• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 F/A panorama
 Table of Contents
 Revisions proposed this year to...
 A challenge to chapters
 We face new problems
 The chapter presidents speak
 FAA membership roster, 1963
 News and notes
 A contractor looks at a new package...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00103
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1963
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00103
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    F/A panorama
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Revisions proposed this year to the architects' law
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A challenge to chapters
        Page 9
    We face new problems
        Page 10
    The chapter presidents speak
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    FAA membership roster, 1963
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    News and notes
        Page 35
    A contractor looks at a new package deal
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Advertisers' index
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Back Cover
        Page 45
        Page 46
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited- permission-to. digitize- and. make-this. electronic-
version- available- has- been- granted- by-the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of- F lori da.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on- of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed- to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association's-web site.










F/A Panorama...


NEW TECHNIQUE FOR DOME CONSTRUCTION
Use of thin-shell, sprayed concrete domes isn't particularly novel; but a method
of constructing such domes made construction news not so long ago. Developed
by a Chicago engineer, the unusual technique utilizes vinyl-coated fabric as a
form, high-tensile steel wires as reinforcing. And the concrete is sprayed on the
underside of the form. The secret is this: The fabric form is attached to the walls
with an airtight seal; steel strands are attached to its underside and anchored to
the walls; and the assembly is inflated to a pressure of 30 to 40 lb. per sq. ft.,
thus tensioning the strands and providing support for wet concrete. This is
sprayed until wires are buried and the inflation pressure held until the concrete
sets, thus creating prestressing in the concrete when pressure is released . .
The new method is said to be adaptable to virtually any architectural form of
roof, and relatively inexpensive as well-since the coated fabric forms the fin-
ished roof surface and intricate form construction is eliminated. In one recent con-
struction of a 100-ft. span, the total roof cost was substantially under $2 per sq. ft.

NEW HOPE FOR POOR OLD DOWNTOWN ...
If the experience of Tacoma, Washington, is any indication, moving sidewalks
for pedestrian shoppers may prove to be the miracle drug needed to cure the
economic sickness of many a city's rundown CBD. There, four moving walks-
or "speedramps"-in the heart of its downtown business district have proven so
successful that four more are being installed. Downtown pedestrian traffic vol-
ume has already increased about 40 percent, according to David D. Rowland,
Tacoma city manager. . Apparently the idea is catching on officially. More
than 20 of the moving walks have been recommended by planners as a key
measure in the renovation proposal for downtown Indianapolis.

COULD THIS WORK IN FLORIDA . ?
A "Draftsmen's Exchange" plan, originated by the New York employment firm of
Stitt, Fineman, is, according to the New York "Occulus," "of considerable advan-
tage to the profession." It works like this: If your office slows down, your trained
and valued personnel can be temporarily assigned to other, busier, offices requir-
ing extra help-which then assume the salary payments until you need the men.
If you get extra busy, skilled men are made available to you on the same basis.
Employee benefits of all types remain intact-and the cost is 10 percent of weekly
salaries-paid only by employers needing extra, temporary help. . For
employers it eliminates the need for permanently breaking up a trained office
organization, on one hand; and of excessive overtime expense, on the other. For
employees it tends to assure more continuous employment and overall security.

JUST KEEP ON SAWING WOOD . .
As at every year's-end, every publication was deluged with huge and detailed
releases anent the prospects for 1963. Some came from economists. Some were
the pronouncements of high-ranking executives-nothing much lower than a
first vice president. Some were the results of "surveys." Some were "analyses"
-usually written by a P R department scribe for a golf-playing president. All
were full of figures, of comparisons, of percentages, of wonderful vagaries such
as . it seems reasonable to hope that. . !" And all of them came to the
same basic conclusion: This country is still in business. It is growing. It needs
what the construction industry and the architectural profession offers. It needs
this so much that next year architects and builders will be a bit busier than this
year. Nothing spectacular. But good and healthy. So .. just keep on sawing wood











































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JANUARY, 1963 1







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


IN 7Th Ise ---


F/A Panorama . . . . . . .
Revisions Proposed This Year to The Architects' Law
By Barnard W. Hartman, AIA
A Challenge to Chapters . . . . . .
By Henry Lyman Wright, FAIA, President, AIA
We Face New Problems . . . . . .
By Roy M. Pooley, Jr., AIA, President, FAA
The Chapter Presidents Speak:
Broward County By Jack W. Zimmer . .
Daytona Beach By David A. Leete . . .
Florida South By Earle M. Starnes . . .
Florida North By Thomas Larrick . . .
Mid-Florida By Robert B. Murphy . . .
Palm Beach By Reed B. Fuller . . .
Jacksonville By Theodore C. Poulos . . .
Florida Northwest By Ellis W. Bullock . .
Florida North Central By Joseph N. Clemons .
Florida Central By H. Leslie Walker . .
FAA Membership Roster, 1963 . . . .
News and Notes . . . . . . .
A Contractor Looks at A New Package Deal . .
By Frank J. Rooney
Advertisers' Index .


FAA OFFICERS 1963
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., President, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville
William F. Bigoney, Jr., First V.-Pres., 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
William B. Arnett, Second V.-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Richard B. Roters. Third V.-President, 511 N. Mills St., Orlando
Jefferson N. Powell, Secretary, 361 S. County Road, Palm Beach
James Deen, Treasurer, 7500 Red Road, South Miami

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Robert G. Jahelka; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton, Carl Gerken; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn
Howell, Richard E. Jessen, Frank F. Smith, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH: James T.
Lendrum, Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen;
FLORIDA NORTHWEST: Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C.
Robert Abele, John 0. Grimshaw, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: John
R. Graveley, Walter B. Schultz, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Fred
G. Owles, Jr., Donald 0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Donald Edge, Harold A. Obst,
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Robert H. Levison, AIA Director, Fla. Region, 525 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verna M. Sherman, FAA Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


. 2nd Cover
. 4

. 9

. 10


. 11
. 11
. 12
. 13
. 13
. 14
. 31
. 31
33
. 33
. 17-28
. 35
. 36

. 42


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
s . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year; January Roster Issue,
$2.00 . . Printed by McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman


ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 13

NUMBER 11963


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















































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Revisions Proposed This Year To




The Architects' Law



The so-called Architects' Law-Chapter 467 of
the Florida Statutes-has been re-drafted in a
somewhat different format. The draft contains
a number of changes from the existing statute.
It has been sent to all FAA Chapters for com-
ment; and in final form will be submitted for
passage into law to the 1963 Legislature. . .
In this article BARNARD W. HARTMAN, a
member of the FAA Government Relations
Committee from Florida Northwest Chapter,
analyzes the purpose and nature of the changes.


Recently, there has been much
public soul-searching and discussion
of the myriad problems spawned or
nurtured by the rapidly-moving urban
sprawl, central city decay, poor or
non-existent community planning,
ugly architecture and other unpleas-
ant realities of our rapidly-changing,
constantly more complicated environ-
ment. Undoubtedly, these and related
enigmas will continue to plague us
far into the future as we struggle to
meet the challenge of providing the
most desirable atmosphere in which
to live while trying to accommodate
the population explosion so typical of
metropolitan development. It is gen-
erally accepted that varied educational
backgrounds and experiences are vi-
tally necessary attributes among those
seeking the best solutions to these
perplexing problems.
Nearly all agree that the architect,
by nature of his training and experi-
ence, is the one individual ordinarily
best suited to co-ordinate the activi-
ties of, and provide leadership, di-
rection and inspiration for, the urban
planning team. The architect's pri-
mary training, emphasizing careful
research, critical analysis and creative,
flexible synthesis, certainly should
provide him with the basic educa-
tional tools necessary to fulfilling this
supreme social responsibility. Indi-
vidually, and in team efforts, many
of us are already seeking ways in which
to better serve our communities, but
4


we all must continually strive to
double and re-double these endeavors.
No one should know better than the
dedicated architect the immense eco-
nomic and esthetic values deriving
from thoughtful, thorough and com-
petent planning.
Lately, within the architectural pro-
fession much has been said of pro-
viding more "comprehensive services"
and increasing our contribution to the
development of the future world in
which we and our descendants shall
live. Every vacuum inevitably invites
intrusion and the present tendency
favors dominance of the forces dedi-
cated primarily to pursuit of the
dollar, thereby leaving many unsolved
problems for our already overbur-
dened society to cope with. In my
opinion, we architects have a definite
responsibility here and should volun-
tarily fill this void to help meet the
needs of our expanding society.
Although it should not motivate our
action, we cannot help but observe
that-should this need be neglected
-we can expect to find the hands
of big government laid further upon
this sector of our lives with the
avowed intention of "promoting the
public welfare." Experience has
taught us, however, that the best
results are almost inevitably achieved
by well-informed, free men working
enthusiastically at a labor of love.
Along with the difficulties arising
out of the mad rush to urbanization,


we are confronted with other inter-
related phenomena the apparently
irreversible trends toward higher edu-
cational levels and specialization, both
natural outgrowths of our increas-
ingly complex society and our scien-
tific and technological progress.
Although specialization implies in-
creased proficiency, the present in-
clination toward fragmentation of re-
sponsibilities can easly result in chaos
unless there are strong cohesive forces
active. The architectural profession
can, and should, fulfill this need.
The emphasis upon specialization
in professional engineering, for ex-
ample, is clearly indicated by the
licensing statutes in California, for

example, where one is separately ex-
amined and separately licensed to
practice within specific, individual
areas of competency, such as civil
engineering, structural engineering,
mechanical engineering, etc. In Cali-
fornia, too, building contracting and
subcontracting are similarly subdi-
vided into their logical components
and minimum standards of compe-
tence and performance promoted by
state examination and licensing. Gen-
eral contractors are sub-classified so
that the individual licensee is re-
strained from undertaking a job be-
yond his capability as evidenced by
examination.
Although such specialized examina-
tion and licensing requirements cer-
(Continued on Page 6)
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JANUARY, 1963 5


71"1Z 7APS ORN IIAMR 5A1E5>w







Law Revisions ...
(Continued from Page 4)
tainly encourage a higher level of
proficiency and performance, they are
merely a part of the effort which
should be directed at the desirable
goal-but impossible task-of insur-
ing "perfection." Coupled with con-
tinuing programs directed at profes-
sional self-education, and an appar-
ently irreversible trend toward ever
higher jury awards in civil cases of
negligence and malpractice, they will
inevitably lead, however, to more re-
sponsible practice by the inadequately-
motivated minority of licensed prac-
titioners who are not yet fully aware
of their implied and statutory obli-
ations.
A number of states already have
legislation affecting the professional
practice of landscape architecture.
Presumably, the day will come when
the professional practice of interior
design and decoration will also be
regulated by the state. In effect then,
the entire field of design for human
environment will be, to some extent,
compartmented and controlled. This
organization and control will be ef-
fected either with or without our pro-


fession's efforts and guidance, as we
choose. It should take little imagina-
tion then to see that here is a won-
derful opportunity for us to be of
great service to our country in pro-
viding the requisite leadership and
co-ordination. Realizing this, the
Florida State Board of Architecture
and those architects active in the
effort to increase our professional re-
sponsibility and stature have wisely
chosen to face this challenge squarely.
In the upcoming legislative session
there will be entered, for considera-
tion, a completely revised edition of
the so called Architects' Law of
Florida-Chapter 467 of the Florida
Statutes, 1955, as amended. As the
first step toward the ultimate desir-
able goal of co-ordinated and inte-
grated management of the entire com-
plex of skills reflected in the various
components of total design for human
environment, the proposed new sta-
tute includes regulation of the prac-
tice of landscape architecture. Other-
wise, the intent and content of the
new statute remain substantially un-
changed. The following brief sum-
mary and analysis of the first draft
make note of those changes which are
significant.


Section 467.01 establishes the State
Board of Architecture as being com-
prised of five architects and two
landscape architects. It further pro-
vides for qualifications of Board ap-
pointees and their terms of office.
Sections 467.02 through 467.07 de-
fine the Board's organization, estab-
lishment of rules, regulations and
duties. Board members' per diem
compensation will be raised to an
equitable level.
Section 467.08 lists the rules gov-
erning examination and the require-
ments for licensing. The holder of
an accredited architectural degree will
be required to have three (rather than
one) years' experience prior to ex-
amination with a comparable increase
in the experience required of non-
graduates. These changes will bring
our statute in line with the long-
standing recommendations of the
NCARB and will, of course, upgrade
the level of competence of the newly-
licensed architect.
The first paragraph of Section
467.09 lists those conditions under
which no license to practice archi-
tecture will be required. This merely
translates the present law's monetary
(Continued on Page 41)


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A Challenge To Chapters




At the national level the AIA has built a firm and broad
base of constructive policy and effective action. . .
It is up to the Chapters to use this base as a foundation
for their own local and specialized programs. . .




By HENRY LYMAN WRIGHT, FAIA
President,
American Institute of Architects


The trade and professional associa-
tion structure has become an indis-
pensible unit in America's fast moving
economy. It is the best means by
which the voice of an individual may
be raised in concert with others on
matters of government and business
practices likely to affect him or his
methods of operation. It is the best
accessible means by which he can
achieve communication with his fel-
lows and share experiences for the
purpose of improving the climate in
which they work.
The American Institute of Archi-
tects is regarded by members and
laymen alike as one of the Nation's
most effective and forceful profes-
sional organizations. It possesses the
unique characteristics of being un-
equivocally democratic in the sense
that the upper echelon of the organi-
zation is completely dominated by
the member and the chapter that
comprise its foundation. AIA policies
and objectives are direct expressions
of the interests of its members as
these are determined in their chapters
and transmitted through their re-
gional directors who function as the
Institute's policy-framing structure.
The need for participation at the
chapter level is not only essential to
the best interests of the local organi-
zation, but the only means by which
the AIA can fulfill its purpose of en-
hancing the competence, knowledge,
stature and experience of all its mem-
bers.
Every administration of the officers
and directors of the AIA commences
its term of office with a determina-
tion to continue with the programs
JANUARY, 1963


launched by its predecessors. Unlike
some organizations that are beset with
internal revolutions with every change
in administration, AIA is convinced
that progress can only be achieved
through continuing effort in develop-
ing programs for which a need has
been indicated by the chapters and
their members.
Architectural blemishes in the form
of slum areas and ill-considered urban
planning are of increasing concern to
AIA members in every metropolitan
area. Long strides in the direction of
achieving better urban design and a
recognition of the need for identifying
factors responsible for urban develop-
ment or degradation has already been
vigorously expressed in several places.
New York architects, for example,
faced the problem of overcoming
public inertia and sponsored a com-
munity conference on esthetic lia-
bility appropriately entitled "Who's
Responsible for Ugliness?". The con-
ference participants included lending
institutions, governmental officials,
leaders in civic organizations and
members of the press as well as mem-
bers of the New York Chapter, AIA.
The conference concluded with ac-
ceptance of the need for a continuing
program of rehabilitation and redevel-
opment and a recognition of the fact
that a successful effort could not be
directed by politicians alone that it
required the wholehearted and dedi-
cated support of all organizations.
The "New York Experience" and
others like it have become case his-
tories in the AIA files, to be shared
with chapters engaged in urban re-
search and to act as milestones by


which the AIA directors and staff
can guide or assist other chapters in
the development of similar activities.
Education of architects is a subject
of continuing interest to curricula
planners as well as architects and
there is an unmistakable need for
stronger communications between AIA
chapters and educators in every area
where schools of architecture exist.
The R-17 program of annual teachers'
seminars, substantially supported by
the Institute, has become a major
factor in promoting a better under-
standing among teachers and practi-
tioners of the scope of architectural
education needed to prepare future
architects to meet the needs of our
profession for an ever expanding prac-
tice.
The organization and development
of student chapters is the direct re-
sponsibility of the Chapter Commit-
tees formed for this purpose. The
student chapter offers the student
architect an early introduction to his
professional responsibilities and an
insight into what his chosen profes-
sion will be like when he graduates.
Through chapter support of the an-
nual student forums in, Washington,
D. C., students have the opportunity
to meet well-known architects who
are the nation's leaders in architec-
tural practice.
Although the national organization
of The American Institute of Archi-
tects has become a tremendous force
on architectural design, urban plan-
ning and national legislative action,
the fact still remains that its functions
are limited to those it can perform
(Continued on Page 40)








74e AA Presidente oo 7o 1963...


