• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Architecture and tourism
 The aesthetics of folded plate...
 Part II: The American city -- today...
 Craftsmanship
 50th annual convention program
 First annual "Florida craftsman...
 50th annual banquet entertainm...
 1964 building products exhibit...
 News and notes
 10th annual roll call, 1963-19...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00125
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1964
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00125
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
    Advertising
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Architecture and tourism
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The aesthetics of folded plates
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Part II: The American city -- today and tomorrow
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Craftsmanship
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    50th annual convention program
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    First annual "Florida craftsman of the year award"
        Page 32
    50th annual banquet entertainment
        Page 33
    1964 building products exhibit directory
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    News and notes
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    10th annual roll call, 1963-1964
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






50th ANNUAL FAA
CONVENTION ISSUE

November, 1964











SSOCIA ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS




















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Bniruc aA4AI TiUn I L4anlauj
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representative who calls on you,
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shaping construction progress is the

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The producers of cement, today, do
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building materials.
A staff of 375 field engineers
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throughout the U.S. and Canada.
They provide expert advice and
authoritative information on con-


create technology, newest con-
struction methods and research
and development. A typical day
may find field men helping a ready-
mixed concrete producer design a
high-strength mix for a special
project-or consulting with high-
way engineers on pavement de-
signs for a modern expressway.
Later, they might be discussing
applications of prestressed con-
crete with the architects for a new
office building-or attending a
citizens' meeting about a proposed
new sewage plant.
Backing these field men are


engineers and specialists at PCA's
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$10 million Research and Develop-
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500 publications and 85 films
covering every modern use of
concrete.
The work of PCA in the United
States and Canada is supported
by competing manufacturers of
portland cement. This service pro-
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everyone in providing better, more
economical and imaginative con-
struction of every kind.


This is Florida's Sebastian Inlet Bridge-a new concept in prestressed bridge design by Consulting Engineers Howard, Needles, Tammen
& Bergendoff, Orlando. The bridge features a 180-foot prestressed clear channel span with a 120-foot drop-in girder resting on 30-
foot cantilevers. Note the walkways extending over some of Florida's finest fishing grounds.

Portland Cement Association
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803,
An organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete

2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





In Your Design for

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A swivel version of the famous ped1






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Florida Architect


OFFICIAL JOURNAL

IN


OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

7Thi IssuC --
Architecture and Tourism . . . . . . . . .. 11
By Roy M. Pooley, AIA
The Aesthetics of Folded Plates . . . . . . . . 13
By Clovis B. Heimsath, AIA
Part II The American City ... Today and Tomorrow . . . . 16
By Peter Blake, AIA
Craftsmanship . . . . . . ... . 21
By Granville Fisher, Ph.D.


50th Annual Convention Program . . . . . .
First Annual "Florida Craftsman of the Year Award" . .
50th Annual Banquet Entertainment . . . . .
1964 Building Products Exhibit Directory . . . . .


. 27-31
. 32
. 33
. 34


NEWS & NOTES
Newly-Elected Officers, AIA Chapters
Fallout Shelter Analysis Courses .
FCPA Honors Student . . .
AIA Honor Awards Program . .
Miami Student Honored . . .
10th Annual Roll Call 1963-1964 . .
Advertisers' Index . . . . .


FAA OFFICERS 1964
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 809 Bert Rd., Jacksonville
William T. Arnett, First V.-Pres., University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Rogers, Second V.-President, 511 No. Mills Street, Orlando
Herbert R. Savage, Third V.-President, 2975 Coral Way, Miami
H. Leslie Walker, Secretary, 3420 W. John F. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Thor Amlie, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Richard E. Jessen, Frank E. McLane,
William J. Webber; FLORIDA GULF COAST: Frank F. Smith, Jr., Sidney R.
Wilkinson; FLORIDA NORTH: Thomas Larrick, James T. Lendrum; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH WEST: Barnard W.
Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: John 0. Grimshaw, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
Earl M. Starnes; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, C. A. Ellingham, Walter
B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: Fred G. Owles, Jr., Joseph N. Williams; PALM
BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Kenneth Jacobson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater, Florida
Executive Director, Florida Association of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables, Florida
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA, Chairman; Wm. T. Arnett, Fred W. Bucky, Jr.,
B. W. Hartman Jr., Dana B. Johannes.


. 39
. 39
. 40
. 43
. 43
. 44-45
. 42


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Inisitute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7454.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
ut publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; April Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.

FOTIS N. KAROUSATOS
Editor
JEAN THOMPSON
Editorial Assistant


VOLUME 14

NUMBER 11 I96
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







T GAS GENIE



IGASGRAM IiN THE HEADLINES


DEPENDABILITY WAS MAJOR FACTOR IN MIAMI RETIREMENT HI-RISE. Will, dependability a must
for its elderly lo.w-inco-me tenants, Miami Housing Authority chose natural gas to provide steam for
heating, and lor essential hot .vater and incineration series in its new 13--story, 322-unit hiah rise
apartment building scheduled to open in Dezember Florida Gas provides for cooking and dishwash-
ing in central facilities, as well.

a MRS. AMERICA'S "DREAM HOME" HIGH ON NATURAL GAS. St Petersburg showplace
- home. .built along lines sug-.g:sted by I Irs America contestants features gas gas. gas. .
a clean sw eep o'. air conditionin., heatiing co okinim, hot w.alter and laundry drying!
!73, St 1 Petersburg Gas Department also ser. ing 7 alditi_-nal rnodel homes featuring 23 tons
of natural gas air conditioning for three progressive builders.

NO UTILITIES BILLS FOR TENANTS OF FLORIDA'S FIRST "TOTAL ENERGY" APARTMENTS! Ten-
ants of new' high rise David William apartments in Coral Gables will have unlimited use of utilities in
their rent City Gas Comnpany will supply natural gas for t'.ao Solar Turbine Engines which will pro-
vide all needed electric power for lighting, air conditioning, heating hot water power kitchen utensils,
refrigerators and dish,.washers But plush cooking center with built-in range, oven and separate broiler
in each apartment will still be all-gas'

JAX SKYTOP RESTAURANT HIGH IN PRAISE OF NATURAL GAS. "Delightedl Th.atis management s
reaction to natural gas installation in Embers Restaurant atop 19-story Universal Marion Building.
Restaurant, which revolves to allord panoramic views, features unique "Keep-Warm" food heater
with down-burnini flames designed by Florida Gas

IDEAL RETIREMENT HOME FEATURES NATURAL GAS APPLIANCES! Mackle Brothers' model retire-
ment home in Florida Exhibit at World's Fair has natural gas range. gas hot water for laundry gas
dryer, and is heated -.vith natural gas But that's nothina --- just about everything else at the Fair is
heated with gas--over 90 in fact.

ANOTHER NATGAS AIR CONDITIONED SCHOOL FOR ST. PETERSBURG. Pinellas School
Board's pioneering in 'cool schools. continues and natural gas continues to dominate,
being specified in five of six: air conditioned school s already built or under way Latest is
Azalea Junior High .with two natural :gas engine-driven units totalling 140 tons

OCALA SOLVES TOUGH HEATING JOBS WITH NATURAL GAS INFRA-RED. How. large, har.d-to-heat
areas respond to multiple in flra-red natural gas installations is sho.n in two: big plants -erved by
Ocala Gas Co Assembly room of Perry Prng Prntn ocess. Inc, w..vhere millions of copies of All Florida
Maga.!ne are processed. maintains ideal temperature with six: 50.000i BTU units Lonergan Corp.'s
Pacem-aker Trailer plant uses eeven infra-red heaters in it1 hard-lo-heat cabinet shop
DRIVE-INS THRIVE IN NEW SMYRNA BEACH. It ? dependable nalurl gas for three new drive-ins
in State's newest service area Clinching sales ,arl ument not one minute's service interruption to
Sou th Florida IN.atural Gas Co customers from either Cleo or Doral

EFFICIENCY NOTE: ONE GAS WATER HEATER REPLACES FOUR ELECTRIC. When Clear.rater's
Lagoon Motel added 22 rooms. City of Clearwater Gas Dept took out four electric water heaters put in
one natural gas unit to carry the entire load While at it. they put in a natural gas pool heater, too

I la CLEO. DORA & CO. FAILED TO HUFF-PUFF GAS GENIE. Rernr- i,. r.--i'-!r.ne
I .: .. r- 7 n .: 2 ir. rii.r _a 1 :.' .. :1 - in -
:inE :m -:..,h *i.: :1 r-p:,-r I- not one -r1:e rl.-.rurj i.:.n -r:, Hurri.- rn Cr :
-.ir.e r e E- iir-. j reh-:r n.:.rt riih r E-- p d 'n :.i h-. :.r r-:.:r.- I 11-
r- Ir I ,i I r rru .i:r: l. r, rr,.i m o -r :I hour r.l i ,: r n :-.,


Reproduction or information contained in this advertisement is authorized without
restriction by the Florida Natural Gas Association, P. Box 191. Fort Pierce. Fia.





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a wall, a door, a partition, a fence, a roof, a
window, a mirror or a piece of furniture ...
of almost any shape, color, texture, size or
design? Transparent, translucent, reflective
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and corrosion? Never becomes obsolete ...
and needs no maintenance but washing?

























E Steel E Wood E Concrete E Glass ] Masonry






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Be sure to visit the PPG Exhibit at Booth No. 30


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT























cypress is back!
and Georgia-Pacific has it, for every paneling, finish and fascia need!
turn page for details







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758-7616

J
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ORLANDO
2721 Regent St.
293-5781


TAMPA
3701 E. Columbus Drive
626-6107


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74e Preadet Speeas to ete 7lorida 7cavet e oucd ..


