• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Current highlights
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Professional teamwork
 Branch office building of the Duval...
 Message from the president
 News and notes
 Public relations survey
 Acoustical ceiling system
 An architect goes to Fort...
 It is well to know
 Advertisers' index
 Current highlights
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00111
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1963
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00111
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Current highlights
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Professional teamwork
        Page 11
    Branch office building of the Duval Federal Savings
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Message from the president
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
    Public relations survey
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Acoustical ceiling system
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    An architect goes to Fort Leavenworth
        Page 27
    It is well to know
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Advertisers' index
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Current highlights
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












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Current Highlights...


0 AVOID


* PASSAGE OF KENNEDY'S TAX PROGRAM IS COUNTED ON to assure a rising business
trend in 1964 or at least to head off a recession. With nothing else in sight to
produce a new lift, economists are taking comfort from the slow progress that the
tax bill is continuing to make through Congress. Net, the outlook is still bright
for some fairly substantial tax reduction. Because the Budget deficit isn't so big
Congress may prove more receptive.
. It's long been clear that there won't be much reform in the new bill -
perhaps a pick-up of $1 billion in new revenue, instead of the $3 billion Ken-
nedy wants. But it sill looks as if he will get $10 billion or so in net reductions
for individuals and corporations the minimum that the experts feel is
necessary to keep business activity on the uptrend.
* THE AUTO INDUSTRY IS HEADING FOR STILL ANOTHER GOOD YEAR its third in a
row, something unprecedented. Economists at the Department of Commerce who
watch auto trends have a very good record as forecasters and are known to feel
that further high sales lie ahead. They base their conclusion on the high level of
consumer income and the high rate of scrapping old cars. Still another 7 million
car year is considered a very likely possibility.
. But a year that only matches this past one won't provide any new thrust
for the economy. (In projecting growth, you have to run faster just to stay on
the same uptrend.) However, high auto sales will help head off a slide while
the economy has a chance to develop some brand-new forces for expansion.
* SALES OF SOFT-GOODS SHOULD START TO DO A LITTLE BETTER from here on. Over the
past 12 months or so, durables and services have claimed a slightly larger share
of the consumer's dollar. Service volume will continue to roll along. But with auto
sales likely to be leveling off, relatively more of the increases in personal income
that are projected will go for the purchase of such items as food . apparel . .
shoes . home-furnishings .. and gasoline.
* CREDIT WILL REMAIN EASY, despite the recent increase in the discount rate unless,
of course, business confounds all forecasts and starts to boom. The action by the
Federal Reserve in July was aimed at increasing the yield on Treasury securities,
to make them more attractive to foreigners than gold. But officials say that they
will still provide plenty of credit for business.
. Can they keep this promise, even if more action is needed to reduce
losses of gold? We get a feeling officials will try hard ... if only to keep long-
term interest rates on bonds and mortgages from rising in 1964 a Presiden-
tial election year. (Continued on Page 32)


EXTREMES OF OPTIMISM OR PESSIMISM in appraising the outlook for business
in months ahead that's the advice of economists in government and industry.
They point out that, while second-quarter business was good, it did not measure
up to expectations of those who were forecasting a near-boom. Similarly, these
analysts feel that doubts about the rest of 1963 can be overdone. The summer
has been a slowdown-the usual doldrums-but the advance is expected to show
some new vigor as the year comes to an end.
. The new minus signs that are cropping up aren't a big threat to the cur-
rent upturn yet. Housing starts and orders for durables have dipped . .
but from very lofty levels. Retail sales aren't zooming, but they are very
high. And there are pluses in the picture, too big ones like good auto
sales . higher spending for plant and equipment . and easy money.
. The forecasters who live with the figures try to put shortlived spurts and
sags into perspective. Viewing the trend in somewhat longer-run terms, these
analysts repeat what they have been saying for some time: No end to the
rise is in sight, but there's too much idle men, money and machines.










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SEPTEMBER, 1963


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



In 7Th Issec ---

Current Highlights . . . . . . .
Professional Teamwork . . . . . .
By James Merrick Smith, F.A.I.D.
Branch Office Building of the Duval Federal Savings
and Loan Association . . . . . .
Architects: Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
Message from the President . . . . .
By Roy M. Pooley, Jr. . .
News and Notes ..............
Symposium . Recently Registered . .
P/C Conference . Handbook ani Slide Rule
Public Relations Survey . . . . . .
Illinois Society Certified Public Accountants
Acoustical Ceiling System . . . . .
By E. S. Graybill
An Architect Goes to Fort Leavenworth . . .
By H. Samuel Kruse, F.A.I.A.


It Is Well To Know .......
By Archie G. Parish, F.A.I.A.
Advertising Index ........

FAA OFFICERS 1963
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville
William F. Bigoney, Jr., First V.-Pres., 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
William T. Arnett, Second V.-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Rogers, Third V.-President, 511 N. Mills St., Orlando
Jefferson N. Powell, Secretary, 361 S. County Road, Palm Beach
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank F. Smith, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH: James T. Lendrum, Lester
N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH-
WEST: Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, John
O. Grimshaw, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: John R. Graveley, Walter
B. Schultz, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Fred G. Owles, Jr.,
Donald O. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Donald Edge, Harold A. Obst, Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region American Institute of Architects
Robert H. Levison, 425 South Garden Avenue, Clearwater, Florida
Executive Secretary, Florida Association of Arcihtects
Verna Shaub Sherman, 801 E Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables, Florida

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, Chairman; Wm. T. Arnett, Fred W. Bucky, Jr.,
B. W. Hartman Jr., Dana B. Johannes.
THE COVER .
The architectural firm of Kemp, Bunch & Jackson are responsible for many
distinctive structures which today punctuate the skyline of Jacksonville . .
The Branch Office Building of the Duval Federal Savings and Loan Association,
shown on pages twelve through fifteen, is an example of one of their smaller
design accomplishments . The JACKSONVILLE CIVIC AUDITORIUM,
shown on the cover, is only one of the many large and imposing buildings
for which the firm was selected as the design team. (photography by Suter,
Hedrich-Blessing)


. 2nd Cover
. 11


.... 12 though 15

. 19

........ 20


. 21

. 23

. 27


. 28

. 30

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Inisitute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida
Corporation not for profit. It is published
monthly at the Executive Office of the Asso-
ciation, 3730 S. W. 8th Street, Coral Gables
34, Florida; telephone, 448-7453.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial merialerilay be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
.Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; January Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.

THIS ISSUE . .
VERNA SHAUB SHERMAN
Acting Editor
H. P. ARRINGTON
Acting Advertising Manager


VOLUME 13

NUMBER 9963
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































WeCAJ adddL tke i of g Ie...


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For more information about this and other
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. . of a property of glass that can help you design better buildings
Is there any limit to the designs you can create with glass? For color, it
offers you the spectrum. Many textures. It can be transparent, trans-
lucent, opaque... or reflective. Glass frees your imagination to create
structures of dramatic beauty.


[ 71


Is glass helping you in all the ways it can? Look through Sweet's
Architectural File, sections 3e, 7a, 13e, 16a, 16e, 19e, 21. And talk to
your local PPG Architectural Representative. He knows modern glass.
Just get in touch with the PPG office nearest you.
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
Paints Glass Chemicals Fiber Glass In Canada: Canadian Pittsburgh Industries Limited
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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SEPTEMBER, 1963


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GUARANTEED as to production . Precision controlled at
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GUARANTEED as to performance . Edsonite doors stand
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door guarantee. Every Edsonite door-in flush panel gum,
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is covered by a written guarantee, backed by the integrity of
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For information phone or write:





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This new Federal Office Building now under construction in Tampa features concrete frame and waffle slab floors comple-
mented by a precast solar skin system with exposed quartz aggregate. Associated Architects are Robert Wielage, AIA, and
H. Leslie Walker and Associates with H. Dean Rowe, AIA, as project architect and Dwight R. Abrams as structural engineer.


For Florida's finest office buildings


the choice is modern concrete


More and more architects and builders
today are finding new beauty and real econ-
omy in structures of modern concrete.
Everywhere you see them rising-each a
dramatic addition to a city's skyline.
Precast curtain walls, exposed aggregate,
facings of white portland cement-such new
uses of concrete bring both beauty and sav-
ings. With concrete frames and new han-
dling methods, construction moves along at


record speed. Even further savings result
from multiple use of forms. Scheduling goes
along smoothly because concrete is always
available on short order. It's there when you
need it. Then, too, concrete needs no special
fireproofing, no painting. No other material
offers such low maintenance cost.
For impressive structural strength,
beauty and freedom from upkeep nothing
matches modern concrete construction.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.N.





