• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Current highlights
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 It is well to know
 The Florida lien law -- revisions...
 New period revisited
 Why not design for the handica...
 The architect and design cente...
 Your convention
 Office procedures seminar
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00112
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1963
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00112
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Current highlights
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    It is well to know
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The Florida lien law -- revisions effective October 1, 1963
        Page 9
    New period revisited
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Why not design for the handicapped?
        Page 13
    The architect and design center
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Your convention
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Office procedures seminar
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

A A FSgo


This- publication- is. copyrighted- by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the.
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available-has-been granted by-the Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.





October, 1963









The

FLORIDA ARCHITECT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.


TI~







Current Highlights...

* BUSINESS FORECASTERS ARE RAISING THEIR SIGHTS for the fourth quarter just a little
bit. They never doubted that activity would keep on rising during the closing
months of 1963. But many thought that the gains might be somewhat smaller than
those of the first half. And now they have become more optimistic. Government
and industry economists are currently looking for output, sales, profits, etc., to
match the brisk tempo of last spring.
.... What's behind this somewhat better feeling? Mainly the good showing
business turned in during the summer. The slump in steel-expected after
the strike-prompted inventory-building-turned out to be surprisingly mild.
Auto and other retail sales have kept rolling . and so has construction
activity.
... One note of caution, though: There's still no expectation of a boom this
year. At this point, the analysts just can't see what is likely to touch off a
spurt. Autos, housing, and government spending are already high. And
spending for new plant, while on the rise, won't lift the economy by itself.
* MOST ECONOMISTS STILL SAY A TAX CUT IS NEEDED to keep the present expansion
rising in 1964. (They include experts from business firms, not just those in the
government.) This may sound repetitious but it must be stressed because tax cuts
at the moment are the key to what will happen to business after the turn of the
year. Don't forget-this upturn is now more than 30 months old .. and that is
rather middle-aged as these upturns go.
... Despite widespread doubts throughout the nation, Kennedy's tax cuts will
be passed. Late checks on Capitol Hill make this clear-though skepticism is
understandable as the wheels continue to grind slowly. As you have heard,
if the cuts are passed by January 1, they will be retroactive.
* INDUSTRY IS INCHING CLOSER TO CAPACITY OPERATION-a development that may
have very bullish consequences for business next year. For a long time, the econ-
omy as a whole was using only 80% of its potential-or even less. But late in
1962, the rate climbed to an estimated 83%. And now the experts believe that
it may be as high as 86 % or 87 %. That's getting up to within striking distance
of the rate that companies like best-said to be about 92%.
... If industry does reach that optimistic 92%, a whole new chain reaction
of cheery boosts for the economy will be touched off. First of all, many firms
will find they need more capacity to avoid bottlenecks, overtime, etc. So
spending for new plant and equipment will be increased. This is the ele-
ment that has been missing in the business picture up to now. It operates to
stimulate all lines-hard goods and soft. Its advent would mean more sales,
income, and profits for all.
* COMPULSORY ARBITRATION IN THE RAILROAD DISPUTE may actually serve to strength-
en private collective bargaining, say government labor experts. Now that the dust
has had time to settle, in the wake of Congress' action in August, they sense a
desire on the part of both management and labor in other fields to avoid a simi-
lar fate. To head off government interference, both sides are expected to work
harder for peaceful settlement of disputes.
* THE BIG JUMPS IN CONSUMER PRICES ARE OVER for 1963. Prices consumers pay rose
0.9% in June and July-the largest two-month rise in several years. The Con-
sumers Price Index-now 1.5 % higher than a year ago . will continue to move
up. But the increases will be much smaller. Food, a major factor in the recent
rises will level out. Meats, poultry, and fruit will dip.
* THE SHORTAGE OF SKILLED WORKERS IS GROWING and seems likely to get worse before
improving-especially in the manufacturing and service fields. The problem has
(Continued on 3rd Cover)















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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



I e 7 Hi Iasse ---
Current Highlights .


. 2nd and 3rd Covers


It Is Well To Know ................ .
By Archie G. Parish, F.A.I.A.
The Florida Lien Law-Revisions Effective October 1 . .
By King Royer, P.E.-Department of Building Construction,
University of Florida
New Period Revisited . . . . . . . .
By Alan R. Logan
Why Not Design for the Handicapped? . . . . .
By William P. Greening, A.I.A.
The Architect and Design Center . . . . . .
By Henry End, A.I.D., I.D.I.


Your Convention- Next Month .
Office Procedures Seminar . .


10 thru 11


. 13


. 14


. 17
. 19


News and Notes ............... .. ..20 thru 22
Nominating Committee Named . Resolutions Committee
Named . Resolutions Passed by FAA Board ... Exhibitors


Advertisers' Index ........

FAA OFFICERS 1963
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville
William F. Bigoney, Jr., First V.-Pres., 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
William T. Arnett, Second V.-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Rogers, Third V.-President, 511 N. Mills St., Orlando
Jefferson N. Powell, Secretary, 361 S. County Road, Palm Beach
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami


DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank F. Smith, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Lester
N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH-
WEST: Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, John
O. Grimshaw, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: John R. Graveley, Walter
B. Schultz, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Fred G. Owles, Jr.,
Donald O. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Donald Edge, Harold A. Obst, Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr.

Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater, Florida

Executive Secretary, Florida Association of Architects
Verna Shaub Sherman, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables, Florida


PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA, Chairman; Wm. T. Arnett, Fred W. Bucky, Jr.,
B. W. Hartman Jr., Dana B. Johannes.


. .. 22

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Inisitute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7453.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; January Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.

THIS ISSUE . .
VERNA SHAUB SHERMAN
Acting Editor
H. P. ARRINGTON
Acting Advertising Manager


VOLUME 131

NUMBER 109 63
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 9



















































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OCTOBER, 1963


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It Is Well To Know...


By ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA
President, Florida State Board of Architecture


Your Board would like to take the
opportunity at this time to answer
inquiries directed to it concerning ac-
tion which may be taken by the Board
against individuals who have been re-
ported in violation of Chapter 467,
Florida Statutes.
During the past fiscal year, a num-
ber of reported violations have been
investigated by the Board. At the
present time there are approximately
one hundred such cases pending. A
number have been investigated and
handled to completion during the
fiscal year. Several cases are awaiting
legal action.
A number of registered architects
were invited to appear before the
Board during the year to explain asso-
ciations with projects reported to the
Board. In all instances, these meetings
resulted in a better understanding of
the Liw by the interested architects.
No formal disciplinary action was
necessary in any case.
Legal action has been completed in
several cases where unregistered per-
sons were illegally practicing archi-
tecture. Permanent injunctions were
secured during the year in the cases
of:-
W. P. HEINL,
Indialantic, Florida
KENNETH OEHMIG,
Naples, Florida
Injunctions are pending in several
other cases; additional injunctions
have been secured in several cases
since July 1, 1963. Further informa-
tion will be given on these cases at
such time as their appeal periods
expire.
It will also be of interest to the
members to know, that many poten-
tial violators were fully advised by
correspondence or personal visit, with
the result that undesirable activities
OCTOBER, 1963


have been discontinued.
This would appear also, a propitious
time to comment on the possibility
of the membership assisting the Board
in the field of its regulatory activity.
Inquiry has been made of the Board
on occasion as to whether the Board
may accept financial assistance from
the several Chapters or individuals in
the handling of its regulatory work.
It is not possible for the Board to
accept such funds. Our attorneys have
advised that acceptance of such funds
would be contrary to Law.
In response to the suggestion which
has been made, that renewal fees be
increased so that additional funds
may be available to the Board, may
we point out that under our present
law this fee cannot be increased above
its present level.
THE VARIOUS CHAPTERS,
HOWEVER, CAN RENDER VAL-
UABLE ASSISTANCE TO THE
BOARD, IN SECURING FIRM
INFORMATION CONCERNING
POSSIBLE VIOLATIONS OF
CHAPTER 467. This assistance can
be in the form of furnishing specific
information concerning possible viola-
tions. One Chapter has an active
committee engaged in this work. The
members of the committee have been
advised as to what evidence is neces-
sary and how to procure it. The Board
made the services of its Executive
Secretary available to the Chapter to
discuss ways and means for procuring
evidence required, and the Executive
Secretary is available to render similar
assistance to any Chapter Committee
requesting it. Mutually convenient
meeting dates can always be arranged
with a minimum of delay.
Local Chapters can also be of ma-
terial assistance to the Board, through
securing and defraying costs of copies


ARCHIE G. PARISH, F.A.I.A.


of plans, permits and other documents
of evidentiary value and can also be of
assistance in "firming up" material
before transmitting it to the Board.
A Chapter Committee can easily re-
duce to provable facts complaints
which are brought to its attention.
Such a committee can, on many occa-
sions, eliminate capricious and/or
vague complaints.
Through the above actions consid-
erable investigative time could be
saved with the result that expenditures
for such activity would be reduced
allowing the Board to increase the
number of cases on which final action
can be taken.
It must be remembered that the
operating funds of the Board come
from fees secured from architects reg-
istered in Florida and from those who
are applying for registration. The
Board receives no appropriations from
any source.
The Board must, however, secure
approval of the Budget Commission
for its operating appropriations. The
Budget Commission has been most
co-operative in approving requested
appropriations. Our entire Operating
Appropriation for this year, which
ends June 30, 1964, approximates
$55,000.00. When you consider that
all administrative costs, meetings and
examinations costs, as well as printing
and other auxiliary costs, must be met
from this appropiration, it will be seen
that only limited funds are available
for regulatory investigative and legal
activities.
In summation, may I assure every
member that your Board will con-
tinue to give every attention to all
matters reported to it for attention,
within the limits of available funds.
















LAST THINGS I




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THE FLORIDA LIEN LAW


REVISIONS

EFFECTIVE

OCTOBER, 1 1963


by KING ROYER, P.E.

Chapter 63-135, the Mechanics' Lien
Law, revises the existing statute, ef-
fective October 1, 1963 for construc-
tion begun after that time. Every
architect should be familiar with the
important points.
If an architect fails to take proper
action, he may find that he has relin-
quished a priority of claim for his fee
to claims of contractors who started
work later; if he does not properly
advise the owner in making payments
to the contractor, he may cause the
owner to be responsible for claims
of which neither the architect or
owner had any knowledge.
The architect has his lien rights
verified; his claim does not depend
.on whether construction actually be-
gins. His lien is good against the
property only to the extent of the
client's interest in it, but a wife is
presumed to be acting as her hus-
band's agent unless he objects (in a
notice filed with the county clerk)
within ten days after learning of the
contracting of the services. Likewise,
a husband may act for his wife. A
tenant may obligate property if the
work has been authorized by the
landlord. Like all claimants, the
architect must file a claim of lien
within ninety days after his services
are completed.
Under this law, the owner is not
responsible to sub-contractors or sup-
pliers of which he has had no notice;
that is, who have not informed him
they have or will have claims against
the job.
To take advantage of this protec-
tion, the owner must file a "notice
of commencement" with the county
clerk and post a copy on the job. In
this notice, the owner designates an
agent to receive other notices under
OCTOBER, 1963


the act; it is desirable that such agent
be the architect, if the latter is to
protect the owner's interest in certi-
fying payments. All liens placed
against the property on account of
construction work take effect at the
date of filing of the notice of com-
mencement, regardless of the date of
filing of the lien. The architect's lien
for services, however, is unaffected
by this notice and takes effect on the
actual date of filing. If the architect
has an outstanding bill at the time
this notice is filed, he will lose the
priority of lien he would otherwise
have, by the filing of this notice.
Subcontractors and suppliers, in
order to be later eligible to file a
claim of lien, must send the owner
(or his agent) a "notice to owner"
which notifies the owner that the
firm is a possible claimant. This no-
tice is not necessarily an expression
of lack of confidence by them in the
general contractor, but a necessary
precaution to maintain their rights.
It is not a notice of lien nor an en-
cumbrance on the property, although
an alarmed and inexperienced owner
might think it were. Some firms
automatically send such notices when
contracting work. The owner's "no-
tice of commencement" must be filed
within 30 days or less before work is
begun, or it becomes void; a "notice
to owner" within 45 days after the
subcontractor starts work, but he may
do so any time before that date. If
the subcontractor's notice to owner
is received after the owner has made
a payment to the contractor, the
subcontractor loses lien rights so far
as that payment is concerned.
In the original notice of com-
mencement, the architect may be
designated the owner's agent to re-
ceive such notices, or he may be des-
ignated an information addressee. The
architect is nowhere mentioned in


