• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Current highlights
 Table of Contents
 A state-level program for FAA
 New office for FAA
 A seven-point program for...
 FAA standing committees for...
 City Hall at Winter Haven, Merit...
 It is well to know
 A seminar -- a symposium
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00104
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1963
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00104
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Current highlights
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    A state-level program for FAA
        Page 4
        Page 5
    New office for FAA
        Page 6
        Page 7
    A seven-point program for FAA progress
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    FAA standing committees for 1963
        Page 11
        Page 12
    City Hall at Winter Haven, Merit award
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    It is well to know
        Page 16
        Page 17
    A seminar -- a symposium
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Advertisers' index
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text

A A FSgo


This- publication- is. copyrighted- by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the.
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available-has-been granted by-the Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.







The aImftGW February, 1963





FLORIDA ARCHITECT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.


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Current Highlights...


* THE BROAD OUTLINES OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S PROGRAM for 1963 have now been
laid before Congress and it is possible to make a first appraisal of how key pro-
posals will fare. This Congress won't be a rubber stamp, but checks with leaders
leaders of both parties suggest that Kennedy will achieve some sizeable successes.
His influence is considered stronger as a result of Cuba. He will, of course, have
some set-backs, too, and some of the more important pieces of his legislation will
pass by only four of five votes.
.. .Kennedy's current program concentrates on domestic economic prob-
lems to a greater extent than in his first two years. During 1961-62, tariff-
cutting, the balance of payments, and stronger defenses held the stage.
Now, it's the home front.
... The President seems more favorably disposed toward industry. He is
stressing legislation to get business moving again . mainly steps to
expand profits and spur investment. And he will continue to court busi-
nessmen .. to build confidence.

* TAX LEGISLATION IS, OF COURSE, GETTING TOP PRIORITY in the Congress. It is the
heart of the Democratic campaign to stimulate business activity. Next come such
such things as Medicare . aid to schools . and new public works. Also due
for attention will be labor legislation, the domestic Peace Corps, farm aid, a trans-
portation policy, banking, and most important the Budget.

* KENNEDY'S UNBALANCED BUDGET FOR FISCAL 1964 the 12 months that begin July
1 may well end up with a bigger deficit than originally shown. He has aban-
doned ... for now . his efforts to erase the red ink; he is more concerned about
persistent unemployment and the failure to achieve complete economic recovery
in recent years. The President is buying the theory that a deficit now will avoid
bigger ones later if business, incomes, and profits go up.
. .But, despite efforts to keep spending below $100 billion, actual out-
lays could conceivably break through the ceiling. Defense projects have
a way of exceeding Budget limits, especially if they are successful and
progress faster than expected. Actual revenues can't be pinpointed at
this time because of uncertainty as to the final details of the tax bill. But
clearly the next deficit could hit $12 billion.
... The defense and space programs will account for the bulk of the
spending rise up at least $5 billion. But non-defense outlays won't rise
over-all; farm, postal, and arms spending will be made more efficient to
allow room under the ceiling for expansion in health, welfare, and edu-
cation programs.

* THE MUCH-TALKED-ABOUT TAX BILL WON'T TAKE FINAL SHAPE until summer, at
the very earliest. Opposition of key Congressmen has already forced the Presi-
dent to modify his proposals to reduce the net amount of revenue loss and to
call for more tax reform sooner. Even so, there'll be quite a fuss.
... The President has done a superb job of building support for an over-
haul of the tax law. He has won a lot of backing. But don't underesti-
mate the opposition. It is still quite formidable in the Democratic, as
well as Republican ranks. (Continued on 3rd Cover)







































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FEBRUARY, 1963 1


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74




Florida Architect

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



la 7&v Isecs ---


Current Highlights . . . .

A State-level Program for FAA P/R .

New Office for FAA .......

A Seven-point Program for FAA Progres
By Roy M. Pooley

FAA Standing Committees for 1963 .

City Hall at Winter Haven, Merit Award

It is Well to Know .......
By Archie G. Parish, FAIA

News & Notes ..........

FAA Receives Award .......

A Seminar A Symposium . . .

Regional Judiciary Committee Members .

Advertisers' Index . . . .


FAA OFFICERS 1963
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville
William F. Bigoney, Jr., First V.-Pres., 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
William T. Arnett, Second V.-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Rogers, Third V.-President, 511 N. Mills St., Orlando
Jefferson N. Powell, Secretary, 361 S. County Road, Palm Beach
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami
Robert H. Levison, Immediate Past President, 485 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton, Carl Gerken; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn
Howell, Richard E. Jessen, Frank F. Smith, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH: James T.
Lendrum, Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen;
FLORIDA NORTHWEST: Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C.
Robert Abele, John O. Grimshaw, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: John
R. Graveley, Walter B. Schultz, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Fred
G. Owles, Jr., Donald 0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Donald Edge, Harold A. Obst,
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.

Director, Florida Region, AIA
Robert M. Little, FAIA, 2180 Brickell Avenue, Miami
Executive Secretary, FAA
Verna Shaub Sherman, Douglas Entrance Bldg., Coral Gables, Fla.


. 2nd & 3rd Covers

. 4

. 6

. 8


. 11

. 13

. 16


. 17

. 18

. 18

. 19

. 20


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. .Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; January Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA, Chairman
Wm. T. Arnett, Fred W. Bucky Jr.
B. W. Hartman Jr., Dana B. Johannes

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 13

NUMBER 21963
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













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A State-level Program



for FAA Public Relations


This article was prepared in 1955 by the Editor as part of an
FAA P/R program study requested by Clinton Gamble, FAIA,
during his term as FAA president. At that time no action was
taken to put the program it outlines into operation. Since then,
however, need for a specific FAA P/R Program has become more
apparent; and the material is reproduced here as suggesting
some phases of P/R activity that might be currently feasible.