We Face New Problems



As Florida's social and economic conditions change, the
challenge to architectural leadership in the construction
industry becomes even more pointed. . To solve the
new problems and to grasp the new opportunities that
Florida's growth is creating the FAA must move steadily
along the lines of its stated objectives. .. ..



By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
President
Florida Association of Architects


There is no question that an urban
culture is the fountainhead of archi-
tecture. And it is, perhaps, no less
true that the architecture produced
accurately mirrors the culture from
which it sprang. All for the obvious
reason that the greater the concen-
tration of people, the greater and the
more complex become the require-
ments for shelter, transportation, serv-
ices and recreation.
There can also be little question
that the State of Florida has devel-
oped an international reputation for
her urban glitter and her natural
charm. A centerline has been passed;
and ours is a predominantly urban
culture, growing at a dizzy pace and
possibly just beginning to accelerate
its momentum in defiance of inertia.
A recent report ranks Florida with
seven other states which, combined,
account for more than half of the
construction activity in this nation.
Our towns are becoming cities and
our cities are becoming great metro-
politan centers. Building has become
our greatest industry, and we proudly
quote figures of many dimensions to
cite our growth and our progress. Such
booming, vibrant, almost frenzied
growth and building is not without
problems, not without mistakes -
and not without great accomplish-
ments.
Our great accomplishments and our
miserable failures will speak with equal
eloquence from the platform of his-
tory. As the designers of our environ-


ment and as the profession recognized
through the centuries as masters of
building, we have the inescapable re-
sponsibility for the success or failure
of the environment being created. It
is the task of creating the very best of
which we are capable to which we
address ourselves.
As architects, we are keenly aware
that each brick, each board, each
shaft of steel and slab of concrete as
well as each growing plant contributes
its beauty or its ugliness to the en-



This is the first of a planned
series of monthly commentaries
by the FAA President during
1963. In them he will discuss
the various ways in which FAA
activities can contribute to the
advancement of the profession
and the progress of our State.



vironment we are creating. As plan-
ners, we know the folly of ill-conceived
plans with blindly limited objectives.
As businessmen, we know the tragic
wastes of resources which so frequent-
ly result from too-short-term economic
considerations. But, perhaps most
acutely, as artists we know that every
man seeks the truth of beauty in his
life's experience; and unlike every
other art form, ours cannot be ignored.
It must be either enjoyed or endured
so long as it exists.


We know, as few can, the effect of
our buildings on the domestic, social,
religious and business life of their
occupants. And who can better realize
that all the new construction of which
we Floridians are so proud is, in fact,
the creation of the environment of
Floridians for generations to come?
Surely we cannot fail to comprehend
that this is a matter of greater signi-
ficance than transient prosperity, more
important than paper profits and
more vital than an occasional monu-
ment.
It is fitting then that the Florida
Association of Architects direct itself
to the problems, the challenges and
the opportunities of Florida's great
construction industry. Only in this
way can we maintain the position of
leadership which enables each of us
to perform at his highest capability.
Our objectives are plain and many
of our courses are clear. It is the
business of our profession to move
along those avenues which are avail-
able with deliberate speed.
Some of these avenues are related
to our public information programs,
our educational programs at both
student and professional levels, legis-
lation affecting the profession in par-
ticular and the construction industry
in particular, and the increased ef-
fectiveness of our organization as a
tool for attaining our objectives. In
future issues I expect to discuss some
of these issues with you as the time
seems appropriate.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Broward


County

JACK W. ZIMMER
President

The biggest honor that has come
to our Chapter since it was founded
in 1950 is the selection of one of
our members to be Secretary to the
Institute. This office goes to our own
Clint Gamble who has long been
active in the affairs of the Institute;
and I am sure he has the distinction
of being the first from the South to
receive such recognition. We could
not have received such a position
without the complete co-operation
and hard work of every Chapter in
the State and for this we wish to
express our sincere thanks.
As I look back over the past year's
activity, I'm very grateful to note
many areas where considerable prog-
ress has been made. We have in-
creased our membership with some
transfers, some new corporate mem-
bers and associate members, and have
accepted one honorary associate mem-
ber. Our Membership Committee has
promised to be much more active in
this field during the coming year
and try some new methods of contact
to stimulate desire for membership
among those practitioners not now
in the FAA or the AIA.
During the past year our monthly
meetings have produced some very
enlightening discussions with mem-
bers of the construction industry or


other fields of service closely related
to our profession. Some of these were:
Technical aids to air-conditioning.
Banking and mortgage helps.
Contemporary lighting in United
States and Europe.
Architectural exhibit at local art
gallery.
New uses for plate glass.
New techniques in concrete con-
struction.
Our Chapter is very fortunate in
having one of our corporate members
in the City Planning Department,
and in this manner we hope to be
advised of the meeting times and the
subjects to be covered which may
be closely related to our field. We
hope that during the coming year we
will have an improved relationship
with this municipal department,
working with zoning revisions and
code changes. We will make sure
that an architect is present at every


City Commission meeting, and hope
to aid in any manner possible.
Many times a mere clarification or
explanation is all that is required to
channel the current action in the
correct manner. This is a small but
very important effort that can help
protect the future of this beautiful
country. We hope to contribute some
very constructive thinking to such dis-
cussions as height changes in prop-
erty line fences and walls, limit the
height of future buildings, etc.
I sincerely hope that during the
coming year, the members of our
Chapter can contribute to more ac-
tivity in holding civic office, aid in
public meetings, etc., and perhaps
contribute, to some extent, a solution
to some of our city's problems, caused
by our population growth. By so
doing, we hope to promote the sym-
bol of the AIA to gain the public
recognition and identification needed
by this professional organization.
I would call this coming year a very
successful one if each Chapter mem-
ber would take a more active, dedi-
cated interest in our affairs, and if
each member would contribute a
larger share of his particular talent
toward advancing the status of the
architect to his rightful place as a
leader in this community.
Each new year of activity has
brought all of the Florida Chapters
increasing responsibility; 1963 looks
as if it will hold its share of new
problems and the whole of Broward
Chapter will take its full part of
the load when our duties are assigned
to us. This year we shall prove that
the architect is capable of leadership
and obligated to assume this role.


Daytona Beach

DAVID A. LEETE
President


Our hands are hot and tired from
being sat upon. We have maintained
our membership of corporate and as-
sociates at near 100% levels but our
active participation stays at mid-field.
The Daytona Beach Chapter is going
to get up off of its hands and go to
work with the following three phase
program.
JANUARY, 1963


First: We intend to increase our
attendance and participation at Chap-
ter meetings by changing our format
from monthly dinner meetings to
quarterly. Each program, under a sep-
arate chairman, will be enlarged to
include a fellowship hour, dinner,
resume of monthly executive board
(Continued on Page 12)







Daytona Beach . .
(Continued from Page 11)
meetings, and informative talks and
demonstrations by various manufac-
turing firms. Wives will be invited to
at least two of the meetings.
Second: It is our hope to enlarge
and refocus the community picture
of the architect by having guests in-
vited from the client group, such as
the press, City Commission, County
Commission, bankers, fine arts groups,


In the broad program of Florida
South, AIA, there is one consideration
that I feel is the only and obvious
one Architecture.
Thus, in terms of the plan for the
year ahead, our progress will be along
two avenues. The first will be con-
cerned with the architect and an
appraisal of his own attitudes and
abilities. The second will be concerned
with our public environment.
As to the implementation of this
two-fold program, we will continue
with the committee projects that are
sound and healthy and representative
of the heritage of previous years of
Chapter life.
The strength of the AIA is depend-
ent on the service it offers to its
membership and the service it offers
to its community. The Chapter will
offer to its members this year pro-
grams at the monthly meetings con-


Planning and Appeals Boards.
Third: To increase the Chapter
participation in the work of the FAA
Committees. Chapter business will be
handled by the Executive Committee
leaving more time for the members to
dig into their FAA Committee work.
I believe we will be active and strong
in all Committees, especially the Gov-
ernmental, Chapter Affairs, Public
Relations, and Community Planning.
Our Committees stand ready to be
called upon by the FAA. Please do so.


EARLE M. STARNES
President


cerned with architecture. We will
study together facets of design
through self-criticism and reviews of
work performed. We will study pro-
gram writing and analysis of clients'
problems and thus project those pro-
grams in terms of the developed archi-
tectural solutions. We will analyze
these projects objectively and thus
learn from the wealth of experience
what the practice of architecture can
offer.
We will study the use of materials
historically and currently in our own
local situation in an attempt to trace
the reasons and consider the validity
in use of certain materials. Thus the
contributions of materials to archi-
tecture in the past and present can be
brought into perspective for members.
Some time must be devoted to the
operation of an architect's practice -
better ways of solving the day-to-day
problems with which we are all beset
in the practice of an art that more
often than not looks like a business.
The programming will be to accumu-
late experience records and after
sifting the experiences, these can be
presented to the membership. Meth-
ods of accounting, methods of speci-
fication writing, methods of office
operation these are a few subjects
to be explored.


Our programs will be oriented about
these and other matters that concern
architecture and the architect. I be-
lieve this is to be an AIA Chapter
function using the programs as a
device through which we can educate,
explore and stimulate. The programs
will be designed for educational value
and for interest stimulation. In some
way we must better prepare ourselves
for the role the architect must play
to genuinely serve architecture. If the
architect is to be the creative leader
in this tremendous social complex that
is our environment today, we must
constantly and creatively re-examine.
The architect must fill this evacuated
role.
The second concern of the year
will be expressed in several ways. The
architect himself is the architect's best
image and it is necessary for the
architect to be everywhere architecture
is being thought about, planned and
made. We must be represented on
all public and private bodies con-
cerned with architecture for ex-
ample, planning advisory boards, zon-
ing boards, building departments, city
and county commissions, private
boards concerned with building.
When a door is opened for archi-
tecture an architect must be there to
guide, counsel, design and build. We
are rapidly building and re-building
- a world that, through default, is
ugly. We are responsible and must
do something about it. If an anti-ugly
contingent is to be developed, we
must develop it. Our sentiments are
genuine. Is our interest and are our
abilities worthy?
To effect direction I think our first
step is to continue a strong liaison
with all public bodies where it exists
and to create it where it does not.
This will be done through our com-
mittees and individual members.
Secondly, two programs are pres-
ently being formulated and developed
by the Chapter. One consists of
"neighborhood" meetings with the
public to present ideas of planning
and indicate how these relate to the
man on the street. This will be done
with the cooperation of the Metro-
politan Planning Department as an
architect-promoted program of public
education.
The second will be the pressing
forward of plans to develop types of
Good Design Seminars. This will be
done with the Chapter Design Com-
mittee preparing programs and pre-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Florida South






senting them to interested people.
There are literally hundreds of "clubs,"
of one nature or another, that are
constantly in search of programs. Our
efforts will be to learn of these and
offer ourselves as part of their pro-
grams and thus bring more people
in touch with architecture. We will
use the AIA films that are available
and create new devices as necessary to


Florida


North

THOMAS LARRICK
President

It is the humble privilege of the
officers of the Florida North Chap-
ter of the past year to serve this
Chapter through the new year of
1963. We hope, with the faithful as-
sistance of all the Chapter members,
that this Chapter will continue to
grow in service to the local communi-
ties and the profession during the
coming year.
During the past year the downward
trend in membership has halted, and,
while the number of corporate mem-
bers has remained unchanged, the
number of associate members has in-
creased by approximately 50 per cent.
The number of meetings were in-
creased to six. The business meetings
were streamlined by effective com-
mittee activity and the handling of
routine business by the Excutive Com-
mittee. This permitted quick and de-
JANUARY, 1963


stir the public's interest in architec-
ture.
This to quote a planner friend
- is a "broad brush" of what Florida
South Chapter will do this year. It
will take energy, cognizant leadership,
and participation. This two-fold pro-
gram can and must enliven the
architect and architecture in South
Florida.




cisive action when time was of the
essence.
The programs for the chapter meet-
ings have been prepared well in ad-
vance, and have varied through a
wide range of interests from com-
munity affairs to extensive research.
The Chapter has been represented at
the Institute's National Convention,
the FAA State Convention, and all
FAA Board Meetings. At the first
Chapter meetings after each of these
conventions and meetings our repre-
sentatives have kept the Chapter in-
formed by regular reports. Meeting
attendance has been good with a
large majority of the members in at-
tendance at every meeting.
The Chapter Committees for the
coming year have been appointed with
only a few changes in committee
members from last year. Every new
member has been appointed to a com-
mittee so that he may feel that he
has a place of active participation in
Chapter activities. Since many mem-
bers have expressed a desire to be on
certain committees with the intent
of active participation, it is believed
that we will have increased commit-
tee activity this year.
The Chapter plans to have six
meetings during the coming year
with a continuation of varied and in-
teresting programs. It is hoped that it
will be possible for the FAA Board
to meet in Gainesville with one of our
Chapter meetings.
One of the highlights that the
Chapter anticipates this year will be
the beginning of the construction of
the new building for the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts. We hope
that there will be an appropriate
ground-breaking ceremony and that
the profession will be well represented.
With an active and growing or-
ganization it is believed that the
Chapter will be able to further the
special, as well as general, objectives
of the Institute and the FAA.


Mid-Florida



ROBERT B. MURPHY
President


The objectives of the Executive
Committee of the Mid-Florida Chap-
ter for the year 1963 are two-fold,
namely, to unify the existing member-
ship into an effective unit of the
Florida Association of Architects; and
to project the activities of the Chap-
ter into the civic and professional life
of the various communities within
its borders.
With the firm conviction that vig-
orous committee action is the basis
for the accomplishment of these ob-
jectives, the newly elected Executive
Committee has proposed a revised
committee structure for the Chapter.
The form follows that recommended
by the "AIA Policy Statements Re
Committees." There will be only four
Committees, namely Chapter Affairs,
Education & Practice, Public Rela-
tions, and Community Development.
The Chairman of each Committee is
a Chapter Officer or Director.
The group replaces the sixteen
committees of former years. Each
Committee consists of six (6) Cor-
porate and three (3) Associate mem-
bers, all serving staggered terms. This
provides vertical alignment with AIA
Committee Structure. As "Special
Committees" are needed, the Chair-
man of the "Parent Committee" can
(ContinueI on Page 14)




































Mid-Florida ..
(Continued from Page 13)
assign such duties to one of his mem-
bers. By the formation of a minimum
number of committees, and with each
committee being chaired by an Offi-
cer or Director, it is hoped that work
of the Committees can be controlled,
kept within the immediate scope of
the Chapter and through constant re-
view by the Executive Committee be
directed toward our objectives. We
will let you know how it works.
At the beginning, Chapter Activi-
ties Committee will concern itself
primarily with membership. The area
of the Chapter includes Leesburg,
Sanford and the coastal area of Bre-
vard County. Effort will be made to
bring eligible personnel into the
Chapter and to encourage activity in
their respective areas. Chapter pro-
grams will be held in each of these
areas. A continuing activity of the
Chapter is the course of instruction
for preparation for the State Board
Examination. It is hoped that the
Ladies Auxiliary will assist with pro-
gram arrangements from time to time
and so share an active part in Chap-
ter Affairs.
Governmental relations will be di-
rected by the Education and Practice
Committee due to the presence of
particularly qualified members, serv-
ing dual purposes on this Committee.