Architecture And Tourism

By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
President, Florida Association of Architects


Some of you may wonder just why
architects should be particularly in-
terested in this organizational meeting
of the Florida Travel Council which
is primarily concerned with attract-
ing visitors to Florida.
It is my purpose to make clear to
you our interest and perhaps indicate
the part we may play in' attaining
your objectives.
Now, God surrounded this Florida
peninsula with mighty oceans and
graced its unending shores with
gleaming beaches. Its interior boasts
majestic rivers and countless glitter-
ing lakes set amongst exotic sub-
tropical growth and bathed daily in
salubrious sunshine.
Yet these natural wonders alone
do not account for our place in the
sun.
Without the highways, railways
and skyways you build and operate,
very few would be able to come to
our state.
Without the gracious, attractive
facilities for fun and rest operated
so capably by you friendly hosts,
few would care to remain or return.
Without the efforts of those of you
who so well tell our story to the
world, who would even know we
exist?
In perhaps a little different way,
our architects, too, are much con-
cerned and contribute greatly to that
which is good in Florida.
In fact it is only the architect who
is qualified to do one job so vitally
essential to our success-the creation
of beauty, order and delight in our
man-made environment!
I suggest to you that there is no
greater tourist attraction than archi-
tecture the architecture of great
cities and of great buildings. It is a
truth we each encounter and use each
day. Consider, for example, the cities
of New York, London, Paris, San
Francisco, or Los Angeles. Or con-
sider Rockefeller Center, the Empire
State Building, the Washington
Monument, or the great new Saarinen
Arch at St. Louis, which will shortly
NOVEMBER, 1964


become one of the most important
tourist attractions in America. Within
Florida alone the magnetic appeal of
fabulous Miami Beach, historic St.
Augustine, Bok Tower or the Jack-
sonville Story make the point!
Architecture is a primary require-
ment for an urban society and archi-
tects are a natural product of urban-
ism. These are the professionals who
best know and understand cities and
their buildings as related to the people
who use them.
And this is important because
"people" is really what architecture
is all about. It is the creation of
shelter, housing, accommodation and
pleasurable surroundings in response
to the aesthetic needs of man.
We people of Florida are busily
building our state at a frantic pace,
and all our 1800 architects are deeply
concerned that we do that job well;
that we avoid, if we can, new com-
munities repeating the same dreadful
and costly mistakes of the past.
Perhaps, as parents find with their
children, most growing communities
will have to learn through their own
mistakes. Still, this is a terrible waste
and we must do all we can on behalf
of orderly and beautiful develop-
ment.
There is no city in America which
can be unashamed of its festering
slums and decaying centers. Harlem
has been much in the news, but a
simple open-eyed drive through down-
town Tampa or Miami, or any other
urban Florida community will surely
make us uneasy. Jacksonville's mag-
nificent expressway system cut a
broad thirty-odd mile swath through
dilapidation and filth and thereby
earned great credit for its planners.
However, it also lays open to view
throughout many of its miles the vast
morass of ugliness left to fester and
breed poverty, ignorance and cor-
ruption.
Yes, your architects are concerned
that when we attract new visitors to
our state they find it a good place
to visit and to live. We want them


to find broad, beautiful boulevards,
majestic bridges, gracious churches,
schools and stores, friendly business
buildings and happy homes. We
would like them to know at a glance
that Florida cares and has no equal!
Those who live beyond our borders
know better than we the enviable
reputation of Florida architecture.
That reputation is an asset which
might well be further developed and
utilized in promoting travel to our
state.
I understand that the things we are
now talking about are not of a nature
to now become an appropriate work
program for this body. Our goals here
today are more immediate. However,
I did want to voice the concern of my
profession in these matters because
they are directly related to our pur-
pose here today. Further, as a long
range phase of our planning, we may
very well wish to take positions on
matters concerning building codes,
zoning, fire safety and similar sub-
jects which certainly have their im-
pact on the traveling public. Beyond
this, you can each in your own com-
munity exert your considerable influ-
ence in behalf of sound and reward-
ing growth.
Specifically, I want you to know
that your architects are deeply con-
cerned with and totally committed to
the growth and development of our
great state. We share your problems
and concerns. We are always prepared
to devote our special talents and abil-
ities to the common and uncommon
problems of each of our communities.
Each of you here today exert con-
siderable influence within your com-
munity. Your voice will be heard in
seeking better solutions to the de-
sign and construction of our cities;
our planning, zoning, transportation,
utilities distribution, and all the
complex mechanics of an urban so-
ciety. Please don't hesitate to call on
the architects of your area. They
will gladly join hands with you in
working for a greater, finer, more
beautiful Florida!









































































Complete 1964 catalogue avail-
able from Blumcraft of Pittsburgh,
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh 13, Pa.

*Trademark ) 1964 Blumcraft of Pittsburgh









The Aesthetics of Folded Plates



By CLOVIS B. HEIMSATH, AIA
Assistant Professor of Architecture, Rice University


(An address on architectural aspects of folded plate
construction given for the Structural Conferences on Fold-
ed Plates held at, Lamar State College of Technology,
April 1963; The University of Houston, April 1963; South-
ern Methodist University, September 1963. Mr. Heimsath
is a partner in the firm Jenkins, Hoff and Heimsath,
Architects and Engineers.)


Not many years ago architects went to great efforts to
cover up the clear structural forms brought into building
by the engineer. Each new form, the steel truss, the shell,
the hyperbolic paraboloids, the folded plates threatened.
aesthetics as interpreted by the architect. Architects are
often called "form givers," yet once they were the "form
removers." Today the bars are down. In the all-encompas-
sing name of Contemporary Architecture anything seems
to go. It is interesting that in the short span of fifty years
architects and engineers have turned from fearing to es-
pousing each new structural form. The credo of some
seems to be the bolder the better, the more the better,
and it seems the less studied the bolder.
Structural exhibitionism is loose in the wdrld and
nothing short of good common sense will end the con-
glomeration of misuse. A recently opened shopping center
in Houston is literally packed with forms, each a mere
echo of the grand structure it would like to be, each
fighting and upstaging the next. If the poor observer is
confused by the visual world around him, there is good
reason. The fact is the visual world around him is con-
fused. Too often the building profession itself is to blame,
for not everything goes, even in the name of progress. The
aesthetics of architecture is changing, but this is different
from not having an aesthetics. Design principles are as
vital to good architecture today as in the past; and al-
though more flexible today, they operate to guide the hand
of the serious designer.
Gestalt psychology, a school which expounds that the
response to an environmental situation is complete and
unanalyzable rather than a sum of specific and individual
reactions to particular elements, has through experimenta-
tion established many telling insights into the brain as it
experiences form. Humans lack the feelers of the bug
which warn the bug of danger, yet man is handsomely
compensated with a mind which intuitively judges the
visual world around him and plots his action. For the
Gestalt psychologist, aesthetic judgment is closely linked
with survival. From primordial time man has learned to
judge distance, movement, form and space as if his life
depended on this intuition alone. Even in our civilized
NOVEMBER, 1964


life today, if often does. Few of us cross a busy street
without looking both ways, or walk into a dark tunnel, or
climb out on a scaffolding after the workmen have gone
home. Recently a house in Houston was demolished and
the supports were removed from a side porch. For days the
porch roof hung out in space, cantilevered off the second
floor. No one would walk beneath. While experience
showed the roof would stay up, intuitively the viewer
knew that it was not supposed to. In short, it was strange!
The viewer was disquieted. The neighbors slept better
when it was finally torn down.
Man sees far more than he generally admits. When
something is understandable, his mind rests. When some-
thing is not clear, he reacts with confusion. Although
few visual situations actually forebode danger, man can
not have a correct evaluation of this unless his mind is
constantly looking, judging, intuitively calculating.
How can Gestalt help in an evaluation of folded plate
structures? Perhaps with a greater awareness of the mind's
probing ability to evaluate, the source of good and con-
fused design can be appreciated more fully. For example,
a folded plate is a long span structure. The professional's
knowledge of structure makes this clear; the non-profes-
sional's eye intuitively tells the same thing. When a
folded plate is used on what is quite clearly a short span
situation, it may irritate the professional, but without any
question it confuses the spectator. Intuitively he evaluates
the deep section of the fold and "feels" that it can span a
goodly distance. If it does not, he has been fooled; his
intuitive judgment miscalculated. Surely he is not ex-
pected to react with glee over this affrontal to his com-
mon sense. A meaningless form is that and nothing more.
It is a meaningless form. When a folded plate has mean-
ing, it is clear, it does its job simply, and it does no job
for which it is not suited. It is designed to respect the
composition of which it is a part, its neighbors to each
side, and the uninterrupted space which it implies.
Certain situations ripe for ugliness and misuse are
common to most applications of the folded plate. First
of all, the folded plate, as other exposed /structural forms,
is an entity in itself. It merges with other forms only at
great peril. The problem is not unlike that of a dome with
which architecture has had far greater experience. A dome
is a structural entity. Throughout history it has been ex-
pressed as one undefilable unit of composition. It has
been pristinely set above the square crossing of the nave
with transitional squinches, later by the custom-designed
pendentives, and it took the Renaissance 200 years to
perfect this one transition from one form to another.
(Continued on Page 14)





Folded Plates . .
(Continued from Page 13)
The dome, when squashed together as in the truli
houses, loses its clarity. And while the houses are pic-
turesque, they are unfortunate transitions between domes.


determine the type plate to use, answer some of the
variables and lead to a balanced composition.
For any given span and loading condition, there may
theoretically be an optimum structural form. It is a stated
rule of thumb that the most economical depth is 1/15th
of the span. Yet there are variables in the design of
folded plates, and there are any number of optimum de-
signs, depending upon which variables are chosen. The
angle of fold, the height and the thickness can vary, and
the forms themselves can be Z's or V's or prismatic forms
of many varieties.










\ /nF/fLFL



v 7 ^


The contemporary designer seems even less sensitive
to the aesthetics involved with folded plates, and he
thinks nothing of interrupting them, pasting trivial secon-
dary forms to the sides, perhaps setting a long, one-story
office wing hard beside a three-story machine shop.


One of the most interesting shapes is the Z-form which
combines structure and excellent overhead lighting.


The entity of the folded plate is by nature repetitive.
Seldom is there one folded plate; rather they are built in
sequence. The modulation of the roof sets up a pattern
which strongly effects the facade beneath, as the columns
did on the Greek temple or in a medieval arcade. No one
would think of bricking up every eighth space between
columns on a Greek temple, yet similar design lapses
occur far too frequently with folded plates and similar
exposed structural forms. Repetitive forms such as the
folded plate must create a compositional framework for
other elements, and the cap must fit the head. The parts
must be in proportion.
Aesthetics has changed, yet good proportion is as
much a part of contemporary composition as it was his-
torically.
When speaking of composition and proportion, the
factors to be considered in the design are the other ele-
ments of the composition. These elements can help
14


Support for the plate roof can be effective or disastrous.
In buildings in which it is effective, it is honest and clear.
The roof itself should "read," so the structure supporting
it should be made known. Folded plates which span
(Continued on Page 46)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























Spice your designs

with unusual woods.

(Here's afrormosia

for a starter.)


Afrormosia, as you might suspect, is an African
wood. It has some resemblance to teak and is at times
used as a substitute. But it stands on its own
character-an interesting grain pattern, often with
a mottle figure, and a soft brown color.
For unusual color, take a look at bubinga. It varies
from pale to deep flesh color with thin purple lines-
with a straight or broken stripe, and mottle
or shell figure.
For fresh ideas to spice your designs, browse through
the library of fine veneers for Weldwood
Architectural Paneling. The selection is constantly
changing. But at any particular time, you'll find a
wide variety of woods with unusual character. You
may see such woods as afrormosia, East Indian
laurel, orientalwood, teak with a rare figure. You'll
usually find bubinga, makore, flamboyant rosewood,
and zebrawood.
And there's an easy way to do your browsing.
Simply decide the general character of the wood you
want and talk to a United States Plywood Architects'
service representative. He'll assemble samples of
currently available veneer flitches that might meet
your requirements-having the length and quantity
you need. You can examine them in your own office,
at your leisure.
For more information about Weldwood Architectural
Paneling, send in the coupon at the right or contact
your nearest United States Plywood branch office.