A Public Relations Program' for the
FAA should operate from two points
of view:
1. It should set up definite objec-
tives for accomplishment.
2. It should be long range. But
plans should be geared to attain
certain specific objectives within
certain definite periods.
A PR program should thus be
something like a military campaign-
in which any good general has a major
objective and a whole series of minor
objectives down to a minimum. So
his plans are fluid at all times; and
what he does after one successful
sortie depends on what that sortie has
actually accomplished.
Let's bring that down to cases in
terms of what FAA wants to accom-
plish in Florida.

1. Maximum objective is complete
understanding of architects' func-
tions and services and a habitual
acceptance of the architect as
indispensable to, and technical
controller of, any sort of build-
ing project for an adequate
fee. That's long-range, continu-
ous, a constant battle against
apathy, ignorance, often antag-
onism.
2. The minimum objective? Per-
haps it's holding the present
volume of professional practice
against encroachments of other
technical groups.
3. And a practical minor objective
within a stated term? That could
well be the passage of legislation
at the next legislature -bills
that are actually needed to in-
increase architectural opportun-
ities and strengthen the profes-
sion's technical competency.


If those three objectives are accept-
able as a basic PR approach for the
FAA, let's see what mechanics can
be put into operation to reach them.
But first, let's analyze a bit.
What's the basis for the legislative
defeats the FAA has experienced? It's
no lack of zeal on the part of com-
mittees or counsel, no lack of coop-
eration in certain legislative quarters.
What has beaten us is ignorance of
what we were after and why we were
after it-and what influence for the
public good the things we were seek-
ing would ultimately have.
That ignorance caused-as ignor-
ance always causes-a negative reac-
tion and enough nay votes to lick us.
It's safe to say it came from the cracker
constituencies-legislators with a ma-
jority voice who are know nothings
so far as our profession is concerned.
What's the answer-how can we
change a nay into a yea? It's Educa-
tion. So--the education of unin-
formed legislators within two year's
time could be put down as the num-
ber one campaign in the long-range
program.
How can it be done? What are
means and methods? And how can
they be used with as much power by
individuals as by organizations? Here
are some suggestions workable in
practice if they are adopted and ac-
tively followed through.
1. First, plan-from the FAA to
each chapter, then to individuals.
2. Then schedule-assign definite
tasks to specific individuals in
every chapter locality. Schedule
tasks as a continuing series of
assignments; and repeat them-
rotate them--with changes
worked only on the surface of
the same basic pattern.
3. Take inventory periodically. Get


PR contracts, or task men, to-
gether for detailed reports to
dovetail effects, assay progress,
use advantages where they ap-
pear.
The foregoing three headings are
geared to the State level. They should
be responsibilities of a central FAA
PR committee composed of PR com-
mittee chairmen from each chapter.
These chapter men would be in charge
of local chapter "task forces" picked
for special abilities or contacts. Theirs
is the job of actually carrying on the
battle-sifting details of the overall
plan down to the grassroots of indi-
vidual understanding and action.
That, generally is the organization
required if any PR plan for the FAA
is to be made to really do a job. It's
essential, should be recognized as
such.
As to the actual detail of carrying
out a plan, the PR Facts prepared by
the AIA PR Counsel contains much
of value so far as mechanics are con-
cerned. But it's generalized. Our prob-
lems are localized, specific-and also
special. So, mechanics have to be
adapted to meet our special needs.
These needs exist in every area of our
operation in three categories:
1. Press contacts.
2. Organizational contacts.
3. Individual contacts.
Let's touch on each briefly to see
what it can do for us, how best to
use it to our overall advantage.
Press . We mean by this, any
means of publicity-newspapers, mag-
azines, TV, radio. And we mean also,
publicity itself, but publicity of an
indirect nature. An example might be
a news story based on what architects
think of a new tax assessment plan,
or what effect the use of new rubber
road paving would have on the devel-
opment of a county budget.
The story could be based on an
interview, written as a by-line opinion,
aired via TV and radio in a panel
discussion. The whole point behind
press action is to let the people we're
trying to reach get to know architects
through individuals who can talk
about subjects and in the language
they understand.
Though local situations vary, the
most effective way to use the press is
to let the press use you. Feed them
ideas, comments, suggestions about
matters of current importance. They'll
do the rest-and come back for more
of the same. So, for a task-forcer, per-
(Continued on Page 20)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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AS USUAL THERE IS SOMETHING EXCITINGLY NEW in the use of con-
crete in architecture . precast white concrete structural members.
Here, for example, are giant precast concrete crosses made with
Trinity White portland cement and white quartz aggregate. More
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The crosses are temporarily braced in position and become inte-
grated into the structure as the concrete floors are poured, which
operation fills a groove in the spandrel beam of the cross.


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New Office..

By VERNA S. SHERMAN

Puerto del Sol Gate of the Sun
was the original name for the Douglas
Entrance Building which will house
the new Executive Offices of the
Association. Located at Douglas Road
and South West Eighth Street the
official address is 801 E. Ponce de


for FAA
Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables 34. It
is convenient to the Airport and
ample parking is available in the gar-
den area adjoining the office site.
The office area was leased, for
three years, in a completely unim-
proved state and a hard working


Committee comprised of William F.
Bigoney Jr., Chairman; C. Robert
Abele, Edward G. Grafton and Rob-
ert E. Hansen started in October
1962 working on details for improve-
ment and occupancy, planned for
early 1963.
The U. of F. Senior Class College
of Architecture and Fine Arts, thru
the cooperation of Dean Turpin C.
Bannister, FAIA, and under direct
supervision of Edward M. Fearney
undertook a three-day sketch problem
to develop the plans.
The completed sketches were a
part of the Architectural Exhibit of
FAA's 48th Annual Convention held
last November. The Committee, act-
ing as judges, selected as winning
design that submitted by LEE OGDEN
and named three others as having
handled the problem in a noteworthy
manner. Those named were Donald
Kaler, Philip Rickman and Paul Rob-
inson.
The working drawings were exe-
cuted in the offices of Herbert John-
son and Associates under direction of
(Continued on Page 19)


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FEBRUARY, 1963 7








M1Cessage %rom 74e 5?,A PretCdeCt...