REED B. FULLER
President


As the Officers of The Palm
Beach Chapter look forward to 1963,
we are inspired and stimulated not
only by the good work done by our
predecessors, but also by the vast
amount of accomplishment and prog-
ress still to be made.
With Officers, FAA Directors and
Executive Committee of excellent
calibre and experience, our Chapter,
in 1963, will work toward the ac-
complishment of the following:
1. The Chapter shall set up com-
mittees of sufficient scope to reach
goals set, shall require regular reports




The Public Relations Committee
has selected the Chapter meeting pro-
grams as its main objective. In an
effort to interest all members a varied
menu is being presented. We hope
to run the gamut from the esthetic to
the last paragraph of the General
Conditions.
For the first time, Chapter Meet-
ings will be held in the Leesburg-
Cocoa-Melbourne area. The "home-
pros" will provide the programs for
these meetings.
Of particular interest to the Com-
munity Development Committee is
the urban renewal project just start-
ing in the Orlando area. The Chair-
man of this Committee is a member
of the Urban Renewal Advisory Com-
mittee.
It is the hope of the Executive
Committee that the activities of the
Chapter can be community-oriented,
that the membership will become
more closely identified with efforts
which need our support. Currently,
members are very active in the art
activities of the community, with
special emphasis toward the Florida
Symphony. There are also members
serving on City and County Boards
related to the building industry.
Through proper direction and en-
couragement such interest and ac-
tivity cannot but help to better the
profession and the community which
it serves.


Palm Beach


of the status of work, and shall count
on sincere efforts to reach objectives.
2. We shall continue further study
to obtain a workable and improved
public relations program, deeming this
to be most important to every mem-
ber of this Chapter.
3. Inaugurate a new committee
whose sole purpose will be to ob-
serve, record, and analyze the con-
tinuing actions of municipal and
county public bodies in so far as
these actions affect the field in which
we work. Where decisions are made,
or where impending actions are con-
templated, by these bodies, this Chap-
ter intends to be prepared to speak
effectively as a community service.
4. The Chapter intends to prepare,
and distribute, for the first time, a
manual covering by-laws, and fixed
policies, so that all members shall
have a clear, concise record of estab-
lished duties, responsibilities, and po-
licies, and the reasons therefore.
5. The entire membership shall be
urged, and required, to pay closer
attentions to the matters of office
and professional practice, the FAA
seminars program, aids to education
in this area, wider professional serv-
ices, local building codes, zoning, and
all aspects of county-wide planning.
6. In 1963, The Palm Beach Chap-
ter expects to be called upon to help
in arrangements for the national con-
vention. To this end, The Chapter
will cooperate fully with Broward
and Florida South Chapters in making
the AIA Convention in Miami the
great success it deserves to be.
7. Palm Beach Chapter has an
active Womens' Auxiliary,-and is
happy to encourage the valued ac-
tivity of this group.
8. Last, but not least, the Chapter
will get underway with some long
range planning toward fixed future
objectives to strengthen our position
in professional stature in the com-
munity, and to be better prepared
to meet the more serious challenges
posed by the rapid growth of this
area. The Chapter has fallen short of
realizing its full potential in this
situation.
To sum up, we intend to measure
up to the responsibilities imposed on
us by the practice of the technical-
and social Art of Architecture,
which assumes responsibility for noth-
ing less than a nation's (and our
local) man-made physical environ-
ment. And the time for doing this is
now.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






The use of


TERRAZZO
on

VERTICAL

SURFACESf

T here is a substantial increase in the use of
terrazzo on vertical surfaces. The Terminal
Buildings, O'Hare International Airport, Chicago is
one such example. The columns, and spandrels
totaling approximately 90,000 sq. ft., are made with
Trinity White portland cement and white marble
chips.
There are important practical reasons. Ter-
razzo provides a high-quality surface at a lower cost
than most typical facing materials. Grime and marks
are easily removed. Maintenance approaches nil
even after a long term of years.
Terrazzo can fill any design requirement. ,
For instance, at O'Hare a monolithic effect was
desired and obtained. Likewise, paneled effects are
easily achieved. The wide color range can be closely
controlled depending on the color of the chips and
whether or not the matrix is tinted.
Two views of Terminal Buildings, O'Hare Airport,
Chicago. In addition to the vertical terrazzo on P"fl
columns and spandrels, the floors are also terrazzo.
Architect: C. F. Murphy Associates, Chicago
Terrazzo Contractor: Roman-Caretti Joint Venture
General Contractor: Malan Construction Corp.

TRINITY

WHITE
9PORTLAND CEMENT
A product of
GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
Offices: Chicago, Illinois Chattanooga, Tennessee *
Dallas, Texas Forth Worth, Texas Houston, Texas
Fredonia, Kansas Fort Wayne, Indiana Jackson, Michi-
gan Tampa, Florida Miami, Florida Los Angeles, Calif.


JANUARY, 1963










ARCHITECTS






GET THE FACTS
ON

NATURAL GAS!

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FOOD PREPARATION
WATER HEATING STEAM BOILERS DRYING INCINERATION
Helping architects and engineers in matters related to the use of natural
gas in the area we serve is "right down our alley." We'll provide specifica-
tions and technical data make complete feasibility reports cost and
operating studies in direct comparison with electric systems covering both
installation and long term operating costs.

SIT WON'T COST YOU A CENT
A minute's phone call now can save untold money, time
and grief for your clients. You owe it to them, and to
HILLSBOROUGH yourself to get the facts. We invite your inquiries. Just
OUNTYN phone our nearest office.
BROWARD
COUNTY
DADE Y
COUNTY
NORTH MIAMI .... PL 7-6222
MIAMI BEACH .LE.... ...JE 1-6461 SINCE 1895
FT. LAUDERDALE .... 522-1404
HOLLYWOOD ..... .WA 2-3524 .L ,, IS'1 I1
TAMPA ............. 229-5164
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







MEMBERSHIP


ROSTER


-1963


The Florida Association of Architects of The American Institute of Architects, Inc.


BROWARD COUNTY

Corporate Members
Thor Amlie
918 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Herbert Anson
1710 S. Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
Ervay J. Baker
1920 S. Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
William F. Bigoney
2520 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Paul M. Bradley, Jr.
2100 N. E. 49 Street
Ft. Lauderdale
William G. Crawford
2114 N. E. 21 Street
Ft. Lauderdale
Robert A. Denyse
1829 Crestline Dr., N. E.
Atlanta, Ga.
Richard Dodge
900 N. Federal Highway
Pompano Beach
John Evans
315 S. E. 9 Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale


Arthur A. Frimet
2632 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
William A. Gilroy
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Robert Hall
311 S. E. 16 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale
Robert E. Hansen
311 S. E. 16 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale
James M. Hartley
1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood
P. R. L. Hogner
2511 S. Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
Arthur D. Inwood
2801 Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Morton Ironmonger
2631 E Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Robert Jahelka
2020 N. E. 17 Ct.
Ft. Lauderdale
Robin John
901 N. E. 9 Street
Pompano Beach


Herbert S. Johnson
14 Elm Street
Concord, Mass.
Robert Kerley
3114 S. Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
David W. Kerr
1270 N. E. 26 Avenue
Pompano Beach
Victor A. Larson
3114 S. Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
Bayard C. Lukens
511A S. 21 Ave.--Rm. 4
Hollywood
Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.
Bldg. L.-Times Sq.
Ft. Lauderdale
Charles F. McKirahan
2400 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
John E. May
500 W. Hallandale Beach
Blvd.
Hallandale
Claus R. Moberg
1928 Tyler Street
Hollywood
Donald H. Moeller
1823 Mayo Street
Hollywood
Gene C. Monaco
4420 N. E. 20 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale


John B. O'Neill
60-D Coral Center
Ft. Lauderdale
Walter E. Pauley
600 Lido Dr..
Ft. Lauderdale
Ray 0. Peck
522 S. Federal Highway
Pompano
William H. Peck
309 S. E. 9 Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
Joseph Phillips
3058 N. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale
William Plumb
3058 N. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale
George M. Polk
4441 N. E. 7 Terr.
Ft. Lauderdale
James K. Pownall
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Arthur E. Prack
910 N. E. 27 Ave.
Harbor Village
Pompano Beach
Beryl Price
121 S. 19 St.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Richard C. Roilly
2504 N. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale


1963 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters


BROWARD COUNTY:
President ---------------Jack W. Zimmer
Vice President---------- Victor A Larson
Secretary ______ C. Robert Kerley
Treasurer ---------------George M. Polk
DAYTONA BEACH:
President ----------------David A. Leete
Vice President ---------Joel W. Sayers, Jr.
Secretary .__..__________ Craig J Gehlert
Treasurer ----------------__Ernest H. Notz
FLORIDA CENTRAL:
President -- --_ H. Leslie Walker
Vice President ----------Dana B. Johannes
Secretary --------------------_ _Jack West
Treasurer --------------Jack McCandless
FLORIDA NORTH:
President __---------------- Thomas Larrick
Vice President ----------- Frank G. George
Secretary __ John L. R. Grand
Treasurer -----------McMillan H. Johnson


FLORIDA NORTH
President ____ __ -
Vice President -------
Secretary ------
Treasurer .....


CENTRAL:
__Joseph N. Clemons
---_ Chester L. Craft
_-_ Charles F. Kuhn
--_ Robert H. Brown


FLORIDA NORTHWEST:
President _----------Ellis Bullock, Jr.
Vice President C. James Kendrick
Secretary ------------W. Stewart Morrison
Treasurer-_ Roger G. Weeks
FLORIDA SOUTH:
President ----------------_ _Earl M. Starnes
Vice President James E. Ferguson
Secretary ---- Robert J. Boerema
Treasurer _- Francis E Telesca
MID-FLORIDA:
President -------------- Robert B. Murphy
Vice President ---------- Gordon D. Orr, Jr.
Secretary ----------- Nils M. Schweizer
Treasurer -------------__Wythe D. Sims, II
JACKSONVILLE:
President -------------Theodore C. Poulos
Vice President ------------_ James 0. Kemp
Secretary _---------------_ _John T. Brickert
Treasurer ---------------_ _Wayne P. Myers
PALM BEACH:
President___------------- Reed B. Fuller
Vice President ------------Robert Wening
Secretary----------- Jack S. Willson, Jr.
Treasurer ------- _John B. Marion


JANUARY, 1963 17


$. -~



I


1








FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Joseph T. Romano
2821 Atlantic Blvd.
Pompano Beach
R. Webster Ross
P. 0. Box 3103--Bahia Mar
Ft. Lauderdale
Carol Sanford
P.O. Box 1177
Pompano Beach
C. Cranford Sproul
2329 Atlantic Blvd.
Pompano Beach
Cedric Start
1823 Mayo Street
Hollywood
Courtney Stewart
1140 Bayview Dr.
Ft. Lauderdale
George D. Storrs, Jr.
2701 E. Sunrise Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Maurice L Thornton
4800 N. E. 15 Way
Ft. Lauderdale
Robert Todd
3432 Atlantic Blvd.
Pompano Beach
William G. Tracey
360 12 Ave. South
Naples
William T. Vaughn
909 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
George Waddey
3345 N. E. 32 St.
Ft. Lauderdale
Emanuel Weisfeld
354 S. E. 2 St.
Ft. Lauderdale
George C. Weisman
P. 0. Box 2506
Pompano Beach
Louis Wolff
2457 N. E. 50 St.
Ft. Lauderdale
Jack Zimmer
1801 N. E. 14 St.
Ft. Lauderdale


Associate Members

Lynn A. Aubel
2931 S.W. 13 Ct.
Ft. Lauderdale
Richard A. Baker
2651 N. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale
George L. Bennett
3215 N. Ocean Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
George R. Carnahan
5041 S. W. 10 St.
Ft. Lauderdale
Dan C. Duckham
3215 N. Ocean Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
Otto D. Grove, Jr.
104 Coconut Dr.
Ft. Lauderdale
James E. Gui
1401 N. E. 42 St.
Ft. Lauderdale
Stanford R. Joseph
1015 N. E. 163 St.
N. Miami Beach
Donald R. Mowry
3455 N. E. 12 Terr.
Ft. Lauderdale
Charles C. Reed, Jr.
2618 Monroe
Hollywood
Elbert G. Steves
804 S. E. 12 St.
Ft. Lauderdale


DAYTONA BEACH

Corporate Members
Francis W. Craig
414 N. Halifax Avenue
Daytona Beach
Arthur F. Dean
209 W. Minnesota Avenue
DeLand
Leo Eldon Dixon
136 Magnolia Avenue
Daytona Beach
William A. Faust
3261/2 S. Beach Street
Daytona Beach
Craig J. Gehlert
523 N. Halifax Avenue
Daytona Beach
Carl Gerkin
P. 0O. Box 1671
Daytona Beach
William R. Gomon
P. 0. Box 1671
Daytona Beach
William P. Greening
200 Seabreeze Blvd.
Daytona Beach
Harry M. Griffin
309 N. Grandview
Daytona Beach
Alfred G. Kemmerer
421 N. Wild Olive
Daytona Beach
David A. Leete
406 Orange Avenue
Daytona Beach
Ernest H. Nots
104 Van Avenue
Daytona Beach
Gouveneur M. Peek
714 N. Boulevard
DeLand
Joel W. Sayers, Jr.
200 Seabreeze Blvd.
Daytona Beach
Walter K. Smith, Jr.
142 Granada Avenue
Ormond Beach
Edwin M. Snead
414 N. Halifax Avenue
Daytona Beach
James E. Shelley
P. 0. Box 658
DeLand
Francis R. Walton
211 N. Ridgewood Avenue
Daytona Beach
Associate Members
Joseph R. Blais, Jr.
1137 Florida Avenue
Daytona Beach
Ed Ek
141 Reef Road
South Daytona
Robert G. Graf
420 E. University
DeLand
Harry Merryday, Jr.
265 Hartford Avenue
Daytona Beach
DeWitt McGee
1161V2 Orange Avenue
Daytona Beach
John B. Sullivan
3333 S. Peninsula
Daytona Beach