El A Report From Key Biscayne


INSPIRATIONAL DESIGNS WITH


Architect: Joseph N. Smith


beauty, dignity, economy at Key Biscayne Pres-
byterian Church is achieved with designs of UNIT
glued laminated wood. Sixteen .reverse-curved
laminated frames form the sanctuary-and basic
shape of the structure. These high-rising one-
piece members meet at a center compression
ring that supports laminated steeple members
which rise an additional 32 feet above the arch
tops. Forty-eight straight laminated beams form
a low roof around the perimeter of the sanctuary
to cover additional facilities. A finished roof of
Southern Pine UNIT-Deck spans directly over all
laminated members. The seemingly complex
framing of this church was resolved quickly and
economically with UNIT laminated members.
Substantial additional savings were realized since
the laminated members were furnished pre-
stained and varnished at the factory. Take a closer
look at UNIT. Mail coupon for more details.


ff--UNIT LAMINATED WOOD


L;nurun Is reutlly acc Uboule Lo surrouunolnU classruuoms,
nursery, offices, kitchen, lavatories.
For personal assistance call Chuck Hamilton, 686-7257
(Area Code 813) in Lakeland, Florida or Fred Omundson,
564-6114 (Area Code 305) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
OUITI sTRucTuRE ......
W ooD PRESE O -'. .G 0 SIO l.0
KOPPERn CoMPANY. INC.
Majf4.i Se Pns.e l .4il:;,a.ea ,:ulr ion
....1.. 1 I. C Pr....I 4 Il 'A.l. COll.l .
----------------------.
UNIT STRUCTURES
WOOD PRESERVING DIVISION, KOPPERS CO., INC.
750 Koppers Building, Pittsburgh 19, Pa.
[] At no obligation, please have representative call
[o Send copy of UNIT'S 1963 Design Manual
NAME TITLE
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ASGR NA NATURAL GAS
AIN THE HEADLINES


MRS. AMERICA BACK TO GASI Widespread electric utility ballyhoo last year when the
Mrs. America Contest switched from its long-time use of gas in the cooking competition
to electric has boomeranged. After one year of "electric living", management of the 24-
year-old search for the Nation's most outstanding homemaker has stated that a principal
interest of future contests will be to expand the emphasis on gas fuel and gas appliances.

JACKSONVILLE'S HOLIDAY HARBOUR PLANS 2,500 ALL-GAS HOMES. One of Florida's largest de-
velopment projects in recent months, Holiday Harbour plans 500 homes per year, 2,500 in all. Specifi-
cations include natural gas ranges, water heaters, heating . optional natural gas air conditioning in
some models.
ANOTHER LAKELAND SCHOOL JOINS GAS AIR CONDITIONING PARADE. New school under con-
struction on Lakeland's Plateau Avenue is latest of a dozen turning to natural gas for air conditioning.
School will have 50-ton engine driven cooling unit as well as 25-HP gas-fired boiler and gas cooking
in school cafeteria.
W. T. GRANT'S LARGEST FLORIDA STORE CHOSE GAS-NATURALLY! New Fort Walton Beach store
of W. T. Grant chain, largest Grant unit in Florida, is air conditioned and heated with natural gas. Store
also features only cafeteria in nation-wide Grant operation-and entire kitchen is natural gas.


S12-STORY APARTMENT HAS BOILERS ON TOP! Ultra-modern Plaza Fifth Avenue 200-
unit apartment building on St. Peterburg's booming "west side" has unique installation
of two 250-HP natural-gas-fired boilers on roof to furnish heating and hot water. Other
natural gas equipment-two large chute fed incinerators, restaurant and beauty shop.


MORE PRAISE FOR NATURAL GAS AIR CONDITIONING. Add success stories for leased Natural Gas
Air Conditioning: Christie's Coffee House, Orlando. Says owner Joe Lombard, "The most reliable air
conditioning I've ever known." Endorsement echoed by owners Thad Scott and Bob Riley of Daytona
Beach's Pleasant Green Motel, "We chose gas air conditioning because of its efficiency and low main-
tenance, have found it also the most reliable air conditioning ever."

McDONALD'S HAMBURGERS COOKING, COOLING WITH GAS. At least part of McDonald's billion
hamburgers are being cooked with natural gas, and natural gas cools the chain's newest outlet in
Panama City. Says operator Tom Johnston, "The cost of operation was much lower than I anticipated
... I can recommend natural gas highly to anyone with a need for air conditioning."


i) CHINESE SMORGASBORD? CERTAINLY, AND COOKING WITH GAS! "Fong-Sha-Noon
Chinerama", billed as America's first Chinese Smorgasbord in North Miami Beach, not
only cooks and heats water with natural gas, but features an eye-catching gas-flame-
fountain as part of its impressive exterior decor.


VERSATILE GAS DOES ODD AND UNUSUAL JOBS. Borden Company joins other Tampa dairies in in-
stalling natural-gas-fired sealing machines for milk cartons. Southern Drying Corporation, special-
izing in drying bread crumbs, finds business so good it plans to triple present natural-gas-burning
installations. Boilers for bus cleaning equipment in Jacksonville's Southern Greyhound Shops are
being converted to natural gas.

TAMPA CONVENTION CENTER GOES WITH GAS. City of Tampa has completed contracts for natural
gas heating and water heating in downtown Curtis Hixon Convention Center. Installation will include
two boilers and four water heaters.

WHAT'S IN A NAME? GENERAL "ELECTRIC" GOING GAS! Something approaching consternation in
the electric utility industry resulted when giant General Electric announced it would soon introduce a
gas laundry dryer in its appliance line. Despite a mail campaign among electric utilities urging a for-
mal protest to GE, word at presstime is that GE is going ahead.
Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without
restriction by the Florida Natural Gas Association, P.O. Box 1658, Sarasota, Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










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BIG SMALL


- LOW


STALL


Whatever you're building-you'll build better when
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-dry-sound absorbent-fire resistant-rust proof-
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Solite before you build.


1 The Berkshire Apartments,
Richmond, Va.
Marcellus Wright & Son, A.I.A.
Architects
Hanson & Craig, Structural Engineers
2 Residence, Ponte Vedra, Fla.
Fred C. Van Dusen, A.I.A. Architect
Stockton-Whatley-Davin & Company,
Developer
3 Technical Education Center, Florence
-Darlington Counties, S. C.
Lewis & Dowis, A.I.A. Architects
Clark, McCall & Leach, A.I.A. Asso-
ciate Architects
4 North Carolina National Bank,
Charlotte, N. C.
Walter Hook Associates, Inc., A.I.A.
Architects
R. V. Wasdell, Engineer


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I Il lI classic tapered aluminum
post 149-S. Sculptured pattern
shown. Available with a plain
surface or Inlaid natural wood.


Complete catalogue of railings
and grilles available upon request.


Permanent display -Architects
Building, 101 Park Ave., New York, N.Y.


01963 BY BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH, 460 MELWOOD STREET, PITTSBURGH 13, PENNSYLVANIA
10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A :







7ampa Hauscin Sewmear ...


Professional Teamwork



By JAMES MERRICK SMITH, F.A.I.D.



The Florida Central Chapter A.I.A., cooperated in co-sponsoring
the Tampa Housing Seminar conducted August ninth and tenth
at the University of South Florida. The address titled "The Eco-
nomics of Professional Teamwork in Housing" as presented by
James Merrick Smith, F.A.I.D., was a highlight of the program
. Mr. Smith, well known to the architectural profession, re-
ceived his B.S. in Landscape architecture from Louisiana State
University and studied architecture, city planning and design at
Washington University... He has been an active member of the
American Institute of Interior Designers since 1952 and was
advanced to Fellowship last year.


