• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Current highlights
 It is well to know
 Can competency be defined?
 Communications and legislation
 Highlights of the A.I.A. conve...
 University of Florida -- ground...
 One of the twenty best houses of...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00108
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: June 1963
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00108
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Current highlights
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    It is well to know
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Can competency be defined?
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Communications and legislation
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Highlights of the A.I.A. convention
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    University of Florida -- ground breaking ceremony
        Page 14
    One of the twenty best houses of 1963
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    News and notes
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.









Current Highlights...


* THE UPSURGE IN BUSINESS WILL GET ITS BIG TEST THIS SUMMER, when the current
fast-moving phase takes a natural breather. That's when the economy will clearly
show the extent of its underlying strength ... whether this is really a solid upturn
-or just another false start like those others we've had in the past two years.
At the moment, most economists are betting thai business will go on expanding
through 1963, ending the year on a firm note.
Here's why the third quarter will be a critical period:
... Inventory-building in steel is certain to come to an end... strike or
no strike. This will be a drag on factory output.
. Auto plants will be in the midst of the model changeovers.
. Car sales-and sales of other durables may slow down as the high
rate of spending relative to income gets back to normal and repayments
on installment debt become very heavy.
... The tax structure will be siphoning off a rising proportion of incomes
as the upturn moves along ... a brake on spending.
But the economy is expected to ride into the fall in fine style. For one
thing, business plans to invest in new plant and equipment are being
revised upward, almost week by week. This is a powerful expansionary
factor and will come along just when steel buying falters. Then, too,
consumers may well fool those who doubt their readiness to keep spend-
ing.


* RISING


CONFIDENCE IS BECOMING A KEY ELEMENT in the business outlook. The fore-
casters are giving more consideration to psychology and its impact. Some feel
that the seeds of further upsurge are germinating in folks' minds. Business and
consumer confidence has been growing steadily for a half year, ever since the
Cuban missile crisis. The better attitude has led to freer spending which helped
psychology. And psychology has been aided by the stock market, Kennedy's
better attitude to business, and looming tax cuts.
Has confidence become so strong now that it can spark a boom by itself?
Some experts can visualize a chain reaction of stepped-up consumer
buying . higher production for sale and inventory . and a big in-
vestment boom. Once this surge got rolling, business would move up
quickly to a full-employment level, with the upsurge running for two
or three years.
This extreme optimism is only a minority view. Most experts still think
1963 will be a year of moderate expansion, but with bigger gains than
expected in January. They won't be ready to raise sights again until
the summer test is over.


* ECONOMISTS ARE WATCHING THE PERSONAL SAVINGS FIGURES closely these days
for another clue as to the direction business activity will be taking later this year.
For some time now, individuals have been saving nearly 7/ of income left
after taxes. But in the first quarter of 1963, the figure fell to 6%, as consumers
went on that splurge that produced so much bounce.
The question now is, will the figure remain at 6% . which would
mean that the consumer would continue to contribute his zip? Or will
it get back up to 7% ... meaning a slowing in his buying and a slower
rate of rise for the whole economy?
* THE STEEL PRICE INCREASE WON'T REKINDLE INFLATION or even make much of a
bump on the price indexes -that's clear now that the dust has settled. To be
sure, other industries have been tempted to repair profit margins by posting
higher prices. But not all are in position to make increases stick. And prices of
some items are still falling. Net, the impact will be small.
A bigger threat to price stability lies in the negotiations with steel
(Continued on 3rd Cover)















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JUNE, 1963


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



1o 7T&4 Iuae ---


. . . . .. 2nd and 3rd Covers


It Is Well to Know ................
By Archie G. Parish, F.A.I.A.
Can Competency Be Defined? . . . . . . .
By Samuel Kruse, F.A.I.A.
Communications and Legislation . . . . . . .
By Roy M. Pooley, A.I.A.
Highlights of the A.I.A. Convention
"The Quest for Quality" by Joan S. Gill . . . .
Convention Notes .................
Levison New Director, Florida Region . . . . .
Two New Fellows .................
University of Florida
Ground Breaking Ceremony ... Shell Home Study . . .
One of the Twenty Best Houses for 1963 . . . . .
Architect William Morgan
Harry E. Burns Appointed to State Board of Architecture . .
Notes and Notes
J.C.C. Elects Starnes . . Design Symposium . . .
New FAA Office . F.A.A. Special Exhibit . . . .
Safety Regulations . Necrology . Office Procedures Seminar


Advertising Index .
1963 FAA Convention .
FAA OFFICERS 1963
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville
William F. Bigoney, Jr., First V.-Pres., 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
William T. Arnett, Second V.-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Rogers, Third V.-President, 511 N. Mills St., Orlando
Jefferson N. Powell, Secretary, 361 S. County Road, Palm Beach
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Robert H. Levison, Immediate Past President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton, Carl Gerken; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn
Howell, Richard E. Jessen, Frank F. Smith, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH: James T.
Lendrum, Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen;
FLORIDA NORTHWEST: Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C.
Robert Abele, John O. Grimshaw, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: John
R. Graveley, Walter B. Schultz, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Fred
G. Owles, Jr., Donald 0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Donald Edge, Harold A. Obst,
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Director, Florida Region, AIA
Robert H. Levison, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Executive Secretary, FAA
Verna Shaub Sherman, Douglas Entrance Bldg., Coral Gables, Fla.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA, Chairman; Wm. T. Arnett, Fred W. Bucky Jr.,
B. W. Hartman Jr., Dana B. Johannes.


. 11
12
. 12
. 13

. 14
. 15

. 19

. 19
. 20
. 21


. 22
. . 4th Cover


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; January Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher
VERNA SHAUB SHERMAN
Editorial Assistant
H. P. ARRINGTON
Business Manager


VOLUME 13

NUMBER 61963
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Current Highlights .


















































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It Is Well To Know...


By ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA
President, Florida State Board of Architecture


In view of a number of incidents
called to the attention of the Board
relating to the use of names under
Chapter 467, Florida Statutes, com-
monly referred to as the Architect's
Law, I feel that this is a propitious
time to briefly review this phase of
our Law.
Chapter 467.08 of the Law states
in part * * That no certifi-
cate shall be issued either with or
without an examination to any cor-
poration, partnership, firm or associa-
tion to practice architecture in this
state, but all certificates shall be to
individual persons."
The Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture has always recognized that on
becoming registered to practice archi-
tecture, the individual has been ac-
tually privileged by the State to use
the title "Architect" and with this
privilege he assumes grave responsi-
bilities in serving the public under
the common laws of the State, as
well as those particularly mentioned
under the Architect's Law.
Since the architect is registered as
an individual, by the same token the
responsibilities imposed must of neces-
sity evolve upon him as an individual.
Consequently it would be most
appropriate for all currently registered
architects and those aspiring for regis-
tration to carefully review Rule 7 of
the Florida State Board of Architec-
ture, which clearly defines the types
of name styles which are approved as
well as those name styles which are in
conflict and are not approved.
In promulgating Rule 7, most care-
ful and studied consideration was
given to insure that name styles would
be in conformity with the law in
assuring the public that only those
who are thoroughly qualified by edu-
cation, experience and examination,
could designate themselves as profes-
sional architects. Our basic law and
our rules and regulations connote to
the public the words:-"This man,
who identifies himself as an architect,
is truly experienced in his profession


and may be relied upon to adequately
protect your interests."
Misleading name styles can onl}
confuse the public and at times result
in placing the architectural profession
in disrepute. It is illegal to use such
name styles as "Milky Way Designers,
Your Home of the Future" and the
like. The unwary prospective client
may be ensnared into believing he in
fact is dealing with a group which has
the official approval of architectural
know-how. When he finds out to the
contrary through added expense ol
correcting slipshod work on his home,
his building, his church or other edi-
fice, he lays the blame on the State
and the architectural profession foi
not protecting him. The result, the
entire profession suffers.
Other misleading name styles occur
and, I am sorry to say, may be com-
pounded by members of the profes-
sion. For example we have "John Doe
and Associates, Architects." We find
that only John Doe is registered, yet
a client calling at the office and speak-
ing to Jane Doe, an associate, has
every reason to believe that he is dis-
cussing his problem with a registered
individual. Again, we find name styles
such as "Richard Roe Associates,
Architects and Engineers," where
Richard Roe is not an architect,
thereby misleading the public as to
the identity of the professional archi-
tect.
The above examples can be multi-
plied many times over in many areas
of professional endeavors. They are
too numerous to further tabulate.
The many difficulties in this area
of "Name Usage" are brought about
largely by thoughtless acquiescence of
members of our profession to the de-
triment of those members who cherish
their registration and who endeavor at
all times to practice within the legal
scope of the profession. We should
be proud of the fact that we have
been found to possess talents which
have permitted us to secure our certi-
(Continued on Page 23)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










































This new Federal Office Building now under construction in Tampa features concrete frame and waffle slab floors comple-
mented by a precast solar skin system with exposed quartz aggregate. Associated Architects are Robert Wielage, AIA, and
H. Leslie Walker and Associates with H. Dean Rowe, AIA, as project architect and Dwight R. Abrams as structural engineer.


For Florida's finest office buildings


the choice is modern concrete


More and more architects and builders
today are finding new beauty and real econ-
omy in structures of modern concrete.
Everywhere you see them rising-each a
dramatic addition to a city's skyline.
Precast curtain walls, exposed aggregate,
facings of white portland cement-such new
uses of concrete bring both beauty and sav-
ings. With concrete frames and new han-
dling methods, construction moves along at


record speed. Even further savings result
from multiple use of forms. Scheduling goes
along smoothly because concrete is always
available on short order. It's there when you
need it. Then, too, concrete needs no special
fireproofing, no painting. No other material
offers such low maintenance cost.
For impressive structural strength,
beauty and freedom from upkeep nothing
matches modern concrete construction.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


JUNE, 1963






The use of



TERRAZZO

on

VERTICAL

SURFACES

There is a substantial increase in the use of
terrazzo on vertical surfaces. The Terminal
Buildings, O'Hare International Airport, Chicago is
one such example. The columns, and spandrels
totaling approximately 90,000 sq. ft., are made with
Trinity White portland cement and white marble
chips.
There are important practical reasons. Ter-
razzo provides a high-quality surface at a lower cost
than most typical facing materials. Grime and marks
are easily removed. Maintenance approaches nil
even after a long term of years.
Terrazzo can fill any design requirement.
For instance, at O'Hare a monolithic effect was
desired and obtained. Likewise, paneled effects are
easily achieved. The wide color range can be closely
controlled depending on the color of the chips and
whether or not the matrix is tinted.
Two views of Terminal Buildings, O'Hare Airport,
Chicago. In addition to the vertical terrazzo on
columns and spandrels, the floors are also terrazzo.
Architect: C. F. Murphy Associates, Chicago
Terrazzo Contractor: Roman-Caretti Joint Venture
General Contractor: Malan Construction Corp.


TRINITY

WHITE
SPORTLAND CEMENT
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Can Competency




Be Defined?



By H. SAMUEL KRUSE, FAIA


Time has come to think of quality in the


performance of public
to General Contractor


work, the corollary
State Registration.


Under the system of competitive
bidding for construction, each con-
tractor invited, or in the case of public
works any contractor who wishes to,
submits a bid to perform work defined
in the bidding documents for a fixed
price. This system appears to be with-
out fault: all bidders are given equal
opportunity to prepare bids; the sys-
tem is simple; the owner only needs
to accept the lowest price bid to select
the contractor for his project. This
could be an accurate description of
competitive bidding were all bidders
of equal responsibility and compe-
tency, but unfortunately such is not
the case. The best contractor is
pitted against the worst so that selec-
tion on the basis of low bid alone
does not usually buy the best value
for the owner. The lowest figure bid
receives more scrutiny than the less
obvious advantages afforded by the
more competent builder whose bid
is not the lowest.
In private work the disadvantages
of the competitive system can be les-
sened by refusing to place on the list
of bidders any contractor excepting
those known to the owner and archi-
tect to be most responsible and com-
petent. Since this method eliminates
many capable contractors not known
to the owner and architect as well as
the less competent contractors, it is
too "unfair" for public agencies to
use.
The public official does not enjoy