FLORIDA CENTRAL
Corporate Members
Franklin 0. Adams
921 So. Orleans Ave.
Tampa


Howard F. Allender
651 -40 Ave. S.
St. Petersburg
Carl N. Atkinson
205 Third St. S.
St. Petersburg
Frank W. Bail
P. 0. Box 310
Fort Myers
George H. Bail
P. 0. Box 310
Fort Myers
Gene Beach
1864 Drew St.
Clearwater
Felix Benton
510 Bon Aire Ave.
Temple Terrace
McAllister Blanton
3637 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa 9
Francis G. Bonsey
1420 4 St. S.
St. Petersburg
Garry A. Boyle
7125 N. Armenia Ave.
Tampa
William F. Breidenbach
203 S. Lockmoor Ave.
Temple Terrace
Braxton Lamar Bright
105 N. New York Ave.
Lakeland
James Y. Bruce
939 Beach Drive N.E.
St. Petersburg
Joseph L. Coggan
606 Court St.
Clearwater
Charles L. Colwell
4500 Lakeview Ave. S.
St. Petersburg
Douglas E. Croll
205 Walcaid Building
Bradenton
John M. Crowell
225 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota
Charles F. Curry, Jr.
207 E. Davis Blvd.
Tampa
Kenneth W. Dalzell
300 S. Garden Ave.
Clearwater
K. Whitney Dalzell, Jr.
300 S. Garden Ave.
Clearwater
Harold B. Davis
2021 W. First St.
Fort Myers
Donovan Dean
P. 0. Box 310
Lakeland
Lee De Franco
2923 San Jose St.
Tampa 9
Gordon Dirkes
P. 0. Box 391
Bartow
Clarence W. Doll
5595 4 St. S.
St. Petersburg
Earl John Draeger
2032 Hillview
Sarasota
James R. Dry
1019 S. Florida Ave.
Lakeland
David T. Ellis
1024 Lexington
Lakeland
Ralph A. Erickson
5131 Ocean Blvd.
Sarasota


Eliot C. Fletcher
404 Marion St.
Tampa
Alfred T. Floyd, Jr.
4603 Wishart Blvd.
Tampa
William R. Frizzell
2120 McGregor Blvd.
Fort Myers
John B. Gay
7257 Central Ave.
St. Petersburg
Eugene Paul Graham
2521 34 St. S.
St. Petersburg
Erwin Gremli, II
1790 Wood St.
Sarasota
Leonard Griffin
2910- 8 Ave. W.
Bradenton
Raymond S. Griffith
Box 1241
Punta Gorda
Robert Lee Grundman
2521 34 St. S.
St. Petersburg
Elliott B. Hadley
860 Snell Isle Blvd.
St. Petersburg
Jefferson M. Hamilton
1114 N. E. 7 St.
Gainesville
Horace H. Hamlin, Jr.
532 S. Ft. Harrison Ave.
Clearwater
Mark G. Hampton
Stovall Professional Bldg.
Tampa
Edgar C. Hanebuth
1544 Dolphin St.
Sarasota
William B. Harvard
2714 9 St. N.
St. Petersburg
James A. Heim
P. 0. Box 333
Avon Park
Roy M. Henderson
425 S. Garden Ave.
Clearwater
Warren L. Henderson
1319 Alicia Ave.
Tampa 4
Richard S. Himes
3637 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa
A. Wynn Howell
2400 Circle Drive
Lakeland
Lee Hooper
53' Sandpiper Rd.
Tampa 9
James Jennewein
310 Jackson St.
Tampa
Richard E. Jessen
1529 Grand Central Ave.
Tampa
Dana B. Johannes
410 S. Lincoln Ave.
Clearwater
Charles N. Johnson
1444 Fairhaven Drive
Lakeland
Glenn Q. Johnson
939 Beach Drive N.E.
St. Petersburg
Gordon T. Johnson
217 N. Franklin St.
Tampa 2
Blanchard E. Jolly
2714 Ninth St. N.
St. Petersburg
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Werner F. Kannenberg
1544 Dolphin St.
Sarasota
William H. Kerfoot
2032 Hillview
Sarasota
Paul Russell Krone
Box 1144
Holmes Beach
Gene R. Leedy
604 Phillips Bldg.
Winter Haven
Robert H. Levison
425 S. Garden Ave.
Clearwater
M. Winfield Loft
2707 5 Ave. N.
St. Petersburg
Victor A. Lundy
1218 First St.
Sarasota
Harry A. MacEwen
207 E. Davis Blvd.
Tampa
Edmond N. MacCollin
211 S. Myrtle Ave.
Clearwater
James B. McBryde
2120 McGregor Blvd.
Fort Myers
Jack McCandless
939 Beach Dr. N.E.
St. Petersburg
John R. McDonald
Beach Drive
Indian Rocks Beach
George R. McElvy
310 Jackson St.
Tampa
Donald D. Mcintosh
205 W. Brorein St.
Tampa
Frank E. McLane
205 W. Brorein St.
Tampa
William H. Mason
1020 W. Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda
Harry C. Merritt, Jr.
313 Van Skiver Bldg.
Winter Haven
Joseph H. Messineo
4 Sixth St. S.
St. Petersburg I
Joseph I. Mitchell, Jr.
5030 Central Ave.
St. Petersburg
Frank Robert Mudano
P. O. Box 1307
Clearwater
Archie G. Parish
112 Rutland Bldg.
St. Petersburg
John David Parrish
939 Beach Dr. N.E.
St. Petersburg 1
Frank P. Patterson, Jr.
608 Tampa St.
Tampa
Earl A. Quenneville
4403 W. Burke Ave.
Tampa 3
John F. Ranon
2913 10 St.
Tampa
R. James Robbins
404 Marion St.
Tampa 2
Henry L. Roberts
115 Magnolia Ave.
Tampa
Harold D. Rowe
3308 Korina Lane
Tampa 12
JANUARY, 1963


Louis F. Schneider
1518 67 Ave. W.
Bradenton
Edward J. Seibert
231 S. Palm Ave.
Sarasota
Roland W. Sellew
P. O. Box 1335
Sarasota,
Robert L Shaw
P. 0. Box 1335
Sarasota
Norman F. Six
214 E. Davis Blvd.
Tampa 6
Frank F. Smith, Jr.
1829 Bougainvillea
Sarasota
Warren H. Smith
404 E. Beacon St.
Lakeland
J. Bruce Smith
939 Beach Dr. N.E.
St. Petersburg
Thomas V. Talley
P. 0O. Box 1104
Lakeland
George R. Tebrugge
217 Franklin St., Suite 200
Tampa 2
Gene Thompson
800 First St. N.
Winter Haven
Cyril Tucker
215 Miami Avenue
Venice
J. P. Trouchaud
3710 Bayou Louise
Sarasota
Ralph S. Twitchell
125 Big Pass Lane
Sarasota
Frank S. Valenti
404 Marion St.
Tampa 2
Carl A. Vollmer
2032 Hillview
Sarasota
Roy Wakeling
425 S. Garden Ave
Clearwater
H. Leslie Walker
620 Twiggs St.
Tampa 2
William J. Webber
403 Morgan Street
Tampa 2
Charles R. Wedding
2901 58 Ave. N.
St. Petersburg
Arthur Weiser
225 John Ringling Blvd.
Sarasota
Donald Jack West
536 S. Pineapple
Sarasota
Robert C. Wielage
217 N. Franklin St.
Tampa 2
Frank W. White
10101 Forest Hills Drive
Tampa 12
Sidney R. Wilkinson
3011 Manatee Ave. N.
Bradenton
Donald S. Wililams
1931 Rippon St.
Clearwater
Albert K. Wilson
P. 0. Box 476
Dunedin
J. Arthur Wohlburg
209 S. Coolidge St.
Tampa


Associate Members
John J. Albert
1321 Murray
Clearwater
Frank A. Alfano
3301 W. Woodlawn Ave.
Tampa
Cesar P. Alfonso
2917 12 St.
Tampa
Robert L. Allen
1020 41 Ave. N.
St. Petersburg
Joseph R. Bernado
205 W. Brorein St.
Tampa
Matthew Bodo
5301 49 St. N.
St. Petersburg 9
Tilman P. Chamlee
4205 S. Manhattan Ave.
Tampa
Ivor Marcus Farnell
4000 Gandy Blvd.
Tampa 11
Ted E. Fasnacht
1215 Drew St., B-5
Clearwater
Sidney G. Frazier, Jr.
329 Miami Avenue
Venice
Genove Garcia, Jr.
205 W. Brorein St.
Tampa
David R. Godschalk
306 Jackson St.
Tampa
Jacob L. Gottfried
205 W. Brorein St.
Tampa
James A. Greene
3603 Granada
Tampa
Clifford C. Holloway
204 104 Ave.
St. Petersburg
Prentis S. Howard
Rt. 4, Box 485
Lakeland
John H. Howey
4503 N. "B" Street
Tampa
Julian F. Jones
734- 1st St. N.
Winter Haven
Richard McClain Jones
3197-66 Way N.
St. Petersburg
Richard P. Jones, Jr.
P. 0. Box 3276
.Lakeland
Dale T. Kincaid
1482 6 St. N.W.
Winter Haven
Harley P. Kinney
204 15 St. W.
Bradenton
Herbert T. Lawton
509 S. Albany, Apt. 5
Tampa
Frederick E. Leggett
323 South Blvd.
Tampa 6
Thomas T. Mayo, Jr.
3761 Whiting Dr. S.E.
St. Petersburg
Joe Louis McClung
200 Windward Passage
Clearwater
Walter Melody
515 52 Ave. S.
St. Petersburg


Lester N. Merwin
112 Rutland Bldg.
St. Petersburg
Russell J. Minardi
2910 Grand Central Ave.
Tampa
Frank H. Morris, Jr.
1416 Lynn Ave.
Clearwater
James C. Padgett
6335 Hollywood Blvd.
Sarasota
Franklin M. Page
Box 10692
Tampa 9
Julian S. Peterman, Jr.
1529 Drexel Ave. N.E.
Winter Haven
John Edward Piercy
3035 E. Hatton St.
Sarasota
Frank R. Prince
217 N. Franklin St.
Tampa
Albert L. Reese
300 55 Ave. S.
St. Petersburg
Bruce A. Renfroe, Jr.
411 Pablo Place
Lakeland
Ralph E. Ricks
1005 E. Pine St.
Clearwater
E. Jason Robarts
7711 Silver Oak Lane
Tampa 5
Harold Dean Rowe
3308 Konina Lane
Tampa 12
Joseph C. Russello
4603 Grand Central
Tampa
Melvin Frederick Schultz
1215 Drew St., B-5
Clearwater
Eugene R. Smith
2119 Hills Ave.
Tampa 6
James E. Thurman
2411 Brevard Rd. N.E.
St. Petersburg
Richard C. Vogler
3223 51 St. N.
St. Petersburg
I. Blount Wagner
843 60 Ave. S.
St. Petersburg


FLORIDA NORTH

Corporate Members

William T. Arnett
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Turpin C. Bannister
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Arnold F. Butt
306 Tigert Hall, U/F
Gainesville
Arthur L. Campbell, Jr.
603 N.E. I Street
Gainesville
E. Bryan Duncan
3021/2 Ocklawaha Avenue
Ocala
J. Vance Duncan
314 Robertson Building
Ocala


I







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Guy C. Fulton
Box 2181, University Station
Gainesville
Frank G. George
P. 0. Box 488
Palatka
John L. R. Grand
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Wililam C. Grobe
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Myrl J. Hanes
201 N. W. 10 Avenue
Gainesville
Gordon S. Johnson
1107 S. W. 2 Avenue
Gainesville
McMillan H. Johnson
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Thomas Larrick
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
James T. Lendrum
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Lester N. May
606 N. E. I Street
Gainesville
Jack Moore
606 N. E. 1 Street
Gainesville
Walter Raymond
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Frederick N. Reed, Jr.
9737 Highland Avenue
Jacksonville
Craig B. Thorn
Suite 4, Lightner Museum
Bldg.
St. Augustine
Pasquale M. Torraca
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville

Associate Members
George A. Asinc
3004 N. E. 11 Terrace
Gainesville
W. E. Baber
606 N. E. 1 Street
Gainesville
Hans Groeneveld-Meijer
Santisstrasse 662
Pfaffhausen (2H)
Zurick, Switzerland,
John Douglas Hodge
P. 0. Box 488
Palatka
William K. Hunter, Jr.
606 N. E. 1 Street
Gainesville
Tom Jannetides
311 V/2 Laurel
Palatka
Constantine L Klonis
2130 N. E. 12 Terrace
Gainesville
Sadi S. Koru
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Maxsis Leo Lucs
552 W. College Avenue
Tallahassee


F. Vlair Reeves
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville
Frank G. Schmidt, Jr.
314 Robertson Bldg.
Ocala
Tommy N. Watts
606 N. E. 1 Street
Gainesville
D. Neil Webb
Building E, U/F
Gainesville
Canning K. M. Young
College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, U/F
Gainesville

FLA. NORTH CENTRAL

Corporate Members
Pearce L. Barrett
118 N. Gadsden Street
Tallahassee
Robert H. Brown
Board of Comrn. of State Inst.,
Construction Div., Capitol,
Tallahassee
Joseph N. Clemons
109 West Park Ave.
Tallahassee
Forrest R. Coxen
Avant Building
Tallahassee
Chester L. Craft, Jr.
State Bd. of Control,
Architect's Office
P. 0. Box U3234, F. S. U.
Tallahassee
C. Ernest Daffin
118 N. Gadsden Street
Tallahassee
Prentiss Huddleston
1215 W. Tharpe St.
Tallahassee
Charles F. Kuhn
510 North Adams
Tallahassee
Robert H. Maybin
2050 North Monroe
Tallahassee
David W. Potter
112 Barbara St.
Tallahassee
Ernest J. Stidolph
Avant Building
Tallahassee
James A. Stripling
308 E. Park Avenue
Tallahassee
Albert P. Woodard
1367 East Tennessee
Tallahassee
Forrest M. Kelley
552 West College Avenue
Tallahassee

Associate Members
Charles Benda
StateSchoolArch itect'sOffice
Dept. of Ed., Knott Bldg.
Tallahassee
Wayne Betts
StateSchool'Architect'sOffice
Dept. of Ed., Knott Bldg.
Tallahassee
Jack Buckley
1367 East Tennessee
Tallahassee
Warren A. Dixon
111 North Gadsden Street
Tallahassee


Saxon Poyner
StateSchoolArchitect'sOffice
Dept. of Ed., Knott Bldg.
Tallahassee
Newton Sheppard
308 East Park Ave.
Tallahassee

FLORIDA NORTHWEST

Corporate Members
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
101 W. Wright Street
Pensacola
Thomas H. Daniels
425 Oak Avenue
Panama City
Robert Daniel Hart
10 N. Spring St.
Pensacola
Barnard W. Hartman, Jr.
4717 South Lakewood Drive
Panama City
Henry T. Hey
129 Estes Street
Marianna
James Kendrick
12 West Main Street
Ft. Walton Beach
Hugh J. Leitch
2925 Navy Blvd.
Pensacola
James Henry Look
611 Brent Annex
Pensacola
Ula Lee Manning
354 Brent Building
Pensacola
Sam M. Marshall
325 S. Palafox Street
Pensacola
William Stewart Morrison
611 Brent Annex
Pensacola
Chester A. Parker
Box 702
Panama City
Roy L. Ricks
12 West Main Street
Ft. Walton Beach
Frank J. Sindelar
1924 N. Palafox Street
Pensacola
Roger G. Weeks
425 E. Gregory Street
Pensacola

Associate Members
William R. Bean
211 N. Pace Blvd.
Pensacola
Daniel R. Bruno
P. 0. Box 928
Pensacola
F. R. Fritz
215 N. Madison Drive
Pensacola
Carlton Noblin
1921 E. Fisher Street
Pensacola
Karlvon Strasser
611 Brent Annex
Pensacola