the statute in this respect; anyone
may be designated the "owner's
agent". As an information addressee,
the architect would undoubtedly re-
ceive copies of notices, but the sub-
contractor or supplier is under no
obligation to provide them. A sup-
plier on contracts of over fifty thous-
and dollars gains rights to later file
a lien for materials delivered else-
where than to the jobsite. To do this,
he must provide the owner both a
notice to owner, and a "notice of
delivery". This latter notice states
the value of material delivered, the
place to which delivered, and is ack-
nowledged by the purchaser.
No firm dealing directly with the
owner is obliged to file a notice to
the owner; likewise, an architect has
no such obligation. The general con-
tractor, however, acquires lien rights
as of the date of filing of notice of
commencement, while the architect
acquires such rights on the date of
actual filing of his claim of lien. By
failing to file a notice of commence-
ment, the owner waives his rights
under the act to receive notices from
subcontractors working on the job;
subcontractors (and suppliers, in each
case) waive their lien rights by fail-
ing to provide a notice to the owner
at the appropriate time. If neither
the notice of commencement nor
notice to owner is furnished by the
respective parties, lienors may still
file claims of lien, which are effective
on the date filed.
Having received "notices to own-
er", how does the owner (or the
architect, on approval of payments)
protect himself? At this point, pay-
ments are substantially the same as
before. The owner may require an
affidavit of the general contractor as
to the amounts due, on progress and
final payments, but the owner is re-
(Continued on Page 21)














NEW PERIOD REVISITED



By ALAN R. LOGAN, Chairman
Architectural Barriers Sub-Committee
renderings by HARVARD & JOLLY, A.I.A., Architects





In the August issue we commented
on the emergence of the newest peri-
od of Architecture, the "Barrierless
Period". We outlined its birth, we
stressed its importance and we
delineated the numbers directly af- ''i
fected by: Architectural Barriers. 1I
This was the "What" and the II
"Why". Immediately following, "En-
tering a New Period", was a prime
example of the "How"; a presenta- 4 L j. --
tion, complete with exterior render- I ., I
ing, of St. Petersburg's now-under- -
construction Bayfront Auditorium- -
Arena. We listed its many features .- v"-:`1'1 np-
that make it a totally accessible 'Art .
facility, a truly "public" building. .- -
This month we present another '
sterling example of how Architect, .
Design Engineer and Client can A446oe nterevo e Rme ;eadiyn G atdevte
(through foresight and desire for *
total accessibility) come up with aI
truly "public" building that meets
all requirements of the American 'I
Standards Association Specifications .
for Making Buildings and Facilities '
Accessible to, and Usable by, the .
Physically Handicapped and still re-. '
main within the budgeted allowance- '
AND create a triumph of architec- "
tural beauty. The under-construction
St. Petersburg Public Library is such "
victory.
To complete this month's Archi- r
tectural Barriers trilogy we present
an analysis of barrierless design as r r
viewed by a member of the Florida.' '- -
Association of Architects. He delves
into the ease of compliance and the
advantages to be gained. '
10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







St. Pete.sburg' Bariers s iUrr


Culminating several years of pre-
liminary study in conjunction with
the St. Petersburg Friends of the
Library Organization, William B.
Harvard, A.I.A., and Blanchard E.
Jolly, A.I.A., were commissioned by
the City of St. Petersburg to complete
the design work on the new Public
Library. In agreement with the re-
quirements of the Friends Organiza-
tion and the City Planning Depart-
ment the final design was arrived at
and approved by City Council. Entire
structure; including stacks, equipment
and furniture, to be built within a
one million dollar budget. Contracts
were let in early '63 and facility will
be completed in January '64.
One of the requirements was that
the entire facility be totally accessible
to all of the public. With this in
mind the Library was designed with
a broad, ramped and covered drive-in
entrance. Entrance doors are pneu-
matically operated via step mats. Cor-
ridors are extra wide for easy traffic
flow. A meditation area is at the rear
of the building. It overlooks a lake.
This entire area is at finished floor
level. On the east side of the building
is a reading garden, easily reached by
means of large double doors and this
too is at finished floor level. The
large Lecture Hall is floor level and
has an area to the rear of the last
row of seats where wheel chairs may
park in comfort and safety. Restrooms
will comply with ASA standards and
although the book racks are two-story
design with stairs any book can be
secured at the "desk" upon request.
The facility was designed to func-
tion in close relationship with the
large, manmade, lake on the north
end of the building. This lake pro-
vides an excellent and non-distracting
view from reading rooms and medita-
tion area. Strong emphasis was placed
on immediate and easy access by the
entire public from reading areas to
the outside reading Memorial Gardens
which extend along the north and
east faces of the building.
OCTOBER, 1963


As one enters the building it is
possible to view the entire 200' depth
of the building and beyond to the
lake. In the approximate center is the
main registration desk and control
center. Children's and reference areas
have separate librarians and control
desks.
The entire perimeter of the build-
ing is higher than the central core
thus enabling the lecture hall and
reading areas to have very high ceil-
ings and providing space for the
doubledeck book stacks. The central
core has a 9' ceiling. This change of
roof height enable the Architects to
provide a clear full story of fixed glass
all around the inside perimeter and
thus providing bilateral lighting to
most reading areas.
Beneath the entire floor is a 5'
high crawl space for extensive electri-
cal and mechanical distribution and


return systems. This provides un-
limited flexibility in meeting future
demands in tls electronic library.
The perimeter "skin" is composed
'of precast concrete panels with ex-
posed Mexican Beach Pebble aggre-
gate of charcoal gray. These alternate
with 2' deep, gray solar glass glazed,
window wells thus providing built in
sun shading and eliminating the need
for draperies.
Nothing in cost or convenience was
sacrificed to make this facility a total-
ly accessible one. Its beauty has been
enhanced by its conveniences and
barrierless planning. It is not only
usable by the impaired and non-im-
paired as well but it is safer, more
attractive, and more accessible for
everyone. This is the intrinsic beauty
of Barrierless Construction every-
one benefits. Nothing is lost or sacri-
ficed- much is gained.