photo- ara Farkas
photo---Klara Farkas


"The question of professionalism as
it applies to interior design produces
numerous reactions regarding its attri-
butes and its detriments.
In the broad range encompassing
all building, the architect is likely to
say that interior design is part of the
integrated whole that must certainly
be controlled completely by the archi-
tect, with interior design becoming
a subordinate component supplied by
another specialist. He is prone to say,
too, that interior design is only quasi-
professional, because, in most cases,
the interior designer cannot function
purely as a consultant planner, but
must also act as the merchandising
contractor.
To some extent this argument is
valid. It is difficult to be the designer
and specifier on the one hand, and
the installing supplier on the other,
without taking the risk of jeoparadiz-
ing the true value or need for certain
elements of the client's requirements.
Fortunately, much is being done today
by the strong organizations like the
American Institute of Interior Design-
ers, who, working directly with all of
the schools that offer curricula in the
field, are establishing the kind of
balanced training that-with its
thorough indoctrination in history,
philosophy, and the synthesis of de-
sign properly prepare the individual
for work as a true professional.
In housing, far more than in the
multi-use office or commercial build-
ing, the need for teamwork manifests
SEPTEMBER, 1963


itself in the search for economical
improvements answering the cry of
lower-middle income groups for a
more comfortable setting for family
life.
Dealing with individual clients, the
interior designer must be first, the
psychologist with insight to interpret
the directions of living of a particular
family unit, and secondly, the pre-
scriber of shapes and forms and
color and texture to best put these
into play. It is a somewhat different
picture that comes in focus in specu-
lative building when the interior de-
signer is asked to be part of the team,
because analysis in this case is not
for a specific family group, but for a
nebulous composite of all the people
who might evince interest in the de-
velopment at hand. Still, the need
here is even greater, because the
changing concepts of value have cre-
ated a buyer who is intensely hungry
for the tools and rewards of more
comfortable living--and this buyer
says "Show me what this house can
do! Show me how to use this shell!"
Interior design, as differentiated
from "interior decoration," is a rela-
tively new field, having only in the
past 15 years manifested itself in the
actual development of inside spaces
to optimum usage. It is planning for
interior functioning, establishing
scale, circulation patterns, storage ac-
commodation and the like before any
thought is given to surface decoration.
It is the evaluation of space to provide


the best possible pattern for living or
working.
In effect, it becomes interior archi-
tecture, separated from the basic crea-
tion of the shell in that it interprets
the space not just as shelter, but as a
functioning answer to the howss" and
"whys" of what a given room can do
to make living more enjoyable.
There are good and bad interior
designers, just as there are good and
bad architects or builders. They need
to be selected in the same way -on
proven integrity, performance, and
design ability. Today, there are many
thoroughly trained ones specializing
in the overall concept of interior de-
sign.
Happily, through successful collab-
orations that have shown the added
benefits to be achieved through joint
design and execution, teamwork is
becoming less of a rarity. I think of
the interior designer as a catalyst,
taking the shell the builder has ach-
ieved with architectural and engine-
ering guidance, and moulding it into
usable space through the application
of furnishings and surface decoration,
complementing both the structure and
the potential user's way of life.
Togetherness among the architect,
builder, interior designer, landscape
architect, and craftsmen is fine; but
too often the interior designer is
brought into the picture when an
almost-rigid format is already estab-
lished, and then much of his ability
(Continued on Page 30)






















































il: ": : :: -:'*: :* 'l~3 t '3 5:^
.. ., .:. :- : : .
:,]': ,: ,.
.::,:









12TH .F A I
12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Duval
Federal
Savings
and
Loan
Association
Branch Office


Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
Architects -








Desied ftor FutWuie EpanioL 7mo...

By N. A. HOLMAN


This eye-catching, well proportioned
building is located on busy 4-lane
Roosevelt Boulevard between Jack-
sonville and the U. S. Naval Air Sta-
tion. The architects, Kemp, Bunch
& Jackson, designed the building not
only to meet the present banking
needs, but also to allow for future
expansion on adjacent property to the
east. As an added special feature, the
building includes community meeting
facilities which are made up of a
public lounge, foyer-gallery area and
rest rooms. Civic meeting and bank-
ing conferences normally held after
banking hours can be separated from
the lobby by closing a 14 ft. wide
sliding open metal grille. The lounge
also contains a kitchenette unit, re-
frigerator, sink, hot plates and storage
facilities for serving sandwiches and
refreshments.
The exterior wall materials are
white ceramic glazed magnesium spot
face brick. The entire banking and


public area is surrounded on three
sides with floor to ceiling glass which
is glazed into duranodic finish alum-
inum. The paved surfaces at the main
entrances, planters and platform are
of exposed aggregate paving slabs.
The canopy and eave fascias are faced
with white marble. The exposed slop-
ing roof surfaces are reinforced con-
crete covered with asphalt emulsion
over "Monoform" glass fiber rein-
forcement type roof coating.
Interior wall finishes in the public
and banking areas are white glazed
brick and American black walnut
wood. All floors in the public and
office areas are carpeted and the floors
of general work spaces are vinyl asbes-
tos tile. Floors in toilet areas are cera-
mic tile. Wall surfaces in work area
and in ladies lounge are vinyl fabric.
The ceiling of the banking lobby and
general work area is of luminous plas-
tic panels with fluorescent strips
mounted on the underside of the roof


slabs above. Ceilings in the office and
public lounge area are a combination
of recessed luminous panels and fis-
sured acoustical tile.
The foyer-gallery area is used for
art exhibits and miscellaneous civic
type exhibits and displays of public
interest.
The pylon sign contains an attrac-
tion board for special announcements
concerning the Association's opera-
tions and meetings and exhibits which
are held in the public suite.
Of special interest to those who
visit the bank is the 5 ft. by 12 ft.
beautifully colored sand sculpture re-
lief located on the interior wall oppo-
site the teller counter. It presents a
visual interpretation of the history
of currency throughout the ages. The
artist of conception for the relief is
Roy C. Craven who is widely known
for his unique creative ability in this
field of art.


Page twelve . View looking South.
Page thirteen . Above, looking south showing officers area, lounge for patrons and portion of general
lobby area. Below, view looking east from the Boulevard.
This page . Lobby, looking south, showing counter and teller work area on left.
Opposite page . Above, looking north showing spacious lobby in foreground and foyer-gallery in
background.
About the architects . William D. Kemp, AIA, Franklin S. Bunch, FAIA, and William K. Jackson, AIA,
partners, are all graduates of the University of Florida School of Architecture and are members of the Jackson-
ville Chapter, AIA, since 1945 and 1946 . Franklin S. Bunch, FAIA, received his Fellowship from the Institute
on the basis of Service to the Institute and Public Service in 1961 . .is a past president of the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects and served for two years as President of the Florida State Board of Architecture.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














































































SEPTEMBER, 1963 15








"It's just a matter of good business", say
builders and owners.
The MEDALLION award is a big asset. Your prospects
know at a glance that Medallion-awarded apartments are
truly modern . better electric living has been built into
them. This gives you a competitive selling edge.
Rental units are easier to rent... co-ops
are easier to sell.
There's no question, today's renters and buyers over-
whelmingly prefer the push-button comfort and con-
venience that only flameless electricity makes possible.
Flame-free, fume-free all-electric kitchen appliances create
no fuel-film or dirt ... so rooms stay cleaner. Less interior
painting is required.
Cooler, too... so that the operating cost of air condi-
tioning is reduced.
And since flameless electric appliances need no flues,
floor plans can be designed to better advantage.
If you are planning to build or to modernize an existing
building, your electric company will gladly supply you
with factual information relating to the economical utiliza-
tion of electricity and how you can profit by the Medallion
Home certification program.



"Medallion" apartments pa:







MEDALLION STANDARDS

ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN -including electric range,
water heater and at least two other major electric
appliances.
FULL HOUSEPOWER-100-200 amp service entranceand
enough switches and outlets for modern convenience.
LIGHT FOR LIVING -ample lighting provision for
comfort, safety and beauty.






Florida's Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor-Owned
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
GULF POWER COMPANY TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









arbor View Apartments ... 16 UnitS-Golden Gate Point, Sarasota
ellew & Shaw, Architects
ay Mathis, builder, says:
Our MEDALLION-certified deluxe apartments will be occupied by
discriminating clientele. Therefore we must have the best equipment
available. Naturally, we chose electric throughout range, water
eater, refrigerator, dishwasher, food waste disposer, washer-dryer,
ad year-round electric air conditioning that provides cool comfort
i summer and cozy warmth in winter."


The Bayshore Co-op Apartments... 102 UnitS-Pensacola, Florida
Wise, Simpson, Aiken & Associates, Architects-Engineers
Mrs. Ouida Baggett Regan, developer of this $2-million
apartment building, says:
"After careful consideration of comparative costs and other factors, I
decided that the comforts and conveniences of total-electric living
would be most desirable for BAYSHORE residents. So this building
- the first high-rise cooperative apartment in this section of Florida
- was planned in accordance with MEDALLION standards. This
means that each resident will enjoy a cooler, cleaner kitchen
equipped with flameless electric built-in range, super-safe water
heater, dishwasher and other flameless electrical helpers . year-
round electric air conditioning for summer and winter comfort. ..
and ample, scientifically planned lighting and Full Housepower wir-
ing. The enthusiastic response we have had from prospective occu.
pants proves that this is what people want today in apartment living."


larview Towers Apartments... 88 Units-Clearwater, Florida
Irlos B. Schoeppl & Associates, Architects
,uis Jacobson, vice president of Clearview Towers, says:
:learview Towers was designed to provide our tenants with the
Lest in modern living. Each unit has an all-electric kitchen and
ar-round electric air conditioning, in addition to other outstanding
itures. We selected a total electric operation because we felt it
>uld provide the most comfort and efficiency for residents of
ir building."


