results of all
balloting at the last business session of the Convention
and declare all elections.
Seton 2. Special.
a. A special meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is made by any of the
following:
(1) The Convention, by concurring majority vote.
(2) The Board, by concurring vote of two-thirds of
the Board.
(3) Not less than one-half of the Chapters, provided
each such Chapter has obtained the concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the membership of its gov-
erning body.
(4) Written petition to the Board signed by not
less than twenty-five per cent of the total number of
members in good standing of the Association.
b. Chapter representation shall be by delegate,
under the same rules governing the conduct of the Con-
vention.
c. The number of delegates for each Chapter shall
be the same as for the last preceding Convention.
d. A new Chapter chartered subsequent to the last
previous Convention shall be entitled to delegate votes
in accordance with the Secretary's count of such Chapter's
Corporate Members in good standing fifteen days prior to
the special meeting.
SeCioI 3. Note.k
Notice of the Convention or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association by letter or in an official publication of
the Association. Notice of the Convention shall be served
not less than thirty days before the opening session, and
in case of Special Meetings, not less than fifteen days
before such meetings.


Section 4. Rule of Order.
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance with
Robert's Rules of Order.
section Voting.
a. Voting may be by affirmation, unless a vote by
roll call is requested by a qualified delegate, at which time
a roll call vote of the delegations shall be taken.
b. The Chairman or acting Chairman of each dele-
gation shall cast the votes for his Chapter's delegation,
but Chapters shall not be required to vote as a unit.
e. No Chapter may vote by proxy.
d. An officer of the Association shall be entitled to
vote only as a member of his Chapter delegation except
that the President shall have an independent vote in the
event of a tie.
*. Minimum number of votes required for action.
Unless these bylaws otherwise require, any action or de-
cision of an Annual Convention or other meeting of the
Association shall be by the concurring vote of a majority
of the delegates voting, except that on a roll call vote any
action or decision shall be by the concurring vote of a
majority of those accredited votes which are cast.
f. A quorum for a meeting of the Association shall
consist of no less than 25 Corporate Members, and at
which meeting there is present at least one Corporate
Member from a majority of the Chapters in the State.
Secin 6. Latter allots.
No vote shall be taken by letter ballot
Section 7.
elegaes* to Aamr a n hrttue oftArch iects Conventon
The Delegate representing the Association at the An-
nual Convention of the American Institute of Architects
shall be the President of the Association.
Sectkn 8. Suspension of Bylaws.
These bylaws may be suspended at any meeting for
the transaction of any special business by a two-thirds roll
call vote of the delegates present. When the special busi-
ness has been consummated, the bylaws shall be immedi-
ately in force again.

ARTICLE IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 1. Memberbl.l
a. There shall be a Board of Directors, in these by-
laws referred to as the Board. The Board shall consist of:
(1) The Officers of the Association;
(2) One or more directors from each Florida Chapter
as hereinafter provided.
(3) A Director-at-Large, who shall be the Director
of the Florida Region of The American Institute of
Architect; and
(4) The immediate past president, who shall be a
member of the Board the year following his term as
president.
b. The Directors, one or more from each Chapter,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting.
(1) An Alternate Director, one for each Director,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its annual meeting
to function for the Director when the Director cannot
attend Board meetings or serve as a Director.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





(2) The number of Directors from each Chapter
shall be based on The Institute membership in the various
Chapters as determined by the current membership roster
of The Institute as follows:
No. of Members in Chapter No. of Directors
1 to 19 1
20to 59 2
60 or ormre 3
(3) At least one director and his alternate director
shall be members of the Chapter Executive Committee.
a. The Florida Student Associates of Chapters of
The American Institute of Architects shall be represented
on the Board by Student Representatives who shall main-
tain liaison between the Association and their Student
Chapter.
Seclan 2. Vaemels.
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled as
set forth in the Charter.

a. The Board shall manage, direct, control, conduct
and administer the property, affairs and business of the
Association, and between annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directives and instructions adopted by the Asso-
ciation at a meeting of the Association.
b. The Board shall issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and to others as determined
by the Board.
e. The Board shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations supplementing, but not in conflict with the
Charter and these By-laws, to govern the use of the
property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of the Asso-
ciation and to govern the affairs and business of the
Association.
d. Each Director, and Alternate Director in the ab-
sence of the Director, shall convey to the Board the
actions and requests of the Chapter he represents.
Sdion 4. Metin.
a. Regular Meetings: The Board shall hold at least
four regular meetings each year.
(1) Time and place of the meetings shal be fixed
by the Board.
(2) One regular meeting shall be held immediately
preceding the opening of the annual Convention and
another meeting within thirty days after the beginning of
the new fiscal year.
(3) Ten members of the Board shall constitute a
quorum and all decisions shall be made by concurring vote
of not less than a majority of those members present
(4) Upon the request of the Director-at-Large the
Board shall convene as the Regional Council.
b. Special Meetings: A special meeting of the Board
may be called by the President, or by a written notice by
a majority of the Officers or by six members of the Board.
(1) Time and place for the special meeting shall be
fixed by the person or persons calling the meeting.
a. Notices and Minutes:
(1) Notice of each meeting of the Board shall be
sent in writing by the Secretary to each member of the
Board at least five days before the date fixed for the
meeting.
FEBRUARY, 1965


(2) Minutes of the meetings of the Board shall be
recorded by the Secretary and approved by the Board in
its succeeding meeting.


ARTICLE V.


OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION


Seclto 1. 14a.
a. The Oficers of the Association shall be members
of the Board and elected by a majority vote of accredited
delegates present and voting at the annual meeting.
b. The officers of the Association and Board shall
consist of a President, President Designate (Vice Presi-
dent), Secretary, and Treasurer. The officers shall be
Corporate Members and shall be elected by the Member-
ship of the Association at the Annual Meeting, as desig-
nated herein.
c. The President shall not be elected directly, but
shall assume office by automatic succession from the
Office of President Designate (Vice President), except
the President shall be elected when the President Desig-
nate (Vice President) is unable or unwilling to assume
the Office of President.
d. The Secretary and Treasurer shall be eligible for
re-election.
All terms of office shall begin with the fiscal year.
f. Any or all officers shall hold office until their
successors have been elected and qualified. If a vacancy
occurs in any office of the Association, other than the
expiration of the term of office, such vacancy shall be
filled as set forth in the Charter.
g. Only such members who have been officers or who
have served on the Board for at least one year are eligible
for nomination for President Designate (Vice President).
Sectio 2. Preo tm.
a. The President shall be the administrative head of
the Association and shall exercise general supervision of
its business and affairs, except such thereof as are placed
under the administration and supervision of the Secretary
and of the Treasurer, respectively, and he shall perform
all the duties incidental to his office and those that are
required to be performed by him by law, the Charter,
these bylaws, and those that are properly delegated to
him by the Board.
b. The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and the Board and shall be Chairman of the
Executive Committee.
c. The President shall serve a term of one year.
Section 3.
The President Designat (Vie Preddat).
a. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
possess all the powers and shall perform all the duties of
the President in the event of the absence of the President
Sor of his disability, refusal, or failure to act.
b. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
perform other duties that are properly assigned by the
Board.
c. The President Designate (Vice President) shall be
Chairman of the Committee on Committees.
d. The President Designate (Vice President) shall
serve a term of one year.
(Contilmwd o Page A8)