A Seven-point Program




For FAA Progress




This article by ROY M. POOLEY, FAA President, con-
tains pertinent excerpts from an address made by him
to the FAA Board at its January meeting held in Winter
Park. . .


In November, last year, just after
our own FAA Convention, the Florida
State Chamber of Commerce held its
46th Annual Convention in West
Palm Beach. The theme of that Con-
vention was, "Florida, Ever-Expanding
State."
The essence of this theme is, I
think, literally true. Perhaps you are
familiar with some recently-published
statistics: Of the 50 states of our
country, 50 percent of the architects
are concentrated in eight states; and
60 percent of the country's construc-
tion industry is also concentrated in
these states. Also, if I recall figures
correctly, 50 percent of the engineers
in this country are concentrated in
nine states.
Florida is one of the states showing
the largest concentration of architects,
engineers and construction activity.
So, in addition to the ever-expanding
character of the State's development,
we have, I think, an ever-expanding
series of problems to accompany our
ever-expanding responsibilities and
opportunities.
These present our profession in par-
ticular with a tremendous challenge
- a challenge to provide the leader-
ship in the construction industry
which is so desperately needed in this
development. I think this leadership
is needed because we are deeply in-
volved in an economy which is a
breeding ground for the "quick-buck
operator" and the happy hunting
ground of the merchant builder. It is


needed also, I believe, because the
construction industry generally ap-
pears to be engaged in some rather
wishful thinking in which lien laws
and other legal protections can be
used as substitutes for sound business
practices.
Our State is now primarily urban
- at least numerically so. Most of us
practice in urban areas. And we come
to think of our State as one of cities.
But there are vast regions in it that
are still not developed; and so it's
logical to conclude that geographically
we are still rural. Obviously the facts
are in conflict; and because of this we
all are facing a rather painful political
situation in our State Legislature and
our County Governments.
This is only one example of the
problems with which we must live. I
think our profession has a responsi-
bility to learn to cope with these
problems. I think we have the respon-
sibility of learning how to increase
our competence in helping to solve
these problems not only at the
practicing level, but also through the
teaching of men who are to follow us.
As one specific instance, we must
learn to out-deal the package dealer.
And in my view this is not a penny-
ante game; we are all playing for high
stakes. I am sure we have before us
the business of building one of the
greatest states this country has ever
seen or ever will see. But I am equally
certain that our success can be meas-
ured by two factors: One, our deter-


mination to control our own destiny;
and, two, our ability to recognize the
reality of the problems which we will
face and to focus our talents and ex-
perience on their solution.
I would like to practice architecture
as an individual free and unfet-
tered and unhampered by government
restrictions. I'm not particularly anxi-
ous to be a joiner of organizations.
Yet I recognize the necessity for this
or I wouldn't be here. I believe you
think so too or you wouldn't be here.
I am convinced that our professional
strength lies in our professional organ-
ization the AIA, Chapter, State
and National. And the business of
this FAA Board is to strengthen our
AIA State Organization. It is a diffi-
cult business at best. In a way it is a
battle even a continuing series of
battles. But every battle we win -
however small it might appear to be
- results in an advantage for our
profession and for the people of our
State.
As to the particular business that
will concern us this year, I suggest
seven objectives that I believe to be
of prime importance. I know there are
many others that sooner or later will
certainly develop. But these seven are
those I would like to see us concen-
trate on this year.
1 ... This Association has devel-
oped a pretty positive and well-organ-
ized legislative program. We should
concentrate every possible energy to-
(Continued on Page 21)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































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The reuse of forms, quick concrete delivery and round uniform columns coupled with excellent design and construction skill...That's
how General Contractor Robert L. Turchin, Inc., Miami Beach, consistently placed a complete 40,000 square foot concrete floor
every four working days at King Cole Apartments. The 12-story, all concrete structure is designed by Fridstein and Fitch, architects
and engineers of Chicago, with Melvin Grossman of Miami Beach, associate architect; Crain Engineering of Miami, structural
design; and B. D. Freedman of Miami, structural consultant to the contractor and design engineers.


Fast construction comes easy

with concrete frame and floors


More and more architects and builders are
achieving outstanding speed of construction
with modern concrete. Building can start as
soon as foundation loads are determined. The
efficiency of re-usable forms saves time and
labor. And with concrete, your material is al-
ways there when you need it.
In addition to the advantages of early oc-
cupancy, concrete flat-plate construction
brings big economy. The finished slab, with a
thin coat of plaster, is the ceiling. In high-rise
buildings as much as a full story in total


height can be saved-with less materials such
as conduits and pipes needed.
With no beams, and flexible column place-
ment, there is more usable space. Partitions
can be placed for most efficient room layout.
And concrete provides superior sound in-
sulation, needs no special fireproofing. Archi-
tects and engineers frequently are specifying
concrete frame and floor construction today.
They're finding the same advantages for all
structures, of both conventional and modern
design.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


AV








rauAin ganteed, Daimene Peesou et...