WEL DWOO D

Architectural Paneling
United States Plywood Branch Offices: 603 East 8th Street,
Jacksonville 6, Florida; 3675 N.W. 62nd Street, Miami 47, Florida;
5510 North Hesperides, Tampa 3, Florida.
--------------------------------1
United States Plywood, Dept. FA11-64
777 Third Ave., New York, N. Y. 10017
Please send me "Weldwood Architectural Paneling."

N am e ........... ....................................

Firm ..................................................

Address........ .............................

City ................... State........Zip Code...........
L-----------------------
Come see us at the 1965 World's Fair-Better Living Building.
Board room of South Miami Federal Savings & Loan Association,
South Miami, Fla. Weldwood Algoma-Grade Architectural Paneling
is lot-matched half-round-cut afrormosia. Arch: Harry E. Penney
A.I.A., Penney & De Konschin, So. Miami, Fla. Designer: Vern
Currie A.I.D., Richard Plumer Business Interiors, Inc., Miami, Fla.


NOVEMBER, 1964





Poze 2 ... 74,4uic aa ekeve..


Today And Tomorrow


By PETER BLAKE, A.I.A.
Managing Editor
Architectural Forum


(Part II of this article is continued
from the October Issue of the Florida
Architect.)

On the City.as a Building
But if, and when, we do begin
to look at the city as a single build-
ing, or as a collection of a few mam-
moth buildings, a number of things
become quite evident:
First, it becomes evident that we
must, before everything else, solve
the problem of the structure of this
mammoth building-the basic skele-
ton or grid that will support all the
different rooms to be contained with-
in our mastodon.
Second, we must solve the problem
of mechanical and electrical and
transportation and communication
services within our mammoth build-
ing.
Third-and this is to clarify that
I am not speaking of a sort of all-
knowing superplanner who will domi-
nate all our lives-third, it becomes
evident that we must devise an urban
structure and network of services that
will permit infinite variety and flex-
ibility within the framework of that
basic grid .
In other words, what we need is
not a master plan like that developed
for Brasilia, where block after block
after superblock looks the same and
bores you to tears. We need a frame-
work of basic services, a structural
and mechanical skeleton. When we
have that, the question of what in-
dividual buildings should look like
becomes a matter of personal pref-
erence.
There is at least one proposal for
such a basic skeleton applied, in this
instance, to the problem of rebuild-
ing a portion of Frankfurt, Germany.
This skeleton is nothing vague or
abstract. It exists, in embryonic form,
right now.
Our grid plan is a perfectly good
urban skeleton. In its present form,
it happens to be a 17th or 18th


century skeleton, and it hasn't worked
very well ever since we have had
pipes and wires to bury under the
"gridiron." And it hasn't worked ever
since we have had cars as well as
pedestrians, buses, trolleys and so on.
But it is a perfectly good grid.
All you need to do with it is to make
it a multi-level affair, with different
kinds of services and different kinds
of traffic on different levels. Once this
is established, any sort of building
can be "plugged into" that grid or
skeleton in almost any place-and it
will work.
And the grid itself can be a tre-
mendous architectural form. Just look
at what those insane freeways have
done to the shapes of our cities. In
the hands of intelligent, capable
urban designers, these enormous free-
way structures could be as beautiful
as Roman aqueducts and as strong
a form-giving influence on our cities.
There is no reason why these great
skeleton-structures could not serve as
buildings also-continuous buildings.
Such buildings need not become
walls. They can be broken through
almost anywhere to open up and
frame a view, or to permit another
service structure to cross.
None of this is a pipe-dream. Right
now, near Toulouse, France, a city
for 100,000 people is under construc-
tion. It will consist in its entirety
of continuous buildings that also
serve as streets for pedestrians-with
bridges between buildings to serve as
cross streets. Right now, too, the
British are working on Cumbernauld,
a new town which will be, in effect,
a great highway and service system
expanded into a series of buildings.
And just a short time ago, an archi-
tectural competition decided a new
campus for the Free University at
West Berlin. The winning scheme is
a single building that is really a grid
of roads, pedestrian walks and serv-
ices. Various campus buildings can be
(Continued on Page 18)


Apopka, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Bartow, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Blountstown, City of Blountstown
Boca Raton, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Boynton Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Bradenton, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Chattahoochee, Town of Chattahoochee
Chipley, City of Chipley
Clearwater, City of Clearwater
Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas District
Cocoa, City Gas Co.
Crescent City, City of Crescent City
Cutler Ridge, City Gas Co.
Daytona Beach, Florida Gas Co.
Deland, Florida Home Gas Co.
Delray Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Eau Gallie, City Gas Co.
Eustis, Florida Gas Co.
Fort Lauderdale, Peoples Gas System
Fort Meade, City of Fort Meade
Fort Pierce, City of Fort Pierce
Gainesville, Gainesville Gas Co.
Geneva, Alabama, Geneva County Gas
District
Haines City, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Hialeah, City Gas Co.
Hollywood, Peoples Gas System
Jacksonville, Florida Gas Co.
Jay, Town of Jay
Lake Alfred, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake City, City of Lake City
Lake Wales, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Lake Worth, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Lakeland, Florida Gas Co.
Leesburg, City of Leesburg
Live Oak, City of Live Oak
Madison, City of Madison
Marianna, City of Marianna
Melbourne, City Gas Co.
Miami, Florida Gas Co.
Miami Beach, Peoples Gas System
Mount Dora, Florida Gas Co.
New Smyrna Beach, South Florida
Natural Gas Co.
North Miami, Peoples Gas System
Ocala, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Opa Locka, City Gas Co.
Orlando, Florida Gas Co.
Palatka, Palatka Gas Authority
Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities
Palm Beach Gardens, City of
Palm Beach Gardens
Panama City, Gulf Natural Gas Corp.
Pensacola, City of Pensacola
Perry, City of Perry
Plant City, Plant City Natural Gas Co.
Port St. Joe, St. Joe Natural Gas Company
St. Petersburg, City of St. Petersburg
Sanford, Sanford Gas Co.
Sarasota, Southern Gas and Electric Corp.
Starke, City of Starke
Tallahassee, City of Tallahassee
Tampa, Peoples Gas System
Titpsville, City Gas Co.
Umatilla, Florida Gas Co.
Valparaiso, Okaloosa County Gas District
West Miami, City Gas Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida Public Utilities Co.
Williston, City of Williston
Winter Garden, Lake Apopka Natural Gas
District
Winter Haven, Central Florida Gas Corp.
Winter Park, Florida Gas Co.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











NATURAL GAS cooks-

4 heats this clean!
We have just boiled water in this glass dish over an open nat-
ural gas flame. You can see for yourself natural gas burns
clean... it's 100% combustible! There's no smoke, soot or oily
residue. Not only do pots and pans stay clean, but burners in
natural gas water heaters, furnaces and boilers stay equally
clean. Natural gas is now available in every major population
center Qnd industrial area of Florida. Call the natural gas
utility that serves your area and learn more about the many
advantages of dependable, clean burning natural gas.


G AS
TRANSMISSION COMPANY
WINTER PARK, FLORIDA


NOVEMBER, 1964






The American City...
(Continued from Page 16)
"plugged into" this grid anywhere, at
will.
And so it goes-in Europe .
and in the Far East . and in Latin
America . everywhere except in
the U. S.-cities are being restruc-
tured in radically new ways. They are
being conceived as single buildings,
or organisms, to solve the problems
of the 20th and the 21st centuries.
But in our country, people like
Lou Kahn or Paolo Soleri-who do
have a clear vision of the city as a
coherent organism-are referred to as
"impractical dreamers" and worse,
and put out to pasture to be fed by
the Ford Foundation (which looks
after all the inconvenient people in
our midst).
On the Planning Function
The only reason we are not plan-
ning modern organic cities-despite
our wealth of money and talent-is
that politicians have never under-
stood that planning really means
overall coordination and vision. In-
stead, we have so many different kinds


of planners highway, school, city,
county, state, federal, economic, polit-
ical, social-we have so many varie-
ties, each with its own jealously
guarded specialty, that we have made
a mockery of the word and the func-
tion it represents.
A specialized planner is a contra-
diction in terms. All planners must
be generalized planners, or they are
not planners at all. The first thing
to understand about the modern city
is that it is not a collection of build-
ings plus streets plus services plus
parks plus schools plus industries.
It is-it must be-a densely woven
fabric in which buildings are high-
ways are parks are pedestrian malls
are services, all of which add up to
one organic structure, each part of
which supports every other.
So, to begin, let us get rid of all
these specialized planners, all these
living contradictions who are in-
capable of seeing the forest for all
their private little trees. Let us re-
place them with a new sort of animal
- an urban designer who under-
stands the dynamics of the modern
city, the city in four dimensions.


If a city like New York can spend
$1 billion-either directly or through
American industry-to put up a silly
sideshow like the World's Fair out
in Flushing Meadows and tear it
down after two years, then I think
some of the enterprises and agencies
concerned with the problems of the
American city can spend a few mil-
lion dollars for-at least-a full-scale
demonstration of' what all leading
urban designers the world over are
talking about.
You may say: "All well and good,
but what do we do about East Har-
lem today?" It is a perfectly valid
question. Yes, there are desperate
problems that must be solved imme-
diately. But unless those who are
entrusted with the renewal of our
cities are possessed-by a great vision
-a vision far greater than that pos-
sessed by most official planners today
-unless they have a vision of the
great potentials of our cities, nothing
they do to meet a local urban crisis
will solve anything at all.
I am tired of all those who say
that visionaries are impractical. The
(Continued on Page 38)


47 I; ": '.. ---`-l~'L ~ .
A' ml rN
we *t
( ~ q. j .* Uc


or


Compact Equipment


Increases Efficiency


...and Saves


Costly Space


Push-button telephones allow busy people to handle
several calls at one time. These instruments speed
your telephone work; make it easy for you to transfer
calls; let you hold calls while you talk on another
line.
Streamlined console "switchboards" sit conveni-
ently on the corer of a desk. Yet they handle just as
much traffic as a regular PBX board! These modern
consoles are the answer for many business problems.
Is your equipment keeping up with your needs?
Call your Telephone Company Business Office for a
free communications check-up.

Southern Bell
...a Goa wi#k ~ FAutu


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-'V


Irrrmrmrrrrrarr~*rrr*uull
~B~l~laOBgd~rPIR~M


X

.;&











For quieter, more comfortablefloors-


Siltere' a we(i ''tliIerproof.
a(ld term ite-protecfted


to mneei




F1 i LItli-d -cI'liitli linel L'I n-tF.Uc t ion in ca',-

deltn anl h~i~IhI-r~i-i :lpall t menlts htl~,tl
lelt-l.ll a r-;d lpz1 Itll ll(-Ilt-;. d Ilotek,



-iliI-flt\ andli l.~Iet c'iillip)lte-.-lal -.titngotli.
111 ilt _I11 3 Ii me0 I diect ti I in beittelr

* tit (lanipne--l ic-~Ile-t lltti i:ll. tim k~t-tEpI, m'',i -
nil I 1- I Ilihi~ltd mi&
Reni-.ibeitil I.All Hm mnn-' W'te M i. Ieat -




*~ 111)1 ml if I lliis*i- ?it ti Illll 'U11- ~.ll tri te a nti
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h1 ild inI Illi tel ial (kCLI alel .


t every price and purpose




.1 f. .L ". .