JUNE, 1963


the prerogatives of his private counter-
part. He permits the indifferent con-
tractor a chance to bid, in the hope
the indifferent one will not be low
bidder, or in the futile belief that by
the strictest exercise of supervision the
architect can force an indifferent con-
tractor to become a competent one.
His private counterpart can be ruthless
in selecting his bidders, the public
official must permit all builders fair
treatment and equal opportunity to be
selected for a contract. If it is not so
written in the law, he assumes the
requirement by reason of public pres-
sure. Yet governmental agencies at all
levels are impatient with the deterior-
ation of quality in construction. Rigid
supervision does "break" a few con-
tractors and thus eliminates him from
the next bidding list, but this does
not produce a satisfactory building
and there seems to be an unlimited
number of indifferent contractors to
"break."
It is becoming increasingly appar-
ent that the law's "lowest responsible
bidder" must be defined beyond abil-
ity to pay bills. The ability to assemble
the meanest of subcontractor's figures
combined with the skill to satisfy
merely the letter of the contract is
not sufficient for obtaining the quality
citizens expect of their public build-
ings. Recent actions by school boards
in the State indicate that the public
will not sit quietly on the sidelines
while indifferent contractors arc


awarded contracts repeatedly. The at-
tempts at finding the more competent
contractor other than the lowest bid-
der, highlights the necessity for revis-
ing the method for selecting contrac-
tors for public work.
It is doubtful whether the courts
will permit or public opinion allow a
public agency to award a contract to
other than the lowest bona fide bidder.
If a builder is permitted to bid, it
must be ruled, barring exceptional
circumstances, that he is qualified to
construct the project, should he be
the low bidder. It then becomes nec-
essary to permit only those contractors
who are competent to bid. Requiring
bonds from bidders and contractors to
establish financial qualifications has
been in use for a long time and is
acceptable although many capable, but
financially risky, builders are pre-
vented from bidding. To devise a
method equally as feasible to establish
competency will be difficult. Com-
petency is difficult to define and any
criteria established will be harder to
enforce.
Several methods can be used: (1)
contractor licensing for categories of
work; (2) submission of critical data
with the bid; (3) pre-bid qualifica-
tion by boards for classes of work.
How shall a contractor be rated and
by whom? How can competency be
written in the bidding documents so
that the requirements have validity
(Continued on Page 23)






























































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3 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












Mesage r e t 74 PAeaideart...


Communications



and Legislation


By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
President
Florida Association of Architects


In summarizing high points of Legislative activities
as they relate to the Profession . The President

calls for improved communications on all fronts ..


Nature has endowed Florida with a
unique beauty and salubrious climate
which combine to attract millions of
visitors annually and ignite a love
affair in the hearts of hundreds of
thousands who remain to live with
our beautiful lady.
In a very literal sense, she is a can-
vas of rare quality on which we paint
with the master artist's pigments of
concrete and stone, timber and metal,
brick and earth. Our brush strokes are
sometimes masterful, often garish and
too frequently crude. We have begun
a work of creation which will never
be completed, but the next few years
may well determine whether our can-
vas is destined to become a master-
piece or merely another exhibit crying
petulantly for attention, and withering
under the icy judgment of history. We
have made an exciting beginning--
but most beginnings are exciting.
We stand now before our canvas
tormented with the impulse for fresh
bold strokes held in check by fear of
breaking the mold of conformity, the
patterns of habit. Perhaps this is as
it should be for the maestro's master-
piece emerges as a careful disciplined
exhibition of his most vibrant dreams.
If we are to create a masterpiece of
incomparable value, we people of
Florida, we have much to learn and
must approach our task with intelli-
gence and determination. Success in
JUNE, 1963


this noble venture imposes the respon-
sibility of leadership on the architec-
tural profession and the responsibility
of statesmanship on Florida's political
fraternity.
A tentative response to these de-
mands provoked our petition to the
Florida Legislature this year for im-
provements in our regulatory law,
which is a vital implement. At this
time of writing, with two weeks re-
maining of the regular legislative ses-
sion, it appears that our petition has
been heard, but its import not com-
prehended. It is not likely that any
of the amendments we have requested
will be granted.
The reason is obvious. We have not
found the means to communicate to
our legislature our sense of urgency
and importance in the task before us.
A true perspective of Florida's destina-
tion is clouded and distorted by the
frenzied clamor and shriek of the
work of the day, by the petty ambi-
tions and short range goals of each of
us and an emotional blockade of
reason. Even so, there have been posi-
tive gains.
A number of important legislators
have become more keenly aware of
our problems and purpose.
While it now appears our act will
not be favorably amended, neither
does it seem likely to be amended
unfavorably. Successful unfavorable


amendments sponsored by other inter-
ests were a distinct possibility at the
beginning of the session.
The professional engineer responded
to our suggestion and obtained an
amendment to the Engineer's Act
adopting language similar to the Ar-
chitect's Act with respect to stamping
and sealing drawings not prepared by
or under the direct supervision of the
engineer. Other changes in the area
of corporate practice of Professional
Engineering represent improvements.
However, an effort to establish reas-
onable limits of liability failed.
A far from perfect, but significantly
improved Lien Law was enacted.
While a bill to increase the level
of performance in construction by ex-
amination and registration of contrac-
tors was defeated, again, additional
recognition of this serious problem
was obtained.
A bill which would have the effect
of virtually eliminating required con-
struction standards for a great many
hospitals and nursing homes appears
to have been killed.
Existence of the Florida Residential
Designers Association was exposed. In
testimony given before a Committee
of the House of Representatives, it
was stated this organization has 53
members representing some 300 "De-
signers"; having been in "private prac-
(Continued on Page 22)






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h ig 7t o414 Tec A Miami eacd eonwetio



The Quest for Quality in Architecture

By JOAN E. GILL
"The Quest for Quality in Architecture: The Role of Architecture as an Art"
was the theme of the recent AIA Convention. Within this framework, partici-
pants explored the criteria for defining quality, the influences both internal
and external-on architectural quality, and the means through which quality
is attained . The article by Joan Gill highlights only a small portion of the
program moderated by Burnham Kelly, AIA, dean of Cornell University's
College of Architecture, in future issues we plan to present additional portions
of the program.