FAA Standing Committees for 1963


Late last year the AIA Board ap-
proved a new organizational set-up
for the Institute's national commit-
tees. As proposed by the Committee
on Committees, chairmanned by
ARTHUR G. ODELL, JR., FAIA, its
essential points are these:
1 . Five "Commissions" were
established to exercise a guiding and
supervisory function over a group of
committees assigned to each Com-
mission.
2 . Each Commission will be
administered by not more than three
AIA members, one of which will be a
member of the AIA Board's Executive
Committee and will serve as a liaison
with the Board.
3 . The Commissions are: Pro-
fessional Society, Education, Profes-
sional Practice, Architectural Design,
and Public Affairs. Committees with-
in each Commission will have as di-
rect a bearing as possible relative to
these five categories of professional
concern.
The AIA Board also adopted a reso-
lution encouraging various AIA com-
ponents to realign individual commit-
tee organizations in line with the five
functional groups designated as the
Institute's Commissions.
It is probable that in due time all
of Florida Region's ten Chapters will
reorganize their committee structure
according to the Institute's new pol-
icy. At the State level the Institute's
suggestion has already been adopted
in principle; and thus the FAA's 1963
Committee roster is radically different
from that of past years.
Result of the FAA Board's action
in January of this year established five
Committee Groups to encompass all
of the FAA's 19 Standing Commit-
tees. Three of these groups have been
assigned to FAA vice presidents who
have been charged with responsibility
for their guidance and supervision.
The other two groups have been allo-
cated as the responsibility of the FAA
President. In designation, the FAA
Committee Groups are the same as
comparable Commissions at the na-
FEBRUARY, 1963


tional level; but at least for the
present-Groups contain committees
that are not necessarily those formally
selected by the Institute.
At the January Board meeting all
committee chairmen were named and
approved. However, full membership
of committees has been named in
only a few instances. Other member-
ships will be determined by the FAA
officer in charge of the group and
each committee chairman. Such com-
mittees may, or may not, be fully
representative of each of the FAA's
ten chapters. Full membership of all
committees will be published as early
as information becomes available.
Here is a listing of the five FAA
Groups, the FAA officer in charge,
and the Committee serving under
each:


Professional Society Group
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.,
FAA President

1 ... BUDGET AND FINANCE COM-
MITTEE- Chairman: JAMES DEEN;
Vice Chairman: ROBERT H. LEVI-
SON; Members: WILLIAM T. ARNETT,
A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR., JEFFER-
SON N. POWELL.
DUTIES: To operate in accordance
with the direction of the By-Laws.

2...CHAPTER AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
- Chairman: FRANCIS R. WALTON.
DUTIES: To unify the efforts and
objectives of all FAA Chapters; to
encourage an interchange of informa-
tion on chapter affairs and problems.

3...CONVENTION COMMITTEE-
Chairman: HERBERT R. SAVAGE.
DUTIES: To develop an FAA Con-
vention format and organization for
the 1963 convention consistent with
the professional needs of architects in
the State and consistent with the best
public relations impact. To produce
effective written guidance for future
conventions based on experience of
the 1963 convention.


4...MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE--
Chairman: LESTER N. MAY.
DUTIES: To encourage Chapters to
study AIA membership changes and
to foster increased membership in the
FAA in all categories.

5...PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE-
Chairman: H. SAMUEL KRUSE, FAIA;
Members: WILLIAM T. ARNETT,
FRED. W. BUCKY, JR., BARNARD W.
HARTMAN, JR., DANA B. JOHANNES.
DUTIES: Assume responsibility for
the publications program of the FAA
and act as liaison between the editor-
publisher of The Florida Architect
and the Board. There shall be meetings
held regularly, approximately in con-
cert with Board meetings.


Education Group...
William T. Arnett,
FAA Vice President

1...AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIP
COMMITTEE; BOARD OF TRUSTEES
LOAN FUND Chairman: McMIL-
LAN H. JOHNSON.
DUTIES: Study, advise and admin-
ister all FAA Awards and Scholar-
ships including student and profes-
sional categories.
A...Study the need for increased
student loan and scholarship funds
and provide advice and recommen-
dations on:
1...Scope (participating universi-
ties, students eligibility, etc.)
2...Methods of administration
(faculty, FAA, Chapters)
3...Methods of financing
4...Public Relations value of pro-
gram
B...Examine need for student award
program at Florida universities
other than University of Florida.
At and before Annual Meeting plan
for and give recognition and appro-
priate notification not only to the
architect, but also to the owners and
contractors of buildings entered in the
Architectural Exhibit.
(Continued on Page 12)







FAA Committees...
(Continued from Page 11)

2...EDUCATION COMMITTEE-
Chairman: JACK WEST
DUTIES: To develop continuing
educational objectives, including edu-
cation for practice, guidance for stu-
dents, appraisal of methods and cur-
ricula, teacher training and pre-regis-
tration and post-registration education
and training placing special em-
phasis on curricula at the Chapter
level for the continuing education of
pre-registrants. Analyze annually the
R-17 Program and make recommen-
dations to the Board relative to con-
tinued support.

3...RESEARCH COMMITTEE-Chair-
man: ROBERT E. HANSEN; Members:
DONALD M. FORFAR, JOHN E. SWEET.
DUTIES: To develop a comprehen-
sive, continuing program of architec-
tural research in collaboration with
other elements of the building indus-
try; and to make the results available
to the profession, particularly the
membership of FAA.