WaiU Entrcance































CREDITS: -Architectural & Engineering Div. of Collins Radio Co., Architect; A. C. Martin & Associates of Los Angeles, Architectural
Consulant; Alpha of Texas, Inc., A Subsidiary of Collins, General Contractor; McDonald Brothers Cast Stone Company, Fort Worth, Texas;
Gregerson & Gaynor, Inc. of Dallas, Mechanical-Electrical Engineers, and Mullen & Powell of Dallas, Structural Engineers.


Precast

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square feet of exterior and interior walls with every swing
of the crane. How? By using pre-cast, contoured white
concrete curtain wall panels. Each panel was 6 feet wide
by 27 feet high and was made of Trinity White and white
marble aggregate.
Precast white concrete curtain walls gave the designers
these four advantages-One-a building of startling beauty.
Two-speedy, economical construction. Three-a mainte-
nance-free exterior. Four-a building simple to alter as
plant expansion is needed. Additional panels can be pro-
duced at any time from the original molds.
Whenever concrete should be white-specify Trinity
White Portland Cement.




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12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







W4 Not VeDesie n or...


THE


HANDICAPPED?


By WILLIAM P. GREENING, AIA


















The article by Alan R. Logan
"Entering a New Period" which
appeared in the August issue
of THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
- was responsible for many com-
ments from Architects, Build-
ers and Municipal Officials ...
The Architectural Barriers Sub-
Committee of the Governor's
Committee on Employment of
the Handicapped has available
for use and distribution without
charge, ASA Standards; litera-
ture and a thirty minute Color
Slide Program. Inquiries and
requests should be addressed to
Mr. Logan at P. O. Box 7368,
St. Petersburg, Florida.


The American Standards Associa-
tion has published a set of "Standard
Specifications for Making Buildings
and Facilities Accessible to, and Usa-
ble by, the Physically Handicapped."
It is the result of extended and careful
consideration of available knowledge
and experience on this subject and
presents minimum requirements for
adapting public facilities to those with
ambulatory, sight, hearing, coordina-
tion and aging disabilities.
It is remarkably easy to comply
with the Standards. I think you will
find, as I did, that your office already
incorporates a good portion of the
requirements as a matter of design
policy. Door widths minimum of 32"
stairs without square projecting
nosings, non-slip floors and low gra-
dient ramps-these and most of the
other requirements are "naturals" and
require little or no departure from
your normal design. The other re-
requirements take a little thought the
first few times they are used. It is not
hard to work a 32" high horizontal
rail member into the stair rail design.
It is just as easy to specify a water
cooler with front spout and controls
as any other. The newer wall-hung
telephone booth can be set for wheel
chair height.
The toilet rooms require the biggest
departure from the normal condition.
A person confined to a wheel chair
needs more room in a toilet compart-
ment, more room under a lavatory, a
mirror set lower. However, one com-
partment and one lavatory is usually
all that need to be assigned for han-
dicapped use and this does not in any
way prevent its normal use* by all.
The owners of a department store


or other private building for public
use would not approve of a set of
stairs at each entrance even if the
architect wanted to put them there.
The reason is primarily economic:
the owner would not want to prevent
any portion of the buying public from
entering. The same is true of public
buildings: the owners (all of us, in-
cluding the handicapped) would not
wish to deny access to anyone.
The cost in dollars and cents of
providing barrierless buildings would
vary with each type of building, but
under normal conditions, when pro-
rated over the entire construction
cost, the amount is negligible.
From the standpoint of beauty, we
all hate to impose further design re-
strictions on our work. To ground a
building with ongrade entrances or
low gradient ramps could possibly be
the weak point of an otherwise good
scheme. However, some access (other
than the service entrance) complying
with the Standard requirements
should be provided. It does not need
to be prominent, but it should be
convenient. Normally there is seldom
a conflict in this area, and with in-
creased use of the ASA Standard, the
conflict should become even less fre-
quent.
How about the safety factor? When
we build facilities suitable for use by
the handicapped members of our
community, we are at the same time
eliminating potential hazards to all.
Poorly designed stairs, steep ramps
and slippery floors all contribute to
accidents not only to the handicapped
but to each occupant of the building.
Claims against the owners' insurance
(Continued on Page 23)


OCTOBER, 1963







Mfiai's Internationt VeDeg enter ..


THE ARCHITECT



AND



DESIGN CENTER


By HENRY END, A.I.D., I.D.I.
Founder and President International Design Center,
Miami and Los Angeles.