FLORIDA SOUTH

Corporate Members
C. Robert Abele
550 Brickell Ave.
Miami


Maurice Abramovitz
225 Westward Drive
Miami Springs
Milton Abrams
315 N. W. 27 Ave.
Miami
LeRoy K. Albert
209 Giralda Ave.
Coral Gables
Scott B. Arnold
7500 Red Road
South Miami
Montgomery Atwater
700 S. W. 12 Ave.
Miami
Leslie M. Barret
Box 206
Marathon Shores
Alf Otto Barth
1410 N. E. 2 Ave.
Miami
Edward H. Baxter
315 N. W. 27 Ave.
Miami
Lowry M. Bell, Jr.
2801 S. W. 22 Ave.
Miami
Samuel S. Block
11101 S. W. 88 Ct.
Miami
Carl H. Blohm
1258 S. W. 3 St.
Miami
Robert J. Boerema
501 Dade Federal Bldg.
Miami
J. Frank Bradley
2210 S. W. 22 Terr.
Miami
James E. Branch
University of Miami
Coral Gables
Charles S. Broward, Jr.
327 Almeria Ave.
Coral Gables
Henry E. Brown, Jr.
Box 241 M, RR 2
Homestead
Thomas A. Bruno
8300 Old Cutler Road
Miami
Herbert Burnham
2575 S. Bayshore Drive
Miami
David K. Chaplain
7 Wendover Way
Bedford, N. H.
Robert W. Clark
Box 45-203
Miami
Juan Corbella
18201 N. W. 52 Ave.
Opa Locka
Edward E. Crain
1020 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
Charles L. Crumpton
19411 N. W. 23 Ct.
Miami
Stephen M. Davis
4700 LeJeune Rd.
Miami
Joseph J. DeBrita
12865 W. Dixie Highway
No. Miami
James L. Deen
7500 Red Road
South Miami
Howard M. Dunn
623 Brickell Ave.
Miami
Howard L. Dutkin
19420 N. E. 23 Ave
No. Miami
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























[ -- -1"P. F< -
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Ballimore, Md.
Mies van der Rohe, Architect
Farkas and Barron, Consulting Eng.neers
Metropolitan Buildeis, Inc General Contractor


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Richmond, Va.
Marcellus Wright & Son, Architects
Hanson & Craig, Structural Engineers
Standard Construction Company, General Contractors


Federal Office Building
Richmond, Va
Marcellus Wright & Son. Merrill C Lee, Associated Architects
William T ST Clair, Structural Engineer
Wise Construction Company, Inc General Contractors


St. Andrews Presbyterian College
LuribuOd, N.C. As fat Archiect Lightweight Structural Concrete
Boyle Construction Company, General Contractors Lightweight Masonry Units


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Box 9138, Richmond. Va. Box 1843, Charlotte, N. C.
Robert Meyer Hotel
Orlando, Fla. PRODUCERS OF SOLITE LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE
Reynolds, Smith & Hills, Architects and Engineers
Daniel Construct.on Company, Contractors







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When you specify MEDALLION standards* you automatically cash in on the dynamic force
created by a continuing multimillion dollar program of advertising in newspapers, magazines,
radio and television ... a hard-hitting program that pre-sells home buyers and apartment
renters on the electrical comforts and conveniences vital to better living today and tomorrow. ( T
The MEDALLION HOME seal is a built-in sales appeal. Tie in with it. And remember, too,
valuable floor space can be utilized better in a Medallion Home, because flameless and fumeless
electric appliances can be installed without the problems encountered with chimneys,
flues and vents.
For full details on how you can take profitable advantage of the
Medallion Home certification program, contact your electric utility company.


Commander C.E. Fanning of Gulf Breeze, says:
"Everything in our Medallion Home is operated by flameless
electricity. In addition to our all-electric kitchen, the pleasure
of our year-round electrical air conditioning has exceeded
all our expectations. It provides wonderful climate control-
cozy warmth in winter and cool comfort in summer. A
Medallion Home is truly the home of the future, here today."


Matt Jetton, Pres., Sunstate Builders, Inc. of Tampa, says:
"Home buyers just naturally prefer the clean, modern advan-
tages of flameless electric 'Medallion' living-from the all-
electric kitchen to the year-round electric air conditioning.
When Life Magazine named our Carrollwood development
'The Nation's Outstanding Residential Subdivision of 1961',
we certainly felt our Medallion Home qualifications played
an important role in this choice."


Floridal's Electric Companies


22 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








and APARTMENTS
















MEDALLION HOME STANDARDS
ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN including electric range,
electric water heater and other major electric appliances.
FULL HOUSEPOWER-100-200 amp service entrance
and enough switches and outlets for convenience.
LIGHT FOR LIVING-ample lighting provision for
comfort, safety and beauty.


C. R. Lovorn of Conway Estates, Orange County, says:
"As an electrical engineer, I can appreciate that only a home
built to Medallion standards of Full Housepower wiring has
the overall electrical capacity for truly modern living-
without worry about overloaded circuits. The work-and-time-


W.E. Kelly, Jr., Sec'y-Treas., Halifax Enterprises of Daytona, says:
"For those %ho enjoy the comfort and Inability, of our
luxurious Landmark Apartments at Daytona Beach, we chose
to go all-electric for both convenience and economy-as
signified by our 'Medallion' award. Designed by Robert Fitch


saving appliances in our Medallion Home give us extra hours Smith, the 88 units have all-electric kitchens and year-round
) to enjoy the natural advantages of Florida living." reverse-cycle electric air conditioning."


Taxpaying, Investor- Owned

Jl A A Y. 1 96

JANUARY, 1963









































Deliveries of precision-made glulam materials of
Timber Structures, Inc. to Southeastern contractors
are now several days faster than formerly. This sav-
ing of time results from a new arrangement by which
engineered structural timbers for this area are man-
ufactured in the Greenville, Alabama, plant of W. T.
Smith Timber Fabrications Company.
Affiliated with W. T. Smith Lumber Company,
one of the oldest corporate names in the Southern
states, the new laminators have an unlimited source
of structural quality Southern yellow pine, precision
sawmill and dry kiln equipment, a new modern lam-
inating and fabricating plant, and over 70 years of
woodworking experience.
These facilities are coordinated with rigid quality
control measures in order to manufacture to the


1


rMTC1
IUAII,,I


F
SYMUOI. OF
QUALITY IN
ENGINEERED
TIMUEW


most demanding quality standards, worthy of the
undivided responsibility assumed by Timber Struc-
tures, Inc. for the performance of their products.
Consultation and assistance is readily available,
as always, from the Timber Structures organization.
This is the largest group of timber specialists in the
industry. Detailed drawings are sent to Greenville
for laminating, finishing and shipping.
For fast service on dependable glulam products,
contact the nearest representative shown below.


BIRMINGHAM 5, ALABAMA
P. 0. Box 3206
CHARLOTTE 9, N. C.
P. 0. Box 11235
CHATTANOOGA 5, TENNESSEE
2907 Haywood Avenue
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA
2708 Rosewood Drive
HIALEAH, FLORIDA
P. O. Box 1262
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI
104 North Lemon
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
6314 Stetson Road
KNOXVILLE 20, TENNESSEE
231 W. Ford Valley Road


LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
P. 0. Box 295
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS
107 Main Street
MARIETTA, GEORGIA
P. O. Box 1131
MEMPHIS 12, TENNESSEE
P. O. Box 5161
SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
P. O. Box 631
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
1818 S. Monroe Street
VALLEY STATION, KENTUCKY
P. O. Box 144
WINSTON-SALEM, N. CAROLINA
P. 0. Box 2972


TIMBER STRUCTURES, INC.
P. 0. Box 3782-E, Portland 8, Oregon
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Robert C. Eberhart
1115 S. W. 100 Ct.
So. Miami
Arnold W. Eckhoff
100 Biscayne Blvd.
So. Miami
Upton C. Ewing
362 Minorca Ave.
Coral Gables
Nelson A. Faerber
Trailways Bldg.
Naples
Andrew J. Ferendino
2575 S. Bayshore Drive
Miami
James E. Ferguson, Jr.
4221 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
Robert Jerome Filer
4701 S. W. 95 Ave.
Miami
H. George Fink
255 University Drive
Coral Gables
Bryan Flemming
1127 Dupont Bldg.
Miami
Donald M. Forfar
550 Brickell Ave.
Miami
Robert K. Frese
3047 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Tom Fuehrer
19120 N. W. 5 Ave.
Miami
J. Alden Fusco
1900 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach
Regis L. Gallagher
2927 Shipping Ave.
Miami
James E. Garland
315 N. W. 27 Ave.
Miami
August Geiger
1630 Lenox Ave.
Miami Beach
Edward M. Ghezzi
7915 S. W. 128 St.
So. Miami
Frederick A. Gibbs
927 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach
Charles Giller
4100 North Miami Ave.
Miami
Claire Dempsey Giller
4100 North Miami Ave.
Miami
Norman M. Giller
975 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach
Theodore Gottfried
3298 Mary St.
Coconut Grove
Edward G. Grafton
2575 S. Bayshore Drive
Miami
John 0. Grimshaw
550 Brickell Ave.
Miami
Melvin Grossman
420 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach
William H. Guerin
1st Nat'l Bank Building
Miami
Curtis E. Haley
214 Alhambra Circle
Coral Gables
Harold E. Hall
8 Canterbury Rd.
Mobile, Ala.
JANUARY, 1963


Clarence E. Hamer
2901 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
William C. Hardwick, Jr.
Box 612, Santa Monica
Calif.
Abbot Harle
2212 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Bernard C. Hibler
American Embassy,
Mexico City, Mexico
Lewis M. Hitt
622 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
George J. Hladik
1071 N. E. 85 St.
Miami
Joseph Hoover
10240 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach
Irving F. Horsey
8340 N. E. 8nd Ave.
Miami
0. K. Houston, Jr.
2734 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
Walter J. Hubbard
721 N. W. 21 Ct.
Miami
James G. Hundley, Jr.
660 N. Mashta Dr.
Key Biscayne
Miami
Emory L. Jackson
1924 N. E. 154 St.
Miami
Herbert H. Johnson
550 Brickell Ave.
Miami
Verner Johnson
250 N. E. 18 St.
Miami
James W. Junkin, Jr.
550 Brickell Ave.
Miami
William E. Kittle
1060 Brickell Ave.
Miami
Bernard R. Klekamp
1666 N. E. 111 St.
Miami
Walter S. Klements
1150 So. Dixie Highway
Coral Gables
Charles Frasuer Knight
2971 Coral Way
Miami
Howard B. Knight
214 Alhambra Circle
Coral Gables
Irvin Korach
721 N. W. 21 Ct.
Miami
Sidney L. Kotkin
9211 Bird Road
Miami
M. Louis Kroman
2288 N. E. 173 St.
No. Miami Beach
H. Samuel Kruse
141 N. E. 3 Ave.
Miami
Alexander Kulhavy
Stallagsweg
Germany
Vernon D. Lamp
1909 N. W. 14 St.
Miami
Morris Lapidus
940 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
Alexander Lewis
1101 Lincoln Road Bldg.
Miami Beach


Robert M. Little
2180 Brickell Ave.
Miami
John M. Lyell
3135 S. W. 3 Ave.
Miami
Geoffrey Lynch
1020 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
James Lynskey
3325 S. W. 97 Ct.
Miami
E. A. MacKay
927 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach
Thomas J. Madden, Jr.
240 N. E. 17 St.
Miami
(Miss) Marion I. Manley
3,356 Virginia St.
Coconut Grove
J. Burnham Maylard
9801 S. W. 70 Ave.
Miami
William H. Merriam
401 Coral Way
Coral Gables
Rudolf Mikuta
101 N. W. 12 Ave.
Miami
Alexander G. Milkton
5784 S. W. 13 St.
Miami
Col. Alvin R. Moore
1504 18 Ter.
Key West
Richard W. Morris
483 Fifth Ave. South
Naples
Dorothy McKenna
Box 407
Coconut Grove
Donald E. Nick
708 Fifth Ave.
Naples
Otto H. Oppenheimer
462 So. Dixie Highway
Coral Gables
Lester C. Pancoast
2575 S. Bayshore Drive
Miami
Russell T. Pancoast
2575 S. Bayshore Drive
Miami
H. Maxwell Parish
7101 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Alfred B. Parker
2921 S. W. 27 Ave.
Miami
Clarence J. Parman
405 S. Flagler St.
Homestead
Dean Parmelee
1131 Ingraham Bldg.
Miami
Harry E. Penney, Jr.
5830 S. W. 73 St.
South Miami
Gerard Pitt
4375 Ingraham Highway
Miami
Igor B. Polevitzky
250 N. E. 18 St.
Miami
Theodore F. Price
1835 S. W. 27 Ave.
Miami
Samuel M. Puder
6090 S. W. 62 Place
South Miami
Edwin T. Reeder
1114 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami


Don Reiff
1185 71 St.
Miami Beach
Paul L. Reiner
1000 N. W. 28 Avenue
Miami
Edward T. Rempe
153 Sevilla Avenue
Coral Gables
Joseph G. Rentscher
462 So. Dixie Highway
Coral Gables
Fred E. Robbins
1102 DuPont Plaza Center
Miami
Donald Rowell
4130 Braganza Avenue
Coconut Grove
Trip T. Rusell
1020 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
James P. Sampson
9410 S. W. 60 Terrace
Miami
Herbert R. Savage
2828 Coral Way
Coral Gables
Jerome Schilling
1270 N. E. 102 Street
Miami
Roy J. Schneider
1431 Flamingo Way
Hialeah
Marvin Schwartz
1947 73rd Street
*Brooklyn, N. Y.
Wayne F. Sessions
2311 Tigertail Court
Miami
Gordon Severud
2971 Coral Way
Coral Gables
Tony M. Sherman
1700 Sans Souci Blvd.
Miami
Robert M. Shrum
14535 N. E. 5 Court
North Miami
Frank Shuflin
9200 N. E. 6 Avenue
Miami
A. J. Simberg
814 S. W. 27 Avenue
Miami
Jerry P. Simmons
1500 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Norman A. Skeels
2575 S. Bayshore Drive,
Miami
Coulton Skinner
4125 Santa Maria Avenue
Coral Gables
John L. Skinner
1102 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
Donald G. Smith
721 N. W. 21 Court
Miami
Joseph N. Smith III
808 Olympia Bldg.
Miami
Robert F. Smith
201 Security Trust Bldg.
Miami
Wahl Snyder
1177 N. E. 79 Street
Earl M. Starnes
462 South Dixie Highway
Coral Gables
Harold Steward
1102 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Ned R. Stull
635 Parkway Avenue
Trenton, New Jersey
B. Robert Swartburg
4014 Chase Avenue
Miami Beach
John E. Sweet
9251 S. W. 59 Street
Miami
Charles S. Symonds
4131 Barbarossa Avenue
Coral Gables
John R. Tanner
4460 Royal Palm Avenue
Miami Beach
Francis E. Telesca
3170 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grove
Frank E. Torres
9630 S. W. 164 Street
So. Miami
Kenneth Treister
7630 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Henry 0. Trimm
504 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
John A. Tripp
1001 S. W. 1 Street
Miami
William E. Tschumy
2346 Douglas Road
Coral Gables
Robert E. Turner
8485 S. W. 143 Street
So. Miami
Loyd F. Vann
101 N. W. 12 Avenue
Charles H. Vann
4223 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
James E. Vensel
5555 S .W. 101 Street
Miami
Vladimir E. Virrick
5400 S. W. 92 St.
Miami
Freeman L. Walker
950 S. W. 22 Road
Miami
Frank E. Watson
811 Chamber of Commerce
Bldg.
Miami
Raymond Weakley
3280 S. W. 17 Avenue
William M. Weidemeyer
Aprt. 2 118 Antiquera
Coral Gables
Maurice B. Weintraub
235 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
Murray B. Wright
4702 So. LeJeune Road
Coconut Grove
Stefan H. Zachar
1630 Lenox Avenue
Miami Beach