4...SCHOOLS AND EDUCATIONAL
FACILITIES COMMITTEE Chairman:
C. ELLIS DUNCAN.
DUTIES: To promote professional
leadership in the principles of planning
of schools and educational facilities
- the total environment. To estab-
lish productive contacts at state and
local levels and to cooperate with gov-
ernmental and private agencies in
matters of mutual interest. To dissem-
inate its contributions to professional
knowledge by publication in The
Florida Architect (in cooperation
with the Publications Committee)
and in reports to the Board.
To coordinate with the School
Plant Section of the State Depart-
ment of Education for conferences
concerning next revisions to the
School Building Regulations. To con-
fer with the same department con-
cerning procedures, channels and in-
terpretations in submitting school
plans; promote FAA contact with
state organization of County School
Superintendents concerning their sur-
vey in School Building Regulations
and their effect on school building
design and educational program; fol-
low, study and recommend on the
newly-developing building regulations
for air-conditioned schools.


Professional Practice Group
Richard Boone Rogers,
FAA Vice President

1...FAA FAIA COMMITTEE-Chair-
man: ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA;
Members: TURPIN C. BANNISTER,
FAIA; FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, FAIA;
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA; ARCHIE
G. PARISH, FAIA.
DUTIES: To assist and encourage
Chapters in submitting appropriate
nominations for AIA Fellowships.

2...FAA FES COMMITTEE Chair-
man: To be announced ...
DUTIES: TO promote professional
relations between architects and engi-
neers.

3...OFFICE PROCEDURES COM-
MITTEE Chairman: EARL M.
STARNES.
DUTIES: To assist the architect to
perfect himself in his profession
through technical improvement in his
office organization and techniques;
and to develop seminars and office
aids to accomplish this purpose. To
explore the possibility of conducting
seminars in conjunction with two
Board meetings now scheduled the
first in Gainesville on the 15th of
March to coincide with the Board
meeting on the 16th, the second in
Palm Beach scheduled for September
14th.

4...PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE
- Chairman: EDWARD G. GRAFTON.
DUTIES: TO work closely with the
Chapters on the problem of the pub-
lic relations of the profession; and to
consider means whereby the programs
developed at State and National levels
can be extended to the maximum
degree at the Chapter level. To sched-
ule, if feasible, a Public Relations
Seminar for the entire FAA member-
ship to fall between the May and
September Board meetings.

Architectural Design Group
William F. Bigoney, Jr.,
FAA Vice President

1 ...COLLABORATION WITH DESIGN
PROFESSIONS COMMITTEE Chair-
man: A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR.
DUTIES: To foster the Fine Arts
and to promote a close relationship
between architects and sculptors,
painters and others practicing the arts
allied with architecture; and to pre-


pare a list of those artists available to
architects.

2...COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
COMMITTEE- Chairman: WARREN
C. HENDRY, JR.

DUTIES: To provide professional
leadership toward assisting in the de-
sign and redesign of urban and metro-
politan areas; and to foster sound
community development. To encour-
age Chapters to assume active roles in
community leadership; to conduct
Urban Design Seminars; to dissemi-
nate community development infor-
mation; and to foster enabling legis-
lation on planning, zoning, sub-divi-
sion regulation, and urban conserva-
tion and rehabilitation.

3...HOME BUILDING CONSTRUC-
TION INDUSTRY COMMITTEE-Chair-
man: EARL M. STARNES.
DUTIES: To unify the construction
industry in the State; to work out
inter-professional problems; and to
collaborate with other associations in
the construction field. To represent
the FAA on the Joint Cooperative
Council.

4...HOSPITALS AND HEALTH COM-
MITTEE-Chairman: WALTER B.
SCHULTZ.
DUTIES: To provide professional
leadership in the study and planning
of health facilities; and to cooperate
with related agencies.

5...PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC
BUILDINGS COMMITTEE Chairman:
JOHN R. GRAVELY.
DUTIES: TO foster preservation of
significant historic buildings. To de-
velop continuing exhibits, utilizing
materials collected by the special AIA
Exhibit Committee of the FAA. To
establish contact and collaborate with
state agencies engaged in the restora-
tion of St. Augustine's historic build-
ings.

Public Affairs Group...
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.,
FAA President
I...GOVERNMENT RELATIONS
COMMITTEE Chairman: FORREST R.
COXEN; Vice Chairman: BARNARD W.
HARTMAN, JR.
DUTIES: To carry out the policies
established by the FAA and to imple-
ment the objectives of the FAA in
matters pertaining to Government;
and to create a long-range recom-
mendation as to future action.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























The City Hall at Winter Haven...

Merit Award, 1962 FAA Convention

GENE LEEDY, AIA
Architect
FEBRUARY, 1963 13










Merit Award, 1962

The building program involved pro-
vision of all necessary executive and
administrative facilities for the City
of Winter Haven excluding those
incident to Fire and Police Depart-
ments, both of which will be housed
in a future building adjacent to this
present one. In addition, a certain
degree of flexible use was a require-
ment since part of the building will
be used from time to time for such
public purposes as art exhibits and
various types of civic meetings.
Basically the building consists of
an executive, or policy-making, area
and an administrative, or essentially
clerical, area divided by a public con-
course. Both areas overlook open
courtyards; and the concourse, open
at both ends, is top-lighted by four
large monitor skylights. All glass
areas are sliding glass door units, thus
providing a sense of openness unusual
in a public building of this kind.
However, the shrewd placement of
solid surfaces and the use of walls
enclosing court areas has adequately
provided privacy where necessary.
The building sits on an extended,
elevated base that serves also as a
planting area. This, with use of free-
standing columns helps to create, in
the architect's words, "a rhythmic,
monumental atmosphere."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































































As suggested by the plan, the
building was modularly planned
on the basis of a four-foot grid.
Columns and beams are of
poured concrete; and long-span
steel joists support the roof be-
tween beams. Exterior walls are
of concrete block. Interior walls
are of concrete block. Interior
walls in the executive area are
paneled with walnut plywood.
The entire exterior is finished
with white, spray-on stucco.