Walthugh Apartments ... 10 Unit-Tampa, Florida
H. B. Patterson, Architect
V. J. Sultenfuss, builder, says:
"We went all-electric in our Walthugh Apartments because the
MEDALLION program provides the conveniences and comforts we
wanted our tenants to have. Year-round electric air conditioning as
well as the all-electric kitchens have proven to be completely
reliable and satisfactory. Our residents appreciate the modern
livability of our Medallion apartments."


SEPTEMBER, 1963





.~ ., -.'


& Mrs Ph.Ip Tocp'r.o Surnmerland Ke,. Flor.d3


Look of
Quality . .
This Florida Keys home is an outstanding example of the use
of reinforced concrete where buildings must withstand seasonal storms.
The living quarters are entirely on the second floor, supported by a
first story designed to offer the least wind and water resistance,
as well as shelter for the family airplane and boat.
Skilled use of versatile concrete has resulted in grace of line
in addition to sturdiness of construction . another graphic illustration
of the strength, beauty and adaptability of concrete.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


V







MW ssage fWr 71e PredeneMt...




Define The Methods...


By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
President, Florida Association of Architects


She sounded almost desperate on
the phone.
"I have had my plans drawn and
now I can't use them, I must have
a new set by next Monday morning.
Could I please have an appointment
with you tomorrow?
This was the beginning of the con-
versation which led to my working
the 4th of July and most of that
week-end. It recalled a similar July
4th twelve years past when I was
employed by an architect who does a
great deal of residential work.
The following Monday morning
my desperate lady left happily with
a set of drawings and FHA specifi-
cations for a nice little house and I
experienced a great sense of satisfac-
tion in having been able to meet her
needs.
This story really began in April of
this year when Mrs. G. first asked
me to design her a small home. At
that time, being heavily committed
to the FAA Legislative Program it
was not possible to make a firm prom-
ise of when the work could be com-
pleted and so somehow Mrs. G. was
ultimately attracted to a local lumber
company which offers a planning ser-
vice. Being "experts" in the house
building field they were able to offer
sudden service at a very low price.
The results of their efforts cost me
my 4th of July holiday, but also pro-
vided the obvious answer to ques-
tions posed to me by legislators dur-
ing the recent legislative session.
Mrs. G. had obtained her plans
quickly and cheaply. From the first
conference with the lumber company
"architect' 'to delivery of the draw-
ings required no more than a week
or ten days. The price was right at
$150.00 and the low bid for con-
struction was well in line. From her
point of view there were only two
problems. She wanted the house con-
structed in reverse of the way it was
drawn but was assured the contractor
could handle this with no difficulty.
SEPTEMBER, 1963


The second problem was not so sim-
ple. Her lending institution did not
think the plans were quite adequate.
They were right.
To the professional eye, the reason
Mrs. G. was able to obtain such fast
design service at low cost coupled
with a "good" construction bid were
obvious. Her drawings and specifi-
cations must have occupied the drafts-
man for a good solid day and a half,
counting conferences and coffee
breaks. The cost of construction could
hardly have been higher since the
draftsman was indeed knowledgeable
about the cheapest possible materials
and the absolute minimum in con-
tract requirements. For example, the
windows specified were of a sheet
metal gage so light that factory glaz-
ing is required to hold them in shape
for shipment. Finish hardware speci-
fied was a flashy quality which would
assure at least a year's service, under
favorable conditions.
I am sure the same house con-
structed according to the plans and
specifications prepared by me will
cost Mrs. G. 5 or 6% more and per-
haps she will appreciate the 100%
greater value. I sincerely hope her
building project will be successful for
I know it is more meaningful to her
than a new million dollar plant ex-
pansion to a corporation president.
The point of the story is just that.
It seems to me there is no greater
problem facing our profession today
than finding more effective means of
communication to the home building
public the true value of professional
services. Profesisonal fees and appro-
priate quality of construction coupled
with a professional prohibition against
advertising create a difficult barrier
to communication but one which is
not insurmountable. Our need is to
more fully recognize the importance
of this market to our opportunities
for successful practice in other fields.
The fact is so obvious we may be
prone to forget that virtually every


member of the Church Building Com-
mittee, the Local School Board, the
Corporation Board of Directors and
each public official has built or will
build a home. That home has greater
personal significance for him than the
church, school, business or public
building for which he will also have
some responsibility. If a builder's ex-
pert knowledge, advice or ability
could be accepted as adequate for
the design and construction of his
home, why should his attitude be
greatly different in a less personal
application. The fact is, of course,
that each of us experiences a greater
willingness to gamble with our own
resources than with those of others
for which we are responsible.
None-the-less, if we are to truly
communicate with the public at large
we must find the means to play a
more important role in the design
of small homes. It is not enough for
us to recognize the indirect influence
we have on the design of many ele-
ments of today's builder's house. We
may be aware that a good hardware
design or a good window design or
a clever new arrangement of space or
an improvement in some other facet
of construction was developed in re-
sponse to professional demands -
still the home owner relates these
things to his own personal experience.
And his personal experience has too
often not reflected direct contact
with the architectural profession.
There are in Florida a great many
architects successful practicing in the
residential field to the great benefit
of their clients and their profession.
To them I direct a challenge let
us better define the methods of con-
ducting a successful and rewarding
residential practice to the end that
more of our members will dedicate
their efforts to this area of endeavor.








News & Notes


Symposium . .
James T. Lendrum, Head, Depart-
ment of Architecture of the Univer-
sity of Florida announces plans for a
symposium concerning Caribbean
Architecture to be held December 4th
through the 7th, this year, at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Carlos Contreras, S.A.M., F.A.I.A.,
Mexico City and Martin Dominquez,
Professor of Architecture, Cornell Uni-
versity, will be guest speakers for the
meetings. Mr. Contreras will present
a public address entitled "The Archi-
tecture of Mexico," and Professor
Dominquez will conduct a professional
seminar for the students. Both gentle-
men will serve on the jury for the
senior terminal project.
The Department is coordinating its
efforts with the School of Inter-Ameri-
can Studies, University of Florida,
which each year sponsors the Carib-
bean Conference held on the Gaines-
ville campus.
There will also be a photographic
exhibit on display covering the work


of Professor Dominquez and "4000
Years of Mexican Architecture."
Detailed information will be pub-
lished in forthcoming issues of THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT.


Recently Registered ...
Twenty five residents of the State
passed the June written examination
given by the State Board of Archi-
tecture and were granted registration
to practice architecture. They are:
Broward County Chapter area:
Donald F. Casther.
Florida Central Chapter area: Carl
N. Atkinson, Matthew Bodo, James
E. Fulcher, Gus N. Paras, Robert N.
Pettigrew, Alvin E. Strauchn, Tollyn
J. Twitchell, I. Blount Wagner, Ed-
ward Walker, Jr., Philip C. Warren.
Florida North Chapter area: Mays
L. Gray.
Florida South Chapter area: Elliott
Goldsmith, Thurston Hatcher, Jr.,
Richard Levine.
Jacksonville Chapter area: Edgar
Crenshaw, John W. Dyal, Byron G.


83-Year-Old Baby

In 1880 when Floridians picked up
a phone for the first time, they
talked-and that's all. But look
what happens today. Your calls can
be dialed for you (Automatic Dial-
ers), you can talk hands free
(Speakerphones), and conduct com-
mittee meetings (Call Director).
Not only that, all Florida phones
are now 100% dial. In spite of all
the things phones do today, it's only
the beginning. More and better serv-
ices are being developed right now
to make your telephone an even
greater marvel of convenience and
pleasure, at the lowest possible cost.


SouthernA Bell
... Gwoviq i wAP Fdw


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


McIntyre, Daniel M. Urbanus.
Mid Florida Chapter area: Bruce
Blachman, Bernard Harter, Jr., John
A. Hollifield, Tom R. Hunten, Ed-
ward L. Thomas.
Palm Beach Chapter area: William
Cox.

P/C Conference . .
Key specifiers and users of building
products will have the floor at the
Producers' Council 42nd Annual
Meeting and Chapter Presidents'
Conference September 18-20 at the
Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C.,
as they examine the function of the
manufacturer in the total building
process.
Addressing themselves to the
theme, "Viewpoints The Customer
Speaks," prominent spokesmen for the
architectural and engineering profes-
sion and for the contractor and sub-
contractor, owner, investor, and home-
builder will discuss what they expect
from the products, services and repre-
sentatives of building material manu-
facturers. They will also discuss how
their expectations are met and what
can be done to further improve manu-
(Continued on Page 25)








Public Relations Survey...