Associate Members
Bartle Allen, Jr.
4061 Ventura Avenue
Coconut Grove
Ralph S. Anderson
6290 S. W. 28 Street
Miami
Jorge Arango
3141 Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grove
William D. Andrews
1901 N. W. 88 Terrace
Floyd Bradd, Jr.
19610 N. W. 4 Court
Miami


Glenn A. Buff
9369 Dominican Drive
Miami
Hilario Candela
3228 Aviation Avenue
Miami
Jules P. Channing
71 N. W. 54th Street
Miami
James H. Church
543 N. E. 67 Street
Miami
Spencer R. Conklin, Jr.
4101 Toledo Street
Coral Gables
Charles Cotterman
1711 Columbus Blvd.
Coral Gables
R. William Clayton, Jr.
11055 N. E. 6 Avenue
Miami
Harold C. Decker
15875 S. W. 79 Court
Miami
Leonard J. DiSilvestro
530 N. E. 82 Street
Miami
Stanley N. Glasgow
6500 S. W. 26 Street
Miami
Max Gruen
6500 S. W. 26 Street
Miami
Paul A. Grupp
714 N. E. 128 Street
Miami
Alfred M. T. Hardesty
100 So. Biscayne Blvd.
Miami
Ronald Hedlund
7500 Red Road
South Miami
Carlos G. Hegel
Box 59 2223, Miami
Francis R. Hoffman
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
Robert C. Hundevadt
840 N. W. 172 Terrace
No. Miami Beach
Martin S. Ives
2000 S. W. 16 Terrace
Miami
Douglas G. Jackson
3051 Jefferson Street
Miami
Walter L. Keller
696 Fifth Avenue, So.
Naples
Edwin L. Klare
520 N. E. 110 Terrace
Miami
Carroll D. Klements
1550 So. Dixie Highway
Coral Gables
William C. Kreidt
1150 S. W. 1 Street
Miami
Emmet J. Laughlin
58 W. 30 Street
Hialeah
James Donald Lee
2933 Center Street
Coconut Grove
Herman R. Uchtman
211 S. Miami Avenue
Miami
Stephen C. Little
1509 Palancia Avenue
Coral Gables
Charles K. Lonsdale
521 N. E. 39 Street
Miami


Wayne H. Martin
1101 N. W. 149 Terrace
Miami
Richard A. Miskiel
10521 S. W. 52 Street
Miami
Ernest C. Norlin
316 N. W. 100 Terrace
Miami
Philip Pearlman
1190 N. E. 163 Street
No. Miami Beach
Arthur Perrin
5765 S. W. 9 Terrace
Miami
Richard S. Pollack
740 N. E. 178 Terrace
Miami
Lemuel Ramos
5214 N. E. 3 Court
Miami
George F. Reed
3680 Avacado Avenue
Coconut Grove
Hal T. Reid
708 Fifth Avenue
Naples
Henry A. Riccio
1305 N. E. 132 Street
Miami
Donald C. Rider
10700 Caribbean Blvd.
Miami
Herbert D. Russell
6298 N. W. 12 Court
Ft. Lauderdale
William A. Russell
1020 Dupont Plaza Center
Wilbert S. Schafer
500 Malaga Avenue
Coral Gables
Frederick A. Schick
1019 15th Street
Washington, D. C.
Reuben S. Schneider
1431 E. 4 Avenue
Hialeah
Richard J. Skrypkowski
60 N. W. 76 Street
Miami
Fount T. Smothers, Jr.
820 12 Avenue
Naples
Samuel B. Spence, Jr.
711 N. W. 187 Drive
No. Miami
Marshall M. Spring, Jr.
254 N. E. 30 Street
Miami
Rolf Strahle
Tulane University
New Orleans, La.
Wray G. Succop
1114 Dupont Plaza Center
Miami
Jalmar V. Suominen
4810 S. W. 69 Avenue
Miami
Joseph D. Swain
3625 Solana Road
Coconut Grove
Richard Van Harren
2081 S. W. 27 Terrace
Ft. Lauderdale
Harold W. Vivier
13125 S. W. 63 Avenue
Miami
Donald R. Vizza
6387 S. W. 9 Street
Miami
Sidney M. Walker
311 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach


Randolph F. Ware
152 Valencia Avenue
Coral Gables
Robert C. West
8225 S. W. 62 Place
Miami
William E. West
2250 Cedar Dale Avenue
Baton Rouge, La.
Harold Wiener
1160 102 Street
Bay Harbor, Miami
Wayne C. Williams
7100 S. W. 57 Street
Miami
Earnest F. Wolfman
1920 N. E. 154 Street
Miami
Eugene Yaros
5920 S. W. 44 Terrace
Miami
Russell Charles Zinkel, Sr.
7995 N. W. 13 Avenue
Miami

JACKSONVILLE

Corporate Members
John Franklin Adams
4530 Theo Street
Robert E. Boardman
227 Park Street
Robert A. Broadfoot, Jr.
5557 Arlington Road
Robert C. Broward
836 May Street
Joseph H. Bryson
111 West Adams Street
Fred W. Bucky, Jr.
1320 Coast Line Building
Franklin S. Bunch
1320 Coast Line Building
Cecil B. Burns
3991 St. Johns Avenue
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
1410 Prudential Building
John T. Brickert
1454 Arlington Avenue
Eugene A. Cellar
2029 Gilmore Street
Logan S. Chappell
1320 Coast Line Building
James I. Clements
1422 Live Oak Lane
David M. Close
American National Bank
Building
Herbert Coons, Jr.
850 May Street
H. Lamar Drake
3952 Ferrara Road
W. Kenyon Drake
303 O'Reilly Building
Thomas E. Ewart, Jr.
2014 Arcadia Place
C. A. Ellingham
Prudential Building
S. Ralph Fetner
3991 St. Johns Avenue
George Ryad Fisher
458 Riverside Avenue
John T. Foster
504 Co. Court House,
330 E. Bay
Norman H. Freedman
1201 San Marco Blvd.
Allen D. Frye
617 Park Street
F. Duane Fullerton
5640 Weller Drive
Richard Dill Germain
6180 Fordham Circle, West
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


William Hill Goodman
303 O'Reilly Building
W. Stanly Gordon
1653 Mitchell Avenue
John Graveley
1012 Florida Title Building
John Richard Graveley
1012 Florida Title Building
John P. Graves
1320 Coast Line Building
Mellen G. Greeley
6457 Pottsburg Drive
J. Brooks Haas
115 Park Street
Taylor Hardwick
764 May Street
Warren C. Hendry Jr.
1320 Coast Line Building
F. A. Hollingsworth
216 City Building
St. Augustine
Abner C. Hopkins
38 W. Monroe Street
Louis C. Holloway, Jr.
919 Beach Blvd.
Jacksonville Beach
William K. Jackson
1320 Coast Line Building
James 0. Kemp
1456 June Street
William D. Kemp
1320 Coast Line Building
William H. Kent
238 E. Forsyth St., Rm. 310
H. J. Klutho
9 Ocean Street
Zeb V. Lackey
105 E. Ann Street
Valdosta, Ga.
W. Mayberry Lee
746 May Street
William H. Marshall
458 Riverside Avenue
James A. Meehan, Jr.
2014 Arcadia Place
Wayne P. Myers
6352 Sprinkle Drive, N.
McDonald, James A.
1569 River Hills Circle
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street
Harry C. Powell
520 First Federal Building
Jefferson D. Powell
901 Atlantic Bank Building
Theodore C. Poulos
23i7 W. Forsythe St.,
303 O'Reilly Bldg.
F. Stewart Roberts
502 First Federal Building
Harold F. Saxelbye
502 First Federal Building
Curt C. Scheel
702 Hendricks Avenue
Walter B. Schultz
P.O. Box 4817
LeeRoy Sheftall
409 Clark Building
Albert L Smith
4341 Worth Drive, East
Ivan H. Smith
P.O. Box 4817
Walter S. Snell
6016 Robbins Circle, North
Willis L. Stephens
594 S. Edgewood Avenue
John Pierce Stevens
4362 Kelnepa Drive
James M. Sutton
504 Riverside Avenue
Fred C. Van Dusen
1028 Gary Street
Robert A. Warner
917 Gilmore Street
JANUARY, 1963


Associate Members
Channing Baker
4203 Kings Court
Howard B. Bochiardy
6228 Sprinkle Drive, N.
David B. Boyer
2970 Riverside Avenue
William H. Carswell
7067 San Jose Blvd.
John M. Creamer
1739 Embassy Drive
Edgar M. Crenshaw
2547 Barrs Terrace
Wellington W. Cummer
P. 0. Box 4640
Robert F. Darby
1125 Eutaw Place
Ed. L. Farris, Jr.
2951 Collier Avenue
Walter J. R. Gallagher, Jr.
2857 Ernest Street
James L. Garland
762 Osceola Street
Robert C. Goodwin
3552 College Street
Russell L. Gustafson
4012 Ferrarra Street
Joe B. Harms
502 First Federal Building
William Hawkins
1417 Mapleton Road
J. W. Herbert
5378 South River Road
Nathan A. Holman
227 River Hills Drive
Homer, Hull, Jr.
P. 0O. Box 1204
Atlantic Beach
Richard Douglas Karig
2613 Green Street
Billie W. Kellam
3023 Belair Court
Frank Milton Legate, III
2298 Larchmont Road
Duane W. Leuthold
5444 Weller Place
James D. Logan
1110 LeBrun Drive
John 0. Lauwaert
321 Third Street
Atlantic Beach
Royce M. Months, Jr.
6220 Elise Drive
Don R. Morgan
Box 347, Keystone Heights
William N. Morgan
227 Park Street
John P. Nelson, Jr.
2535 Patsy Anne Drive
W. John Parks, III
6970 Deau' ille Road
Charles E. Pattillo, III
4328 Garibaldi Avenue
Richard W. Pearson, Jr.
P. O. Box 4817
Robert S. Seals
360 Beach Avenue
Neptune Beach
Herschel E. Shepard, Jr.
850 May Street
James A. Sizemore
4029 Rodby Drive
Allen H. Smith
5519 Dickson Road
J. Douglas Snead, Jr.
1759 Keats Road
H. S. Thorson, Jr.
5640 Wiltshire Street
Jerry D. Tillinger
5117 Rosebay Court
Dan M. Urbanus
3004 Klein Road


Richard J. Veenstra
4742 Solanda Circle, West
Norman E. Washer
10552 Ritgers Road
Lynwood G. Willis
2318 Ironwood Drive

MID-FLORIDA

Corporate Members
Lawrence L Anglin
3124 Corrine Drive
Orlando
John A. Burton, IV
P. 0. Box 938
Sanford
F. Earl Deloe
P. O. Box 7518
Orlando
John P. Deloe
P.O. Box 7518
Orlando
Robert V. Ford
918 W. Main Avenue
Leesburg
L. Alex Hatton
815 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando
Charles L. Hendrick
4936 S. Orange
Orlando
Laurance W. Hitt
189 E. Morse Blvd.
Winter Park
Harold W. Johnson
210 Park Avenue N.
Winter Park
John B. Langley
Lypar Building
Winter Park
Ralph B. Lovelock
145 Lincoln Avenue
Winter Park
Stewart A. Marshall, Jr.
2024 Howard Drive
Winter Park
Robert B. Murphy
1210 Edgewater Drive
Orlando
Gordon D. Orr, Jr.
1330 Palmetto
Winter Park
Fred G. Owles, Jr.
1401 Edgewater Drive
Orlando
Donald 0. Phelps
Lypar Building
Winter Park
James Gamble Rogers, II
145 Lincoln Avenue
Winter Park
Richard Boone Rogers
516 E. Central Avenue
Winter Park
Nils M. Schweizer
206 Park Avenue South
Winter Park
Wythe Davis Sims, II
1731 Winchester Drive
Winter Park
Hill Stiggins
729 N. Thornton
Orlando
Rhoderic F. Taylor
5 Branlan Arcade
Melbourne
George A. Tuttle, Jr.
1330 Palmetto
Winter Park
John T. Watson
917 W. Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park


Henry P. Whitworth
59 Bamboo
Orlando
Joseph N. Williams
1631 Shelby Drive
Eau Gallie
James E. Windham, III
333 N. Rosalind
Orlando
Clifford W. Wright
185 W. Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park

Associate Members
Theodore G. Andrew
P. O. Box 1345
Orlando
Allen E. Arthur, Jr.
1800 E. Central Avenue
Orlando
Alan B. Berman
50'1 Magnolia Avenue
Orlando
James G. Chapman, Jr.
P. 0. Box 762
Winter Park
William A. Cox
305 N. Fern Creek
Orlando
John E. Dye
646 W. Colonial Drive
Orlando
Lyle P. Fugleberg
404 Barclay Drive
Winter Park
David L. Goodwin
525 Crystal Lake Drive
Orlando
Clarence A. Hamilton
529 S. Summerlin Street
Orlando
Danald R. Hampton
201 W. Canton Avenue
Winter Park
Wayne D. Heasly
1612 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando
John A. Hollifield
917 W. Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park
Thomas Horas
1211 34th Street
Orlando
Jeffe-Gene Hoxie
2507 N. Cocoa Blvd.
Cocoa
Robert B. Kelly
91 South Fairfax Avenue
North Orlando
James R. Page, Jr.
918 W. Main Street
Leesburg
Charles H. Parsons
Lake Georgia Drive
Winter Park
Hans D. Schweixer
103 W. Woodlake
Maitland
Frank T. Sheehy
2603 Greenleaf Drive
Orlando
Edward L. Thomas
1659 Knollwood Circle
Orlando
Donald E. Thompson
P. 0. Box 458
Titusville
John W. Totty
P.O. Box 1531
Winter Park
Franklin W. Tye
2417 Summerlin
Sanford







FAA Membership Roster, 1963


Earl C. Unkefer
1861 Windsor Drive
Winter Park
Robert I. Webb
227 Grandview Avenue
Maitland

PALM BEACH
Corporate Members
Donald E. Armstrong
Rm. 12, Arthur Dehon Bldg.
Stuart
James Ashley
235 South County Road
Palm Beach
Allen Babcock
706 Chase Avenue
West Palm Beach
Ames Bennett
361 South County Road
Palm Beach
Robert F. Blake
1045 East Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach
Kemp Caler
378 South County Road
Palm Beach
Howard Chilton
446 Brazilian Avenue
Palm Beach
Robert W. Citron
Paramount Building
Palm Beach
L. Phillips Clarke
6010 South Dixie
West Palm Beach
Chester Cone
216 N. W. 16th Street
Belle Glade
Robbins L. Conn
322 N. W. 16th Street
Delray Beach
George C. Davis
36 S. W. Eighth Court
Delray Beach
Dillard Duff
835 Biscayne Drive
West Palm Beach
John E. Dugger
329 Ponte Vedra Road
Palm Springs
Ellis C. Duncan
P. 0. Box 695
Vero Beach
Donald R. Edge
Plaza Building
Palm Beach