Eighteen months ago when I first
opened the International Design Cen-
ter of Miami, I had definite, pre-
conceived goals-the most important
of which would be the establishment
of a central headquarters for archi-
tects, interior designers, graphic ar-
tists, for everyone connected with the
design profession. I set this goal be-
cause it was my contention then, as
it is now, that a building should be
the creative brainchild of the archi-
tect and the interior designer, each
striving to create the ultimate in good
design and the best for clients they
represent.
After our goals for the Internation-
al Design Center had been clearly de-
fined and an overall concept of oper-
ation established, we engaged Miami
architect, James Deen, to create archi-
tectural concepts so that both the
exterior of the Design Center would
spell good design and the integrated
interior would be the most stimulat-
ing showcase for architectural and
decorative products in the country.
That we have succeeded is evident in
the heavy flow of traffic in the Center
including both the professions and
the public and the fact that we are
expanding and opening an even larger
Design Center in Los Angeles.
One of the most gratifying events
to us was when the American Insti-
tute of Architects, meeting for their
National Convention recently in
Miami Beach, took time off from
14


their busy schedule of activities, to
come as a group to International De-
sign Center. It proved what has al-
ways been obvious to me-that the
architecture of buildings and the in-
teriors of these edifices cannot be sep-
arated. Comments from the visiting
architects also bore out this fact.
Today, many architectural firms
pursue the idea of total design, incor-
porating interior design departments
within the framework of their organi-
zation.
A main gripe among architects is
that they are tired and frustrated by
the so-called interior designer, com-
monly known in the past as a dec-
orator, who approaches a design as-
signment devoid of sympathetic
appreciation towards the concept of a
building. Examples have been cited
where a sparkling clean contemporary
building interior has been bedecked
with festoons and frivolous frou-frou,
depicting some distant period in dec-
oration and creating a stage setting
rather than an integrated design
concept.
I am the first to admit that such
claims have foundation, although in
certain cases the influence of the
client or the unrestrained interfering
hand of the client's wife, is often the
culprit. The excuse, of course, can be
that the decorator, hungry for a fee,
will go along with any decorating
gimmick, as long as he can make the
sale. Commercialism rears its ugly


head in all fields of endeavor. Even
in architecture, true integrity is a rare
commodity.
In my recently published book "In-
teriors Book of Hotels and Motor
Hotels", I touched upon this subject
when I wrote, "It is easy to appreciate
an architect's fears when he sees an
interior designer brought into a pro-
gram. There have been too many ex-
amples of architects being treated
badly by designers who have neither
training nor proper experience. The
architect who creates a contemporary
building is fearful that some decorator
will come along and make the in-
teriors early American. But the good
interior designer should have no
trouble establishing rapport with an
architect. There must be mutual re-
spect. The architect is trained in the
act of delineating ideas. He becomes
impatient with the designer who is
working with fabrics and colors and
finishes, utilizing talents that are often
nebulous. More often than not, the
trouble stems from a lack of com-
munication. The designer knows ex-
actly what he intends to accomplish,
but he cannot relate ideas easily. His
sketches are often too dreamlike and
out of scale".
The question remains-how can
the architect and interior designer
work together in harmony where both
can apply their respective skills to
create the best results?
(Continued on Page 16)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















Shown here is a small section of the
History of Florida Architecture exhibit
. . compiled by a Committee of the
F.A.A. chairmanned by Robert E. Han-
sen . first shown at the A.I.A. Con-
vention at the Americana in May, it
was removed from the display area there
to International Design Center.


ALLw


photo by Black-Baker


Typical of many interesting displays at
International Design Center . .the one
shown here combines aluminum furni-
ture, batiks, ceramics and plaques.


OCTOBER, 1963


W -











the profile spells
VERVE
...distinctive new shapes that add
excitement and daring to planning.


3
BS3-C






* '.M


Design Center...
(Continued from Page 14)
At a panel discussion in Los An-
geles recently on the subject of "Ar-
chitect and Interior Designer,-How
Should They Interact?", Adele Faulk-
ner, well known interior designer on
the West Coast said, "Although 95%
of the interior designer's work comes
from the client, we would prefer that
the architect select and bring us the
job . architects can seek out good
interior designers who have the ability
to coordinate with the overall plan
as well as the wish to conform re-
spectfully with the architect's think-
ing and conceptual aims . ours is
a much newer field than architecture.
The early Florentine architect didn't
mind being called a builder in the
least and it was some decades before
suitable standards enabled him to use
the word architect as a designation of
his extra abilities. We interior de-
signers are going through a more or
less parallel period in the transition
for the connotation attached to the
word 'decorator' versus designer."
West Coast architect C. M. Deasy
said "Architects and interior designers
waste their time bickering about the
division of prerogatives and responsi-
bility between the two groups. They
would be well advised to focus their
attention on a much more funda-


REMEMBER, WE'RE ALWAYS
AS NEAR AS YOUR PHONE
Miami: WI 5-7912 Hollywood: YU 9-0287




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1950 N. 30th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA


DO WE HAVE YOUR CORRECT MAIL ADDRESS?
If you are not receiving your copies of this FAA magazine,
it is probably because your address in our stencil files is
incorrect . We try hard to keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us do so by following these Sug-
gestions:
* If you change jobs or move your home to another loca-
tion, get a change-of-address card from your local Post
Office and mail it to us.
It will EXPEDITE CORRECTION if you will include the
label from last mailing received.
* Should you need to change your address, it would be
most helpful if you would indicate under which category
you receive a copy of the magazine-architect, engineer,
AGC member, student, etc.
* It is also possible that you are now receiving two copies
of the magazine. If this should be the case, won't you
,please tell us about it so that we can eliminate the dupli-
cation? Thank you.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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mental matter-the needs of the
client."
Our role at our design offices in
Miami has been a history of success-
ful collaboration with architects even
with those who have interior design
departments of their own. Some time
ago, we were given a most interesting
role where we were the interior de-
signer working with two firms of
architects-Curtis & Davis, exponents
of the contemporary idiom and Koch
and Wilson, experts in the history
of New Orleans style of design. This
collaboration resulted in a most suc-
cessful hotel, the Royal Orleans, New
Orleans, Louisiana.
I am an avid believer in design cen-
ters. They have much to offer. In the
past architects and builders were
forced to seek architects sample bu-
reas for their materials; while the dec-
orator, on the other hand, had to
seek out his needs at showrooms and
far-scattered merchandise marts. At
International Design Center, both
commodities are displayed side by
side because I am convinced that
architecture and interior design does
not stop at any given point.
In a manner of speaking, I believe
that the relationship between archi-
tect and interior designer is much
akin to marriage. A husband and wife
team may fight like the devil, but
must work at living together.