Ten articulate panelists composed
of prominent architects, critics and
scholars explored the ramifications of
the 1963 AIA Convention theme:
The Quest for Quality in Architec-
ture: The Role of Architecture as an
Art. Three sessions, moderated by
Dean Burnham Kelly of Cornell, in-
cluded lively discussions designed to
examine three related problems: What
is Quality? What (and Who) Influ-
ence Quality? and The Attainment of
Quality.
In the opening speech by Sir Basil
Spence, past president of the Royal
Institute of Architects, immediate rec-
ognition was given to the subject of
quality as an "illusive phenomenon,
like an extra dimension." Implying
that it was sometimes easier to recog-
nize than define quality, he noted that
in any work of art "the measure of
quality reveals the depth and funda-
mental understanding of the design-
er."
Sir Basil asked the members of the
profession to consider the essential
quality of thought and of simplicity,
along with the quality of structure.
The attainment of great architecture,
he said, includes considerations con-
cerning the quality of: the material -
"the difference between ivory and
imitative plastic;" the craftsmanship
- not necessarily hand craftsmanship
since in America "there are many
buildings which are examples of ma-
chine craftsmanship at its best;" the
scale--"Many arcihtects are seduced
by bulk and height . but I believe
that small size helps quality."
Concluding his remarks, the de-
signer of the Coventry Cathedral
quoted Sir Henry Wooton who wrote
in 1624, "Well building hath three
conditions, Commodity, Firmness and
Delight;" then he himself defined the
architect who understands quality as
JUNE, 1963


one who "must be very near the
renaissance ideal of the complete man,
artist, philosopher, and thinker."
The definition of excellence in ar-
chitecture, according to San Francisco
architect S. Robert Anschen included
not only commodity and delight but
the additional qualities of tension and
humanity. Eero Saarinen's Dulles In-
ternational Airport is a contemporary
example of such a total solution and
as architecture incarnate, by Anschen's
standards, stands in contrast to the
"glass box, the dreary imitative
towers, the forbidding buildings of
Public Housing- . symbols of the
architect's abdication of his responsi-
bilities in America today."
While "society determines what,
and the quality of what, we build,"
Anschen, formerly Technical Director
of Housing Authority of the City of
Vallejo in California, declared that it
behooves the architect "to convince
every client with every bit of moral
persuasion . . that in the long run,
the impoverishment of spirit engen-
dered by the mean, the ugly, or the
merely dull . built in the name of
expediency and economy are far more
costly to the fabric of culture and
society."
This Fellow of the Institute speci-
fically condemned the tendency
towards "architectural segregation"
which isolates the "Lesser houses"
(suburbia, factors, warehouses): this,
Anschen stated, negates the new op-
portunities for realizing quality in
contemporary buildings of all kinds,
and is "a hangover of obsolete plan-
ning thinking."
When the chairman of the Yale
Department of Architecture spoke,
he was strongly of the opinion that
"The architect must search for his
own way" since there is no universal
outlook today, no comprehensive aca-


demy where design can be measured
against dictum. "Change is the only
constant," said Paul Rudolph, al-
though "the site and symbolism of
the particular building set the course."
To achieve excellence in architec-
ture, Rudolph asserts, the creative art
must first be embraced, and to realize
a great work of art "it is axiomatic
that certain problems must be ignored
. . Thus when one stands in front
of the Mies Van der Rohe office
building in New York City's Park
Avenue," he continued, "it seems ab-
solute in its authority although count-
less considerations are ignored."
Tracing the evolution of modern
architecture, the architect -educator
pointed out that "There were many
who felt the idea of building a flexi-
ble, loft-type space, sheathed with
curtain walls . would make it pos-
sible for an vernacular architecture
to emerge. Some thought this 'pack-
age' architecture required little talent
. . Time has proven these notions
to be a complete fallacy."
Deeply concerned over the gap
between teaching and action, theory
and architectural practice, Rudolph
charged the architect with his respon-
sibility to continually view and review
his art as a creative process in which
he conceives of a "single generating
idea, an idea strong enough to bind
all parts into a whole." Concerned
with the changing landscape, he par-
ticularly urges the architects to re-
member that "a single building must
le compatible with its neighbor, plus
suggesting that which could come
next."
In this same vein, critic George
McCue contends that "In our cities
we urgently need order and harmony,
a sense of orientation, a mediation
between the tower scale and the
(Continued on Page 13)








Convention

Notes...
The Institute's 95th Annual Con-
vention at Miami Beach was officially
called to order at 2:30 p.m. on Mon-
day, May 6th. Two FAA members
were on the program for the opening
session-Robert M. Little, FAIA,
Director of the Region and Honorary
Chairman of the Host Chapter Com-
mittee; and H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
General Chairman of the Host Chap-
ter Committee.
For the President's Reception held
Monday evening, following the first
Session, on the beautiful Starlight
Patio of the Americana; Florida's
weather was perfect. Many in atten-
dance remembered the all-too
crowded rooms wherein some previous
Receptions, of necessity, were held.
This one, given by Henry L. Wright,
FAIA, will long be remembered.
At the opening of the first Business
Session on Tuesday morning, May 7th,
it was noted that 874 delegates were
registered from a total of 173 Chap-
ters. First Vice President J. Roy Car-
roll, Jr., FAIA, presided. All By-Law
Changes presented for consideration
to the Convention were approved,
however, the one relating to "Election
of Three Vice Presidents" etc., had
the following added to the last line:
"to take effect 1964." The most con-
troversial was on the "New Head-
quarters Building." There were no ad-
ditional nominations from the floor
and at the close of the Session only
the Offices of Treasurer and Second
Vice President were contested.
At the second session, Second Vice
President Arthur G. Odell, Jr., FAIA,
presided. Our own Clinton Gamble
FAIA, Secretary of the Institute,
reviewed the Board's Report and it
was acted upon favorably by the Dele-
gates. Other business included Reports
of the Committee on Structure and
the Resolutions Committee.
At the close of the Professional
Program on Thursday morning Presi-
dent Henry L. Wright, FAIA, an-
nounced the following were elected to
Office for 1963: President, J. ROY
Carroll, FAIA; First Vice President
(President-Elect) ARTHUR G.
ODELL,, JR., FAIA; Second Vice
President, WAYNE S. HERTZKA,
FAIA, and Treasurer, ROBERT F.
HASTINGS, FAIA.
12


ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA


New Director-


Florida Region, AIA


The FAA's Immediate Past Presi-
dent Robert H. Levison became Direc-
tor of the Region, replacing Robert
M. Little, FAIA, who ended a three
year term as Director, at the AIA's
Miami Beach Convention.
The Region, created in 1958, has
had as former Directors the late San-
ford W. Goin, FAIA; and Clinton
Gamble, FAIA, now serving his sec-
ond term as Secretary of the Institute.
Levison is well known to all archi-
tects of the State, he served as Presi-
dent of the FAA in 1961 and 1962,
and was elected at the Annual Meet-


ing held November 1962 to the
Directorship he now holds.
In addition to being active in State
Association affairs he has served the
Florida Central Chapter as a Direc-
tor, Vice President and President. He
holds a BS in Architecture from the
University of Florida and is a Lt.
Colonel in the U. S. Army Reserves.
He is a member of the firm of
Wakeling, Levison & Williams of
Clearwater, and with his charming
wife Roberta resides in that City. He
is the Father of three children, two
Daughters and one Son.