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SENIOR MEMBERS
Charles Ala
Henry Alexander
R. G. Allen
John Antonides
F. D. Barbaree
Dave Boubelick
George Bull
Joel Channing
Bayne Collins
Mallory Crank
Bruce Creager
Rafael De La Sierra
Bill Dilatush
Al Dompe
Sam Evans
Bill Fischer
David J. Flathe
Ricard Geldbaugh
Leonard Grossman
Gene Hayes
T. G. Hoffman
28


Herman E. Fernau
75 S. Military Trail
West Palm Beach
Reed B. Fuller
240 Ashworth Road
West Palm Beach
John Gesbocher
365 5th Avenue, So.
Naples
C. Herrick Hammond
P. 0. Box 855
Delray Beach
Richard T. Hanna
524 N. E. Second St.
Delray Beach
Henry K. Harding
318 Royal Poinciana PI.
Palm Beach
Maurice E. Holley
601 N. Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach
Kenneth Jacobson
Boyd Building
Delray Beach
William R. Johnson
Wyeth Building
Palm Beach
Philip M. Julien
281 Austin Lane
West Palm Beach
Frederick W. Kessler
361 South County Road
Palm Beach
Howarth Lewis
6107 Lake Avenue
West Palm Beach
Gustav A. Maass
200 Phipps Plaza
Palm Beach
Howard E. McCall
211 S. E. First Avenue
Boca Raton
Paul A. McKinley
301 N Federal Highway
Boca Raton
John A. Marfleet
2909 Ocean Drive
Vero Beach
John B. Marion
238 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach
Sidney K. Neill
P.O. Box 1065
British West Indies
Robert Newstead
531 North Palmway
Lake Worth


Emily V. Obst
214 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach
Harold A. Obst
214 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach
Samuel Ogren, Jr.
7 N. E. Fifth Avenue
Delray Beach
Edmond A. Pachner
307 South County Road
Palm Beach
R. Carroll Peacock
324 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach
Raymond H. Plockelman
230 South County Road
Palm Beach
Henry V. Pope
1310 N. E. Eighth Street
Delray Beach
Jefferson N. Powell
361 South County Road
Palm Beach
Richard E. Pryor
Rm. 12, Arthur Dehon Bldg.
Stuart
Robert Richardson
Paramount Building
Palm Beach
Jimmy W. Robinson
139 Twelfth Place, No.
Lantana
David V. Robison
1002 20th Place
Vero Beach
Norman Robson
937 Belvedere Road
West Palm Beach
Robert E. Roll
48 N. E. First Avenue
Boca Raton
Victor Renfeldt
P. 0. Box 867
Jupiter
David B. Scoville
225 Fern Street
West Palm Beach
Gerhard Selzer
137 Longfellow Drive
Palm Springs
John T. Shoup, Jr.
301 N Federal Highway
Boca Raton
David S. Shriver
335 Worth Avenue
Palm Beach


MEMBERSHIP OF UNIVERSITY STUDENT CHAPTERS
Ed Hoon Louise Donnelly
Jeff Huberman Judith L. Emmons
Jerry James William B. Harvard, Jr.
Donald Kalec Christine Karandjeff
Wally Kirkpatrick Vicki Leigh Markland
Frank Lamb Roger Paluzzi
Emilio Lebolo Alexander Pollock
Gini Lenz William A. Speer, Jr.
Dave Leonard George T. Szabo
Ruthanne Lind Ed Marc Trieb
DoroLhy Mainella UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

Lee Ogden William Bell
Tom Peacock Edward Berounsky
Frank Piazza Gustavo Brol
Paul Robinson Sheldon Chaplin
Heidar Schirazi Gordon Chin
Ted Tschumy Ronald Danials
Pete Volmar J. De Gennaro
Arthur Dearborn
JUNIOR MEMBERS Emma Esoino
Richard Becker Thomas Ford
Thomas D. Berry, Jr. Domingo Galan
Chris Benninger James Goodkin


Roy M. Simon
P. 0. Box 35
Delray Beach
Hilliard T. Smith
214 City Center Bldg.
Lake Worth
John Stetson
249 Peruvian Avenue
Palm Beach
William C. Taylor
1020 Miracle Mile
Vero Beach
Charles E. Toth
7 N. E. Fifth Avenue
Delray Beach
William R. Upthegrove
1287 E. Blue Heron Blvd.
Riviera
John L. Volk
206 Plaza Circle
Palm Beach
George J. Votaw
210 Okeechobee Road
West Palm Beach
Robert W. Wening
321 Northlake Blvd.
North Palm Beach
Jack Willson, Jr.
225 Potter Road
West Palm Beach
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth
Marion Simms Wyeth
Wyeth Building
Palm Beach
Associate Members
Timothy H. Darrows
301 N. Federal Highway
Boca Raton
William W. Brainard
206 Arlington Road
West Palm Beach
Paul B. Henderson
P.O. Box 1592
Stuart
Ronald L. Lane
433 Date Palm Drive
Lake Park
J. Raymond La Thomus
930 Paseo Morella
West Palm Beach
Ronald D. Schwab
724 Evergreen Drive
Lake Park
John Webb
623 Evern;a Street
West Palm Beach


Donald Hoydu
Joel Lipinsky
Henry MacCarthy
Melvin McCorrison
Isaac Mizrachi
James Neal
Arne Nordstron
Leon Noubleau
Walter Pedreira
Judi Philpott
Edwin Sampson
Rafael Sanchez
Robert Sauerteig
Frederick Scheer
John Scott
John Shelton
Raymond Simmons
Paul Smith
Vibul Thansriskul
Dan Trotter
Carroll Turner
Michel Victor
Kenneth Vorzimer
Leon Wilhelm
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















Miami's KingC

.... a complete f<

__n~


The reuse of forms, quick concrete delivery and round uniform columns coupled with excellent design and construction skill...That's
how General Contractor Robert L. Turchin, Inc., Miami Beach, consistently placed a complete 40,000 square foot concrete floor
every four working days at King Cole Apartments. The 12-story, all concrete structure is designed by Fridstein and Fitch, architects
and engineers of Chicago, with Melvin Grossman of Miami Beach, associate architect; Crain Engineering of Miami, structural
design; and B. D. Freedman of Miami, structural consultant to the contractor and design engineers.



Fast construction comes easy

with concrete frame and floors


More and more architects and builders are
achieving outstanding speed of construction
with modern concrete. Building can start as
soon as foundation loads are determined. The
efficiency of re-usable forms saves time and
labor. And with concrete, your material is al-
ways there when you need it.
In addition to the advantages of early oc-
cupancy, concrete flat-plate construction
brings big economy. The finished slab, with a
thin coat of plaster, is the ceiling. In high-rise
buildings as much as a full story in total


height can be saved-with less materials such
as conduits and pipes needed.
With no beams, and flexible column place-
ment, there is more usable space. Partitions
can be placed for most efficient room layout.
And concrete provides superior sound in-
sulation, needs no special fireproofing. Archi-
tects and engineers frequently are specifying
concrete frame and floor construction today.
They're finding the same advantages for all
structures, of both conventional and modern
design.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


JANUARY, 1963









THE

EXTRA

PLUS


OF AN


A
(l( Z=~


TRUSS
GRE AT ER E FFICIEN CY speed construction . while decreasing costs.
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Pre-fabricated trusses using ANCHOR LOCK's proven system have opened new
vistas in design and building. They are continuously tested for the ultimate in
strength and durability. With ANCHOR LOCK's patented design, you can add
new beauty in interior design and room layout. You achieve structural rigidity
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worthy" roof trusses!




OF FLORIDA, INC.
ENGINEERING OFFICE / ANCHOR LOCK OF FLORIDA, INC. / 1950 N. 30th AVE., HOLLYWOOD, FLA. / YU 9-0287-AREA CODE 305
Write for information and name of the distributor nearest you


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I











Jacksonville





THEODORE C. POULOS

President






The year that has passed now
stands as a testament of achievement
for the Jacksonville Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects.
Many of the goals established during
the year have been reached, and
others are now established as a part


of Chapter affairs which will be con-
tinued to the planned conclusion.
The climax of our most successful
effort came in November, when, at a
dinner meeting, the Chapter present-
ed awards to outstanding craftsmen
in recognition of excellence in the


execution of their work. Although
conceived primarily as a recognition
and encouragement of fine workman-
ship, the presentation and announce-
ment of these awards brought popular
response far exceeding our expecta-
tions. This reward of the efforts of
selected craftsmen was endorsed not
only by the Construction Industry
but by other organizations and indi-
viduals as well.
As we look to the coming year, we
shall continue the programs now
proven by experience to be successful,
but shall also enter new activities
conceived to increase the effective-
ness of the Chapter as a professional
organization. By placing more em-
phasis on improving relations with
allied professions, the construction
industry, and civic organizations of
our community, we hope to reach
beyond the past to a new record of
service and achievement. With high
ideals and an energetic membership,
we will accomplish our aims.


Florida Northwest


ELLIS W. BULLOCK
President


We in North West Florida are one
of the smallest chapters of the A.I.A.,
however our size and location shall
not impede our activities for the year
1963. Since our charter a little over
six years ago, we have doubled our
membership and vastly increased our
Chapter activities. Excellent progress
has been made in the past and I am
looking forward to continuing our
present programs with additional ac-
tivities in other areas.
We shall make a concentrated ef-
fort to increase our membership, both
corporate and associate. Although the
principals of almost all of the offices
encompassed by our chapter are cor-
porate members, many have employees
who are registered and eligible for
corporate membership. Other em-
ployees will be encouraged to become
associate members. The employer will
not only be asked to sponsor new
memberships, but, if possible, to share
membership expense. We need a
JANUARY, 1963


strong participation from our new
members in the extension of our
Chapter activities.
Our work in public relations will
continue. We will avail ourselves as
a group to the planning committee
of the Chamber of Commerce, City
and County bodies and other Civic
groups desiring our skills. The ground-
work has been laid in Escambia Coun-
ty with the school authorities for a
more comprehensive and detailed
study of education methods and trend
as related to our future school plans.
It is proposed that a Specification for
Education will be drawn by local
school authorities with active partici-
pation by the architect concerned.
One previous meeting was enthusias-
tically received and plans are in prog-
ress for establishing a guide procedure.
This program will be vigorously pur-
sued and all involved believe it will
result in a better relation between the
educator and the architect.


There is much work to be done on
our "Image of the Architect." We
will seek a better relationship with
the press through direct contact and
invited coverage of all pertinent items
and affairs.
There is a strong need for improve-
ment of our relations with the build-
ing industry as a group. As one of the
largest industries on the state and local
level we consist of professional and
contractual groups with no direct re-
(Continued on Page 33)







NEW CONCRETE REVETMENT SEAWALL

DEFIES WIND, WAVES, EROSION


Conventional seawall during storm of March, 1962

Two Year Old Installation
At Jupiter Island Proves Most
Effective Barrier To
Storm Damage and Erosion

Two years ago, Jupiter Island, off the lower East
Coast of Florida, was steadily losing its shoreline to
the waters of Hobe Sound. Vertical seawalls did
little to stem the persistent erosion of its beaches.
High winds and water during storms made off with
great chunks of expensive property, and constant
pounding of conventional seawalls set up a noise and
vibration that cracked plaster in waterfront homes.
W. C. Crowell, Jr., Vice President and Manager of
Dickerson, Incorporated, Stuart, Florida, was com-
missioned to build 350 linear feet of this completely
new seawall design. It was a revetment wall made
of interlocking concrete units. Being metal free, it
was rust free. For thirty-five feet it followed the
natural rise of the beach from below the water line
to property level. Designed by Dr. Per Bruun, noted
head of the Coastal Engineering Staff at the Uni-
versity of Florida, the new wall combined the wave
dissipating properties of revetments with a concrete
wind screen to prevent overtopping. Each inter-
locking concrete block weighed 1,400 pounds. In


Revetment seawall during same storm

1961, 1,100 linear feet were added, and in 1962,
2,500 linear feet more.
In March of 1962, the revetment wall withstood its
biggest test. A storm with 15 to 20 foot waves
roared into the island, doing considerable damage


Revetment seawall after the storm. Beach has actually
been built up.
to other seawalls and property. But the new instal-
lation stood intact. The beach in front of it had actu-
ally been built up. Rear Admiral Richard Tuggle,
Town Manager of Jupiter Island, said, "Judging
from the experience we've had, it actually collects
the sand. It stops vibration. It is working out well."
A new concept in shore protection has nullified the
twin threats . storm damage and erosion . .
proving once again, the economy, low maintenance,
and durability of concrete.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Northwest . .
(Continued from Page 31)
lation or tie. The need of a County
building code, review and revision of
existing City codes are two items that
will require a united effort by all of
the building industry. Consideration
of an informal association for stronger
representation is in order.
We shall endeavor to make our


profession and our chapter better
known and our purposes better under-
stood to our state and national legis-
lators. Our aims, ambitions and place
in society will be presented to our
representatives through increased
chapter and individual efforts.
We shall increase our participation
and representation to all FAA com-
mittee meetings and functions, and
will use our geographical location ex-


cuse only as a last resort. The mem-
bership will be kept informed of all
committee meetings and results by a
chapter newsletter.
I am looking for an eventful year
of increased participation and mem-
bership in the Association, of a strong-
er related building industry, and of a
strong program of education of the
public to our place, need, and neces-
sity in our society.


Florida North Central

JOSEPH N. CLEMONS
President
1. To maintain the present high
standard of professional service offered
by the local members of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects.
2. To follow as nearly as possible
the by-laws of the Chapter, FAA, and
AIA.
3. To emphasize the committees
whose functions are most important
in the conduct of local affairs. (The
small number of corporate members
precludes extensive activity for all
recommended committees).
4. To seek a reasonable amount of
newspaper recognition for certain
chapter meetings and projects.
5. To include on a more active
basis those architects and others asso-


Florida Central
H. LESLIE WALKER
President
The year 1962 was a very active
year for The Florida Central Chap-
ter, climaxed by being the Host
Chapter for the F.A.A. Convention,
recently concluded at the Soreno
Hotel in St. Petersburg.
1963 will see an intensification of
activity if all goes as planned. The
chairmen and members of the stand-
ing committees have been selected
and they have been charged with
their duties. Although our committees
met several times last year and much
important work was produced, we
expect greater efforts to be forth-
coming this year primarily because
our steering committee chairman and
JANUARY, 1963


ciated with the profession who are
employed in the various state offices.
6. To make use of chapter mem-
bers for chapter programs.
7. To have as many chapter mem-
bers as possible ready to speak to civic
clubs, to garden clubs, on television,
and for other occasions that may
arise.
8. To have exhibits of local work
ready for use at art festivals, county
fairs, university exhibitions, and other
similar events.
9. To encourage all members to
continue their education and enhance
their value to the profession by keep-
ing up to date on new products and
techniques, by studying actively in
related fields, and by attending semi-
nars and conventions.
10. To discuss with high school
students the choice of architecture
or drafting as a career, and to en-
courage those so inclined.