New "4-Way" Floor Decking is applied in 2'
x 8' T&G panels, 1 11/32" thick, directly to
joists. Sub-floor, underlayment, sound dead-
ening and weatherproof protection. INR indi-
cated is with carpet and pad over "4-Way".


(/


For use in high and low rise aparlmenls.
motels hole s and anywhere that concrete
rloors are installed above giade. 4 x4 panels
of '. and "'Resilbase" wdh pad and
carpel-ng laslened in conventional manner
provide INR indicated.


Tested in accordance wilh FHA =750.
ITesl resullt on requesli
Write lor descriptive Itleralure


HOMASOTE COMPANY
TRENTON 3 NEW JERSEY





NOVEMBER, 1964


Regular Homasote in 4' x 4' or 4' x 8' panels
for use over plywood or other wood construc-
tion (even old hardwood floors!) Conventional
fastening of carpeting and pad provides the
INR indicated.
(2 layers plywood)

Architectural Department L-13
HOMASOTE COMPANY, Trenton 3, N.J.
Please send ] Technical literature on your Resilient Underlayments
] Acoustical test results 0 Name of local Homasote supplier.

N A M E .. ... .. ...............
FIRM ...
ADDRESS . .........
CITY ...STATE


I ENR
+ 19
+ 19 *


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Quarrying limerock at the Dade County Plant, Miami.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Smiotec Releatigonsr Between 1rcCdtect actd traftman


CRAFTSMANSHIP

By GRANVILLE FISHER, Ph.D.


(The following speech was given
by Dr. Fisher during the recent Crafts-
man Award Dinner of the Florida
South Chapter.)


The nature of the universe is such
that everything is in motion Noth-
ing is really static. Even the granite
was not always a hardened stone. It
was once mud. This primeval mud
became the hardened form which we
now see. But even this has already
begun to disintegrate. The seed grows
into a rose. The rosebud open into
full blossom, fades, drops it's petals,
and goes back into soil. There is al-
ways this cycle of building up and
tearing down; creation and destruc-
tion.
And this also characterizes human
affairs. There are those who build
and those who tear down. Alexander
Dumas said that most men live and
die without ever really creating any-
thing, but that no man lives and dies
without destroying.
If there is any purpose or meaning
at all to the human enterprise it is
that of building a better world for
ourselves and for our children. If
there is any purpose or meaning to
the life of any individual it is to have
moved through the experience of liv-
ing and being, finally leaving the
scene a little bit better because he
passed this way -better because the
product of his hand and his mind is
a little more enduring; because it
more adequately fulfills human needs;
and better because it is a little more
beautiful. And the beauty may be
beauty of form or beauty of excel-
lence.
Craftsmanship refers to this good-
ness of human effort; it reflects
workmanship that is more enduring,
more fulfilling, and more beautiful.
The craftsman thus places himself on
the creative side of life, not on the
destructive side.
Although labor is involved, crafts-
NOVEMBER, 1964


manship is far beyond just labor. The
mule draws the plow not because he
recognizes the part he plays in build-
ing a distant harvest, but because
there is a bit in his mouth, and some-
one's hand upon the reins. Many
humans perhaps even most labor
for similar reasons, and thus look upon
themselves as harnessed, driven, co-
erced and controlled by outside forces;
never feeling any personal identifica-
tion with the end product of their
toil. And, like the unthinking and un-
feeling mule, they often trample and
destroy the very thing their effort is
designed to build.
The architect is in many ways also
a craftsman, but chiefly he is a spin-
ner of dreams and fantasies. His ex-
cellence lies in the quality of these
dreams, the originality of their forms,
and the reach of his imagination. But
dreams they would remain were it
not for those whose skill and talent
and know-how make these dreams
come trtre; those who translate the in-
tangible mental forms in the mind of
the architect into tangible reality.
But the conscientious worker and
craftsman are more than just trans-
lators of the architect's imaginings.
They too are innovators, originators.
They express themselves through their
products, and the mark of their in-
dividuality is stamped indelibly on
their work. As such expressions of
individuality reach various levels of
excellence, the attention of others is
drawn to them. As the architect is
made increasingly aware of these su-
perior products he seeks to incorpor-
ate them into the scheme of his
dreams, and thus attain an even great-
er magnificence in the completed
whole.
So, we have here the symbiotic
relationship between architect and
craftsman each essential to the ful-
fillment of the other. As the poet
said, "No man is an island." No man
walks alone, independent of others.
The recognition of this interdependent


relationship between architect and
craftsman will hasten the more com-
plete self-realization of both.
So much for some of the social as-
pects of craftsmanship. Just as im-
portant is the question of what crafts-
manship means to the craftsman him-
self. One of the greatest dangers
confronting man today even more
dangerous and destructive than the
atomic and hydrogen bombs is the
alienation of the individual from his
work; his lack of a sense of purpose
and meaning through identification
with the end products of his labor.
It is filling the offices of the psycholo-
gist, the psychiatrist, and our mental
hospitals with those who are flounder-
ing in confusion, anxiety, and despair;
void of purpose or direction. "Who
am I? Where do I fit in? Where am
I headed? Where do I belong?" So
many have not found answers to these
questions.
So much of this is due to a dis-
torted sense of values which regards
work as an evil to be avoided if pos-
sible. Certainly drudgery is an evil,
but work, is a necessity even a bene-
diction. In the mental hospitals so
many find their way back to sanity
through work, through occupational
therapy. The distorted mind of the
criminal is often rehabilitated by pro-
grams that allow him to experience
the rewards of constructive occupa-
tion.
To be occupied is essential for
health physical health and psycho-
logical health. To be enthusiastic
about one's occupation is perhaps life's
most enduring satisfaction and happi-
ness. Enthusiasm comes with a de-
veloping sense of skill and excellence,
and the opportunity to exercise that
excellence. To look upon one's work
and to know that it is good -life
has no greater reward.
Every man wears a mask conceal-
ing his true self from all other men.
But in his work he stands revealed
(Continued on Page 37)







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Just as a top tailor wouldn't think of using an inferior
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-Roger G. Weeks, architect, Pensacula, Florida


NOVEMBER, 1964






Book Review...


"Tree men spend their lives search-
ing for trees which will accommodate
themselves to the impossible condi-
tions of urban living . Trees and
people should band together against
the unwholesome ugliness of most
city living . If, instead of forcing
trees and people to conform to the
demands of today's cities, we were to
redesign those cities to conform to
the needs of trees and people, the
millennium might be near," says Gar-
rett Eckbo in his latest book, "Urban
Landscape Design," which McGraw-
Hill will publish in June.
Eckbo discusses the qualitative as-
pects of the general physical land-
scape with particular emphasis on
more urbanized areas, the relationship
between landscape and people, and
the importance of quality, complete-
ness, and continuity of landscape ex-
perience wherever we may be.
He endeavors to bridge the gap be-
tween various special ways of looking
at the landscape: Between those which
are detailed and specific and those
which are generalized and diagram-
matic; between those taken by various
professions; and finally between those
concerned with pure form and those
concerned with social content.
The first of the nine chapters of
"Urban Landscape Design" provides
a general summary of the natural, so-
cial, and philosophical background for
design thinking. Chapter Two is a
detailed discussion of the elements
which make up the physical land-
scape and their interrelationships
which shape the living space surround-
ing us. Chapter Three through Eight
are case study chapters, abundantly
supplied with illustrations and detail-
ed descriptions of specific projects,
arranged in expanding scale to demon-
strate the continuity of design think-
ing and feeling from small individual
spaces to community and region.
The last chapter, written by Ed-
ward A. Williams, a partner in the
firm of Eckbo, Dean, Austin and Wil-
liams, discusses the intimate recipro-
cal relationship between design and
maintenance and includes a survey
of certain quantitative aspects as ex-
pressed by superintendents of parks
and campuses.
"It is ironic that the richest coun-
try in the world, which boasts of its
high standard of living, should live in
26


a landscape so poverty-stricken in visu-
al quality," observes Eckbo. The qual-
ity of our physical environment can
ultimately be judged only by the re-
lations it establishes between the
three primary elements Structure,
Open Space, and Nature. The pro-
cess of urbanization tends to maximize
the first, minimize the second, and
eliminate the third; it is only by ar-
tistic and timely design and by proper
relation of the three elements that
man can derive peace and the reward
of beauty from his surroundings, he
concludes.
Garrett Eckbo has been prominent
in the field of landscape architecture
for many years. In recent years he has,
in addition to his professional prac-
tices, served as Program Chairman of
the Eighth International Design Con-
ference in Colorado (1958), and
Festival Designer of the Sixth All City
Outdoor Art Festival in Los Angeles
(1958). Other books written by Gar-
rett Eckbo are: "Landscape for Liv-
ing" (1950), and "The Art of Home
Landscaping" (1956).


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Black-Baker Photo


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BUSINESS INTERIORS
155 N. E. 40th ST., MIAMI, FLA. PLaza 1-9775

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







*.. i.. .

.I


Vtl~,~;

~ k~
t.~


The Theme DESIGN FOR LEARNING


With the steady growth of the population of this country and in par-
ticular because of the more rapid than average growth of the population
of the State of Florida, educational buildings of all types have become of
greater significance and of more importance to the architect than ever
before. It was in recognition of this that the planners for the convention
in the first stages of their work chose "Design for Learning" as the general
theme of the Convention.
S" Schools being built now are a far cry from those built only a few years
.ago, and the difference is not in the materials or construction but rather
that they were designed to meet today's special needs. The techniques of
-ieducating our children are not static. Foreign language laboratories with
tape recorders and ear phones have replaced the monotonous drill of irregu-
lar verbs. Television and film libraries have made far places, expensive
equipment, and complicated processes available to the smallest school.
Team teaching and special purpose rooms are common, and unless an
architect is aware of these and many other changes and advances in our
educational systems, he is unable to aid in the preparation of a program
for a new school or to translate that program into an efficient building that
will hold its value for a period of years. In order to hold its value it must
be flexible, because the techniques of today will give way to those of the
ROY M. POOLEY, JR. future just as surely as they have replaced those of the past.
President, FAA


L ai
JAMES T. LENDRUM
Program Chairman


A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR.
General Chairman


Itf
JAMES O. KEMP, JR.
Pres. Jacksonville Chapter


NOVEMBER, 1964 27


XT 11 p al I-entian

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS








P


A" E~i


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION C

GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTI

WEDNrESDAY, I lO.VWE MB I 1


9:30 A.M. Installation Product Exhibits,
to Mezzanine.
6:00 P.M. Installation Architectural Exhibit
Mezzanine.
1 :00 P.M. Registration for Exhibitors, FAA
to members, guests and students,
9:00 P.M. Mezzanine.
2:00 P.M. Board of Directors meeting,
President Roy M. Pooley, Jr.,
presiding, North Club Room.
3:00 P.M. OPEN BOARD MEETING, FAA
members are invited to attend z
to participate, North Club Room
6:30 P.M. PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION,
to Ballroom (black tie or business
8:00 P.M. suits). Cocktails, canapes, hours
d'oeuvres your convention
registration is your admittance.
8:00 P.M. Hospitality Suites open.


to midnight

THU
7:30 A.M.