Above Business Session shows, left to right, J. Roy Carroll, FAIA, Henry L. Wright,
FAIA, Samuel Spencer, Arthur G. Odell, Jr., Clinton Gamble, FAIA, J. Winfield Ran-
kin and William H. Scheick.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








7vew V &A ?07 0 0


JOHN STETSON, FAIA


FRANK E. WATSON, FAIA


At the Annual Dinner of the Institute, held May 9th in the Grand Ballroom
of the Americana Hotel, two members of the FAA were advanced to the rank
of Fellows. JOHN STETSON, FAIA, a member of the Palm Beach Chapter
and former President of the FAA, received the recognition for SERVICE TO
THE INSTITUTE and PUBLIC SERVICE. FRANK E. WATSON, FAIA, a
member of the Florida South Chapter received the recognition for achievement
in DESIGN.


(Continued from Page 11)
human scale." While McCue pro-
pounded the short-comings of the pub-
lic client who demands "expediency,
impulsive solutions for an early show
of results," he does not exonerate the
architect for his relinquishment of
design authority. The profession, he
said, must assume design initiative
and educate the public: "One good
building, and one enlightened piece of
development planning, strengthens
the possibility of another. It could
help quality to come back into style,"
declares the art critic for the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch who specializes in archi-
tecture and urban planning.
McCue took strong exception to
Miami Beach architecture, suggesting
that the "frenetic approach to archi-
tecture" where "eclectic originality"
is confused with novelty and diver-
sion, could be curbed. The means is
through the education of the public
client, the architect's awareness of
his aesthetic responsibility, and Mc-
Cue added, "There is certainly oppor-
tunity for the pursuit of a collabora-
tion . between the architect and
the sculptor, painter and art crafts-
man, and there is plenty of occasion
for the enrichment of character, as
distinguished from the impoverish-
JUNE, 1963


ment of fashion."
When the Assistant Commissioner
of Design and Construction for the
General Services Administration took
the rostrum to discuss What (and
Who) Influences Quality, he lost no
time in declaring that Mr. Architect
is Mr. Citizen, "and when we discuss
government influence on quality it
translates into your influence." Equat-
ing influence and leadership, Karel
Yasko calls on the man of courage to
shed his role as the "cost-accountant
architect who will not accept the
challenge to create design with a shoe-
string."
In citing the opportunities for
members of the profession to become
effective and dedicated public serv-
ants, he refers to The Report to the
President by the Ad Hoc Committee
on Federal Office Space: "the devel-
opment of an official style must be
avoided and design must flow from
the architectural profession to the gov-
ernment and not visa versa. Major
emphasis should be placed on the
choice of designs that embody the fin-
est American architectural thought."
Referring to the government docu-
ment on Design in Urban Renewal on
the subject of the "increasingly fruit-


ful collaboration between architecture
and the fine arts," Yasko declared
this "gives the signal to the architect
to design the total environment," and
he quoted: "where appropriate, fine
arts should be incorporated in the
designs, with emphasis on the work
of living American artists." Yasko
amplified, "Please note the use of the
word 'incorporated'-not applied as
afterthoughts. This demands a collab-
oration and exchange of ideas early in
the design stage for a true integration
.... If this can be brought about,"
he said, "then this is government in-
fluence-on the positive side."
Yasko stated that governmental re-
quirements and so-called interference
are not necessarily limitations to cre-
ativity. "I am angry because the archi-
tects have failed to provide leadership
in governmental design quality ... on
the other hand, I am optimistic be-
cause I believe the architects will
respond to the Guiding Principles-
the charter for public architecture and
will take as their marching song the
quotation from Pericles' evocation to
the Athenians . . 'We do not
imitate -for we are a model to
others'."









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Ground Breaking

Ceremony
The construction of the long-
awaited building complex for the Col-
lege of Architecture and Fine Arts at
the University of Florida started June
1, 1963, with a ground-breaking cere-
mony. The contract for the first build-
ings of this complex was awarded to
Raymond L. Tassinari, General Con-
tractor of Gainesvillc, Florida.
The ground-breaking ceremony was
held at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, June 1,
at the site south of the Administration
Building and just off Southwest 13th
Street. Officials of the State and the
University as well as officers of the
Florida Association of Architects,
Florida Chapters of the American In-
stitute of Architects, Florida General
Contractors Associations, Homebuild-
ers Associations, Music and Art Asso-
ciations, Kemp, Bunch and Jackson,
architects for the buildings, and For-
rest Kelley, Architect for the Board of
Control attended the ceremony.
Roy M. Pooley, President, FAA,
represented officially the architects of
Florida and made a brief address. The
Florida North Chapter extended a
cordial invitation to all architects who
arrived in Gainesville on Friday, May
31, to attend the Chapter meeting
and social at the Holiday Inn that
evening.



Shell Home Study
The University of Florida has con-
tracted with the Federal Housing and
Home Finance Agency to make a
study of shell homes throughout the
United States. The announcement was
made recently by Dr. C. C. Osterbind,
director of the University's Bureau of
Economic and Business Research.
The study, under a one year grant
of $39,769, would presumably bring
into focus the acceptability of such
shells to homeowners.
The HHFA needs this information
Dr. Osterbind said, to determine the
feasibility of insuring mortgages on
such homes under the Federal Hous-
ing Administration.
Their ultimate objective, he said, is
to assist in the satisfactory completion
of habitable but incomplete homes,


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-L


and to encourage mortgage lenders to
finance such homes.
Shell homes, sold throughout the
country under an assortment of brand
names consist of frame, roof and
walls, roughed-in wiring and some
roughed-in plumbing.
Purchasers of such shells finish the
interiors themselves or arrange to have
it done by someone other than the
shell home builder.
Principal investigator for the nation-
wide survey is William Shenkel, as-
sistant professor of real estate in the
University's College of Business Ad-
ministration, and instructor of the
nation's first course in industrial real
estate, also at Florida.
Working with him will be J. M.
Trimmer, of the College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts Department of
Building Construction.
The specialists will interview
some 500 shell homeowners and build-
ers across the country. They will check
on how owners feel about buying the
shell and arranging finish work on a
local basis, if they are happy with the
homes, how they feel about the work
that was done on their particular
house, and costs incurred.
Dr. Shenkel said HHFA is also in-
terested in determining where these
homes are located in a community,
the types of neighborhoods which sur-
round them.