By courtesy of
Illinois Society of
Certified Public Accountants


I. Background Information
A. The Professional societies sam-
pled and the response received:
% REPLIED
Architecture ---- 70 %
CPAs ------- 80%
Dentistry ..------ 80 %
Education ----80 %
Prof. Eng'rs ---90%
Law -----------80 %
Medicine --- 80 %
Nurses __ --- 50 %
Optometry ---- 70 %
Pharmacy ---- 70 %
Vet. Medicine ---- 90%
B. Year society chartered:
Medicine is the oldest profes-
fession; the first society was char-
tered in 1781 and the last in this
group in 1874, Pharmacy (1865-
1887), education (1845-1907),
and dentistry (1856-1917) are
the next oldest professions.
Society for CPAs were founded
in a short span (1897-1915)
while these other professional or-
ganizations' covered a longer
period: veterinary medicine
(1874-1929), optometry (1895-
1926), nursing (1901-1924),
law (1880-1950), professional
engineers (1904-1949), and archi-
tecture (1913-1950).
C. Size of membership:
Educational organizations are far
and away the largest, ranging
from 30,000 to 130,000 mem-
bers. A wide variance is found in
law and medicine which have,
respectively, 3,800 to 24,000 and
4,800 to 26,000. Nurses' groups
range from 7,000 to 13,000.
Most CPA groups average be-
tween 3,000 to 4,000 members
but the range is from 2,000 to
12,500.
Smaller professional organizations
are: architecture (600-2,000),
dentistry (1,850-5,600), profes-
sional engineers (1,600-6,100),
optometry (340-1,500), phar-
macy (1,600-3,600), and veteri-
nary medicine (175-1,500).
SEPTEMBER, 1963


Recently the Associations' Executive Office was asked to furnish
material for a "Survey of State Professional Organizations' Pub-
lic Relations Programs". The survey results have been made
available to the F.A.A. and should be of interest to all members.
The sample was composed of 110 professional societies repre-
senting 11 professions in the 10 largest states of the country . .
Replies were received from 84 societies whose combined member-
ship totals more than 835,000 professional persons. The survey
revealed these highlights: (1) Continuing professional education,
improved technical standards and professional ethics, and legis-
lation are more important to members than external or internal
public relations. (2) The organizations still rely mainly on news-
papers as the media for their public relations with speakers and
pamphlets ranking highest as other means for telling a profes-
sion's story. (3) Each profession seems to have its favorite special
project which also serves as a peg for publicity such as, pre-
paid dental care, legal aid, rabies control, etc. (4) Scientific
evaluation of the public relations activities is very limited; but,
regardless, replies indicated definite opinions of the problems such
public relations can help in overcoming. "Correcting a common
misconception" was easily the most frequent reply.


II. Public Relations Orientation
A. Allocate a percentage of annual
budget to public relations?
More than half of the state soci-
eties for CPAs, dentistry, educa-
tion, professional engineers, law,
optometry, and veterinary medi-
cine check "YES." The remain-
der (architecture, medicine, nurs-
ing, and pharmacy) predomin-
ately checked "NO".
If yes, what percentage?
The average percentages checked
were:


Architecture
CPAs
Dentistry -
Education ------
Prof. Eng'rs
Law ------
Medicine
Nursing -
Optometry -
Pharmacy -
Vet. Medicine


----- 35%
---- 5%
---10%
------------ 5%
---- 2%
-----5%
-----13%
.----7%
---- 5%
-- 20%
-----8%


B. Who has specific responsibilities
for public relations?
The majority of all the profes-
sional groups checked "staff
members and public relations
committee" as being responsible
for public relations. The second
choice was "executive director
and public relations committee."


Third most frequent choices were
"public relations committee" as
solely responsible and "executive
director" as solely responsible.
Fourth selections were "outside
public relations counsel" as solely
responsible, "executive director,
staff member and public rela-
tions committee" and "executive
director, outside counsel, and
public relations committee."
C. Who decides and sets the public
relations policy?
Most organizations selected
"board of directors" as the
policy-setting body for public re-
lations. Second most popular was
"public relations committee".
and third, "board of directors
and public relations committee."
A large number also selected "ex-
ecutive committee".
D. Which activities are most im-
portant to the membership?
"Continuing professional educa-
tion" was the most frequently
chosen "1" activity of all the
respondents. "Improved techni-
cal standards and professional
ethics" was marked "2", and
"legislation" was marked with
varying choices but over-all
would be the third most frequent
(Continued on Page 24)








ACOUSTICAL CEILING SELECTION CHART


Type of Ceiling
Wood Fiber






Asbestos Panel






Mineral Fiber


Acoustical units in either
tile or panel form offering
rated fire protection for
structure under which they
are installed


-n
r-

5 Ventilating Tile or panel ceiling
systems designed to serve
> as air diffuser as well as
Decorative, sound absorbent
interior finish

m
H


Description
Low cost acoustical tile
available in variety of sizes
and designs




Large, perforated
incombustible facing units
installed with glass fiber
backing



Incombustible acoustical
units in either tile or
panel form



Metal facing units, usually
aluminum or steel, installed
with sound absorbent
mineral pad



Incombustible tile or
panels faced with durable
polyester film for easy
maintenance


Mechanically suspended


Mechanically suspended


Mechanically suspended


Mechanically suspended


How Installed
Cemented; Stapled to
furring;
Mechancally suspended




Screwed or nailed to wood
furring or metal nailing
channels; mechanically
suspended



Cemented;
Mechanically suspended


Among highest of all
acoustical ceilings


Comparable to similar
acoustical materials
without facing


Good


Good


Acoustical Efficiency
Medium to high depending
on installation method





Medium to high
depending on installation
method




Medium to high
depending upon product
and installation method


Usually moderate to high
material cost, moderate
installation cost; however,
economy "lay-in" systems
available




Usually moderate to high
material cost, moderate
installation cost; however,
economy "lay-in" systems
available


Cost
Low material cost;
Low to moderate installation
cost depending on method




Moderate material cost;
moderate installation cost





Low to high depending
upon product and
installation method




Usually high material cost,
moderate to high
installation cost; however,
economy systems available



Moderate to high material
cost; moderate installation
cost


Exceptional ease of
maintenance; Ideal for
areas subject to high
standards of sanitation;
Complete incombustible




Economical fire protection
where required; Time
design ratings up to
four hours


Provides improved
air-conditioning efficiency,
while eliminating diffuser
costs and substantial
amount of ductwork; Some
systems available with
fire-retardant time
design ratings


Major Advantages
Low cost; Good
acoustical efficiency





Incombustibility, economy
and wide range of
installation methods




Complete incombustibility;
Attractive finished
appearance




High sound absorptive
ability; Incombustibility;
easy to maintain


Metal


Membrane-faced


Fire-Retardant
















Acoustical





Ceiling





System...


IW~a~tregore '40(entomee ..


Virtually every commercial and in-
stitutional construction project today
involves the installation of acoustical
ceilings. Once regarded as a novelty,
these ceilings have become an inte-
gral part of any well-planned building
interior.
Yet despite this near universal ac-
ceptance, there remains a certain
amount of confusion among architects
today concerning the various types of
ceiling systems available, and their
relative advantages. Thinking primari-
ly in terms of sound absorptive capac-
ity, many architects are at a loss to
understand the reason for the wide
variation in ceiling costs. Why, for
example, does one acoustical ceiling
system cost 30c a foot while another
system costs three or four times that
amount? Is there a comparable in-
crease in the noise quieting efficiency
of one over the other?
Generally speaking, the answer is
no. While it is true that certain ac-
oustical materials do absorb more
sound than others, the cost differen-
tial between the various systems can-
not be attributed to this factor alone.
Part of the reason lies in the fact that
there are some 30 different methods
in installing acoustical ceilings in com-
mon use today, each designed to ac-
commodate a specific set of job re-
quirements. These methods range
from simple cement application of
SEPTEMBER, 1963


the tiles, to highly complicated me-
chanical suspension systems where the
acoustical units are held in place by
a supporting metal framework. Ob-
viously, when a job calls for one of
the more difficult and time-consum-
ing installation methods, the cost of
the finished ceiling increases propor-
tionately, regardless of the type of
acoustical material that is installed.
The selection of the material it-
self, however, is probably the key factor
affecting costs. Years ago, when acous-
tical ceilings were designed only to
absorb sound, material costs were tied
directly to sound absorbing efficiency.
The greater the efficiency, the higher
the cost of the material.
Today, there are many other factors
that determine this cost. For example,
the widespread use of ceiling-height
wall partitions today demands that
utmost attention be given to the
sound transmission loss properties of
the ceiling. Even the most efficient
sound absorbent ceiling material -
because of its porosity may trans-
mit noise through itself, over the par-
tition, and back down into an adjoin-
ing room. For this reason, some acous-
tical materials are manufactured of a
higher density composition than
others, specifically to stop sound from
passing through the ceiling. Although
somewhat higher in cost, these mater-
ials are essential for installations where


speech privacy is required between
areas separated by ceiling-height par-
titions.
Another major cost determining
factor is appearance. From the time
when ceilings were considered little
more than the upper boundary of a
room, today's acoustical materials play
a vital role in interior design. Literally
hundreds of attractive and unusual de-
signs, patterns and textures on the
market make it possible to create vir-
tually any ceiling effect desired, rang-
ing from the simple and inconspic-
uous, to highly ornate and dramatic
treatments.
Within the past five years, still
another trend has developed which
has an important bearing on today's
ceiling costs. It is simply that acous-
tical ceilings have taken on more and
more new functions and capabilities
which are entirely unrelated to the
field of acoustics. While these new
functions tend to increase the cost
of the acoustical ceiling itself, in the
long run they usually result in sub-
stantial savings in over-all construction
time and costs.
For example, some systems now
offer rated fire protection for the floor
or roof structure under which they
are installed. Five years ago, this same
protection had to be installed separ-
ately- above the finished ceiling -
(Continued on Page 29)