8:30 A.M.
to
6:00 P.M.
9:00 A.M.
to
12:30 P.M.


10:00 A.M.
to
12:00 noon
10:00 A.M.
to
12:00 noon


f SDAY, NO' :".." 12
Breakfast Past President's
Advisory Council, Ballroom.
Registration, Mezzanine.


Opening of BUILDING PRODUCE
EXHIBIT, President Roy M. Pool
Jr., officiating. Guests, City anc
County Officials. Entrance to
Exhibit Area, Mezzanine.
First Seminar for Students. Pane
discussion with Architects,
North Club Room.
OPENING BUSINESS SESSION
CONVENTION, President Roy A
Pooley, Jr., presiding.
Invocation by Rev. Richard K. M
ton, Jacksonville University,
Ballroom.


12:30 P.M. Luncheon President Roy M.
Pooley, Jr., presiding. Ballroom.
ADDRESS, "The Triangle of Un(
standing" by Charles S. Stock, Pr
dent Producer's Council. Preser
tion of Awards to Product Exhibi
by James O. Kemp, President, Ja
sonville Chapter.
2:00 P.M. Visit Product Exhibits, Exhibit -
2:00 P.M. DESIGN FOR LEARNING -
"Changes in Education," C. Ellis
Duncan, AIA, Chairman, Ballroo
Keynote ADDRESS "The Name
the Game is Change" by Dr. Ha
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









n. u a


L 0


Van v


ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

- JACKSONVILLE NOVEMBER 11, 12, 13, 14, 1964


Gores. "Design for Higher Educa-
cation" by William Brubaker, AIA;
"Physical Environment and Learn-
ing", Dr. John Gilliland; "School
Building for Space Age Education,"
Dr. B. Frank Brown; "The Training
of Leadership for School Plant Plan-
ning", Dr. R. L. Johns.
:00 P.M. Product Exhibits close.
:30 P.M. Cocktail Party, Roof Spa,
Roosevelt Hotel.
:30 P.M. "First Annual Florida Craftsman of
the Year Award" Dinner, Ballroom,
Roosevelt Hotel. Hilliard T. Smith,
J., presiding.
Address by MR. HUGH MURPHY,
U. S. Department of Labor.
:30 P.M. Hospitality Suites open.
to
:00 A.M.

IAY, V A 13
:30 A.M. Breakfast Product Exhibitors
(invitation only), Ballroom.
:00 A.M. Balloting for FAA Officers,
to Mezzanine.


noon
:00 A.M.
to
noon
:00 A.M.
to
:30 P.M.
:00 A.M.


Final Registration, Mezzanine.


Visit Product Exhibits,
Exhibit Hall.


DESIGN FOR LEARNING "The
High School Case Studies,"
Ballroom. Eau Gallie High School,"
Dr. Harold L. Cramer, Wayne Betts
and George Maxwell. "Nova High
School," Robert Pulver, James Hart-
ley AIA and A. B. Wolfe. (The Plan-
ning Its Design -
Its Operation).


:30 P.M. Luncheon-Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Director, Florida Region, presiding.
Ballroom. ADDRESS, "The Archi-
tect's Horizon" by Morris Ketchum,
Jr., FAIA, President Designate AIA.
Presentation Architectural Exhibit
Awards.
:00 P.M. Visit Product Exhibits, Exhibit Hall.


to
00 P.M.
00 P.M.


DESIGN FOR LEARNING "Plan-
ning the Campus," Ballroom, Andrew
J. Ferendino, AIA, Chairman. "Plan-
ning a New Campus", Charles Pul-
ley, AIA. "The Junior College in


4:30 P.M.
to
6:00 P.M.
6:45 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


8:00 P.M.
8:30 P.M.
to
9:15 P.M.


Florida," Dr. James L. Wattenbarger.
"Miami-Dade Jr. College Its
Design," Edward G. Grafton, AIA.
Summary of Professional Sessions by
John L. Cameron.
Second Seminar for Students -
"Office Practices", North Club
Room.
Cocktail Party, Mezzanine.
Annual Banquet, Ballroom (black tie
or business suits). President Roy M.
Pooley, Jr. presiding.
Dancing John Jelineki's Orchestra
Presentation of Anthony L. Pullara
Awards. Presented by Dana B.
Johannes.
FAA Past Presidents honored.
Announcement of new elected FAA
officers.


9:45 P.M. Star studded floor show Bill Ber-
nardi, Holly Warren, Tanya and
Biagi. Continuous dancing until mid-
night to John Jelineki's Orchestra.
10:30 A.M. Hospitality Suites open.
to
1:00 A.M.


9:00 A.M.
to
12 noon
9:00 A.M.


12 noon
1:30 P.M.


Visit Product Exhibits, Exhibit Hall.


Final business session, Ballroom,
President Roy M. Pooley, Jr., presid-
ing. Florida State Board of Architec-
ture panel discussion on recent
developments with Architect's Reg-
istration Act, Archie Parish, FAfA,
presiding. Presentation Product
Exhibit Visitation Awards.
Convention adjourns.
Post Convention Board Meeting,
North Club Room.


CO'-N vE:',;T,.Y-_ NO 3S:
All FAA members may take part in any Convention discussion, but
voting on any question calling for Convention action is restricted to
those Chapter delegates who have been properly accredited and regis-
tered as such at the Convention.
Admission to Convention meetings and affairs will be accorded only
to those who have previously registered for the Convention. Evidence
of registration is a badge, the color of which designates these classifi-
cations: Corporate Members, white; Associate Members, yellow; Student
Members, orange; Exhibitors, beige; Ladies, pink; Guests, gray; Manu-
facturers (non-exhibitors), light green; and non-members FAA, light
blue.
Only FAA members are eligible for Product Exhibit Attendance
Awards. These are: for Corporate Members, $200, $100, and $50;
for Associate Members, $50; for Student Members, $15 and $10. All
prizes will be cash.
Host Chapter members will be wearing Host Ribbons. They will be
available throughout the Convention to provide information and to
answer questions.
Ladies of the Convention are invited to attend all sessions and
meetings. Information on the Convention Ladies' Program may be
obtained at the registration desk or the Ladies Lounge.


NOVEMBER, 1964









The Changing World Of Education...


Development of the Convention Theme will be through three
"Sessions" each dealing with the specific design phases that are
involved with the production of significant architecture. Each
Session will be conducted by panelists each an expert in his
field.

... These Sessions will be in effect workshop seminars. The purpose
will be to integrate the subject of each with the basic problems
of school architectural design. Each session will be scheduled to
provide for questions from the floor, and audience participation
to this extent is invited. In addition, two important seminars for
students have been planned to which all Convention Registrants
will be welcomed.






These Are Some Of The Speakers...


HAROLD B. GORES
Graduate of Harvard University . .
Principal, teacher and superintendent
since 1931 . Chairman of Fulbright
Teacher Exchange Program, N. E. Re-
gion . Currently President, Educa-
tional Facilities Laboratories.


m m
HAROLD L. CRAMER
Graduate of University of Arizona, West-
ern Reserve University . Currently
Coordinator, School Plant Planning Sec-
tion, Florida State Department of Edu-
cation.


WILLIAM BRUBAKER


Member of firm Perkins & Wills . .
Well known in field of School Archi-
tecture . Addressed Conference of
Junior Colleges in Tampa this year.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









CRAFTMANSHIP AWARD DINNER SPEAKER


The personal representative of


the HONORABLE


W. WILLARD WIRTZ,


SECRETARY


DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, MR.


HUGH


address the 50th Annual Convention


OF THE U. S.
MURPHY, will


of the FAA


Thursday


evening,


November 12th.


MR. HUGH MURPHY, Administrative


Director of


Apprenticeship & Training of the Department of Labor,
will be the featured speaker at the First Annual "FLORIDA
CRAFTSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD."


Luncheon


Speakers...


CHARLES M. PULLEY
CHARLES M. PULLEY


University Architect for Southern Illi-
nois University since 1951 . Gradu-
ate of University of Illinois . Form-
erly associated with the firm of Wahl
Snyder, Architect, in Miami.


MORRIS KETCHUM, JR., FAIA
Graduate of Columbia University and
School of Fine Arts, France . Princi-
pal of firm Morris Ketchum, Jr., & Asso-
ciates . First Vice President and
President Designate of the A.I.A . .
Member of Who's Who in America.


CHARLES S. STOCK


Graduate Mechanical Engineer, Prince-
ton University . Elected Vice Presi-
dent, Marketing of American Air Filter
Co., in 1962 ... Recently elected Pres-
ident of the Producer's Council.


NOVEMBER, 1964






FWied o 74e Irl aft Ceaitr l ao miees Wtide Receeie 4Award...




Florida Craftsman of the Year Award


This year for the first time, the
Florida Association of Architects will
choose one from among its chapters'
Craftsmen of the Year to be State
Craftsman of the Year. Seven chap-
ters participated in the Craftsmanship
program this year, the most in its
ten year history. The seven craftsmen
chosen by these chapters will be hon-
ored, and examples of their work
shown, at Thursday night's Award
Dinner, during the convention. At
that time Hilliard T. Smith, Chair-
man of the Awards Committee will
announce the winner of the Crafts-
man of the Year award.
Daytona Beach Chapter, participat-
ing in the program for the first time
this year, honored Walter Hosford, air
conditioning expert. Hosford was nom-
inated by Joseph R. Blais, Jr., for his
ductwork in Bailey Hall, at Daytona
Beach Junior College. Mr. Hosford's
other recent work includes the Clyatt
Memorial Geriatric Center, Junior
College Administration building, and
the Medical Arts Building. Hosford
is employed by D. W. Browning the
subcontractor for the builder, Stan
Jensen.
Florida North Chapter honored
Ocala carpenter Clarence Sislcr for
his finished carpentry in the home of
Mr. and Mrs. George K. Drake. Chap-
ter members and guests viewed the
award-winning work on a tour of the
Drake home before the award dinner.
The home was designed by Hal Reid,
AIA, who nominated Sisler. Sisler is
employed by the Drake Construction
Company.
Two craftsmen shared honors at
Florida South Chapter's tenth annual
awards dinner: Peg and Otto Holbein,
batik craftsmen. The Holbeins design
and dye fabrics which are used as wall
hangings or laminated in panels. They
were nominated by George Reed, AIA,
for door panels in the Saul Eig resi-
dence, which he designed.
The Jacksonville Chapter selected
Walker S. Wilson as the outstanding
craftsman in their four-county area.
Wilson is in the wall-covering trade,
and was honored for the wall cover-
ing installation in the main ballroom


Left:
Florida South Chapter
Award Winner
Batik Craftsman






Below:
Florida North Chapter
Award Winner
Decorative Millwork


of the Roosevelt Hotel in Jacksonville.
Mr. Wilson, who is 72 years old, is
the holder of a 45-year union member-
ship card.
Palm Beach Chapter honored car-
penter Oliver W. Holmes for "excel-
lent craftsmanship in the installation
of decorative millwork" in the North-
wood Methodist Church. John B.
Marion, AIA, who designed the
church, said the work was "extremely
tedious and required patience, talent,
and understanding of the work to be
done." His work included the build-
ing in of mill-made furniture and
equipment as well as the decorative
(Continued on Page 35)


Daytona Beach Chapter
Award Winner
Unusual Ductwork


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






50th Annual Banquet Entertainment

Stet Studded *eoor S4ow


BILL BERNARDI


Versatile Gentleman of Comedy -
Situation Comedy, Dialect Stories,
Songs and Impressions Surprise Vent. Closings
Master of Ceremonies


..