RENEWAL NOTICE
W. Richard Glavin, Exec-
utive Secretary of the
State Board of Architec-
ture hereby advises all
members that Renewal
Fees presently being re-
ceived will be acknowl-
edged by the appropriate
Renewal Certificates
promptly after completion
of the June 1963 written
examinations. Checks for-
warded by the members
covering renewal fees
must, under Comptroller
and Audit regulations, be
held until July 1, 1963
before deposit is made.











WILLIAM MORGAN
Architect



MR. and MRS.
ALVIN D. JAMES
Owner



H. W. KEISTER
Structural Engineer'.



CHARLES J. PYATT
Contractor





ALEXANDRE GEORGES
Photographer







One of the Twenty Best


Houses of 1963

House, shown here, designed by Jacksonville Chapter architect was se-
lected as one of ARCHITECTURAL RECORD'S twenty best houses of 1963.


A two story living room spatially
unites the upper sleeping area with
the lower living area. From the entry
foyer one walks under a low ceiling
JUNE, 1963


bridge and into the 15 foot high
living room which opens through slid-
ing glass doors onto the living terrace.
A 7'-4" ceiling height is maintained


in the kitchen, dining room and fam-
ily room to dramatize their contrast
with the high central space. An open
(Continued on Page 16)







One of the Twenty
Best Houses of 1963
(Continued from Page 15)
staircase leads from the foyer to the
upper level bridge, connecting the
master bedroom and bath on the
right with the children's bedrooms
and bath on the left. From the bridge
and studio balcony one looks down
into the living room and fireplace,
and catches a glimpse of the Atlantic
Ocean through the pine grove to the
East. A delicate wood lattice shields
the upper glass wall of the living room
from sun and glare.
Except for high clerestory lites and
narrow ventilating windows the bed-
rooms are enclosed by unbroken walls,
emphasizing privacy and seclusion in
contrast with the open glass living
areas. The blank North wall assures
privacy from neighbors.
Setbacks from all sides limited the
building area to 22' by 52'. An oak
grove to the west and pines to the
east were carefully protected during
construction to maintain natural land-
scaping.
The strutcure is basically load bear-
ing concrete block walls supporting
4" x 12" roof beams on 5' centers.
Two inch tongue and groove wood
planks laid flat support rigid insula-
tion and the built up tar and gravel
roof.
Finishes are primarily natural: clear
silicone waterproofing on concrete
blocks preserve the light beige cast
of South Carolina riverstone aggre-
gate, driftwood gray wood stain on ex-
posed beams and ceilings maintain
the same appearance in interiors and
exterior weather surfaces. Wood trim,
cabinets, builtins, exterior balconies,
and doors are driftwood stained.
Ground floors are terrazzo with white
cement with Tennessee Red and
Georgia white marble chips. The sec-
ond floor is vinyl asbestos tile, with
mosaic tile baths and drywall interior
partitions. The air conditioning sys-
tem consists of a horizontal unit
under the carport ceiling from which
a single duct runs under the balcony
bridge serving all interior spaces.
The cost was $15,867 including
1550 sq.ft. air conditioned, 240 sq.ft.
in garage, storage and laundry areas,
and 360 square feet of covered ex-
terior balconies and terraces. The pro-
rated cost per square foot is $8.62.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Opposite page . .
Above, dining terrace showing laundry, utility
and storage. Sliding glass doors on ground level
open into dining room. Window, to left of
doors, opens from the kitchen. Sliding glass
door on second floor level, off balcony, leads
into the master bedroom.
Lower, main living room showing fireplace,
glass doors opening onto living terrace with the
Atlantic Ocean in background.






This page . .
Above, main entrance showing open-riser stair-
way adjoining main stairway leading to the
bridge and studio balcony on second floor.
Lower left, second floor plan. Right, first floor
plan.






About the architect . .
William Morgan, a native born Floridian (Jack-
sonville) is an Associate member of the Jack-
sonville A.I.A. Chapter. He is an alumnus of
the Harvard Graduate School of Design and a
Fulbright Scholar, and has operated his own
office for the past two years.


JUNE, 1963



















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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


JCC Elects Starnes . .
At the Annual Meeting of the Joint
Cooperative Council the FAA's JCC
Committee Chairman, Earl M. Star-
nes (Florida South Chapter) was
elected President. The Council's
membership includes representatives
of the Home Builders Association of
Florida. The Florida Building Indus-
tries Council and the Association of
General Contractors in addition to
the FAA.
Work of the Council, has for the
past months, been primarily concerned
with passage of a State Wide Con-
tractor Licensing Law at the '63 Ses-
sion of the Legislature. Future work
will be concerned with adoption of
a State Building Code and research
into the area of public bodies within
the State tending to design and con-
struct projects of some consequence.
In addition to President Starnes,
the Association is represented by J.
Vance Duncan (Florida North Chap-
ter) and Joseph T. Romano (Brow-
ard County Chapter).