Mr. E. S. Graybill, Manager of theCeil-
ing Systems Department of the Arm-
strong Cork Company, describes in this
article some of the important advances
that have taken place in acoustical
ceiling systems in recent years, and
what these developments mean to the
architectural profession. The article
S is by no means a complete discussion
S of acoustical ceilings, it is intended
to give you a better understanding of
many factors that can affect ceiling
costs, and to provide you with some
S technical knowledge which should be
helpful in specifying intelligently that
which will function best for your
requirements.







P/R Survey...
(Continued from Page 21)
choice. "Internal public rela-
tions" was fourth and "external
public relations", fifth.
E. Are purposes and goals of public
relations prepared in writing?
Replies were evenly divided be-
tween "yes" and "no".
III. Ends and Means for Public
Relations
A. To what specific groups is pub-
lic relations directed?
The groups most frequently
selected by all professions, listed
according to rank, were:
Internal membership
Legislators
Press, radio, TV
Students
Educators
Other professional groups
Government Officials
Clients, patients
Business leaders
B. What media is most consis-
tently effective in publicity?
Listed according to preference,
the media preferred were:
Newspapers
Television


Professional and trade maga-
zines
Radio
C. Means other than publicity
which is productive of public
relations?
Listed according to preference
the activities selected were:
Speakers
Phamplets
Exhibits
Others: own publications,
clinics, special weeks, films,
etc.
IV. Evaluation of Public Relations
A. Three activities which have been
most productive of favorable
notice?
Listed according to preference,
the activities selected were:
Meetings, conventions
Special day, week or month
Press publicity*
Special professional activity
(pre-paid dental care; legal
aid and lawyer referral, vis-
ual screening programs, poi-
son prevention centers, rabies
control program, Sabin oral
polio vaccine, etc.)
Legislation
Speakers


Radio, TV spots and programs
Miscellany (education of
membership, advertising,
local campaigns)
(*NOTE: Although press publicity is
not correctly an "activity" nor a func-
tion which produces favorable notice
outside the membership, many re-
spondents listed it. More proper activ-
ites are the professional activities
which generate voluntary publicity
from the press.)
B. Specific public service projects
found effective in public rela-
tions?
Listed according to preference,
the activities selected were:
Scholarship
Special professional activity
(See list shown with "A"
above)
Award
Student loan fund
Clinic for needy
Career Guidance
(Others marked: exhibits, ethics
enforcement, emergency call
service)
C. If you evaluate your public re-
lations, how do you do it?
Listed according to preference,
(Continued on Page 30)


More and more prospective clients are
realizing that no home is completely modern
without natural gas . not only because
of the many home services it performs
better, faster and cheaper . but because
of the added protection to health, welfare
and comfort which natural gas . .depend-
ably delivered underground . assures
them in time of need.


For details on how natural gas con
tributes to balanced energy for bette
living in truly modern homes, consul
your local natural gas utility or contact
us direct.


FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSI


14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 20)
facturer-specifier/user relationships.
Official representatives of Council
members and presidents of the Coun-
cil's 48 chapters will hear A. M.
(Brig) Young give the convention's
keynote address on Wednesday morn-
ing September 18th. Young manager
of marketing for the Libby-Owens-
Ford Glass Company, is president of
the Council.
An architect-engineer panel will fol-
low the keynote address. Speaking for
the architects will be Francis D. Leth-
bridge, AIA, winner of numerous
architectural awards, and presently
chairman of the AIA National Com-
mittee on Residential Architecture.
Representing the engineering pro-
fession on the panel will be Sanford
K. Fosholt, PE, national president of
the Consulting Engineers Council.
Thursday's general session will be
devoted to the viewpoints of other
key specifiers and users, including the
contractor, sub-contractor and home
builders. Speaking at the luncheon
the same day will be W. W. Sproul,
vice president and general manager,
Commercial Construction Group,


Westinghouse Electric Corporation.
The afternoon session, a panel com-
osed of owners and investors will con-
clude the general session program.

Slide Rule Available...
A "Slide Rule" which will easily
determine air conditioning savings
through the application of Sun-X
Glass Tinting on windows in any
building in any part of the United
States has been developed for Sun-X
International, Inc.
Devised to be of help to architects,
engineers, contractors and builders,
the copyrighted Sun-X Glass Tinting
"Slide Rule" utilizes test data devel-
oped by ASHRAE (American Society
of Heating, Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Engineers), to deter-
mine the dollar savings per month for
air conditioning installations after
Sun-X Glass Tinting has been applied.
Sun-X Glass Tinting manufactured
by E. I. DuPont, also controls fade
and glare caused by the sun's rays, as
well as heat.
Copies of the "Sun-X Slide Rule"
can be secured by writing Sun-X In-
ternational, P. O. Box 6565, Houston
5, Texas.


Handbook Available...
A technical handbook, "Principles
of Architectural Sound Control," is
now available to architects: It has
been created to aid the architect in
coping with some of the basic prob-
lems of sound control.
Designed as a practical working
handbook rather than an exhaustive
treatise, the booklet helps the archi-
tect identify various kinds of acousti-
cal problems.
"Principles of Architectural Sound
Control" also assists the architect in
the solution of acoustical problems.
The booklet was prepared in co-
operation with Lyle F. Yerges, Reg-
istered Professional Engineer, who has
authored numerous publications on
sound control. Mr. Yerges is past-
President of Acoustical Materials As-
sociation; former Director of National
Noise Abatement Council; member,
Acoustical Society of America and
ASTM Committee C-20 for Acousti-
cal Materials.
A copy of this technical handbook
can be acquired by writing to the
Amerada Glass Corporation, 3301 S.
Prairie Avenue, Chicago 16, Illinois.


ependable...


when you need it MOST!


)MPANY P.O. BOX 44, WINTER PARK, FLORIDA


Member: Florida
Natural Gas Association


SEPTEMBER, 1963 25


I





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S COPPER SANIMASTER
I COMMERCIAL GAS
WATER HEATERS
Available in a wide variety of models, with
recovery rates up to 300 gallons per hour at
100 rise. All Ruud Copper Sanimaster Water
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ble to LP gas beyond the natural gas mains.
RUUD MANUFACTURING COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILL
A Subsidiary of Rheem Manufacturing Company


WHEREVER YOU ARE! Contact your local
natural gas utility for details on natural gas service.
Or write Florida Gas Transmission Company, whose
transmission lines serve major areas of Florida as
shown on this map. Address P.O. Box 44, Winter
Park, Florida.