Si


HOLLY WARREN
- Musical Comedy Starlet -
Red headed singer of songs, who is a favorite
not only in our country's leading supper clubs but also
in South America, possesses one of those trained
singing voices that aren't too abundant today,
she can make herself heard without a microphone.


TANYA and BIAGI
Dance Stylists -
Side splitting comedy, delight dancing, suspenseful
adagio, finesse and beauty -
Comedy dancers par excellence


Dancing to -
Johnny Jelineki's Orchestra


NOVEMBER, 1964


No -1






7e 5Oth l 744 ongetion SuPcoeroe' Educateaeat SEow ...




1964's Building Products Exhibit...


MEN
3 2


Convention affairs have been scheduled to allow plenty of time to view product exhibits
and to discuss with manufacturers' representatives the ways by which their products and
materials can help solve various problems in architectural design . Visit all the exhibit
booths. Added to the information you'll get you'll establish your eligibility for one of the
several booth attendance awards.


1...Southside Blueprint Service,
Inc.
2...NuTone, Inc.
3...LCN Closers
4...Schlage Lock Company
5...Schlage Lock Company
6...GEM Aluminum Products,
Inc.
7...Lambert Corporation of
Florida Subsidiary of
Guardsman Chemical
Coatings
8...Rohm & Haas Company
9...American Olean Tile
Company
10...Caloric Architectural
Division, Caloric Corporation
11...Libbey Owens Ford Glass
Company
12...Clearview Corporation
13...Zonolite Division-
W. R. Grace & Co.
14...Concrete Products, Inc.
15...Benjamin Moore & Co.
16...Griffco Aluminum, Inc.
17...Hotpoint Division of
General Electric Company
18...Americana Corporation
19...Formica Corporation
20...United States Plywood
Corporation


21 ...Becker County Sand & Gravel
Company, Specialty Products
Division
22...Kawneer Company
23...Miami Tile & Terrazzo, Inc.
24...F. Graham Williams
Company, Inc.
25...KoolShade Solar Control
J. M. Hetherington Company
Alpro Enterprises
26...Bird & Son, Inc.
27...Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utility Companies:
to Florida Power Corporation
Florida Power & Light Co.
Gulf Power Company
29...- Tampa Electric Company
30...Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Company
31...Mabie-Bell Schokbeton
Corporation
32...Lloyd A. Fry Roofing Co.
33...Hough Manufacturing
Corporation
34...Sunroc Corporation -
P. O. Moore, Inc.
35...National Lumber Manufac-
turers Association (Wood
Council of Florida)
36...E. Frank Peek, Lox-All Sales
Corp., The Delta Company


37...Curtis-Electro Lighting, Inc.
38...Acousti-Engineering
Company
of Florida
39...Kohler Company
40...Reflectal Corporation -
Subsidiary of Borg-Warner
Corporation
41...EBCO Manufacturing
Company
42...Guy Gray Manufacturing
Co., Inc.
43...Gory Roofing Tile
Manufacturing, Inc.
44...Harris Paint Company
45...Georgia-Pacific Corporation
46...Compressed Concrete
Corporation
47...FINTRA, INC. Florida
International Trade
Association
48...Leviton Manufacturing
Company, Inc.
49...Orest Pidfigurny (Architec-
tural Presentations)
50...Rowell Van Atta Inc. -
Julien P. Benjamin Co.,
Lambert Corp.
51...Hymar Stone Corp.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





State Craftsman Award ...
(Continued from Page 32)
trim inside and outside of the church.
The Gulf Coast Chapter of the
AIA in its first annual "Craftsman of
the Year Award" selected Robert Lohr
as its winner for "excellent crafstman-
ship in carpet installation work" in
the residence of Dr. Edward Straka.
The home was designed by architect
John E. Piercy, AIA and the contrac-
tor was John A. Hartenstine.


The Broward County Chapter in
conjunction with the Broward Build-
ers Exchange selected Larry Abbate
as the nominee for the State-wide
"Craftsmanship of the Year Award"
for his work on stone masonry and
slate at the residence of Dr. and Mrs.
Andre S. Capi. The home was de-
signed by William P. Plumb, AIA,
the subcontractor was Rudy's Stone
and the general contractor was Col-
lins, Hall & Baumann.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Craftmanship . .
(Continued from Page 21)

before the world for what he is. The
discipline that went into the develop-
ment of the skill that is in the touch
of his hand; the attitude of his mind,
reflecting in l.ir2... measure his philoso-
phy of life; the love, or indifference,
or even the hatred in his heart;
his essential honesty or dishonesty;
whether or not he is a cheat and a
fraud, or a person of inlt ril. whether
he walks with dignity and self-respect,
or slumps with slovenly shamelessness
and irresponsibility all are there in
the product he turns out. Craftsman-
ship is the truthfulness of labor and
human effort. Shoddiness is labor's
dishonesty.
In a day when old idols are being
smashed and old meanings arc losing
their appeal, with no new guideposts
firmly established, both old and young
experience confusion or futility; be-
cause a life without meaning is a
tragic life, a senseless life, an empty
life, and cannot be long endured. In
this age of machines, mass production
and automation, where the worker has
lost his distinction as an individual,
the true craftsman is doubly blessed;
because in his very work he finds
meaning and meaningfulness, calling
for self-investment and dedication of
his very best, to create the good and
the beautiful. He finds the deepest of
satisfactions in the knowledge that he
is contributing bit by bit toward the
fulfillment of the continuing human
dream to rearrange the materials in
a jumbled up, chaotic world into
better and more beautiful forms, thus
enriching the lives and adding to the
enjoyment of all who are touched by
what his hand or his mind has pro-
duced. But exceeding even all this is
his own profit, for it is his very salva-
tion. Thus when a man prostitutes
his craft, when he sells out on per-
sonal integrity, when he abandons
personal pride and dignity, when he
makes pretensions not backed up by
performance, he but damns himself
and creates his own inner hell.
In some of the ancient Roman con-
tracts let out to the marble workers
was the phrase, "sine cera," which
meant "without wax." The unscrupu-
lous would work wax into the flaxs in
their marble, rub it a little, and thus
obscure the flaws. Of course, once the
(Continued on Page 38)
NOVEMBER, 1964


1


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.1

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<1C


this is






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for all fresh concrete floor surfaces

Developed in Lambert's Florida Laboratories, KEESTONE is a specially formulated
powder, containing properly graded aggregates, in a ready-to-use form. Applied to freshly
poured concrete floor slabs, by dust-on or broadcast method, KEESTONE is floated and
troweled into the surface to simulate the natural keystone. The entire operation is completed
while concrete is in a plastic state. 0 A KEESTONE finish assures you of a colorful and
textured surface that is slip-proof and glare-proof with uniformity of color over any size
area. The finish is permanently "fused" to become a monolithic part of the concrete floor.
* KEESTONE'S dramatic surface is ideal for concrete patios, swimming pool and deck
areas, showroom floors . in fact, for any exterior or interior concrete floor surface where
a decorative, natural stone effect is desired. Resistant to heavy traffic and adverse weather
conditions, KEESTONE is a lasting complement to architectural design and landscape. 0
You will be assured of a durable and distinctive appearance when you specify all concrete
floor surfaces to be finished with KEESTONE. I'rite for AIA File Brochure.

LAMBERT CORPORATION of FLORIDA
Plant and offices: 2125 W. Central Blvd. P. 0. Box 2226 Orlando, Florida
Manufacturers of: Paints Lacquers \ -1, 'i...r.fhL, Architectural Coatings
Plants in: Orlando, Fla. Houston, Tex. Grand Rapids, Mich. High Point, N.C.
A subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings, Inc.


V. :


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,


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3
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Craftmanship ...
(Continued from Page 37)
marble was set in place, and the ele-
ments began to beat upon it, the wax
soon disappeared and the flaws be-
came evident. Our English word
sincere derives from sine cera. This
could well become the orienting em-
blem of every craftsman.
But now back to the craftsman
himself. The finest product of the
creative person is not the framed can-
vas, nor the polished marble, nor the
ceramic mural. The greatest expres-
sion of his imagination, originality,
beauty and graciousness is what he
does with himself. Those works which
are commonly referred to as art and
craft are but the by-products of a
person in the process of creating him-
self.



The American City...
(Continued from Page 18)
evidence, to date, is that the so-called
"practical politicians" are the ones
who have proved to be monumental
failures. They have been chipping
and nibbling away at our cities for 50
years now-and look at the fantastic
mess they've made!
We have only two kinds of cities
left in America. We have the kind
that have become so jammed with
people, cars, trucks, buses( and poli-
ticians) that they have come to a full
stop-like Manhattan. And we have
the other kind-the city that has be-
come an empty, eerie void like
downtown Detroit-because it has
been abandoned by all humanity.
Let me conclude as I began. In 36
years, there will be six billion people
on this earth. Either these souls will
suffocate in the kinds of cities we
are building today-and before they
do so, they will engage in a few spec-
tacular bloodbaths or they will
abandon their cities altogether and
take to the hills. Because you and
I believe in the city as the source of
most civilizations, we should insist
that this great source be preserved,
renewed, revitalized. The city is much
too serious a business to be left to
bureaucrats and politicians. The city
is what all modern life-all art, love,
humanity, hope-is all about. The
civilization we can save may be our
own.


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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Represented in Florida by

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P. O. Box 5443
Jacksonville, Florida 32207 Telephone: 398-7255



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA
GA.







News & Notes


Newly Elected Officers of
AIA Chapters . .
Florida Northwest Chapter held its
election of officers on October 9.
Elected President was James H. Look;
Vice President, C. James Kendrick;
Secretary, Roger R. Weeks; Treasurer,
William R. Bean; Director, B. W.
Hartman, Jr.



Florida Central Chapter's new offi-
cers, elected at the Annual Meeting
on October 10 are President, Dana
B. Johannes; Vice President, Jack
McCandless; Secretary, James J. Jen-
newein; Treasurer, James R. Dry; Di-
rectors, I. Blount Wagner, J. Arthur
Wohlberg, and Archie G. Parish.
Named FAA Directors were William
J. Webber and Frank R. Mudano;
FAA Alternate Directors are Earl A.
Quenneville, Mark Hampton, and H.
Dean Rowe.