Seclon 4. Tme Secrtey.
a. General Duties of the Secretary. The Secretary
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall act as its recording secretary and its corresponding
secretary and as the secretary of each meeting of the Asso-
ciation, the Board and the Executive Committee. He shall
perform the duties usual and incidental to his office and
the duties that are required to be performed by the law,
the Charter, these bylaws and the duties properly as-
signed to him by the Board.
b. Specific Duties of the Secretary.
(1) Custody of Property. The Secretary shall have
custody of and shall safeguard and shall keep in order all
property of the Association, except that property with
which the Treasurer is charged.
(2) Issue Notices. He shall be responsible for the
preparation and issuance of all notices and all calls and
notices of all meetings of the Association, the Board and
the Executive Committee.
(3) Conduct Correspondence and Maintain Records.
He shall conduct the correspondence, keep the member-
ship roll and corporate records, minutes, annual reports.
(4) Affix Seal and Sign Papers. He shall keep the
seal of the Association and affix it on such instruments as
require it and sign all papers that require the attest or
approval of the Association.
(5) Prepare the Board's Annual Report. In collabor-
ation with the Officers of the Association, he shall prepare
the annual report of the Board.
(6) Meetings. He shall have charge of all matters
pertaining to the arrangements for and recording of
meetings.
(7) The Secretary shall obtain from all Chapters of
The American Institute of Architects in the State of Flor-
ida by February of each year the names, classifications and
addresses of all the Chapter Corporate, Professional Asso-
ciates, Associates, and Emeritus Members in good standing
on the first day of January of that year.
a. Delegation of Duties. Delegation of the actual
performance of his duties is the prerogative of the Secre.
tary, however, he shall not delegate his responsibility for
the property of the Association, or affixing the seal of the
Association, or the making of any attestation or certifica-
tion required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
d. The Secretary shall serve a term of one year.
Section 5. The Tr rmmr.
a. General Duties of the Treasurer. The Treasurer
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs,
keeping the records and books of account thereof. He
shall assist the Finance and Budget Committee to prepare
the budget, collect amounts due the Association and shall
have the custody of its securities, funds and moneys making
the disbursements for the Association therefrom. He shall
have charge of all matters relating to insurance, taxes,
bonds, instruments and papers involving financial trans-
actions. He shall conduct the correspondence relating to
his office. He shall sign all instruments of the Association
whereon his signature is required, and perform all duties
required to be performed by him by law, these bylaws,


and the duties that are properly assigned to him by the
Board.
b. Reports of the Treasurer. The Treasurer shall
make a written report to the Board at its regular meetings
and to the delegates at each annual meeting and other
meetings of the Association if required. Each report shall
describe the financial condition of the Association, a
comparison of the budget to appropriations as of the date
of the report, the income and expenditures for the period
of the report, and the Treasurer's recommendations on
financial matters.
c. Liability of the Treasurer. The Treasurer, per-
sonally, shall not be liable for any decrease of the capital,
surplus, income, balance or reserve of any fund or account
resulting from any of his acts performed in good faith in
conducting the usual business of his office. When a new
treasurer takes office, the retiring treasurer shall turn over
to his successor a copy of the closing audit of the treasury
and all the records and books of account and all moneys,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belonging
to the Association that are in his custody and possession.
The incoming treasurer shall check the same and, if found
correct, shall give the retiring treasurer his receipt therefore
and a complete release of the retiring treasurer from any
liability thereafter with respect thereto.
d. Delegation of Duties. The Treasurer may not
authorize any person to sign any financial instrument,
notice or agreement of the Association that requires the
signature of the Treasurer, unless such delegation or
authorization is expressly permitted by these bylaws or
the Board, but he may delegate to assistants the actual
performance of the clerical, bookkeeping, statistical, col-
lecting, and recording work of his office and may author-
ize designated assistants to sign, under their respective
titles, records, vouchers, receipts and other documents if
such is not prohibited by the bylaws.
e. The Treasurer shall serve a term of one year.

ARTICLE VI.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD
seeion 1. Compositioon
There shall be an Executive Committee of the Board
composed of the President, the President Designate (Vice
President), the Secretary, the Treasurer, the Director of
the Florida Region and the immediate Past President who
shall serve on the Executive Committee the year following
his term as President.
Section 2. Powers Delegated to the Commsitee.
The Executive Committee shall have full authority,
right and power to act for the Board during periods be-
tween Board meetings on all matters except that it shall
not:
(1) adopt a general budget;
(2) change the policies, rules of the Board or the
bylaws;
(3) make an award of honor,
(4) purchase, sell, lease, or hypothecate any real
property;
(5) form an affiliation;
(6) fix assessments and annual dues; however, it
shall be allowed to act for the Board on any of the fore.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






going excepted matters which have been delegated spec-
ifically to it by two-thirds vote of the Board.
Setdlo 3. Decisions of the Commintee.
a. The President, who shall be the chairman of the
Executive Committee, shall fix the time and place for the
meetings of the Executive Committee.
b. A quorum of two-thirds of its members shall be
necessary to transact business at a meeting. Every decision
of the Executive Committee shall not be less than a
majority of votes.
c. The Executive Committee must actually meet in
order to transact business, otherwise the acts and decisions
of the Executive Committee are not binding on the
Board or the Association.
d. The actions of the Executive Committee shall be
recorded in minutes and ratified by the Board at its
meeting following such action.