~ ~tV





li~en! 7/f~a~B~


The FAA's 1963 Convention-a FUN FILLED
FOUR DAYS-to be held at the Grand Bahama Hotel,
West End, Grand Bahama Island, B.W.I., will officially
open it's Registration in the MAIN LOBBY of the Hotel
Thursday, November 7th. This year there will be no
tickets sold at the Convention site since all functions are
included in the Full American Plan (three meals daily)
Hotel Rate.

Forms have been mailed to all FAA Members covering
Hotel Reservations. We urge you to make your reser-
vation at once if you've not already done so. Space at the
Hotel is not unlimited and it is imperative that reserva-
tions be made as soon as possible.

Registration forms for all FAA Members will be
mailed in mid-October and it will be extremely helpful
to your Staff if you will return them immediately to the
Executive Office for processing prior to Convention time.
Fees for FAA Members are as follows:


Corporate Members
Associate Members
Wives and Children


$15.00
$ 5.00
-none


Food service is available in the following areas daily:
SUGAR AND SPICE ROOM from 7:00 A.M.-9:00
P.M.; OUT ISLAND DINING ROOM from 8:00 A.M.
- 10:00 A.M., 12:00 Noon to 2 P.M. and 6:30 P.M. to
9:00 P.M.; Turtle Walk Lounge from 6:30 P.M. to 1:00
A.M. Room Service is available from 7:00 A.M.-9:00
P.M.

Cocktails are available daily, in the intimate SIT'N
BE DAMNED LOUNGE, off the Main Lobby, from
10:00 A.M.-1:00 A.M. with Music from 7:00 P.M.
until closing. TURTLE WALK LOUNGE from 6:30
P.M.-1:00 A.M. with music nightly and a native floor
show at 10:30 P.M. Friday and Saturday nights.
WITCHES' LIGHT at Poolside, 10:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.

The Executive Secretary can supply complete infor-
mation to members wishing to Cruise or Fly over in their
own crafts. Marina Dockage and Services are available
and Tie-down guarded outdoor plane storage can be ob-
tained.

All sports equipment for golf, tennis, fishing, bowling,
scuba diving, and skeet and trap is available on a rental
basis. Cars and Bicycles, Sailboats and Cruisers are also
available. Detailed information relative to costs can be
secured from your Executive Secretary.
OCTOBER, 1963


PROGRAM
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7
9:00 A.M.-12 Noon- Registration
Main Hotel Lobby
11:30 A.M.- FAA Board Meeting
12 Noon- Luncheon, on your own
1:00 P.M.- 4:30 P.M.-Registration
2:30 P.M.- 4:30 P.M.-First Business Session
Eleuthera Room
6:00 P.M.- 7:00 P.M.-Cocktail Party
Witches' Light Poolside
Cocktail Bar


Evening-


On your own


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8
8:00 A.M.- Sports Tournaments.
9:00 A.M.-12 Noon- Registration
1:00 P.M.- Sports Award Luncheon
Grand Bahama Room
2:30 P.M.- 5:00 P.M.-Final Registration
2:30 P.M.- "A Commentary on Environ-
ment"
By-James Lucas
Abaco Room
6:00 P.M.- 7:00 P.M.-Cocktail Party
Garden Patio
7:30 P.M. until ? ? ? Calypso Jamboree and Dinner
Entertainment-Dancing
Turtle Walk Lounge
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9
9:00 A.M.-10:30 A.M.-Balloting for Officers
Plaid Room
10:30 A.M.- Final Business Session
Eleuthera Room
12:30 P.M.- Luncheon
Speaker, J. Roy Carroll, Jr.,
F.A.I.A., President, AIA
Grand Bahama Room
3:00 P.M.- Bikini Poolside Party
Evening- On your own
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10
10:00 A.M. Round Table Discussion
Moderator, William
Scheick, AIA
Director, AIA
Eleutheria Room
NOTE: Various Committee Meetings called will be
posted on the Bulletin Board in the Main Lobby. Please
check it frequently to determine time and place.


0 0







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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-WHEN







Office Procedures Seminar...


Only about sixty architects attended
the FAA's Office Procedures Seminar
hosted by the Palm Beach Chapter
and devoted to a review of the new
edition of the "Handbook of Archi-
tectural Practice," held on Saturday
September 14th at the Palm Beach
Towers Hotel in Palm Beach.
The main objective of the Seminar,
planned by the FAA's Office Pro-
cedures Committee Chairman, Earl
M. Starnes in cooperation with Reg-
ional Director Robert H. Levison and
Robert J. Piper, Head of the Insti-
tute's Department of Educational
(Continued on Page 23)


REINFORCINGz
REINFORCING l


DANIEL SCHWARTZMAN, F.A.I.A.
Chairman AIA's Professional
Practice Committee


a


S'C'
W J I


Eight of Florida's ten Chapters are represented in the above photograph ..
keen interest in the topic being discussed is apparent.


Panel members, left to right, Luther Lashmit (Winston-Salem, North Caro-
lina); Daniel Schwartzman, FAIA (New York City); Terrell R. Harper
(Dallas, Texas); Robert H. Levison, Regional Director, Florida Region AIA
(Clearwater); Ronald A. Spahn (Cleveland Heights, Ohio); Dean F. Hil-
finger (Bloomington, Illinois); Earl M. Starnes, FAA Committee Chairman.
OCTOBER, 1963


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gives you economies in steel,
concrete and labor.
Specify A432 FLORIDA
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News & Notes


Nominating Committee
Named . .
The FAA's Board elected members
to serve on the 1963 Nominating
Committee at the recent meeting
held September 15th at the Palm
Beach Towers Hotel, Palm Beach.
In accordance with the By-Laws a
member was named from each Area
of the Association as follows: Florida
Central Area, FRANK FOLSOM
SMITH; Florida North Area,
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, JR.;
Florida South Area, IARL M.
STARNES (Chapter Presdent).
Chairman of the Cdmmittee is
BARNARD W. HARTMAN, JR.,
Florida, North West Chapter.
The Committee will apprise the
membership of their nominations by
letter on or about October 15th. This
notification will undoubtedly be in-
cluded on a mailing to include infor-
mation on the Convention. It is sug-
gested you carefully examine all mail
from the Executive Office so this
important information will not in-
advertantly be destroyed.