Florida South Chapter's Annual
Meeting was held October 13, when
the following officers were chosen:
Francis Telesca, President; Robert
Boerema, Vice President; O. K. Hous-
ton, Jr., Secretary; George Reed,
Treasurer. Directors for the coming
year are William Tschumy, Frasuer
Knight, and John Sweet. Named FAA
Director was James Ferguson, with
Herbert Savage as Alternate Director.




Newly elected officers of the Jack-
sonville chapter are James O. Kemp,
President; Robert C. Broward, Vice
President; John P. Stevens, Secretary;
Allen D. Frye, Treasurer; C. A. Elling-
ham, Chapter Director. F.A.A. Direc-
tors for the coming year are Robert
A. Broadfoot, Jr., C. A. Ellingham,
and Walter B. Schultz; Alternates are
George R. Fisher, Warren C. Hendry,
Jr., and Robert A. Warner.


Fallout Shelter Analysis
Courses . .
Courses in Fallout Shelter Analysis
and Environmental Engineering are
being offered this fall by Region
Three of the Office of Civil Defense.
Instructors will be university staff
members who have completed courses
of instruction offered by the Depart-
ment of Defense.
Registered architects or engineers,
or graduates of recognized schools of
architecture or engineering, are eligi-
ble for the Fallout Shelter Course.
The Environmental Engineering
course is open to those who have
completed the Fallout Shelter Analy-
sis course, or engineers with a BSME
degree and a background in heating,
ventilating or air conditioning.
Florida cities where Fallout Shelter
Analysis is being offered are Ft. Lau-
derdale, Jacksonville, Melbourne, Or-
lando, Pensacola, Environmental En-
(Continued on Page 40)


GORY ROOFING TILE
GORY INDUSTRIES INC. P.O. BOX 490 135 N.W. 20th ST. BOCA RATON 395-1770
GORY ROOFING TILE MFG., INC. 1773 N. E. 205th ST. NORTH MIAMI 945-7691


NOVEMBER, 1964 39





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 39)

gineering will be given in Miami
and Tampa.
Architects desiring to enroll should
contact their local Civil Defense
Director. Dates and times for the
13-15 week course will be set by the
local civil defense office and the in-
structors. Tuition and Textbooks are
free.




FCPA Honors Student
Benjamin Yaskin, a student at the
University of Miami, was awarded
the $150 first prize by the Florida
Concrete and Products Association in
their 7th annual design competition
among students of architecture at the
University of Florida and the Uni-
versity of Miami. Smaller prizes were
awarded three other winning entries,
and donations of $50 were given to
the Student AIA Chapters at both
schools, to be used to send a student
to the FAA convention.


This year's design problem was to
design a vacation lodge for the Flor-
ida Keys, using concrete and concrete
products. The jury of architects who


judged the entries was chaired by
Edward Grafton, of the Florida
South Chapter.
(Continued on Page 43)


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40 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Winning Entry by Benjamin Yaskin of Miami, Fla.

., V
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The revolutionary CELLON* process is proving to be the
most valuable development ever to come out of Koppers
Company, Inc.'s relentless research for better pressure-
treated wood preservatives. This impregnating treatment,
applicable to any wood or wood product, provides 100%
penetration of pentachlorophenol into every cell of the
wood. The preservative is deposited in non-leaching crys-
talline form, and the treated product emerges dry.
Among many improved qualities, this new treatment is
colorless, odorless, practically weightless and non-swelling.
Materials treated are paintable, unchanged in dimension
and free from raised grain.They retain the same strength,
weight and appearance as untreated wood.
The principal advantage, of course, is outstanding resist-
ance to decay and insect attack... consistently better than
woods treated with regular light-solvent pentachlorophenol
solution.
For more than a year Alger-Sullivan Company in Northwest
Florida has been CELLON treating long-leaf yellow pine and
other species for industrial, commercial and residential
uses. If your next plan calls for a combination of natural
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Alger-Sullivan Company .41
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh 12
A. R. Cogswell . .42
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Dwyer Products of
Florida, Inc. . 2nd Cover
Florida Gas Transmission 16-17
Florida Industries Exposition 26
Florida Investor-Owned
Electric Utilities .24-25
Florida Natural Gas
Association-Gas Gram 7
Florida Portland Cement Div.,
General Portland Cement 20
GEM Aluminum Products, Inc. 3
Georgia-Pacific Corporation 9-10
Gory Roofing Tile Manu-
facturing, Inc. .. 39
Guy Gray Manufacturing
Co., Inc. . . 22
Griffco Aluminum, Inc. . 35
Harris Paint Company . 35
Homasote Company . 19
Knoll Associates, Inc. . 4


Lambert Corporation of
Florida . . 37
Merry Brothers Brick and
Tile Company . . 1
Miami Tile & Terrazzo, Inc. 40
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler
Company . . . 42
Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Company . . . 8
Richard Plumer Business
Interiors, Inc. . .. 26
Portland Cement Association 2
Reflectal Corporation . 36
Solite Corporation . . 5
Southern Bell Telephone &
Telegraph Company . 18
United States Plywood
Corporation . . 15
Walton Wholesale Corporation 43
George Washington
Hotel .. 4th Cover
Weis-Fricker Mahogany
Company . . . 23
F. Graham Williams Company 38
Zonolite Corporation . 42


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Jacksonville, Fla. Tampa, Fla.
P. 0. Box 42125 P. 0. Box 1195
Miami, Fla. Myrtle Beach, S. C.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ADVERTISERS' INDEX


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"SINCE 1921"


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Jul, ) V=-
_j L. -_
r





News & Notes-
(Continued from Page 40)
AIA Honor Awards
Program .
Entries in the AIA Honor Awards
Program are due for preliminary sub-
mission on December 4. The work of
Florida architects should be well rep-
resented in this judging. Projects will
not be judged in competition with
other entries, but on the basis of the
architect's solution of the problem,
and its worthiness for an award for
excellence. Entry slip and fee must
be received by the Institute by De-
cember 4, brochures by January 22.
Award winners from Florida in recent
years include Weed, Johnson Asso-
ciates; Wm. B. Harvard; Robert M.
Little and William G. Crawford;
Twitchell and Rudolph; and Victor
Lundy.

Miami Student Honored
A 22-year-old University of Miami
architecture major has received a $200
prize from Reynolds Aluminum for
his design of a collapsible, portable


aluminum roof.
Melvin B. McCorrison of Unity,
Maine, UM's winner of the 1964
Reynolds Aluminum Prize for Archi-
tectural Students, received his prize
from H. R. Schroeder, Reynolds
Metals Co. divisional sales manager.
McCorrison is a fourth year student
in the five year architecture program.
McCorrison's "best original design
of a building component in alumi-
num" was a structural roof system
designed for fast assembling on mov-
able structures, such as portable class-
rooms, workshops or display booths.
His entry, judged by a panel of the
American Institute of Architects, has
been entered in the Reynolds national
student competition, which carries a
$5,000 grand prize divided equally
between the winner and his school.
Winner will be announced at the
AIA national convention this spring.
John E. Sweet, associate professor
of architectural engineering, was Mc-
Corrison's advisor on the project.
Dean T. A. Weyher and James E.
Branch, AIA, chairman of UM's de-
partment of architecture and archi-
tectural engineering, also were present
for the check presentation.


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INSTALLATIONS

Ionian Terraflex@: A new vinyl asbestos
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A massive swirl of marbleization is dispersed
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Ionian is oil and grease proof.
Write or phone today for
Architect's Data file.

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Wholesale Floor Coverings
7171 N. W. N. W. 10th Ave.
Miami, Florida
Phone: Miami 754-2639
Ft. Lauderdale 522-8151
Also Representing:
Sandura Co., Vinyl Plastics, Inc.,
Myca Rubber Products, and B & T Metal Co.
NOVEMBER, 1964 43


Please


Review


the


Annual


Board


Report


Mailed on
Oct. 30











10th Annual Roll Call---1963-1964



Listed here are firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA

grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they

make or sell are of quality to merit specification. They seek your approval.


ALGER-SULLIVAN LUMBER COMPANY
Century, Florida
Wood preservative process
Agency-Dodson, Craddock & Born
Advertising Agency, Inc.,
Mutual Federal Building,
Pensacola, Fla.


BIRD & SON, INC.
Stark Industrial Park,
Charleston Heights, Charleston, S.C.
Liquid roofing system
Agency-Reach McClinton & Co., Inc.
69 Washington St., Newark 2, N. J.


BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh, Penna.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts, aluminum
grilles



CEMENT ENAMEL DEVELOPMENT,
INC.
18656 Fitzpatrick St., Detroit 28, Mich.
Trowelled marble
Agency-Accent Advertising
4120 Fenkell, Suite 210
Detriot 38, Mich.



A. R. COGSWELL
P. O. Box 26, 433 W. Bay St.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Architects' supplies & reproduction
service


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th St., Hialeah, Fla.
Decorative masonry materials



DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
921 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Manufacturer kitchens for motels,
resorts and hotels
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency,
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Ind.


FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami, Fla.
Custom-cast plaques


FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION CO.
P. O. Box 44, Winter Park, Fla.
Gas-cooking and heating
Agency-Fry/Hammond/Barr &
Rollinson, Inc., 600 East Washington
Orlando, Fla.


FLORIDA HOME HEATING
INSTITUTE, INC.
2022 N. W. 7th St., Miami, Fla.
Oil heating
Agency-Bevis Associates,
Advertising, 2020 S. W. 1st St.,
Miami 36, Fla.


FLORIDA INDUSTRIES EXPOSITION
Exposition Park, Orlando, Fla.
Agency-Alfred L. Lino &
Associates, 1327 9th St., South,
St. Petersburg, Fla.


FLORIDA INVESTOR OWNED ELECTRIC
UTILITIES
Electric Utility
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave.,
Miami, Fla.


FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASS'N.
Deland, Fla.
Gas-cooking and heating
Agency-Palmer Tyler & Co.,
Biscayne Plaza Bldg., at 79th St.,
Miami, Fla.


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co.
P. O. Box 1528, Tampa, Fla.
Portland cement
Agency-Gray Advertising, Inc.,
Daugherty Bldg., Tampa, Fla.


FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
1715 Cleveland St., Tampa, Fla.
Reinforced steel & accessories
Agency-Liller, Neal, Battle &
Lindsey, Inc., 304 Washington St.,
Tampa, Fla.

GEM ALUMINUM PRODUCTS, INC.
715 Barnett Drive, Lake Worth, Fla.
Aluminum doors and jambs

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
111 W. Monroe St., Chicago, III.
Trinity White cements
Agency-Harris, Wilson & Bauer, Inc.
110 N. Wacker Dr., Chicago 6, III.

GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTEL
Jacksonville, Fla.
Agency-Paul Acosta Advertising,
P. O. Box 1332, Jacksonville, Fla.

GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION
77 N. W. 72nd St., Miami
2727 Regent St., Orlando
1333 Haines St., Jacksonville
3701 East Columbus Dr., Tampa
Plywood & paneling

GORY ROOFING TILE MFG., INC.
1773 N. E. 205th St., North Miami, Fla.
Concrete Roofing Tiles
Agency-E. J. Scheaffer and Asso-
ciates, 1101 N.E. 79th St., Miami, Fla.