FEBRUARY, 1963









It Is Well To Know...


In the recent past a number of
complaints have been received by the
Florida State Board of Architecture
wherein it is alleged that Florida
registered architects have been associ-
ating with architectural firms not
registered in Florida either as associ-
ates or as consulting architects con-
trary to Florida Law.
In most instances these complaints
cover projects of national chains -
restaurants, department stores and
the like. For example, the XYZ
Corporation, a Drive-In Restaurant
Chain, having headquarters in a state
other than Florida, desires to con-
struct a restaurant in Florida. The
XYZ Corporation has its individual
type of building which is the only
type approved by the Corporation.
The Corporation has either stock
plans or plans prepared by an archi-


tect who may not be registered in
Florida.
For various reasons, which include
securing the necessary permits, con-
struction supervision, etc., contact is
made with an architect registered in
Florida to associate in the project
either as associate architect or con-
sulting architect. Plans are signed
and sealed by the Florida Architect
in such a capacity, and necessary per-
mits are requested and secured on the
basis of the seal of the Florida archi-
tect. The Florida architect thereby
assumes full legal responsibility for
the project in question.
This procedure is at times followed
by Florida registered architects with-
out their understanding that they are
in violation of Chapter 467, Florida
Statutes 1955.
In this regard attention is invited


By ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA
President, Florida State Board of Architecture


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IJ J new avenues in home design. Eliminated are the
problems encountered with chimneys and flues.
Valuable floor space can be utilized to maximum
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TO M ORE Following the trend toward all-electric living,
the MEDALLION signifies an all-electric kitchen
HOM E including a flameless electric range, electric
water heater and two other major appliances*
SALES as part of the purchase price of the home. Also
Full Housepower 100-200 amp wiring with suf-
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16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


to 467.15 of the Law which states in
part:
"No architect shall affix or
permit to be affixed his seal or
his name to any plan, specifica-
tion, drawing or other related
document which was not pre-
pared by him or under his
responsible supervising control."
Associating with architectural firms
not registered in the State and sign-
ing and sealing plans prepared by
such unregistered individuals or firms,
is in direct violation of the section
above mentioned. The plan, speci-
fication, drawing or other related
document was not prepared by the
Florida Architect or under his respon-
sible supervising control.
Every architect registered to prac-
tice in Florida should bear the above
in mind, if contacted by persons not
registered to practice in Florida, to
associate on such projects. The Board
has no alternative but to vigorously
investigate such complaints and take
administrative action when such ac-
tion is indicated.







News & Notes
Craftsmen Awards . .
James M. Hartley chairmanned the
Awards Committee for the Crafts-
manship Awards program sponsored
by the FES, Broward County Chap-
ter AIA and the Broward Builders
Exchange. Presentation to the twelve
recipients was made early in Febru-
ary at the Governors' Club Hotel in
Ft. Lauderdale.
Frank E. Watson, Florida South
Chapter, was main speaker of the
evening. Jack W. Zimmer, President
of the Broward County Chapter gave
a welcoming address.


Officers Installed ...
Edward G. Grafton installed the
newly elected Officers for the Archi-
tectural Secretaries Association at a
recent meeting held in Miami. The
main project of the Association, now
in its fourth year, is to foster support
for the Variety Children's Hospital.
The Officers are: President, Ida
Neuman; Vice Presidents, Jeanette
Tracy and Magda Kulhanjian; Treas-
urer, Slyvia Fromberg; Recording Sec-
retary, Ruby Waller and Correspond-
ing Secretary is Viola Lewis.

Student Award . .
Walter M. Pedreira, a member of
the University of Miami Student AIA
Chapter, has been awarded $200 as
winner of the 1963 Reynolds Alum-
inum Prize for Architectural Students.
A fourth-year architecture student
from Santurce, Puerto Rico, Pedre-
ira won with his design of a folding
canopy that could serve as a portable
roof for various structures.
The prize administered by the
American Institute of Architects is
for the "best original design of a
building component in aluminum."
Now in its third year, it was estab-
lished by Reynolds Metals Company
to encourage creativity in architec-
tural design and to stimulate interest
in the design potential of aluminum.

Partner Named . .
Richard P. Jones Jr., Architect, and
Bruce A. Renfroe Jr., Architect, an-
nounce the addition of W. Wade
Setliff, Architect, as a Partner. Firm
to be known as Jones, Renfroe and
Setliff, Architects, 215 E. Lemon St.,
Lakeland.


Helping to build the frame-
work of the new, dynamic in-
dustrial Florida is Florida Steel.
More than a million tons of Flor-
'ida Steel have gone into more
than 10,000 different construc-
tions building a new Florida.


Always specify Florida Steel, the only reinforcing steel
manufactured and fabricated in Florida a limitless source
of quality-controlled steel right at your finger-tips. Structural
steel, reinforcing steel, special fabrications.


You build a better Florida
FLORIDA STEEL when you build
CORP RATION with Florida products.

TAMPA ORLANDO MIAMI
S/eel en o 4ad JACKSONVILLE FT. MYERS
WEST PALM BEACH


FEBRUARY, 1963








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT was again
recipient of an award made yearly at
the Annual Meeting of the Florida
Society of Association Executives.
Presentation of the Award -
FIRST PLACE, in the magazine cate-
gory, was made at the Robert Meyer
Hotel in Jacksonville last December.
Publications were judged on the
basis of over-all appearance and edi-
torial content. Of the three issues
submitted by the Editor the October
1962 issue was judged the finest.
Executives of major Professional
and Trade Associations throughout
the State constitute membership of
F. S. A. E. The Annual Meeting for
1963 will be held at the Eden Roc
and the FAA's Executive Secretary
has been named Awards Chairman.