ARTICLE VII. ADMINISTRATIVE AND
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
Section 1. Executive Offcer.
a. The administrative and executive offices shall be
in the charge of an executive officer, who shall be known
as the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall
be employed by and shall report to the Board.
b. The Executive Director shall be the Assistant
Treasurer and shall perform such duties in this capacity
as the Treasurer may direct and under his direct super-
vision.
Section 2. Duties of Executive Diretor.
a. The Executive Director shall be and act as the
chief executive officer of the Association, and as such shall
have general management of the administration of its
affairs, subject to the general direction and control of the
Board and the supervision of the administrative officers of
the Association.
b. He shall stimulate programs under the various
departments and coordinate all inter-departmental affairs.
c. He shall be the officer in whom the Board shall
place the responsibility for carrying out its general policies.
d. He shall maintain contacts with other professional
societies particularly those in the fields allied to architec-
ture and with trade associations in the construction indus-
try so that he may be constantly informed as to the activi-
ties in those fields, extending the cooperation of the Asso-
ciation as circumstances may warrant.
Section 3. Functions of Executiv Director.
a. Administrative Functions. He shall direct the ad-
ministrative functions of the Association office as provided
in Article VII of the bylaws. He shall serve as Chief Exec-
utive Officer of The Association in charge of the adminis-
trative and executive offices, and shall maintain liaison
with professional societies. The Executive Director will
limit his employment to the Association.
S b. Editorial Functions. He shall be responsible for
Sthe publications of the Association, including the official
'journal, carrying out Board directives as formulated by the
Publications Committee and the Board.
S c. Legislative Functions. He shall establish continu-
ing and effective relationships with the Florida Legislature,
carrying out Board directives as formulated by the Legisla-
FEBRUARY, 1965


tive Committee and the Board. He shall serve as Legisla-
tive Representative for the Association on a continuing
basis, with such specialized legal assistance as may be
necessary from time to time.
d. Legal and Accounting Function. He shall co-
ordinate legal and accounting functions of the Association
as required, acting to carry out directives of the Board.
e. Liaison Functions with State Board. He shall
establish and maintain effective liaison with the Florida
State Board of Architecture subject to the direction and
control of the Board and supervision of the officers of the
Association.
Setion 4. Assistnts to the Executive Director.
Upon the recommendation of the Executive Director,
the Board may employ assistants to the Executive Director
to perform such duties as may be assigned to them by the
Board and by the Executive Director, including the details
of the administrative work of the Association.

ARTICLE VIII. COMMISSIONS
Section 1.
The Association shall establish commissions to act as
supervisory and liaison agents for the Board and the Asso-
ciation.
Section 2.
Each commission shall consist of a Commissioner
elected by the Board at the post-convention Board meeting
and at least one member who shall be the Vice-Commis-
sioner appointed by the President with the concurrence
of the Board at its first regular meeting. At least one mem-
ber of each commission shall be a member of the Board.
Section 3.
The terh of office of the members of a commission
shall be one year and that term shall coincide with the
term of the President.
Section 4.
The number and type of commissions shall be similar
in title and functions to those of the national commissions
of The Institute which presently include the Commission
on the Professional Society, the Commission on Education
and Research, the Commission on Professional Practice,
the Commission on Architectural Design and the Commis-
sion on Public Affairs.
Section 5.
a. The Commission on the Professional Society shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate
to the administration of Association affairs or business.
b. The Commission on Education and Research
shall have jurisdiction over committees and its functions
relating to architectural education, pre-registration train-
ing, the registration or licensing of architects, continuing
adult education of the practitioner and research as a source
of knowledge to be integrated with educational con-
stituents.
c. The Commission on Professional Practice shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate to
the practice of architecture.

(Continued on Page S0)






d. The Commission on Architectural Design shall
have jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate
to architectural design.
*. The Commission on Public Affairs shall have
jurisdiction over committees whose functions relate to
public affairs or governmental relations.
f. A list of Commission Committee jurisdiction shall
be published in the Rules of the Board or in a supple-
mentary publication thereof.

ARTICLE IX. COMMITTEES
seedan 1. sereumd .
a. The Association Committees shall consist of Re-
gional Committees, of Special Committees required for
specific short term activities of the Association, and Stand-
ing Committees, established by these bylaws, of two types:
(1) FAA Standing Committees which serve the spe-
cial needs of the Association and cooperate with similar
committees of the Chapters or Sections of Chapters of
The Institute located in the State of Florida.
(2) Standing Committees which are equivalent to
those Chapter and Institute committees with similar titles
and duties.
b. Regional Judiciary Committee. The Regional Judi-
ciary Commitee shall conduct initial hearings on charges
of unprofessional conduct against a Corporate Member of
the Association which have been referred to it by The
Institute and which hearings shall be conducted according
to the bylaws and Rules of the Board of The Institute.
The Regional Judiciary Committee shall be com-
posed of three Corporate Members, elected to serve stag-
gered three year arms, and an Alternate, elected to serve
a one year term. Members and Alternate shall be members
in good standing in The Institute, shall be from different
chapters in the Region, and shall not be the Regional
Director nor Officers of the Chapters, The Association or
The Institute.
e. Special Committees may be created by the Presi-
dent or by the Board. When created by the President,
the Board, at its next meeting thereafter, shall review
such action and may continue or discontinue such Com-
mittees, or make changes in personnel as it may deem
proper.
(1) Special Committees shall expire with the fiscal
year, but may be recreated to continue to function into
the following fiscal year.
(2) Chairman and members for special committees
shall be appointed from the membership and their terms
shall expire with the committee.
d. FAA Standing Committees shall be a Nominating
Committee, Committee on Finance and Budget, Commit-
tee on Governmental Relations, Committee for Publica-
tions, Committee for Conventions, Committee for Joint
Cooperative Council.
(1) The membership of these committees shall be
selected by the President from the membership according
-to those bylaws and policies established by the Board.
e. The President Designate (Vice Presidents) rec-
ommendations for committee Chairman for the following
fiscal year shall be presented to the Board at its regular
meeting immediately prior to the Convention of the
30


Association for Board approval and advice. The committee
chairman for the subsequent fiscal year shall be announced
at a business session of the preceding Convention.
f. The President may, at any time, discontinue spe-
cial committees, alter classification, or make any changes
in the personnel of Special and FAA Standing Commit-
tees and report such action to the Board at its next
meeting.
e. Other Standing Committees shall be the chairmen
of the Chapter Committees performing the same functions
of the Association Committee at the Chapter level.
Section 2. Nomnating Committn.
a. There shall be a Nominating Committee whose
duty shall be to nominate members in good standing with
The Institute, the Chapter and the Association, qualified
to become Officers in the Association for each of the
offices about to be vacated.
b. The Board, at least sixty days before the Conven-
tion of the Association, shall elect the committee com-
posed of a chairman and four members from separate
geographical areas of the Region. Chairman and members
shall be Corporate Members.
c. The Committee shall apprise the membership of
their nominations prior to the convening of the Conven-
tion and shall report their nominations to the Covention
at the first business session.
d. The powers of the Committee shal terminate with
the adjournment of the Convention.