Nominations for FAA Officers
should be a vitally important matter
to each member of the Association.
Officers to be nominated for the
Association are President, Third Vice
President (Florida South Area) Sec-
retary and Treasurer.
Nominations for the Regional Judi-
ciary Committee will be made for the
Three year Member and a one year
Alternate Member.

Resolutions
Committee . .
The Committee on Resolutions, to
function prior to and during the An-
nual Meeting of the Association, was
named by President Roy M. Pooley
and approved by The Board at the
September meeting.
Committee Chairman is WILLIAM
T. ARNETT, (Second Vice Presi-
dent and member Florida North
Chapter), JOHN M. LANGLEY,
(Alternate Director and member of
Mid Florida Chapter) and FRANCIS
R. WALTON, (Director and member
of Daytona Beach Chapter).


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Any Chapter or Member having a
resolution to present can do so prior
to the Annual Meeting by writing to
the Chairman of the Committee. Res-
olutions not available prior to Con-
vention date can be presented to the
Chairman at the Convention Site.
So that proper consideration can be
given to all Resolutions it is suggest-
ed that they be made available to the
Committee just as soon as possible.



Resolutions Passed
By F.A.A. Board . .
WHEREAS, the Steering Commit-
tee on Office Procedures, The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, came from
great distances to Palm Beach, Flori-
da; to present the New Handbook
for Professional Practice to members
of the Florida Association of Archi-
tects assembled in a Seminar and to
discuss it's meaning, it's content and
it's application with the members of
the Seminar; and,
WHEREAS, the Steering Commit-
tee presented the information with
such skill and discussed practice prob-
lems with the sixty odd members of
the Seminar with great knowledge and
verve.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLV-
ED that the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute
of Architects inform The Board of
The American Institute of Architects
of the Association's gratitude for the
stimulation and education the Com-
mittee gave so freely and skillfully;
and,
That the Secretary of the Associa-
tion send a copy of this Resolution
to each of the Committee Members
who participated in the Seminar.


WHEREAS, the Palm Beach
Chapter of the American Institute of
Architects and the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects did act as Hosts to
the fifth meeting of the Board of
Directors of this Association in a
delightful setting on Florida's Gold
Coast; and,
WHEREAS, this Chapter did ex-
tend to all people here gathered the
hospitality of this area, culminating
in a social hour Saturday afternoon.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLV-
ED that the Board of Directors of
(Continued on Page 22)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 9)
sponsible for seeing that the subcon-
tractors and material men receive
their payments. On the final pay-
ment, the owner has the right to rely
on the contractor's affidavit as to the
amounts due unless there are lienors
not listed in the affidavit; this would
be anyone who has furnished a "no-
tice to owner", but is not listed by
the contractor.
Copies of contracts may be de-
manded by interested parties. Sub-
contractors may request a copy of the
general contract, including the total
amount; the owner may request copies
of subcontracts from a subcontractor.
There is no obligation to furnish such
copies, in either case, but a refusal
will obligate the refusing party for
any loss suffered by the other because
of his lack of knowledge. If an
owner refuses to furnish a copy of
the general contract to a subcontrac-
tor, the owner may assume responsi-
bilities for payment which he did not
previously have. Likewise, if a sub-
contractor refuses the owner a copy
of his subcontract, the subcontractor
may lose lien rights. Refusal to fur-
nish a copy of a contract may have
the effect of falsely stating the amount
of the contract, so far as the injured
party is concerned.
If a claim is filed, the lienor has
a year to bring action for collection.
However, the owner may force the
action or remove the claim by sev-
eral means:
(1) By request to the county clerk,
the lienor may be required to show
cause within 20 days why his lien
should not be enforced or canceled;
(2) By filing a notice of contest
of lien, obliging the lienor to file suit
within 60 days; or
(3) By posting a cash or other se-
curity bond to provide security for
the payment of the claim. This
amount shall be the amount of the
claim, plus 18% and $100.00.
Of the above courses of action, the
last does not require court action, and
would presumably encounter the least
delay.
In summary, the architect has an
interest in the proper execution of
the following documents, on behalf
of the owner or in his own interest:
(1) Notice of Commencement,
filed by the owner before work is
begun;
(Continued on Page 23)
OCTOBER, 1963


COSTS YOU NOTHING-


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close to the mason at the wall.
HERE IS WHAT ARKETOTE DOES FOR YOU:
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2
A lump or thickening in
the breast or elsewhere.
3
A sore that does not heal.
4
Change in bowel or bladder habits.
5
Hoarseness or cough.

6
Indigestion or
difficulty in swallowing.
7
Change in a wart or mole.
Ifyourdangersignal lastslonger
than two weeks, see your doctor
at once. Only he can tell whether
it is cancer. Send your dona-
tion to CANCER, c/o your local
post office. *
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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 20)
the Florida Association of Architects
do express their appreciation for this
hospitality by a standing vote of ap-
proval.

Exhibitors . .
This year the FAA will not have
a Prouct Exhibit as part of it's Annual
Convention. It will be missed by
Members who have, annually, availed
themselves of the opportunity to learn
more about the new products avail-
able for specification. The former Ex-
hibitors, have been invited to join
with the Association Members at
Grand Bahama, and we urge you to
give them every consideration possible.
This year, for the first time too in
FAA history, they've been invited to
attend all meetings and functions.