URBAN DESIGN is the subject for
discussion at the first FAA sponsored
Seminar for the year under the guid-
ance of Earl M. Starnes, Chairman of
Committee on Office Procedures. It
will be held at the University of Flor-
ida on March 15 and the opening
session is scheduled for 10:00 A.M.
Paul Spreiregen will show the film
presentation prepared by the A. I. A.
Urban Design Committee and lead
discussion relative to it. Nicholas
Satterlee will present a Case History
of an Urban Design Project. Matthew
Rockwell, Coordinator of Urban De-
sign Seminars for the Institute will
participate and Robert H. Levison
will moderator.


Two nationally known architects
will be featured at the symposium
on architecture at the University of
Florida in Gainesville on March 14.
They are Henry N. Wright, adjunct
professor of architecture at Columbia
University, and William H. Scheick,


c'iw lk a~riii -Assn. oW'Arduck


1 c .e L; i


executive director of the American
Institute of Architects.
Wright, a specialist in the relation-
ship between environmental forces
(heat, light, sound) and building
design, is a pioneer in the design
of radiant heating for homes. With
George Nelson he was co-author of
the best-selling Tomorrow's House,
and co-inventor of the Storage Wall.
Scheick, author of numerous pub-
lications on housing and building
research, served for five years as direc-
tor of the Small Homes Council at
the University of Illinois. Before be-
coming executive director of the AIA,
he headed the Building Research
Advisory Board and the Building
Research Institute of the National
Academy of Sciences.
The symposium, third in a series of
three on Environment, Technology,
and Architecture, is sponsored by the
Department of Architecture and the
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts. Theme of the third symposium
is TECHNICS AND TECHNIQUES.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A Seminar


A Symposium







New Office ...
(Continued from Page 6)
Committee member C. Robert Abele.
Construction is currently underway
and it is hoped the area will be ready
for occupancy by the end of March.
In the meantime the office is tem-
porarily being operated from 1202
Pizarro Avenue, Coral Gables.
The Building has a unique history.
It was the dream of Coral Gables
developer George Merrick. In 1924
at a cost of a million dollars the
library, ballroom, archway and apart-
ments; all facing Douglas Road, were
started. To the rear was a huge
quadrangle garden area which is still
lovely today.
In 1927 the first buildings were
occupied and in addition to housing
they provided space for a City Library
and offices. The Ball Room was used
for social functions and meetings.
The total building concept planned
to utilize eight acres of ground was
never completed. Ownership changed
hands eight times and finally in 1955
it was acquired by the Douglas Devel-
opment Corporation. Plans for a three
and a half million dollar addition in
1958 did not materialize and the
structure today remains much as it
did at the time of the formal opening
in 1927.


Regional Judiciary

Committee
Chairman of Florida's Regional
Judiciary Committee for 1963 is
James Gamble Rogers III (Mid Flor-
ida). Members are Kenneth Jacob-
son (Palm Beach) and Robert E.
Hansen (Broward County). The Al-
ternate is W. Stewart Morrison (Flor-
ida North West).

h- a
"With the passing of our col-
league, Roy A. Benjamin, A.I.A.,
to the Master Architect, Crea-
tor of the Universe, be it en-
tered into the minutes of the
meeting held on January 31,
1963, that the Jacksonville
Chapter of the American Insti-
tute of Architects extends its
sincerest condolences to the be-
reaved family and friends. Those
in the profession who were in-
spired by his creative abilities,
his genuine warmth and kind-
ness will note his passing with
great sorrow. The impact within
the community he served well
and faithfully, will be deeply
remembered."

FEBRUARY, 1963


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Dyfoam Corp. . . 18
Florida Foundry and
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Florida Natural Gas Assn. 7
Florida Power and Light Co 16
Florida Steel Corporation . 17
General Portland Cement 5
Merry Bros. Brick & Tile 3
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Prescolite . . . 18
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 6
Tidewater Concrete Block
& Pipe Co. . . 9
Vogue Kitchens . . 20
F. Graham Williams Co. . 21


P/R Program ...
(Continued from Page 4)
of the same. So, for a task-forcer, per-
sonal friendliness with press people is
one of the most potent weapons he
can develop. In two years such con-
tacts can provide education.
Next Organizations . To the
extent you will work with them they
will ultimately do a great deal of work
for you. Sometimes that will mean
speech making. Often, however, it
may involve little more than a lunch
with a president and the discussion
of an idea down the alley of the presi-
dent's interest and his organization's
scope of action.
An example. Is a service club seek-
ing a program? Suggest to the presi-
dent that the local legislator speak on
the civic center problem-with a law-
yer, an accountant and yourself form-
ing a panel to explore the possibilities
of getting it started. Let the legislator
get all the limelight-but be sure you
cement a firm personal contact. In
two years of that you'll be able to
ask his advice about training the com-
munity's youth-and his support for
the forward looking legislation you
want passed.
The organizations are legion-
clubs, churches, schools, etc. Culti-
vate them all through a number of
task forces. And let them use you to
your advantage just as has the press.
Individuals . It's by far the most
effective contact you can make. But
it can be useless unless you cultivate
it, keep it active. Make it early in the
two-year program. It's the objective
you're trying to reach.
There may be a thousand ways for
creating understanding in another
man. Any of them are good if you
know how to handle them to do the
job. But most can't be effective over-
night. Backed by what's been, and is
being, done via press and organiza-
tion contacts, two years should pro-
vide time enough to get your point
across. But not as any political favor
-from understanding of what you're
driving at.
We all recognize one practical ob-
stacle. That's the fact that legislators
change. But because old ones usually
know something about the possible
new ones, it's necessary to work both
sides of the street. Work on the old
ones; then let them work for you in
educating the new ones.
It has worked before elsewhere.
With organization and personal push,
it might here.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