Members: Florida Natural Gas Association


FLORIDA GAS COMPANY serving: Miami, Jack-
sonville, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Lakeland, Eustis,
Tavares.
FLORIDA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY
serving: West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Lake Worth,
Delray Beach, Boca Raton.
PEOPLES GAS SYSTEM serving: Miami Beach,
Tampa, Hollywood, Ft. Lauderdale, North Miami.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


"JI~?I
)t~


^1818R
w ''f~? y "~;'








An Architect Goes to Fort Leavenworth


Old Army posts are much more
interesting than those of World War
II vintage, or World War I, for that
matter. Whereas the younger estab-
lishments tend to drab sameness in
its buildings and a decided butchery
of the landscape, these are not true
of old ones.
Fort Leavenworth is an old one. It
was here that Colonel Leavenworth
established in the spring of 1827 the
westernmost outpost of the young
Republic. Here on top of a high bluff
overlooking the great river valleys of
the Missouri and Platte, the post sat
astride the Santa Fe and Oregon
Trails. From this post young Buffalo
Bill Cody, Sheridan, Sherman and
Custer lead cavalry troops assisting,
protecting the great western expan-
sion.
Many of the old landmarks remain
and the Fort was declared a historic
site in 1961. Colonel Lcavenworth's
home, which also housed the Terri-
torial Governor of Kansas in the
1850's, and buildings representative
of the stages of cultural change in the
Nation from 1827 are here for study.
The setting too is interesting and
charming. The earth rolls in grass
covered folds shaded by giant poplars,
elms and maples, and the buildings
nestle in it all. In the mind's eye one
can see the cavalry smartly trot at
daybreak down the hills to patrol the
plains and return at sundown, a slow
dust laden walk of tired horses. But
the horses are not here. The army has
abandoned its reliance on the horse,
a result of a reorganization that took
place over a generation ago, which
introduces the purpose of this article.
It was Army reorganization which
brought a Florida architect to this
historic Army post.
Nearly every high school student
knows that since its genesis some 188
years ago, that the people of this na-
tion have held to the policy of main-
taining a small, highly skilled regular
force of arms to hold the line in case
of emergency and train, equip and
SEPTEMBER, 1963


deploy a larger force of citizens to
assure the victory. It is generally
known that the United States Army
is a combination of regular forces and
citizen-soldiers, like Vance Duncan,
Robert Levison, Lester May, Herbert
Savage to mention a few, called re-
serves, but it isn't generally known to
what extent the changing times have
altered the degree of preparedness of
the citizen-soldier and the increased
dependence upon him. A citizen's
responsibilities not only oblige him
to pay taxes and vote regularly, but
also to be ready before an emergency
arises to take up arms and deploy
when the emergency arises.
Recognizing that the public needed
to be apprised of this increased de-
pendence upon the citizen and of
recent developments affecting the citi-
zen and citizen-soldier, the Depart-
ment of Army invited judges, doctors,
engineers, lawyers, bankers and busi-
nessmen, even two architects and a
city planner, from all the States of
the Union to come to Fort Leaven-
worth to learn of the recent reorgan-
ization of the Department of Army.
The Army's mission is the same as
always: the ground partner with the
other military services to deter war
or to win the war should deterrence
fail. At the present time nuclear large-
scale war seems stalemated, however,
erosion of the Free World by aggres-
sion short of a general war appears
more likely to occur. It is the mission
of deterring aggressive acts short of
general war, that demands an accel-
eration of activities of the Army and
a greater demand on citizens and
citizen-soldiers. The organization of
the Department of Army was changed
to expedite decision, streamline ad-
ministration and delegate decision-
making to the lowest qualified agency.
Ground troops become more versatile,
ready to fight anywhere in any kind
of war. The revamped Army has a
nuclear role. However, it also consists
of especially trained units to conduct
limited war anywhere effectively from
the first day of challenge.


By H. SAMUEL KRUSE, F.A.I.A.


The Army is now sixteen ready
combat divisions instead of eleven.
For a general war the Army is sup-
ported by units from the reserves who
are trained and ready for its tasks at
moments notice. A program to mod-
ernize weapons, vehicles and other
equipment exploits the most advanced
technology and practical research. The
number of specialists trained in guer-
rilla fighting, and a teaching of the
necessary skills has developed rapidly.
The air arm has expanded in the
interest of achieving much greater
mobility on any future battlefield.
For greater economy of force and
expenditure of the taxpayers money,
the air defense of the Nation, the
immediate support of regular estab-
lished forces, and the replacement of
security missions of deployed regular
established forces are all the responsi-
bility of a ready organized citizen-
soldier reserve. In addition state col-
leges and military schools are ex-
pected to train annually in their
R.O.T.C. programs twice the number
of officers for the regular established
forces than the Military Academy at
West Point. The R.O.T.C. program
is also expected to provide most of
the reserve officers. The citizens draft
is expected to provide the soldiers for
the regular established forces as well
as provide for the reserve strength.
The dependence upon citizen support
and citizen-soldier readiness is beyond
that of any comparable period of our
history. Our security depends upon
the effectiveness of citizen response.
Since all fit unmarried men from
18V2 to 27 years of age will serve in
the Army unless they volunteer and
are accepted to serve in another
branch of service, and since a number
of architects' sons, relatives and em-
ployees fall within these age limits, no
architect should be ignorant of the
Army's high purpose to provide for
the common defense and by so doing
to secure the liberty for ourselves, our
allies and the Free World.
Unless mothers, fathers, educators
and employees understand their share
of the responsibility in the defense
program it will be increasingly diffi-
cult for the younger generation to
accept the traditional role as "minute-
man," and the security of our freedom
and well-being will be compromised.
27








It Is Well To Know...


By ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA
President, Florida State Board of Architecture


HIGHEST
I TOOTH
['0 o VALUE
% IN THE
S INDUSTRY
Engineered and field-tested to meet
or exceed all codes including
B.O.C.A.; Southern Building Code;
U.B.C.; VA and FHA No. SE-338;
Central Mortgage and Housing Cor-
poration (Ottawa, Canada) No. 4176,
and all local codes.
SEND FOR YOUR MANUAL
TODAY ON YOUR LETTERHEAD



ENGINEERING DIVISION
1950 N. 30th AVE.* HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
REMEMBER, WE'RE ALWAYS
AS NEAR AS YOUR PHONE
Miami: WI 5-7912 Hollywood: YU 9-0287


The sixth message by the President of the State Board directed to all
architects registered in the State, calls specific attention to the fact
that . problems facing the profession are in reality "individual
problems" . are you doing your part to solve them? . .


It would be to the advantage of
the profession as a whole and to each
individual architect if we would all
be continuously alert to inform all
persons, having an official interest in
the profession, as to the scope and
purposes of Chapter 467, Florida
Statutes. This is particularly true inso-
far as city and county building offi-
cials are concerned.
Many of these officials, some with
limited tenure in office, do not have
a complete understanding of our law.
Representatives of the Board, from
time to time, in meeting and discuss-
ing matters of mutual interest with
building inspectors, ascertain that
these individuals are anxious to dis-
cuss the law so that they may better
understand its provisos.
The problem of assisting such offi-
cials is one which must be handled,
for the most part, on the local level.
On a statewide level only in those
instances where it is necessary to call
upon the Building Inspector is per-
sonal contact made and discussion
had. With the limited appropriation
available to the Board such travel
must be held to a minimum so that
funds may be conserved.
It is felt that the individual archi-
tect, assisted by his local Chapter can
do much in the field of Education
so far as our law is concerned. We
are all in the position of participating
in the tremendous growth of our
State. It is our responsibility, as pro-
fessional men, to assist in an orderly
growth, making available our knowl-
edge and talents to those who may
not be fully cognizant of the pro-
visions of our Laws.
Chapter 467, Florida Statutes was
passed by the Legislature and ap-
proved by the Governor at time of
passage to insure that those who built
in this State could have confidence
in those who have been registered
and granted the privilege of practic-


ing Architecture. We, in the profes-
sion, should bear this in mind in our
daily work and social contacts. Many
times persons unfamiliar with the law
will comment to the effect that the
only purpose of the law is to help the
individual Architect amassing a per-
sonal fortune. We have all heard this
comment from time to time. Nothing
can be farther from the true facts.
Very few will amass those so called
personal fortunes-but-we all can
be proud of our accomplishments re-
flected in our work in our commun-
ities and in our State.
It would be well if each and every
one of us sat back for a moment and
assessed our programs of assistance to
our communities. Have we volun-
teered to acquaint persons with the
purposes of the Architectural Profes-
sion? How have we done it? Have we
visited newly appointed building offi-
cials either on a personal basis or as
a Chapter Representative? Have we
familiarized civic groups and other
like groups of our aims and purposes?
Have we accepted small commissions
when approached by prospective cli-
ents or have we, in such instances,
discouraged the prospective client with
the result that another unregistered
person is given the prospect which
will result in his growth in our field
of endeavor?
Let us all resolve that the problems
facing the profession are our individ-
ual problems. Let us assist in fully
acquainting the public of the pur-
poses and goals of the Architectural
Profession in our State. These prob-
lems cannot be passed off with a "Let
John Do It" comment. By a joint
continuous effort we will be success-
ful in securing maximum co-operation
from all interested persons. Feel free
to communicate with the Board if
you feel that we can be of assistance
to you in your program of Education.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Important Advances...
(Continued from Page 23)
by means of spray-on insulation, or
a suspended plaster fire barrier in
addition to the acoustical tile. With
the integration of fire protection and
acoustics in a single ceiling system,
however, it is now possible to save as
much as 30c per square foot in over-
all ceiling construction costs.
Another excellent example of this
cost-saving trend is the "ventilating"
acoustical ceiling. Developed late in
1961, this ceiling is designed to serve
as an inlet system for conditioned air,
as well as a decorative, noise quieting
interior finish. Instead of using an
overhead network of ducts and dif-
fusers to distribute air, the ceiling
itself serves as a distributor by releas-
ing a uniform air flow through thous-
ands of tiny, almost invisible perfora-
tions in the ceiling material. There
are no drafts or stagnant spots because
the air descends slowly on all parts of
the room in a continuous, uniform
"blanket."
Ventilating ceilings offer many ad-
vantages over conventional air inlet
systems. In the first place, they save
on construction costs by eliminating
the need for standard diffusers that
ordinarily have to be installed in the
ceiling. They also eliminate a sub-
stantial amount of duct work. In
many cases, a single stud duct is all
that is required to deliver the neces-
sary volume of air to the plenum space
above the ceiling. As the air disperses
throughout this space, it automatically
builds up pressure, then is pushed
down into the room through the
ceiling perforations, steadily forcing
the air below it lower and lower into
the room.
In addition, a ventilating ceiling
usually requires less space above the
ceiling than conventional air-condi-
tioning installations because of the
smaller amount of duct work required.
In new construction, this permits
either an atmosphere of greater in-
terior spaciousness using higher ceil-
ings, or the economy of smaller floor-
to-floor spacing using conventional
ceiling heights. In remodeling pro-
jects, it eliminates the difficult and
often expansive problem of duct place-
ment in areas where there is little
available clearance beneath the ex-
isting joists or beams.
Largely because of new functions
such as air diffusion and fire pro-
(Continued on Page 30)
SEPTEMBER, 1963