Officers . .
The following officers were elected
to head the Draftsmen's Club of Mi-
ami: President, Bill Aston; Vice Pres.,
Robert L. Dykes; Treasurer, Fred
Nehrbass, II; Secretaries, Ronald Gee,
Ervin Keel and Robert Safran.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Anchor Lock.. . 16
Arketex Ceramic Corporation 21
Blumcraft of Pittsburg . 6
A. R. Cogswell . .. 22
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 20
Dyfoam Corporation . 22
Florida Foundry and
Pattern Works . .. 22
Florida Natural Gas Assn. . 4
Florida Power and Light Co. 1 8
Florida Steel Corporation 8 and 19
General Portland Cement Co. 12
Homosote. . . 24
Merry Brothers Brick
and Tile Co. . . 3
Miami Window Corporation 1
Portland Cement Association 5
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. 16
Southern Bell Tel. and Tel. Co. 18
F. Graham Williams Company 23


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


l)JJL K=







Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 21)
(2) Notice to Owner, received by
the owner or architect from subcon-
tractors before payment for their
work is made to the contractor;
(3) Contractor's Affidavit, on re-
quest for progress or final payment;
(4) Notice of Delivery, which ob-
ligates the owner for payment of
materials not yet delivered to the job-
site, and
(5) Claim of Lien, filed by the
claimant within 60 days of the time
he has completed his work.
This summary of a 29-page statute
is not intended to be complete or
authoritative, but preliminary infor-
mation for architects who will read
the complete statute or consult their
attorney before any action is con-
sidered.



Seminar . .
(Continued from Page 19)
Practice; was to illustrate the value
and use of the Handbook.
Daniel Schwartzman, F.A.I.A.,
Chairman of the Institue's Profession-
al Practice Committee moderated all
Sessions and in addition discussed
various Chapters of the Handbook.
Each member of the panel gave a
brief sumary of the Chapter covered
by him and cited two or three ex-
amples from his own experience to
illustrate the usefulness of the materi-
al contained therein.
Although the total attendance was
small, in comparison with the amount
of effort expended and the cost in-
vilved, it did encompass all Chapter
areas and a member of the Palm
Beach Chapter whose residence and
practice is in Nassau, B.W.I., took
time from his busy schedule to attend.



Handicapped . .
(Continued from Page 13)
could be reduced with the use of the
ASA Design Standards.
Florida architects, practicing in a
state where the climate invites those
-with disabilities, should be especially
interested in these new design stand-
ards. Let's take the lead in helping
make our public buildings accessible
to all.


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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Area: 813


OCTOBER, 1963


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selection of finishes for exciting new, open-beam interiors. "Easy-
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Current Highlights ...

become especially acute in electronics and metal working-in the making of
missile guidance-control systems, space components, etc. But many other types
of businesses are feeling this sort of pinch as well.
...One proposed solution to the problem has been a federal program of
grants to schools for vocational training. But legislation has been slow to pass
Congress. Many companies, therefore, have been setting up their own pro-
grams to train labor to operate complex and expensive machines. For many
more, this is probably the only practical solution in sight.
* BANKS WILL BE ENCOURAGED TO SCRUTINIZE LOANS more closely in months ahead.
It won't be just because money has recently been tightened, either. Rather, the
authorities are suggesting that lenders be fussier about loans that may be doubt-
ful. There have been growing fears that the plenitude of money has been con-
tributing to a deterioration in the quality of credit.
... So far, evidence of deteriorating credit is not conclusive, except perhaps
for certain types of real estate loans. But monetary officials are hinting ... in
speeches and testimony to Congress . that some screening would be
desirable.
* THE BALANCE OF PAYMENTS SEEMS TO BE IMPROVING substantially during the sec-
ond half of the year, say the government statisticians who work with the figures
most closely. The gains will be welcome in view of the heavy gold losses of recent
years-losses which have weakened this country's world bargaining power and
crimped growth. More important: If things continue to improve it won't be neces-
sary to curb credit-and the economy-any further.
. No figures yet show the gains. But this much is clear:
-Our trade balance is better-exports up more than imports.
-Outflows of "hot money" have shrunk because of the higher interest rates
now available in the U.S., which are inducing investors to keep funds here,
instead of sending them abroad.
-The tax on foreign securities is working to cut the money going into foreign
bonds since the tax will be retroactive.
MANY LEADING LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS WILL BE PUT OFF until next year, because of
the log-jam that has developed on Capitol Hill. Some of Kennedy's key proposals
probably wouldn't get to a vote-up or down-even if a pile-up hadn't occurred.
But most will lose out . for this session . because tax cuts and the Admini-
stration's civil rights bill will take all the time left.
... The bills that will have to wait until 1964 for final action cover Quality
Stabilization (Fair Trade) . reduced regulation for railroads . new con-
trols on securities trading . "truth in lending" .. "truth in packaging" ...
retraining for youth . money for mass transit . and funds for area rede-
velopment.
WANT A SIMPLE EXPLANATION OF THE NEW IRS RULES on entertainment and travel?
Then get the new booklet-Questions & Answers for the Businessman. It was
especially compiled by the Internal Revenue Service. The cost is 5c. Send
request to the Supt. of Documents, Wash. 25. Ask for Doc. No. 5495.
SOME PARING OF DEFENSE SPENDING MAY BE POSSIBLE in a year or two-if the Rus-
sians behave . and if further thawing of the Cold War develops. U.S. diplomats
now believe that such a thawing is very likely to occur in the period-not because
the Russians have had a change of heart, but solely because their split with Red
China makes a truce with the West necessary.
.. .No cutbacks are now scheduled. Any drops later on will be gradual-not
abrupt slashes that would shock the economy into a tailspin. Plans to ease a
thaw's impact are already being reviewed in Washington. The State Depart-
ment and a Congressional Committee are involved. Further tax cuts and/or
higher spending might be pushed to take up any slack.







49th Annual Convention...
November 7, 8, 9, 10, 1963 Grand Bahama Hotel, West End, B. W. I.


This year's Convention Hotel site The Grand Bahama Hotel and
Club at West End, B W I. is just thirty minutes by air from the Palm
Beaches, forty minutes from Miami and daily flights are available from
Tampa and Jacksonville from Palm Beach too there is a cruise ship
departing twice weekly on a four hour luxury type cruise The
Convention Program provides for business sessions and seminars with
rime aplenty for relaxation and fun


At Grand Bahama you'll find fishing, golf, swimming, water skiing, boating, skin-diving, tennis, bowling, trap-shooting-or just plain
loafing. And at the international shopping mart you can pick up bargains, duty free, from a host of varied imports . .




Florida Region, A. I. A.

Florida Association of Architects




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