Design Symposium ...
In an effort to promote better
understanding of the objectives of the
Navy's construction program as it
affects the design team, Captain J.
Henry Etter, CEC, USN, Director,
Southeast Division Bureau of Yards
and Docks, sponsored a two day De-
sign Symposium on 23-24 May 1963
at the Francis Marion Hotel, Charles-
ton, South Carolina.
As Director of the Southeast Divi-
sion, Bureau of Yards and Docks,
Captain Etter is in Charge of a Con-
struction program in excess of $50,-
000,000 annually in the seven south-
eastern states of Alabama, Georgia,
Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina, and Tennessee; as
well as for the Down Range Facilities
for the Atlantic Missile Range. The
workload is expected to continue to
increase as the Navy Shore Establish-
ment's capacity for supporting the
Polaris Missile Program reaches ma-
turity.
In stressing the importance of closer
and more meaningful liaison between
the Navy's Bureau of Yards and Docks
(Continued on Page 20)
JUNE, 1963


Harry E. Burns

Appointed To

State Board
Late in April Governor Farris Bry-
ant announced the appointment of
Harry E. Burns, Jr. (Jacksonville
Chapter) to serve for four years as
a member of the five man Board of
the State Board of Architecture.
Burns, a native of Jacksonville,
holds degrees from Tulane University
and the University of Florida. He was
registered to practice architecture in
1951 and his Institute membership
dates from 1952.
He served as Secretary of his AIA
Chapter in 1953-1954 (Florida North)
and is an active member of the Amer-
ican Society of Planning Officials.
Burns is an elected member of the
City Council of Neptune Beach and
Supervising Architect for the North-
east District of the Florida Hotel and
Restaurant Commission. He holds the
rank of Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy
Reserve and in 1958 was awarded the


HARRY E. BURNS, JR., A.I.A.

Jacksonville Jaycee Distinguished Ser-
vice Award. In addition, he is an Ad-
mission-Counselor for Tulane Univer-
sity, N. E. District of Florida.
The new State Board member
operates his own office at 1402 Pru-
dential Building, Jacksonville- tele
phone FLanders 9-2372. He is mar-
ried and with his wife and four
children resides in Neptune Beach.


DO WE HAVE YOUR CORRECT MAIL ADDRESS?
If you are not receiving your copies of this FAA magazine,
it is probably because your address in our stencil files is
incorrect . We try hard to keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us do so by following these Sug-
gestions:
* If you change jobs or move your home to another loca-
tion, get a change-of-address card from your local Post
Office and mail it to us.
It will EXPEDITE CORRECTION if you will include the
label from last mailing received.
* All stencils in our files should include codings. Without
the code marks which appear in addition to your name on
the stencil, corrections can be delayed for several issues.
* If your name as it appears on your copy of the FAA
envelope does not contain a code, it simply means that
you've probably been receiving the magazine for a number
of years at the same address. Thus, should you need to
change your mail address, it would be most helpful if
you would indicate under which category you receive a
copy of the magazine-architect, engineer, AGC member,
student, etc.
* It is also possible that you are now receiving two copies
of the magazine. If this should be the case, won't you
please tell us about it so that we can eliminate the dupli-
cation? Thank you.

































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: :ri:
a


News & Notes
(Continued from Page 19)
and the civilian architect- engineer
team, so vital in realizing an effective
construction program, Captain Etter
stated he feels strongly that a sym-
posium of this nature is mutually
profitable to both civilian and Navy
personnel. Approximately 250 archi-
tects and engineers and representatives
of other Naval District construction
agencies were in attendance.
Included in the topics discussed
were "Current U. S. Navy Architect-
Engineer Selection Requirements,"
"Responsibility for Realistic Design
Time and Fees," "Navy Aids and
Limitations for the Development of
Preliminary Engineering Reports and
Final Plans and Specifications," "Resi-
dent Officer in Charge of Construc-
tion / Architect-Engineer Relation-
ships," and "Application of the Cri-
tical Path Method of Scheduling to
Navy Construction Projects."

FAA Special Exhibit ...
In a report to the Board at the May
meeting immediately proceeding the
AIA Convention, Robert E. Hansen,
Chairman of the FAA Special AIA
Exhibit Committee stated that a total
of one hundred and twenty mounts
had been received. Thirty of that
number were from the Historical
Buildings Survey and the remainder
from Chapter members throughout
the State. The exhibit was comprised
of equal numbers of contemporary
and historical and older type buildings
in Florida, and about one hundred
were in full color.
The exhibit will go on display at
the International Design Center,
Miami. Any Chapter interested in
possible use of it should contact the
Chairman or the FAA Executive
Office.

New FAA Office...
By the time this magazine reaches
your desk the FAA Executive Offices
will have moved to the new location
announced in the February issue. C.
Robert Abele (Florida South Chap-
ter) a member of the Office Space
Committee devoted much time and
effort to the renovation project. All
members are cordially invited to visit
the office when they are in the area.
The address is 801 E. Ponce Leon
Boulevard, Coral Gables 34.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes


Safety Regulation . .

The Florida Industrial Commission
is responsible for enforcing, in all
places of employment, Safety Regula-
tion LAD-1959, which deals (in part)
with minimum requirements and di-
mensions for fixed ladders. Ladders,
not meeting the requirements, con-
tinue to be installed in new construc-
tion. In cooperation with the Indus-
trial Commission we urge you to
familiarize yourself with the Regula-
tion and adhere to it on construction
for which you are responsible.


Necrology . .

The Jacksonville Chapter, recently,
lost through death, two long time
members of the Institute.

A. EUGENE CELLAR, a member
of the Institute and the Association
for twenty years, had served as Chap-
ter Secretary in 1956; as President in
1957 and as Chapter Director from
1958 through 1960. He was a Direc-
tor of the FAA in 1961 and served on
many of it's Committees over a period
of years.

Mr. Cellar served the Community
in many capacities and the results of
his efforts will continue to be bene-
ficial to many for years to come. He
expended much effort to better the
relations between the Architectural
Profession and the Construction In-
dustry.

LEE ROY SHEFTALL was a sen-
ior member of- the Chapter and a
pioneer architect in the Jacksonville
area. His Institute and Association
membership dates back to 1921.


Office Procedures
Seminar . .