President's Message ...
(Continued from Page 8)
ward the adoption of the measures we
feel are desirable and to prevent the
passage of those which are detrimen-
tal to the construction industryin gen-
eral and our profession in particular.
2 ... We have work to do in the
building of our membership, because
this is where our strength lies. Along
with this we have work to do in build-
ing a unanimity of opinion on matters
concerning the business of the FAA
and the profession generally.
3 ... We are faced this year with
the need for producing the best State
Convention that is humanly possible.
The site is wonderful. We have every
reason to make the Convention an
excellent one and we have some
plans for this that will be reported to
you a little later. This is vital to us.
Our convention attendance has not
been as good as it should have been
in the past three or four years and
the FAA Convention, of course, is the
focal point of our entire year.
4 ... By the end of this year I
think we should have selected an
Executive Director and worked out
means for properly employing him.
When this has been done and a com-
mitment with him has been made,
he must be supported whole-heartedly
and completely.
5 ... There is a great need to con-
cern ourselves with increasing educa-
tional efforts within the profession
and with students in our architectural
schools.
6 ... There is much work to be
done in solidifying a professional P/R
program on a state-wide basis. Partic-
ularly needed is some means by which
each week and every week some story
relative to our overall interests is on
the desk of every newspaper editor in
the State. Much of this may be drawn
from Convention material. We can-
not, perhaps, expect too much of this
effort but use of even 20 percent
of the material submitted would make
a worthwhile impact.
7... Finally We must concern
ourselves much more seriously than in
the past with State programs that
involve planning, zoning, building
codes, licensing laws.

In short, gentlemen, we have a
great deal of work to do this year. I
know you will join with me in trying
to accomplish our objectives in all -
and in whatever it takes to do so.


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


L
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G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1







Current Highlights..


* CONGRESS WILL TAKE A LONG, LONG TIME to draft the final tax program. Indeed,
it will probably be July or August before a bill is ready to sign. It is certain that
the Ways and Means Committee of the House will conduct lengthy hearings
which promise to be searching and acrimonious on virtually every major point.
Congressional leaders doubt that a bill will get to the House floor before April or
May and the final voting may take weeks more.
. The Senate Finance Committee won't begin to work until it gets a bill
from the House. Then the whole process repeats. Once the Senate acts,
there'll be a long joint conference.
... In the end, a bill will pass . with provisions like these:
... Individual taxpayers will see their income taxes lowered by 10% or
so. Reductions are likely to benefit all brackets.
. Corporations will have their rates cut by 3 to 5 points
. Tax reforms will loom fairly large in the final measure tougher treat-
ment of capital gains . stock options .. and, possibly, some curbs on realty-
tax and interest deductions.
... The net reduction in revenues may be $5 billion each year.
. The date cuts take effect? This will depend on when a bill is ready -
maybe July... September . or even January 1964.

* MEDICAL CARE FOR THE AGED UNDER SOCIAL SECURITY will be pushed hard again
by the President this year. It will be a lot like the bill that did not get through
the House last year. Again, it will provide hospital and nursing-home care of pen-
sioners. But there will be some changes to make the legislation more palatable.
For one thing, folks ineligible for Social Security may be covered. Then, too,
new provisions to establish safeguards against federal interference with medical
practice will be added if needed.
. The votes on Medicare will be close. But the thinking on Capitol Hill
is that Kennedy's program will squeak by. The elections are thought to
have given a slightly more liberal cast to key committees that were blocks
to action last year.

* THE PROSPECTS FOR AID TO EDUCATION do not seem quite as bright as those for
Medicare . though Kennedy will probably push this one hard, too. To strength-
en his case, he'll make much of Russia's alleged lead in training scientists. Ad-
ministration officials are counting on a new formula for the allocation of federal
funds to avoid the religious issue and pick up votes.
... But first surveys suggest that the chances of compromise on aid to
parochial schools are poor. And the Meredith case in Mississippi is said
to have increased Southern hostility.

* KENNEDY WILL RESUBMIT HIS TRANSPORTATION REFORMS with little change from the
program he recommended to the last Congress. Again, he will urge abolition of
minimum-rate regulation, especially as applied to railroads.
.. The railroads and many shippers back this legislation very strongly.
But truck and barge operators will fight it all the way. And most Con-
gressmen are baffled by the complex transportation tangle. So there'll be
lengthy hearings with few changes voted this year and prospects poor for
'64, too.






This year... It's Grand Bahama





Just 20 minutes by air from Palm Beach, 30 from Miami,
0 lies the sun-drenched Bahamian paradise that's the site
l v of the FAA's 1963 Convention . The Grand Bahama Club
at West End will be headquarters--and the convention
J i" program is now being planned on the basis of a long and
luxurious weekend filled with wonderful scenery, super-
% X' O fine food and service, and more kinds of off-beat tropical
Sf K v ^ entertainment than you've ever dreamed of ...


At Grand Bahama you'll find fishing, golf, swimming, water skiing, boating, skin-diving, tennis, bowling, trap-shooting--or just plain
loafing. And at the international shopping mart you can pick up bargains, duty free, from a host of varied imports . .

49th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 10, 1963 GRAND BAHAMA CLUB WEST END, B. W. I.




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