Sectti 6. Commit- on anmm and Bkdget.
a. There shall be a Committee on Finance and
Budget whose duty shall be to prepare the annual budget
for the Board and to recommend fiscal policies for
adoption by the Association.
b. The Committee shall consist of five members who
are serving or have served as a Director or who have held
office in the Association, appointed by the President with
the Board approval, to serve for the initial year terms as
follows: 2 members for one year; 2 members for two years;
1 member for three years. As their terms expire appoint-
ments shall be made for three year terms. The President
annually shall designate one of the senior members to act
as chairman.
e. The annual budget for the fiscal year following
the annual meeting shall be presented in draft for the
Board meeting immediately before the Convention for
its comments and report to the Convention.
d. The final recommended budget shall be prepared
for the Board approval at the first meeting of the Board
in the new fiscal year.
a. The Committee shall provide for long-range fiscal
planning for the Association and recommend policies
related to funding, investments, travel and expense ac-
counts, control of service projects, supplemental income
and other financial matters which will enhance the Asso-
ciation's financial stability and accrue benefits to the
members and the total profession, present and future.
Sectlon 4. Commitee on Governmental Relations.
There shall be a Committee on Governmental Rela-
tions consisting of one member from each Chapter of the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Region, either Corporate or Professional Associate. It shall
be the duty of this Committee to promote the usefulness
of the profession and The Association to the various gov-
ernmental bureaus and agencies having charge of the plan-
ning and designing of public buildings and monuments
and their environment; to promote the employment of
architects in private practice to plan and design such pub-
lic works; to maintain liaison with the legislature of the
state to forward statewide and local legislation that will
promote the welfare of the architectural profession and
the construction industry and the public health and wel-
fare. It shall cooperate with the national Commission on
Public Affairs of The Institute.

Section S. Conmmlte on Publcations.
a. There shall be a Standing Committee for Publica-
tions consisting of 3 Corporate Members. Terms of mem-
bers shall be such as to assure one retiring member per
year.
b. It shall be the duty of the committee to act as
liaison between the editor of the official publications of
the Association and the Board, be responsible for publica-
tion programs, and recommend publication policies to the
Board for its consideration.
Selion 6. Commintt on Con nton s.
a. There shall be a standing Committee for Con-
ventions consisting of 4 Corporate Members, one of which
shall be the Host Chapter Committee Chairman of the
Convention immediately past. Terms of members shall be
such as to assure one retiring member per year.
b. The duties of this committee shall be to recom-
mend convention policies to the Board for its consideration,
to develop convention format and organization consistent
with the professional and educational needs of Florida
architects and consistent with good public relations, and
to act for the Board with Host Chapter Committees in
coordinating programs in harmony with the Association
interests and policies.
Secton 7. Comminee for Joint Coopertive Coundl.
a. There shall be a standing Committee on Relations
with the Building Industry, consisting of 4 Corporate
Members and 4 Professional Associates.
b. It shall be the duty of the committee to foster a
cooperative relationship between architects and contractors,
producers of building materials and equipment and other
elements of the building industry. It shall cooperate with
the national Commission on Professional Practice of The
Institute.
Section 8. Ope tions.
a. The Secretary shall notify the chairmen and mem-
bers of the various committees of the names and addresses
of their respective committee members and their various
assignments.
b. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all
committees, and the Secretary may act as secretary for
the committee if so selected by the committee.
e. Committees have the right to request and receive
all information and records in possession of the Association
and necessary to discharge the duties assigned them.
FEBRUARY, 1965


d. Committees shall act as advisors to the Board and
shall report their findings, recommendations and actions
to the Board except the Regional Judiciary Committee
whose reports are confidential and required by The Insti-
tute to be made directly to the Executive Director thereof.
*. The majority of members of a committee shall
constitute a quorum. Findings, recommendations and
actions of a committee shall be made according to the
concurring vote of the majority of members present at a
committee meeting or a concurring majority vote of
letter ballots.
f. The chairman of any committee requiring an
appropriation shall submit a written request to the Board
for the amount required and reasons thereof, and if
granted, file with the final report of the committee a
detailed accounting of moneys appropriated and expended.
(1) Expenses of the members of the Regional
Judiciary Committee attending meetings shall be reim-
bursed by The Institute in the manner and amount as
prescribed by the Treasurer of The Institute.
g. No committee nor any member or chairman
thereof shall incur financial obligations unless funds are
available in its appropriation and it is authorized to do so
by the Board. No committee nor any member or chairman,
shall commit the Association, orally or otherwise, on any
matter unless specifically authorized to do so by the
Board.
h. When their terms expire, committee chairmen
and members shall transmit to their successors all informa-
tion and records necessary to continue the work of the
committees.

ARTICLE X. FINANCIAL
Section 1. Fiscal Year.
The fiscal year of this Association shall be the calendar
year.
Section 2. Dus.
a. Annual dues equal to the pro-rata share required
to defray the expenses of the Association for the ensuing
fiscal year shall be recommended by the Board and deter-
mined and fixed by the Convention.
b. Each member shall contribute annual dues in an
amount determined by the Convention.
e. Dues shall be for the Association's fiscal year and
shall be due and payable on the first day of the fiscal
year, January 1st.
d. Any Member whose dues for the current year
have not been paid by the first day of July shall be con-
sidered delinquent and the Secretary shall, at that time,
send written notice of such delinquency to each such
member and to the secretary of his Chapter.
S The Secretary shall request The Institute to sus-
pend the membership of any Corporate Member whose
dues remain unpaid on the last day of the previous year,
on or about the tenth day of each January. The Secretary
shall notify each such member and the secretary of his
Chapter of this action at the same time.
f. The Secretary ipso facto shall suspend the Mem-
bership of any Associate Member whose dues remain

(Continued on Page S2)






unpaid on the last day of the previous year on or about
the tenth day of each January, and shall so notify each
such member and the secretary of his Chapter at that
time.
g. Termination of Membership for any Corporate
Member shall be only by action of The Institute.
h. The Board may terminate the membership of
any Associate Member for non-payment of dues twelve
months after such Member has been suspended by the
Secretary. The Secretary shall remove from the rolls of
the Association, the name of any Associate Member upon
receiving notice of termination of membership by his
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person or
Chapter.
1. Each Chapter treasurer shall collect dues from each
member assigned to his Chapter and shall promptly remit
dues collected to the Treasurer of the Association at the
office of the Association.
Section 3. Cmortbetions.
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefor, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend, or terminate the
privileges and rights of any member.
Section 4. Funds and Securities.
a. All moneys received by the Association shall be
promptly deposited, in their original form, in a depository
approved by the Board.
b. Every disbursement of money, except for petty
cash, shall be by check of the Association, signed by the
Treasurer and countersigned by another officer designated
by the Board.
c. The Treasurer shall establish petty cash accounts
as authorized by the Board. These funds shall be disbursed
for the usual petty cash purposes, by the person named
in the Board's authorization of the account. Statements of
expenditures shall be duly recorded and the expenditures
approved by the Treasurer before the account is re-
plenished.
d. Reserve or funds in excess of required operating
funds shall be deposited by the Treasurer in an interest-
bearing depository approved by the Board. Or when
authorized by the Board, such funds may be invested in
short term government or municipal bonds or equivalent
securities.
action S. Annual Budget.
a. The Board shall adopt an annual budget at its
first meeting each year, by a concurring vote of not less
than two-thirds of its membership present. The Budget
shall show in detail the anticipated income and expendi-
tures of the Association for the fiscal year.
b. Unless authorized and directed to do so at a
Convention or special meeting of the Association, the
Board shall not adopt any budget, make any appropria-
tions, or authorize any expenditure or in any way obligate
or incur obligation for the Association, which, in the
32


aggregate of any fiscal year, exceeds the estimated income
of the Association for such year.
c. Each expenditure of money and each financial
liability of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher,
or persons authorized to incur the expense or liability,
except petty cash expenditures which shall be subject to
the approval of the Treasurer, and shall be accounted
against appropriated and/or budgeted items.
Section 6. Audits.
The Board shall authorize employment of a Certified
Public Accountant to audit the books and accounts of
the Association for report at the first Board meeting of
each fiscal year.