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


Clearwater, Florida


G.- ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

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USE A432


REINFORCING


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Its Minimum yield strength
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strength per dollar...real
savings in steel, concrete
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Note the "F" on each A432
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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Anchor Lock of Florida . 28
Blumcraft . . 10
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Dyfoam Corporation . 30
Florida Gas Transmission 24-25
Florida Home Heating Institute 31
Florida Natural Gas Assn. 8- 26
Florida Portland Cement Div. 18
Florida Investor Owned
Electric Utilities . 16-17
Florida Steel Corporation . 30
Koppers Company . . 7
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile 3
Miami Window Corporation 1
Pittsburgh Plate Glass . 4
Portland Cement Association 6
Solite . . . 9
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. . 20
Thompson Door Company . 5
F. Graham Williams . .29


Professional Teamwork...
(Continued from Page 11)
is subjugated. He must resort to adap-
tation or to camouflage, neither of
which can produce a satisfactory re-
sult. But, if, from the onset of plan-
ning, he is a working member of the
team, he can help stretch the con-
struction dollar tremendously.
Cliches are the trouble spots in
any design collaboration; and too
often, when the interior phase of
development is entrusted to an infer-
ior administrator, the end result is
tired and lifeless. Rehashing is not
enough; there must be freshness of
materials and of pattern, cleanness of
design, a minimum of gadgets and
gimmicks, stress on quality and dur-
ability rather than on faddish and
frivolous trivia."


P/R Survey...
(Continued from Page 24)
means selected were:
Press clippings
Legislative changes
Surveys of membership
Opinion survey
None
D. Three greatest problems the
organization faces and hopes
public relations will relieve?
Listed according to preference,
the choices were:
Common public misconception
needs correction
Legislation: standards of prac-
tice, federal intervention, etc.
Internal problems: member-
ship, ethics, budget, commu-
nications, etc.
Recruitment into profession
Others: (education on need
for professional help to pub-
lic, change commercial image,
court reform, etc.)


Important Advances...
(Continued from Page 29)
tection, acoustical ceilings today oc-
cupy a far more significant place in
the over-all architectural specification
than they once did. Certainly, noise
control is and always will be a prime
consideration in selecting an acoustical
ceiling, but it is no longer the sole
criterion in determining the best
acoustical ceiling value.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






;O

1~9


MR. ARCHITECT:
Our Florida newspaper advertising of
cheap, safe, dependable oil home heat-
ing has been going on for several years.
It seems likely that most of the clients
for whom you are designing houses
know by now that inexpensive fuel oil
cuts home heating bills in half. And
that they will welcome your recommen-
dation of central oil home heating.


UTILITY
ROOM


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for a free home heating survey and cost estimate
to help you select the right size and type of oil
heating equipment for your home. Do it now and
assure your family of healthier, happier living
in cold snap weather at lowest possible cost!

FLORIDA HOME 4 HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th ST., MIAMI


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air conditioning the comfort team that works for pennies

SEPTEMBER, 1963 3


i i;~-*: i

C/
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S ...even during winter
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he installed permanent
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chose OIL heat because
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VWaA,


kabm". W







Current Highlights . .

* U.S. SPENDING IS GOING TO LEVEL OFF in the Budget for fiscal 1965, now in prepara-
tion. (We are now in fiscal 1964, which started on July 1.) White House programs
call for an increase of some $1 billion over this year, which itself calls for some-
thing like $3 billion over the year just ended. Kennedy will do his darndest to
keep the total from exceeding $100 billion. But it will be touch and go. This
year's figure is put at $98.8 billion.
. Defense spending and space outlays are going up relatively little next
year, now that the Berlin-prompted build-up is completed and the moon pro-
gram is moving. The object is to keep all other spending at the current level
. if possible.
S. Federal spending has been a major support of the economy in the past
year and a half. If it starts to level off in '64, the economy will indeed face
a test of its basic strength.
* MORE VIGOROUS ENFORCEMENT OF THE ANTITRUST LAWS will be pushed by the Fed-
eral Trade Commission if Congress appropriates additional money this year. Some
of the funds will be used for studies of mergers, unfair trade practices, and price
discrimination. The studies will provide the factual basis for ultimate action
against industry by the Commission's legal staff.
* BASIC MARKETING DATA FOR BUSINESSMEN can be found in new statistics compiled
by the government as a by-product of Social Security operations. The material is
presented under the title "County Business Patterns, 1962." It provides up-to-date
material on such things as the number of businesses and industrial units in each
country . the number of workers . and payrolls. The figures can help in plan-
ning sales campaigns, new plant locations, etc.
Figures for New England appear in the first of 15 volumes just out. The price
of "New England" is $1.50. Cost of the entire series will be $23.75. You can
order these studies from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25,
D.C.
* WILL ROCKEFELLER AND GOLDWATER NEUTRALIZE EACH OTHER as candidates for the
Republican nomination next year? Some political observers believe they may.
Rockefeller, it is agreed, has lost too much ground because of his remarriage. But
he can still hurt the Arizona Senator through attacks on the "radical right." Some
party professionals who won't support the New Yorker may find they can't go
along with some of Goldwater's backing either. So the way may be open to a com-
promise nominee after a convention deadlock.
. As yet, the field of alternates is fairly restricted:
-Romney of Michigan: His boom hasn't gotten off the ground.
-Scranton of Pennsylvania: He has lots of backing from big guns like Ike and
Nixon: But he isn't very well known yet.
-Hatfield of Oregon: He's young and popular with liberals.
-Morton of Kentucky: He is said to be Ike's first choice and as former GOP
Chairman has a lot of allies among party pros.
-Kuchel of California: As a liberal-leaning moderate, he may be acceptable
to a broad range of groups within the party. Or the candidate may turn out
to be a genuine dark horse.

KRUSHCHEV MAY HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH DECIDING THE OUTCOME of the 1964
campaign. Up to now, the thaw in the cold war has been a plus for Kennedy; the
incumbent always gets the credit for any step that looks like progress towards
peace. But what happens if the Russians switch their pitch again as they have so
often and so abruptly in the past. Then, the President would be blamed for being
"taken in" by Moscow in signing the atomic-test treaty.
32 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























Ornamental


Barandas


These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay we
import from Venezuela
They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama.
But they have the same
sort of slight color
variations and occasional
kiln markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished wall.


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INCORPORATED

MIAMI, FLORIDA TU 7-1525


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Ann







49th Annual Convention...

November 7, 8, 9, 10, 1963 Grand Bahama Hotel, West End, B. W. I.

This year's Convention Hotel site . The Grand Bahama Hotel and
Club at West End, B.W.I. is just thirty minutes by air from the Palm
Beaches, forty minutes from Miami and daily flights are available from
Tampa and Jacksonville . from Palm Beach too there is a cruise ship
departing twice weekly on a four hour luxury type cruise . The
Convention Program provides for business sessions and seminars with
time aplenty for relaxation and fun . The October Issue will bring
you detailed information on speakers, programs, times, etc. . Plan
now to attend.


At Grand Bahama you'll find fishing, golf, swimming, water skiing, boating, skin-diving, tennis, bowling, trap-shooting--or just plain
loafing. And at the international shopping mart you can pick up bargains, duty free, from a host of varied imports . .




Florida Region, A. I. A.

Florida Association of Architects




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