Earl M. Starnes, Chairman of the
FAA Office Procedures Committee
and a member of the AIA Committee
is planning another Seminar. It will
be held September 14 at Palm Beach.
The Seminar subject will be a re-
view of the new and revised "Hand-
book of Architectural Practice."
The site has not yet been selected
therefore will be announced later,
however we suggest you plan to attend.
JUNE, 1963


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Communications...
(Continued from Page 9)
tice" for not less than two years is
one requirement for membership; that
85 per cent of all residential plans
placed in F. W. Dodge plan rooms
in Florida are listed as "private plans";
that an enforced 1500 square foot
exemption for residential design and
supervision from the Architect's Act
would "put the residential designers
out of business"; and that the indi-
vidual testifying had been practicing
architecture in defiance of the present
law for eight years. Intention to seek
a registration act for residential de-
signers at the 1965 session of the
Florida Legislature was announced.
And so, while our efforts in behalf
of the future beauty and delight of
Florida were not as successful as we
might have wished in this 1963 Flor-
ida Legislature, they most certainly
can not be classified as a failure. If,
as I believe to be true, the task before
us is a little less obscure and we can
consequently undertake its accom-
plishment with a little greater pur-
poseful determination, then our exer-
tion has been well rewarded.
We must seek and find the means
of communicating to all our people
the spiritual, esthetic and economic
values of the environment we are cap-
able of producing, and the shameful
waste and great loss which will result
inevitably and proportionately to our
degree of failure to produce the best
of which Florida is capable.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Anchor Lock of Florida .. 14
Arketex Ceramic Corp.. 21
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh 8
Dyfoam Corporation . 22
Florida Foundry and
Pattern Works . .. 22
Florida Natural Gas Assn. .. 24
Fire Trol Corporation .. .20
Florida Power and Light Co. .18
Florida Steel Corporation .. 4
General Portland Cement .. 6
George C. Griffin Company .22
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile 3
Miami Window Corporation 1
Portland Cement Association 5
Prescolite . . . 22
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. . 18
F. Graham Williams Company 23
R. H. Wright, Inc. . . 10

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Competency...
(Continued from Page 7)
and are enforceable? Unless these
questions are answered soon, it is
likely that Florida will have a period
of agonizing experimentation.
Our State government seeks FAA
counsel regarding answers to the above
questions. Architects welcome the
challenge, for his past efforts to draw
blood from turnips has taught him
much about the virtues and sins of
competitive bidding for public works.
Architects can make a significant con-
tribution to government, if a FAA
special study group, composed of in-
dividuals interested and experienced
in public work, will prepare criteria
for determining a standard of com-
petency in building and a simple
method for enforcing such standards.
Although such standards and methods
shall be devised primarily for public
works, its applicability to private work
can be equally beneficial to private
owners as to public agencies.



It Is Well To Know...
(Continued from Page 4)
ficates as registered architects. We
should insist that proper safeguards to
the public be enforced-through our
personal actions and professional con-
duct we can insure that our profes-
sion will not be "dragged through the
mud of mediocrity."
We can only continue on our high
professional level by constant com-
bined effort. This must be borne in
mind in all of our contacts of a per-
sonal or professional nature. We need
not hide our talents under "catchy"
or "flowery" name styles. Within the
architectural profession there can be
no better identification than "John
Doe, Architect." This name style tells
the inquiring public what they need
to know. That John Doe has been
found by his state to be qualified to
practice his desired profession. He
needs no "side-show come-ons."


Change...
The Miami firm of WATSON,
DEUTSCHMAN & KRAUSE, archi-
tects and engineers announced the
relocation of its offices from the
Chamber of Commerce Bldg., to 1600
Northwest Le Jeune Road, Miami 44,
Florida. The 'phone is 635-0845.
JUNE, 1963


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


TAH





Current Hgighlits.

labor. If the union wins a big package, others will be tempted to try.
However, the industry will re.ist. And President Kennedy will see that
a settlement is mild.
* STATE AND LOCAL TAXES ARE BEING RAISED THIS YEAR by many government units,
to meet the growing costs of education, highways, and other community facili-
ties. Scores of jurisdictions have voted new or increased tobacco, beverage, sales,
and income levies, adding perhaps $1 billion to the total tax burden. The in-
creases in state receipts will offset, at least in part, the savings due this year or
next from reductions at the federal level.
Work on federal tax cuts continues to progress about on the schedule
that Congressional leaders have been predicting. The word still is that
there will be a bill involving some substantial cuts in rates but little in
the way of "reform."
* INTERNAL REVENUE MAY EASE UP ON EXPENSE ACCOUNTS still further, as a result
of criticism from business and Congress and possible difficulties in enforcement.
The change would kill the requirement that entertainment items in excess of $25
be fully substantiated with receipts. IRS can make the changes administratively
and will get "hints" from Congress to do so.
IRS has already pulled back from a previous ceiling of $10 and may
find the present figure unworkable, too. Tax men point out that an
evening's entertainment can be split into several items, each for less
than $25 and needing no receipt.
* SMALL COMPANIES WILL GET THE RESULTS OF RESEARCH financed by the U.S. under
a plan soon to get under way under the auspices of the Small Business Admin-
istration. The aim is to find out if data with commercial application cannot be
assembled and processed into a form useful to small enterprises. The pilot model
for the program will be a study of the work done on plastics. If successful, the
program will then be extended to other industrial lines.
* A STUDY OF THE GUARANTEES AND WARRANTIES on items sold to consumers will
be begun soon by the Federal Trade Commission. It will be undertaken at the
behest of the Consumer Advisory Council which Kennedy set up in '62. Purpose
of the study is to see if the claims of dealers and manufacturers of appliances,
building materials, etc., are misleading to any great extent.
New legislation that's designed to protect consumers could ultimately
emerge from the study if it does turn up evidence that present war-
ranty practices are in need of policing.
* PROSPECTS FOR A FEDERAL FAIR TRADE LAW ARE LOOKING UP as a result of intensive
efforts on the part of retail groups. It now looks as though the House will pass
the Quality Stabilization Act, as the bill is now called, during 1963. Action by
the Senate is seen as possible next year. Though the Justice Department is op-
posed to the measure, it is backed by many small businesses, once it gets to the
floor for a vote, it will be hard to stop.
Opponents may try to water down a bill by amending it prior to passage.
If this tactic fails, they are counting on the President for a veto. A veto is
in fact likely, but some observers recall that President Truman surprised
everyone some years back by signing a measure that didn't stand up.
* KENNEDY IS COUNTING ON BETTER BUSINESS TO RE-ELECT HIM in 1964. He is oper-
ating on the theory that the economy must be on an uptrend if he is to win
again. He is concerned, Democrats report, that if unemployment is not shrinking
next year, either Goldwater or Rockefeller could defeat him. This goes far to ex-
plain Kennedy's continuing stress on programs designed to lift employment and
incomes-tax cuts, job retraining, etc.,-even though the economy is currently
making welcome though possibly short -lived gains.







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