ARTICLE XI. AMENDMENTS
Section 1. By Meeting of the Association.
The Charter and Bylaws of the Association may be
amended at any annual or special meeting of the Asso-
ciation provided:
(1) Written notice stating the purpose and reason
for each proposed amendment is sent to each Corporate
and Associate Member not less than thirty days
prior to the date of the meeting at which the proposed
amendment is to be voted on. A copy of the proposed
amendments shall be included with the notice circulated
as set forth in the Charter.
(2) Voting shall be by roll-call only and shall
require the concurring vote of not less than two-thirds
of the total delegates-votes present at the meeting.
(3) Every resolution or motion of this Association
amending its Charter or Bylaws shall state that it will
become effective only if and when it is approved by The
American Institute of Architects.
(4) Immediately following adoption of such reso-
lution or motion, the Secretary shall submit a copy of
the amendment and the resolution to the Secretary of The
Institute requesting Institute approval. Upon receipt
of such approval, the Secretary shall enter the amendment
and record its approval in the proper place in the docu-
ments with the date of the amendment and its approval.
Section 2. By The Institute.
The Institute, unless the statutes forbid, may amend
any provision of these Bylaws when the Association fails
to enact amendments properly requested by The Institute.
Each amendment made by The Institute shall have the
same force and effect as if made by the Association, and
shall be effective immediately on receipt of the notice
of the Secretary of The Institute containing the amend-
ment. The Secretary shall enter such amendment in the
proper place in these Bylaws and notify the Chapters
of the change.
Section 3. Titl and Numbring.
The Secretary may rearrange, retitle, renumber or
correct obvious errors in the various articles, sections and
paragraphs of these Bylaws as becomes necessary.

ARTICLE XII. RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any vote
or statement of its officers or members nor be pledged or
bound in any manner except by the approval of the Board,
in conformity with these Bylaws.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







"Fn Aret aua Ves/

By R. H. HAVARD
Director of Design
Formica Corporation


The burden of the present essay is
the establishment of some basic cri-
teria which may be of assistance to
architects, and others concerned with
the decoration of buildings, in the
determination of what constitutes so-
called Fine Art and what Decorative
Design, and wherein the two branches
of Graphic Art differ.
Ever since the revolt of Architects
and Artists at the turn of the century
there has grown up, contemporarily
with Modem Art, a great confusion
as to what constitutes Art with a
capital 'A' and what makes art as ex-
pressed by Design. As in the Renais-
sance and the period immediately fol-
lowing, this revolt found expression
not only in the visual arts, but also
is evident in music, poetry and litera-
ture. Ricard Strauss, then Hindemith
and Stravinsky in music, and Joyce,
Lawrence and Steinbeck in literature,
all expressed new concepts, new ap-
proaches to the expression of old
hopes and fears. Gertrude Stein's "A
Rose is a Rose is a Rose" and, more
recently, Dylan Thomas' poetry, in
their own individual way made known
the fact that new ground rules were
being laid down for their respective
art forms.
It may be that the rapidly shifting
sociological patterns of society are the
root causes of these fundamental pro-
tests by the art community, and with-
in this community also belong archi-
tects and designers such as Frank
Lloyd Wright, Gropius, Le Corbusier
and others. Whatever the underlying
causes, the evidence surrounds us in
every city that great changes of out-
look have taken place from what was
in existence 60 years ago. The pure
line of form following function has
been the exalted hallmark of the ma-
jority of public buildings created dur-
ing these past three of four decades,
but let us not delude ourselves into
believing that this principle is an im-
mutable one. The environment of
society is changing, and while during
the first half of this 20th century
there was a revolt against the smug
complacency of fat-living of the earlier
era, there is now growing a revulsion
against the stark aridity of the cube
FEBRUARY, 1965


and curtain-wall concept. This may
be caused by the now considerable
feeling of despair or lack of cohesion
which present day society is experi-
encing as the result of events toward
the close of World War II and after-
ward.
People appear to be grasping, in a
world of Space technocracy and of
sudden annihilation, for some straws
of hope for a brighter tomorrow; and
this yearning is being expressed in a
growing demand for more traditional
forms of art and furnishings.
It is interesting to compare, in this
context, the popular forms of archi-
tecture and art in these two stages
of social activity in the past forty
years. In Figure 1, we show a typical
house by Le Corbusier in the twen-
ties, while, contemporary with it is a
painting by Piet Mondrian (Figure
2). The next stage, one which we
are now experiencing, is well illus-
trated by the Gallery of Moder Art,
New York City, Architect, Edward
Durell Stone (Figure 3). It is inte-


resting to compare the artwork of Pi-
casso and Mondrian with the work of
newly popular artists such as Paul
Jenkins, Rauschenberg, and Kitaj
(Figure 4). While the earlier artists
were breaking away from reality, the
current crop of painters and sculptors
appear to be groping for absolute re-
ality. The architectural forms of con-
temporary building, as with the other
branches of visual art, seem to be
moving away from the uncomprising
starkness of functional statements as
expressed earlier by disciples of the
Bauhaus, and are acquiring more and
more a softer, perhaps even felicitous,
line.
Since it is evident that architecture
cannot be entirely divorced from its
associated arts, it is important that
artwork chosen to adorn such build-
ings be selected with considerable
care. Whether the art chosen be
labelled "Fine Art" or not is really
immaterial from the decorator point
of view. What the decorator is look-
(Continued on Page 84)