GUY GRAY MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
P. O. Box 392, Paducah, Kentucky
Washing Machine Supply and Drain

GRIFFCO ALUMINUM, INC.
P. O. Box 5829, Jacksonville, Fla. 32207
"Griffco" Aluminum Products

HARRIS PAINT CO.
1022 No. 19th St., Tampa 1, Fla.
Paints & paint products
Agency-Louis Benito Advertising,
Inc., 507 Morgan St., Tampa 2, Fla.


44 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










HOMASOTE CO.
Trenton 3, N. J.
Roof deckings
Agency-Richard La Fond Advertis-
ing, Inc., 505 Park Ave.,
New York 22, N. Y.


HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES, INC.
1050 N. E. Fifth Terr.,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Structural Products and Services


J. I. KISLAK MORTGAGE CORP. OF FLA.
1220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Fla.
Mortgage Banking


KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC.
111 N. E. 40th St., Miami, Fla.
320 Park Ave., New York 22, N. Y.
Furniture and fabrics


KOPPERS COMPANY, INC.
Koppers Bldg., Pittsburgh 19, Penna.
Laminated unit structures
Agency-The Griswold-Eshleman Co.,
Grant Building Penthouse,
Pittsburgh 19, Penna.


LAMBERT CORPORATION
2125 W. Central Ave., Orlando, Fla.
Waterproofing materials, concrete
Agency-McClellan & Associates,
Inc., 740 Clay St., Winter Park, Fla.


MAINTENANCE MATERIALS,
INCORPORATED
P. O. Box M, Pompano Beach, Fla.
Plastic plaster coating


MERRY BROS. BRICK & TILE CO.
Augusta, Ga.
Structural clay products
Agency-Withers & Carson PR &
Advertising, 700 Security Federal
Bldg., Columbia, S. C.


MIAMI TILE & TERRAZZO, INC.
6454 N. E. 4th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Ceramic tile


MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
5761 N. W. 37th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Aluminum awning windows
Agency-E. J. Scheaffer and
Associates, 1101 N. E. 79th St.,
Miami, Fla.


MOORE PIPE & SPRINKLER COMPANY
P. O. Box 4248, Jacksonville 1, Fla.
Automatic sprinkler system


PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO.
1 Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Penna.
Sheet glass
Agency-Ketchum, MacLeod &
Grove, Inc., 4 Gateway Center,
Pittsburgh, Penna.


RICHARD PLUMER BUSINESS
INTERIORS
155 N. E. 40th St., Miami, Fla.
Interior Decorators


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
33 West Grand Ave., Chicago 10, IIl.
Portland cement & products
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.,
410 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, III.


PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
Box 5328, San Leandro, Calif.
Lighting fixtures
Agency-L. C. Cole Co., Inc.,
406 Sutter St., San Francisco 8, Calif.


REFLECTAL CORPORATION
1000 W. 120th St., Chicago, III.
Aluminum foil Building insulation
Agency-The Biddle Company '
108 E. Market St., Bloomington, Ill.


ROBBINS MAUNFACTURING COMPANY
P. O. Box 437, Tampa, Fla.
P. O. Box 477, Lockhart, Fla.
Pressure treated lumber
Agency-Louis Benito Advertising,
Inc., 507 Morgan St., Tampa 2, Fla.


SOLITE CORPORATION
Richmond, Va.
Lightweight aggregates for structural
concrete & masonry units
Agency-Cabell Eanes, Inc.
509 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va.


SOUTHERN BELL TEL. & TEL. CO.
Atlanta, Georgia
Communications
Agency-Tucker Wayne & Co.,
1175 Peachtree St., N. E.
Atlanta, Ga.


STRESSCON INTERNATIONAL, INC.
1000 N. W. 57th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Precast and Prestressed Products


SUPER SKY PRODUCTS COMPANY
Box 113-S, Thiensville, Wisc.
Geometric dome skylights
Agency-Maercklein Advertising, Inc.
4887 No. Green Bay Ave.,
Milwaukee 9, Wisc.


SUPERIOR FIREPLACE COMPANY
4325 Artesia Ave., Fullerton, Calif.
Fireplace units, dampers and
barbecues
Agency-Chet Dippel Advertising,
201 S. Pomona Ave., Fullerton, Calif.


THOMPSON DOOR CO., INC.
3300 N. W. 67th St., Miami 47, Fla.
Hollow & solid core doors
Agency-Bevis Associates
928 S. W. 10th St., Miami 36, Fla.


TIDEWATER CONCRETE BLOCK
& PIPE CO.
Box 162, Charleston, S. C.
Glazed concrete units
Agency-MacLellan Associates, Inc.,
118 Butler Rd., Glyndon, Md.


UNITED STATES PLYWOOD
CORPORATION
55 W. 44th St., New York, N. Y.
Plywood & plywood products
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.,
247 Park Ave., New York, N. Y.


WALTON WHOLESALE CORPORATION
7171 N. W. 10th Ave., Miami 50, Fla.
Johns-Manville Products,
floor coverings


WEIS-FRICKER MAHOGANY COMPANY
Pensacola, Fla.
Mahogany & lumber products
Agency-Dodson, Craddock & Born
Adv., Inc., Mutual Federal Bldg.,
Pensacola, Fla.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
1690 Monroe Drive, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, products


ZONOLITE COMPANY
125 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, III.
Lightweight insulating fill
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
105 W. Adams St., Chicago 3, I11.


NOVEMBER, 1964 45





Folded Plates ...
(Continued from Page 46)
rectilinear spaces clearly create two types of facades, the
front and back facades which are articulated by the folds,
and the side facades which usually look like weak sisters.
Architecturally there is a dilemma here why should
any structure which looks so good from the front look so
dull from the side Too often the designer feels obligated
to "dress up" the blank wall at the ends, introducing
trivia because he can't or won't accept the simplicity of
what he finds. The side walls should not read as bearing
walls if the plate is to keep its integrity. An edge beam
is often needed to beef-up the point where continuity is
interrupted, but this should be expressed as separate from
the infill wall below. If the end wall runs up flush under
the edge beam, the eye will read the wall as loadbearing
and the clarity will have been weakened. A strong reveal
or a strip of glass could clarify this point of juncture.
Three more areas come to mind when considering the
construction and use of folded plates: the treatment of the
underside of the plates, the glazing, and the problem of
utilization in a building of more than one story.
The treatment of the underside and glazing are both
problems of detail, yet the details often make the building.
Certainly it is confusing if the underside of the plate is
not exposed in the interior space. A hung ceiling covering
the structure would, of course, destroy the form within.
Folded plates can have excellent acoustical characteristics,
so this should seldom be a problem.


In many buildings the simplicity of the interior form
is destroyed by the lighting system, whether it is plastered
onto the form itself like little warts, or hung in a random
fashion with little regard for the over-all effect. A well
chosen lighting fixture can set off the roof to advantage,
and the few dollars invested in the fixtures might be the
difference between chaos and a noteworthy space.
It is interesting that in the application of so many of
the well designed folded plate roofs the roofs are canti-
levered well beyond the enclosing walls in front and rear.
Visually this accomplishes two things: it lets the viewer
know what is going on and prepares him for the space
within. The roof overhangs cast shadows on the enclos-
ing walls making them less of a visual barrier. If the en-
closing walls are of glass, it is well that there is a cantilever
46


because glass in the daytime reflects the sunlight and can
appear more impenetrable than marble. A roof which
seems to float at night when the lights are on inside
causing the glass to disappear can seem an ominous block
when the glass reads as a wall during the day. The classic
example of this problem occurred with Nervi's Sports
Palace at E. U. R. near Rome. The structural form, al-
though not a folded plate, was a magnificent thing to
behold while under construction. One day the structure
seemed to disappear and an enormous green house was
there in its place. The building had been glazed, and
that was that. Only at night did it live again. The glaz-
ing had killed it by day. While there really is no answer
to the problem of glazing, the roof cantilever system does
help to maintain the visual integrity of a folded plate roof.
Another minor point in glazing which can't be stressed
often enough is the size of the vertical mullions. Many a
fine structure has been confused by having vertical mul-
lions, which were meant to hold only plate glass, detailed
as if they were major structural supports. And the viewer,
with only his eye to guide him, has wondered indeed why
the big powerful form above has been supporter on such
a multiplicity of columns.
Of all the aforementioned problems, none is more
controversial than that of folded plates used on multi-
story buildings. A folded plate is a long span structure.
If the program calls for a series of floors of uninterrupted
spaces, then theoretically it is possible to stack folded
plate floors and infilling the folds on all but the roof.
However, in the majority of multi-story buildings, the
floors are on a standard framing system. Can this be
aesthetically justified? The only case in which it might
be justified is in a building in which, by some strange
quirk of program, all the large span spaces are on the top
floor. Perhaps in a design expressing these long spans,
perhaps the capping as well as a full height lobby might
be justified. In other cases, the architect probably felt
he needed a little snafu and worked in a bit of folded
plate to make his elevations look jazzier. Misuse of a
folded plate five stories above the ground is just as invalid
as on a one-story overhead.
Who is really responsible when a good folded plate
design is produced the architect or the engineer? Both
should take credit. The architect is not technically fa-
miliar with folded plates though he seeks to use them
properly. The architect, in turning to the engineer, should
look to him for direction not only in the calculation of a
structure, but in its significance as well. There is enor-
mous significance to such structures as folded plates; they
are a basic part of the contemporary aesthetics, and the
engineers who control them can render a real service by
speaking up when the structural systems are misused. A
fine building is a tribute to all who worked on it, and real
teamwork between engineer and architect is, too seldom
achieved but an end greatly to be desired. When over-all
design and structure come together in good work, it is
always worth the extra thought invested in it. Folded
plates are in themselves so handsome that every effort
should be taken not to destroy their integrity, a job which
requires the best both professionals have to offer.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






This Is Red River Rubble


It's a hard, fine-grained
sandstone from the now-dry
bed of the Kiamichi River in
Oklahoma. In color it ranges
from a warm umber through a
variety of brownish reds to
warm, light tan . Face
textures are just as varied. Over
thousands of years rushing
water has sculptured each
individual stone with an infinite
diversity of hollows, ridges,
striations, swirls and has
worn each surface to a soft,
mellow smoothness . The
general character of this
unusual stone suggests its use
in broad, unbroken areas
wherein rugged scale and rich
color are dominating factors
of design . Age and exposure
can do nothing to this stone
except enhance the mellow
richness of its natural beauty...


k11 wT1 1 !1
gggage Jr *


li'HImAi


DUNAN
MIAMI, FLORIDA


BRICK


BRICK

YARDS, INC.
TUXEDO 7-1525


UI








It is our pleasure

to serve you...

And our responsibility


to serve you


Hotel George
YOUR CONVENTION


well!


Washington
HEADQUARTERS


Roosevelt Motor Hotel
BOTH HOTELS IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN,
CONVENIENT TO ALL OF JACKSONVILLE
ATTRACTIONS BY EXPRESSWAY.


ROBERT NEIGHBORS, Vice President-Managing Director




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