FIg 1. o H-e I ame B by La CA--






















Fig. 2. Painting by Mondrlin


Fig. 3. Gallery of Modern Art, New York


Fig. 4. Painting by KIa


Design ...
(Continued from Page 38)
ing for is mere effect; he is not often
vitally concerned with the aesthetic
merits of the artwork. Whether this
philosophy is good or bad may be
debatable, but exist it does, and it
seems no one wishes to concede that
such and such an artist's work has
been selected for such and such an
installation simply because it is a good
design for that particular spot. In
other words, the customer is hope-
fully led to believe that he is acquir-
ing a fine work of art and not merely
a decorative design.
This brings us to the core of this
essay. What, indeed, is the difference
between fine art and design? What
criteria can be used by the architect
or his client in the classification of
the work they may be buying?
Before venturing into some defini-
tions which may be applied to the art
forms of today it would be well if we
re-state some historical parallels. The
architects of Ancient Egypt, like those
of Babylon and every age down to the
present, were confronted with this
problem of decoration for their struc-
tural creations of engineering. Should
the decoration be in an abstract form,
in other words, design? Or should it
carry an import of its own, a context
quite un-related to the surrounding
material or function?
The painted and sculptured heads
of Queen Nefretiti and the Pharaohs
Seti and Rameses II prove that the
artists of three and four thousand
years ago were no less capable than
the artists of classical Greece or of
today in being able to portray, faith-
fully. The features and bas-reliefs in
the temples and tombs they decorated
in strictly stylized fashion only sug-
gests that the architect or his client
had decided in favor of design rather
than so-called fine art. This could,
quite probably, have been a reflection
of the prevailing fashion of the time.
In the archiac period of Greek cul-
ture a similar fashion obtained, and it
was only as we approach the period
of Pericles in the 5th Century B.C.,
that it became fashionable to inject
what might be called "emotion" into
the decorative idiom. Ever since, of
course, we have been confronted with
these two alternatives. And, if we di-
vorce snobbism from the scene, it is
equally as valid to choose good design
(Continued on Page 85)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Design ..
.(Continued from Page 84)
as it is to choose good fine art for
the decoration of an edifice. The only
possible justification for the choice
should be that the work chosen be
'right' for the location.
While good art incorporates ele-
ments of design in its composition,
it is not equally true to say that good
design must also incorporate fine art,
for design need have no meaning
beyond itself, no reason outside its
own existence. In solving the problem
of space in fine art the most happy
proportions, as first laid down by the
Greeks, is that of the "Golden" thirds.
Whether in portrait position (where
the vertical dimension is the greater)
or landscape (here the horizontal di-
mension of the picture is the greater)
the placing of the major theme or
focus of attention is asymmetrical,
usually centered at one of the four
"Golden" third points within any
rectangle. In pure design, on the other
hand, the composition is, usually, ab-
solutely symmetrical within its given
area.
Abstract art, since it is principally


concerned with the application of
color and form within a given area,
is more nearly kin to design than to
fine art as experienced traditionally.
Since it claims to offer no raison
d'etre other than its being for exist-
ence, it offers no 'message' from the
artist; therefore it should be criticized
and accepted only on its merits as
good or bad design.
Any attempt by professional critics
or other viewers to endow a piece of
abstract art with all kinds of erudite
philosophic content can only lead to
ridicule for, just as a phrase in writ-
ing, being incomplete, can have no
sense, so, too, can design not have any
deep, philosophical utterance for Man-
kind . other than, perhaps, the
conveyance of sheer pleasure in sub-
tlety of line; or form, or color.
The burden of the writer's thesis
is the encouragement of architects
and, through them, their clients to
feel free to ignore art experts who dis-
course on the metaphysical qualities
of abstract art. The principal concern
in the embellishment of public build-
ings is that the artwork be fitting for
the environment, and that includes
the style in which the architect has


conceived his creation.
There is no 'good' or 'bad' art as
such, there is only art which satisfies
and that which does not satisfy sen-
sually or spiritually. Proof of this may
be the astonishing satisfaction which
can be recieved from a piece of art-
work created by a technically 'primi-
tive' artist . often such creations
flout the rules of academic style.
Since the field of architecture and
structural engineering has become in-
finitely more complex with the advent
of new materials and services for
buildings, it has become much more
difficult for the Architect to thorough-
ly inform himself in the theories and
practices of all the arts associated
with his craft. Such was not the case
during the Renaissance, it might be
perintent to suggest. The proper dec-
orative embellishment of a building,
whether large or small, is the means
whereby a mere engineering accom-
plishment may be transformed into
a monument of beauty. Such being
the case then it may be that archi-
tectural firms should consider the
incorporation of an accomplished
professional artist into their team -
(Continued on Page 36)


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There are engineers to plan for fu-
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Communications consultants to an-
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These and many more telephone
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FEBRUARY, 1965






Coordination ...
(Continued from Snd Cover)
cerned? A distinguished American ed-
itor, Henry R. Luce, has stated it in
these words: "Good architecture is
good government."
Our generation is embarked on the
most staggering volume of building
ever done in history. There are mil-
lions of prosperous Floridians and
visitors to be housed and rehoused.
And besides houses and apartments,
there is everything else to build -
schools, churches, stores, offices, fac-
tories, airports, parks, playgrounds,
places of art, of entertainment, and of
government.
This picture of a whole new en-
vironment for Floridians is even now
in the imagination of our people. It
ought to be and here I venture a
prophesy and soon wil be "even
in the algebra of politicians."
The new Florida lien law of 1963
-passed after extensive study by a
committee of the Florida Legislature
assisted by the construction industry
- clearly demonstrates the advantage
of the coordinated approach. May the
partnership thus begun the creative
relationship between government and
the construction industry be con-
tinued.
To do so would be in the public
interest, and in the highest traditions
of good government.











Design ...
(Continued from Page 35)
not as a daftsman, but as an instru-
ment, equal in creative contribution
with the architect for the better
aesthetic interpretation of the archi-
tect's structural concept.
In other words, if we are to win
back some of the glory which classi-
cal architecture enjoyed, it may be
that we should bring together again
the two creative elements which
brought about the early successes in
historical architecture: the designer
and the artist.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


HOUDAILLE 0 <<'uds /
FOR FLORIDA'S FUTURE








NATURAL GAS
GASGRAMMI#U
i ASGRAM ;IN THE HEADLINES



IMPROVING CLEARWATER'S CLIMATE TAKES SOME DOING. BUT... Gas Sales Division, City of
Clearwater, reports: first phase of Clearwater Branch, St. Petersburg Junior College, is featuring 333 tons
of engine-driven natural gas air conditioning. Final plans call for 1080 tons-one of the State's largest
systems regardless of type. Also depending on dependable natural gas air conditioning-Clearwater's
recently completed Chamber of Commerce Building, Trinity Baptist Church and new Holiday Inn.
LAKE REGION SEES MULTIPLE BOILER CONVERSIONS TO NATURAL GAS. In Eustis, Florida Food
Products has changed four boilers from oil to natural gas. Lake Region Packing, Tavares, has converted
a 300 HP boiler and installed three new natural gas furnaces. Three additional oil-fired boilers have
gone over to natural gas at Golden Gem Growers, Inc., and the Elks' Harry Anna Crippled Children's
Home has changed two boilers in Umatilla ... all served by Triangle Division of Florida Gas.
"ALMOST UNBELIEVABLE" ECONOMY AT PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE. Florida
Public Utilities has installed its first central air conditioning system with waste heat re-
covery-a 25-ton Atmospak unit at new privately owned dormitories for Palm Beach
sP Junior College. Waste heat from natural gas engine heats hot water, with result that cool-
ing and hot water costs approximately an almost unbelievable $4.00 per dorm unit per
month. Owner's comment: "It's wonderful The apartments are cool and the water's hot.
We are going to install more I"
VERSATILE GAS GENIE GOING STRONG IN ST. PETERSBURG. Charbroiling steaks for Seven Steers
Restaurant, steam cleaning and baking enamel on cars for Fact-o-Bake Auto Painting, heating water
for Winn's Car Wash, cooking Kentucky Fried Chicken and Dunkin Donuts, fueling two new Hardee
Drive-in Restaurants and the new Summit Key Club's kitchen, and converting two 125 HP boilers from
oil to natural gas for Hood's Dairy... all in all St. Petersburg's Gas Department has kept versatile
Gas Genie jumpin'l
TAMPA HOSPITAL MAKES AIR CONDITIONING HEADLINES. Recent article in "Air Conditioning,
Heating and Refrigeration News," authoritative national trade magazine, features natural gas air con-
ditioning installation at Good Samaritan Hospital, Tampa. Under the heading, "Florida's Last Word in
Hospitals," article describes Arkla Heater-Cooler unit, air handling equipment, zone operation and in-
dividual room controls of 25-ton system serviced by Peoples Gas System. Proof of the pudding: since
above article written, hospital is installing an additional 25 tons to take care of expansion program.
U.S. OLYMPIC COOKING TEAM UNANIMOUS FOR NATURAL GAS. Although other
types of appliances were available, Master Chefs of the American Olympic Team chose
natural gas 100% in on-stage demonstrations featuring their only U.S. appearance prior
to the Culinary Olympics in Hamburg, Germany. After posing for their official photo t
S grouped around a natural gas flaming fountain in the Peoples Gas System booth at the
'-, Pan American Hotel and Restairant Exposition in Miami Beach, the Team went on to cap-
ture gold medals and a special citation in the international competition.
HILLSBOROUGH INDUSTRIAL AREA GETS MAJOR PIPELINE EXTENSION. Natural gas is now avail-
able in the fast-growing new industrial area south of Tampa along U.S. 41. In operation since December,
Peoples Gas System's new line runs from Tampa to Black Point to serve Florida Phosphate and inter-
mediate large-scale industrial customers. With dependable low-cost energy added to deepwater port
and uncongested rail service advantages, even more rapid development is forecast for the area.
MIAMI HOUSING AUTHORITY SIGNS FOR 900 NATGAS UNITS. Firm contract for cooking, water and
space-heating in 900 new units scheduled for late 1965 by Miami Housing Authority in northwest sec-
tion has been signed with City Gas, Hialeah. Necessary main extension will take City Gas into area
not previously served.


A GAS TO SAVE WORLD'S LARGEST CO-OP HALF-MILLION DOLLARS A YEAR.
The total energy for 5.840 families of Rochdale Village. New York. will be supplied
A by natural gas-even including electric power for lighting and small appliances
generated right on the site Natural gas exclusively will heat and cool the estimated
S -20.000 residents... will cook all their meals, provide their hot water, dry their
clothes, incinerate wastes...and save nearly hall-a-million dollars annually over
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Rftduction of Information contained In this dvrtusulemt I 8lmd witifut
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Gala Convention Gathering


View of receiving line during
President' Reception and Panormic
View of oecepion enjoyed by
hundreds


L.R: Roy M. Pooley, Jr., AIA, Sen. L-R: John P. Stevens, AIA, Rep. Clyde
John Mathews, Jr., Duval County; Simpson, Duval County, Harry E.
C. Elis Duncan, AIA. Brns, AIA, Rep. Tom Greene, Duval
County.


L-R: Rep. Fred Schultz, Duval County,
Rep. George P. Stalings, Dural Coun-
ty, Mr. Fred Bucky.


L-R: Mrs. Clyde Simpson,
Logan Chappell, AIA,
Rep. Louis Huntley,
Clay County.


L-R: Rep Bill
Basford, Duval
County, Lynwood
G. Willis, AIA.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes...

FAA Awards Architect-
Sculptor ...
Architect-sculptor Pinson Whiddon
has received the first FAA special
award for the best architecturally ori-
ented piece of sculpture in the exhi-
bition of the Associated Sculptors.
Herbert Savage, on behalf of FAA,
presented the $100 award to Mr.
Whiddon at the Norton Gallery in
West Palm Beach, where the ex-
hibit of sculpture was recently on dis-
play. Mr. Whiddon, President of
the sculptors' association, is on the
staff of Pancoast, Ferendino, Grafton,
and Skeels in Miami.





PCI Award Program ...
The third annual Awards Program
is being announced by the Prestressed
Concrete Institute, with entries due
at 205 W. Wacker Drive, Chicago by
June 1, 1965. All registered architects
and engineers practicing in the United
States are eligible to submit any type
of structure completed within the last
three years. A structure will be selected
which is deemed most worthy as a
contribution to the advancement of
prestressed concrete, based on origi-
nality of design, techniques of as-
sembly, effective employment of the
properties of prestressed concrete, and
aesthetic appearance when pertinent
to the application.





AIA Gulf Coast Chapter ...
Recently the Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, AIA, the local group of Pro-
fessional Consulting Engineers, and
the Gulf Coast Builders Exchange
held a joint meeting in Sarasota which
may well be the firerunner of a closer
relationship between these segments of
the building industry in the area ex-
tending from Manatee to Lee Coun-
ties on the Florida West Coast. Jack
West, President, Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, AIA., Donald J. Smally,
P.E., and D. C. Matcham, President,
Gulf Coast Builders Exchange, pre-
sided at the head table for their re-
(Contimued on Page 40)
FEBRUARY, 1965


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and lJckonvill


ADVUTlIRS' INDIX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 24
Florida Foundry
& Pattern Works . 40
Florida Gas Transmission 2-3
Florida Industries
Exposition ..... .40
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities 20-21
Florida Natural Gas
Association-Gasgram . 37
Florida Portland Cement-
Div. General Portland Cement 6
Florida Wood Councils 23
Houdaille-Duval-Wright Co.-
Div. Houdaille Industries,
Inc. . . .. .36
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corp.
of Florida ... .39
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 5
Miami Window Corporation 1
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. 39
Robbins Manufacturing Co. 36
Solite Corporation . . 8
Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co. . 35
United States Gypsum Co. 7
F. Graham Williams Co. . 22




























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MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
1251 Dooelttle Dr., San Lemsdn, Caif.
FACTORIES: Sam Lwndre CalImia
Warminrer, Pemm.. E Derand AtlasM






News & Notes .
(Continued from Page 9s)
spective organizations. Roland W.
Sellew, AIA., Program Chairman, in-
troduced the after-dinner speaker, Mr.
Harry Lindsey, Special Assistant to
the Regional Administrator, Housing
and Home Finance Agency. Mr. Lind-
sey spoke on the numerous over-all
functions of the HHFA and its sub-
sidiary agencies.
The cooperation of Sarasota Feder-
al Savings and Loan and First Fed-
eral Savings and Loan Associations of
Sarasota, made it possible to invite as
guests the elected and appointed of-
ficials of the municipalities and
counties in the West Coast area, to-
gether with their wives. Nearly two
hundred members of the sponsoring
organizations, guests and ladies were
present. The joint meeting was pre-
ceded by the regular meeting of the
architects' Chapter, followed by a
cocktail hour before the dinner.
As a result of tis meeting, each of
the three groups will appoint mem-
ber of a Cooperation Committee to
investigate and pursue matters of mu-
tual interest and concern.

University of Florida
Student Design Winner...
Terry George Hoffman of the Uni-
versity of Florida is the winner of the
$800 first prize in the fourth annual
design competition sponsored by the
Committee of Stainless Steel Produc-
ers. This year's problem was to design
a modular vacation cabin, prefabri-
cated and easily assembled and disas-
sembled for transfer from one location
to another. Hoffman's design was
praised by the jury for its simple
concept, uncomplicated and direct
expression of prefabrication, and its
interesting play of glass and wall area.
Rafael C. Moreu of the University
of Florida received honorable men-
tion. An award of $500 went to the
first prize winner's school for use in
furthering architectural education.

V. E. Brodeur, Jr., AIA, has opened
an office for the practice of architec-
ture at 201-A South Garden Avenue,
Clearwater, Florida.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








;D"#& O 0" 9mu


What manner of man is the new
Governor of Florida? What makes
him tick? What are his hobbies, his
pet likes and his attitudes toward
thins important to citizens of the
state?
What possibly would interest archi-
tects and other professional men-
especially in the building trades is
that Florida's new governor sees
growth and healthy progress ahead,
provided the state changes some of
its archaic operation into a more busi-
nesslike approach.
Haydon Burs, born on St. Pat-
rick's Day in 1912, has been a man
in a hurry ever since. Not so much
in a hurry to go on someplace else
and do other things, but to get mat-
ters settled which face him where
he is.
The Jacksonville Story and its
multi-million dollar urban re-develop-
ment without a cent in Federal
funds and all the ramifications and
assets of such progress is an old
story by now in Florida.
So let's approach a profile-type
look at Governor Burs by relating
some of the things he stands for, a
few things he has said, and some
things he has done.
We'll dismiss the other important
state issues by saying that education
is his prime concern as he approaches
the governor's chair. "If I am to be
remembered for one thing as Gov-
ernor of the State of Florida," he told
a large women's group in Miami dur-
ing the campaign, "it will be to see
to it that every child in Florida will
have an opportunity for a quality
education at all levels."
Governor Burns is conscious of
building and construction. He took
particular pride recently in the fact
that Jacksonville's AIA Chapter won
the Anthony Pullara award for "the
most active, progressive and vital pro-
gram for activity" in the Florida dis-
trict.
The new construction in Jackson-
ville that resulted from his leadership
and inspiration indicates much of his
thinking. Part of his influence is his
belief that buildings, particularly gov-
ernment buildings, should reflect the
progressive attitude of the city, or
state.
As prime examples, the civic audi-


torium and coliseum in Jacksonville
are radical departures from typical
buildings, and the new public library,
which Jacksonville City Council re-
cently voted unanimously to name for
Haydon Burns, will be another unique
architectural accomplishment.
Several years ago, when Jacksonville
was struggling to get a new baseball
park, a proposed sports arena seemed
a million miles away.
Mayor Bums, in acknowledging the
baseball park, set his new goal for not
just a sports arena, which did not suit
such groups as the Jacksonville Sym-
phony, but also for a coliseum AND
a civic auditorium.
A Jacksonville newspaperman asked
Mayor Burns if he did not feel the
bite a bit too ambitious, suggesting
they concentrate their plans on one
building built primarily for basket-
ball, ice hockey and the like, but with
a section that could be used for con-
certs and plays.
"No," Mayor Burns was adamant.
"Jacksonville deserves both and will
have both." And so they came to pass.
Charles Campbell, vice president in
charge of Prudential Insurance Com-
pany's 10-state office in Jacksonville
and who is heading up the Develop-
ment Commission for Bums, has been
quite frank about it for years. The 22-
story building and several thousand
jobs would not have come to Jack-
sonville had it not been for Bums'
leadership and encouragement, Camp-
bell testifies.
The Atlantic Coast Line did not
move its operation, bag, baggage and
several hundred families, to Jackson-
ville by throwing a dart at a map of
the Southeast. This was a major plum
to any city and competition was ter-
rific. But Mayor Burns, with the ener-
getic Chamber of Commerce at one
elbow and other civic and business
leaders at the other, spent many days
telling the Jacksonville Story. A tall,
impressive skyscraper on the water-
front next to the showpiece Auditori-
um is now symbolic of the many fam-
ilies and millions of dollars which
have since blended into the social and
economic picture of the community.
Himself an ardent sports fan a
former high school athlete, sandlot
ball player, horseman, bowler, fisher-
man and airplane pilot Burns


noted several years ago that negotia-
tions between the Florida and Georgia
Universities were bogging down and
becoming a source of newspaper
statement and counter statement.
Quiety, without fanfare or credit,
Burns stepped in and influenced a
decision. When terms were settled in
Atlanta, the Gator coach called Burns
long distance at near-midnight to offer
the glad tidings that Jacksonville's
number one regular football season
attraction was saved.
Several years ago the University of
Florida was host to Southeastern Con-
ference coaches at Welaka on the St.
Johns. Mayor Burns came as a special
guest of Coach Bob Woodruff, then
head Gator. On the "fishing morn-
ing" on the program there was a
shortage of professional guides. Burns
put down his tackle, climbed into the
stern of a boat, cranked up the motor
and led two men on a successful out-
ing- as a guide.
These are only a few points to pry
open a tiny peek at the multi-faceted
character of Haydon Bums, public
administrator and citizen. He is fun-
damentally a serious-minded man.
You'll see him calm-faced more than
perplexed or agitated, but you'll also
see him frown more than he will
smile.
The public's business is serious with
him and he gets more of it done in
a day than most men can in three.
Part of it may be because 16-hour
days are commonplace with him.
What manner of man is the new
Governor? No one can write a com-
plete and accurate story on Haydon
Burns, for the biggest chapter in Hay-
don Burns' life is just beginning.






7, 74e Cemoyu ad 44d e' Purapos4e 7Tsd NaN ...




The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


Architecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience... The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W
Goin lived and worked.
The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Archie G. Parish, President
of Women's Auxiliary, 145 Wild-
wood Lane, S. E., St. Petersburg 5,
Florida.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER, AIA.




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