Chapter vice president, Dana Jo-
hannes last year had the added re-
sponsibility of guiding our conven-
tion planning, and his time in Chap-
ter affairs was limited.
Other Officers for 1963, elected
at our annual meeting in October
are DANA JOHANNES Vice President;
JACK WEST, Secretary; JACK MCCAND-
LESS, Treasurer. Chapter Directors are
JACK WOHLBERG, GENE THOMPSON
and SIDNEY WILKINSON. FAA Di-
rectors are FRANK F. SMITH, FRANK
MUDANO and WYNN HOWELL, with
MARK HAMPTON, FRANK McLANE,
JR., and JOSEPH COGGAN elected as
FAA Alternate Directors.
Our meeting format will be changed
this year to include a seminar on
some matter of interest and informa-
tion of the architects. We are also
(Continued on Page 40)










JANUARY, 1963

Good NEWS about Natural Gas...



ONE-TWO PUNCH! Pinellas County scores with Florida's first natural-gas-
air-conditioned school, Oak Park Junior High in Clearwater... closely follows
with a second Junior High at Safety Harbor. Latter has 75 tons of engine-driven
equipment in first phase, will increase to 22Z5 tons when school is completed.

NATURAL GAS DRAWS INDUSTRY. Sanford Gas Company's $100, 000 ex-
pansion south of city provides natural gas to big new industrial park. Already
signed for natural gas boilers and steam processing: HLH Products, area's larg-
est new industrial plant (food processing) owned by Hunt interests of Texas.

JAX FIRM SAVES $1700. Dixie Galvanizing changed from Propane and No.
2 fuel oil to natural gas for steam boiler and galvanizing tanks. Indicated fuel
saving for first year $1700. 67.

MORE "BIG NAMES" GO NATURAL GAS. Tampa's newest Congress Inn and
Tampa Airport Motel owned by Jim Walter group both big users of natural gas for
cooking, heating, hot water, etc. Western Auto's Southern Regional Warehouse
and General Food's Jacksonville warehouse chose natural gas for heating and
process hot water. Winn Dixie super in St. Pete cut refuse hauling costs in half
by incinerating waste with natural gas.

CLEANERS CHANGE OVER AND SAVE. Florida Cleaners, Jacksonville,
converted two boilers from #5 oil to natural gas. Howard Cleaners, St. Peters-
burg, also converted 30 HP and 25 HP boilers to natural gas. Result as reported
by management: fuel bills cut 501%, operation cleaner and much more efficient.

4 to 1 FAVOR NATURAL GAS FRANCHISE. Voters of Surfside, Miami sub-
urb, have voted 30-year franchise to Peoples Gas System by better than 4 to 1
ratio. Holly Hill, near Daytona Beach, also gave 30-year "vote of confidence" to
Florida Gas Utilities Company.

IT'S GAS FOR BIG ST. PETE APARTMENT. In unusual arrangement, large
equipment is located on top floor of major 12-story apartment house, Plaza Fifth
Avenue, St. Petersburg. Two 250 HP natural gas boilers furnish heat and hot
water. Two large chute-fed incinerators on ground floor are gas-fired.

$3, 000 SAVED IN EUSTIS. F. B. Howard, manager of W. W. MAC Store in
Eustis authors statement that engine-driven natural gas air conditioning in his unit
operates for at least $3, 000 per year less than in any of the 100 other MAC stores
using competitive types.

"ECONOMY-IN-GOVERNMENT" NOTE. After careful survey of competitive
figures, officials chose natural gas for 190 completed and 60 proposed low-rent
housing units in Fort Pierce. Natural gas also won nod for 70 additional units de-
signed for "retirement age" tenants of limited means.

AIR CONDITIONING SWITCH. Unusually cold fall weather is credited for
budding air conditioning boom in Deland. Florida Home Gas reports that aroused
interest in heating helped sell over 20 domestic and small commercial year-round
installations which cool in summer as well.

Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without re-
striction by the Florida Natural Gas Association, P.O. Box 11147, St. Petersburg, Fla.
34 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


Is Your Firm's Brochure
On File and Up To Date?
The following letter from the U. S.
Naval Air Station at Jacksonville,
originally sent to FAA President RoY
M. POOLEY, JR., should prove of in-
terest to all members of the FAA:
"It is the desire of this activity to
maintain in a current status files of
brochures on local architect and engi-
neering firms who are interested in
performing architectural or engineer-
ing work for construction projects at
the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
"It is advised that it would be to
the best interests of firms with which
your members are connected, to bring
their brochures up to date annually
if they are interested in obtaining
Navy contract work.
"Architects and engineering firms
who have not submitted brochures
and are interested in Navy contracts
are cordially invited to do so. If cur-
rent brochures of firms are not avail-
able, standard Architect and Engineer
Questionnaire forms can be made
available upon request to the Public


Works Officer, Code 9561, P. 0. Box
5, U. S. Naval Air Station, Jackson-
ville, Florida. Brochures and/or com-
pleted questionnaires should be mailed
to the same address.
"Normally fees for architectural
and engineering work at this activity
do not exceed $1,500.00. Fees in ex-
cess of $1,500.00 are negotiated by
the Director, Southeast Division -
Bureau of Yards and Docks, Charles-
ton, South Carolina."
The letter was signed by E. HER-
BERT, JR., Assistant Public Works
Officer.
Theme for AIA Convention
The professional program of the
AIA's 1963 Convention-to be held
May 5-9, at the Americana Hotel on
Miami Beach-will develop the theme
"The Quest for Quality in Architec-
ture," according to a recent announce-
men by HENRY L. WRIGHT, FAIA,
president of the AIA.
Noting that the AIA's two most
recent conventions had dealt with
aspects of the Institute's current in-
terest in broadening the architect's
function, the AIA president said,


0


FLORIDA


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& HOMES ,
"-:h .


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Blended glass fibre insulation.
manufactured in Florida for the
first time. now makes it possible
to comfort-proof Floridians with a
quality Florida product, compete
lively priced and quickly delivered
anywhere in the state. Write
Insulation Manufacturing Corp. for
complete information.


INSULATION MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
EXECUTIVE OFFICES 4333 S. FLORIDA AVE. P. 0. BOX 2248 LAKELAND, FLA. PLANT -PIERCE, FLA.

JANUARY, 1963 35


"The 1963 convention seems an
appropriate time to pause in this
period of expansion and again explore
the concept of architectural quality-
to perform the re examination of
'basic Doctrine' in architecture."
The three professional sessions will
deal, respectively with "What Is Qual-
ity," "What and Who Influences
Quality," and "The Attainment of
Quality." Former Florida Region Di-
rector ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, was
one of the five-member committee in
charge of planning the 1963 profes-
sional program.

Changes . .
EDWARD G. GRAFTON has been ad-
mitted to a general partnership in the
Coconut Grove firm of Pancoast, Fer-
endino, Skeels and Burnham. The
firm's new name will be PANCOAST,
FERENDINO, GRAFTON, SKEELS and
BURNHAM. Address and phone num-
ber have not been changed.
The Jacksonville firm of REYNOLDS,
SMITH and HILLS has announced the
admission of partners of WILLIAM J.
WEBBER, AIA, and RALPH WV. HEIM,
AIEE. The firm maintains branch
offices in Orlando, Tampa and Hunts-
ville, Alabama.








A Contractor Looks at


A New Package Deal


This article, by FRANK J. ROONEY, head of one of
the South's largest building organizations and a former
national president of the AGC, contains pertinent ex-
cerpts from an address given at the Carolinas Branch
Convention of the AGC last fall. . .


I am thoroughly convinced there However, I put a different twist to
is a definite trend on the part of it. We join with a leading architect
experienced buyers of construction to and offer to the client a complete
assemble a complete construction service. The big advantage in this
team at the very outset. I am also sort of arrangement is that each re-
thoroughly convinced that the gen- mains independent and does his part
eral contractor will assume a role of of the work on this particular job. It
greater importance in the future than is flexible and can be used with dif-
he has in the past. ferent architects' offices on different
We hear much these days, especi- types of work.
ally from the architectural profession, This type of program takes some
about the "Package Dealers"-that is, selling and education. First, with the
one firm that designs and builds. I architect whose immediate reaction
am not fighting the "Package Deal"; may be that the general contractor
I am joining it. I think it's great. is usurping his authority. But when


the advantages of this team effort
are made clear, they begin to see
the light and after one project most
become very enthusiastic. The advan-
tages are many-a few being that he
may select a general contractor best
suited for this job, one in whom he
has confidence and will work with
his office and produce a good product.
He has the services of a cost con-
sultant during the time plans and
specifications are being prepared. But
the most important is that he has a
guaranteed upset price within the
budget when the plans are finished.
The other selling job, of course, is
with the client. This, I believe, is the
field where the general contractor has
not taken full advantage of his po-
tential. Too many of us are prone
to sit in our offices and wait to be
invited to bid on jobs along with
many others. We bid on ten or more
jobs and maybe get one. As business
becomes more competitive, we find
ourselves bidding work at cost just
to get a job and hoping that in
some magic way we will end up with
a profit.
We know that a good general con-
tractor has a fine product to sell-
(Continued on Page 38)


a announcement of a new Tampa office...









the Rilco Engineered Wood Products Division
of Weyerhaeuser Company
has now opened a Tampa office to provide you with local assistance on
structural specifications, design details and estimation requirements of
Rilco laminated wood arches, beams, trusses and engineered products.
We will be pleased to assist you.


A Weyerhaeuser Company
Rilco Engineered Wood Products Division
Forest Hills Station P.O. Box 17735 Phone 932-8511 (A'c) 813 Tampa 12, Fla.



36 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






--ROAD CONSTRUCTION --


e--TRANSIT MIXED CONCRETE -- I


PRESTRESSED CONCRETE


HOW THE MANY DIMENSIONS OF


R. H. WRIGHT BENEFIT YOU


TRANSIT MIXED CONCRETE ... Three complete batch-
ing plants in Broward County capable of producing a
combined total of 450 cubic yards of concrete per hour.
These are specification mixes and rigidly controlled and
tested.
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE . Three precast, pre-
stressed concrete production plants for the production
of structural concrete members. One of the largest oper-
ations of its type in the nation, producing concrete units
to meet your requirements and all local building codes.
ROAD CONSTRUCTION ... One of the leaders in the
State of Florida in grading, drainage and paving work on
Federal, State and local municipal roads, and in land
clearing and developing.
HOUDAILLE-SPAN . This precast, prestressed con-
crete, hollow core flat slab is machine-extruded in thick-
nesses of 6" and 8" and can be cut to any desired
length to meet structural requirements for structurally
safe, attractive, economical roof and floor systems.
PLASTER MATERIALS . Complete ready-mix mor-
tar plant capable of producing specification-type pre-
mixed mortars, stuccos, sand plasters and finishing lime
for the construction industry.
.&L


ASPHALT... Broward Asphalt Corp., a division of R. H.
Wright, has one portable and two permanent watching
plants, each with a capacity to produce 700 to 800 tons
of Type I or Type II asphaltic concrete per day.
AGGREGATES . One of the most modern equipped
rock crushing plants in South Florida with a capacity of
2,500 tons of crushed rock per day. Used in road build-
ing, concrete and asphalt mixes.


R. H. WRIGHT
1050 N.E. 5th Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.


JANUARY, 1963 37


- --- ..^i-n- . _1


I


HOUDAILLE-SPAN@ ;A4







Planning an apartment? motel? hotel?


Or an office, school or institutional building? i i
Specify the Dwyer Compact Kitchen in the
size and capacity required for the applica-
tion. There's a full line of Dwyers from 39" to '.
72" in length, for conventional or recess in-
stallation. Include refrigerator, gas or elec- '-
tric range and bake/broil oven, deep sink and P '"4
storage. Heavy-duty construction and vit-
reous porcelain finish assure lasting dura-
bility and beauty. lIa I
Write or phone today for L
r Architect's Data File.
n.o v Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc., Suite 621, DuPont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Boulevard Way, Miami 32, Phone FRanklin 1-4344


Package Deal ...
(Continued from Page 36)
his skill, responsibility and integrity.
Many times we are reluctant to ap-
proach a client and tell him how good
we are and why we are the one
best qualified to build his new build-
ing. If we are to assume our rightful
role, we must let people know who
we are and what we do. I am sure
there are many questions in your
minds. How can he make a firm price
without complete plans? How does
the client know he is getting the
right price without a check figure?
And, perhaps many more.
Allow me to get personal. Our firm
does a good volume-85 per cent
of this work is negotiated. We bid
selected jobs to assure ourselves we
are competitive. Many years ago the
leading department store chain in
our area decided to build a new build-
ing on Miami Beach. We were the
successful bidder and were awarded
the contract. During the course of
this job we became friendly with
the officials of this company, especial-
ly the Vice President in charge of
Store Planning and Construction.
This was a very important job for us.


Opening New Vistas

for

PROGRESSIVE

ARCHITECTS


From Air Conditionin


7no


rn.


Plush new REEF
Motor Hotel on
Clearwater Beach
features Capri
Restaurant and
Candlelight Inn,
with Natural Gas
Air Conditioning,
two All-Gas
Kitchens, Water
Heating . even
warm water for
swimming pool. 1


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


,0" -
P96






At the time it was a large job and
one of prestige because of the promi-
nence of the owner. Needless to say,
we put our best efforts forward. We
had a friendly architect and everyone
cooperated. It was a happy job. Work-
manship was very good, time sched-
ules were met or beaten. And, inci-
dentally, we made a fair profit. Every-
one was pleased with the outcome.
We kept our relationship active by
regular visits to the store, making
adjustments and correcting minor de-
fects before they were called to our
attention. During construction we
kept very accurate cost records, not
only on the work we did with our
own forces but also the subcontract-
or's work. When the job was com-
pleted we made studies of every
phase of the job; and these figures
revealed some very interesting in-
formation to the client, architect and
engineer. A meeting was held and all
the facts and figures freely discussed.
Not in the spirit of criticism, but
as information that would be helpful
on another project.
About a year later we were invited
to lunch by this client and with
the architect and engineer shown
sketches for a new building in West


Palm Beach. We were asked to make
a preliminary estimate for the pur-
pose of establishing a budget. We
were also asked to suggest the type
of contract that would suit this ar-
rangement.
After two meetings with the archi-
tect and engineers an outline specifi-
cation was agreed upon; and by using
information from the previous job we
were able to establish an upset price.
This price was given with the agree-
ment that we would have control of
design within certain limits. The
architect was given the go-ahead and
we acted as cost consultants. The
engineers submitted four different
schemes of framing which we esti-
mated and all agreed on one. We
had an estimator assigned to this job
and he practically lived with the
architect. He raised the red flag when
an eager-beaver draftsman started to
gold plate a certain item. He worked
with the specification writer so that
we had open specifications and could
get competitive bidding. And, when
the plans were almost finished, the
price was confirmed with slight ad-
justments and we were ready to sign
a contract and get started.
The contract we worked out was a


combination of a lump sum and cost
plus. We used the AIA cost-plus form
of contract and added a paragraph
that covered the guaranteed upset
price. This upset price included a
fixed fee-in this instance 6 per cent
of our estimated cost. This fee was
net, because the overhead, except
officers' salaries and home office ex-
penses, was charged to the job. Now
came the question of assuring the
client of the right price without a
check figure. We worked out a plan
whereby any savings made that would
reduce our cost was divided between
owner and contractor-50-50, or 75
to owner and 25 to contractor basis.
On this particular job we did about
35 per cent of the work with our
own forces and sub-contracted about
65 per cent. On the sub work we
took competitive bids, thereby assur-
ing the owner that the major part
of the job was bid competitively. This
plan has been followed through the
years and we have recently completed
the seventh project for this one client.
This plan has worked so well we
have used it on most of our work.
The clients like it and the architects
are now selling the plan to new
clients.


SSwimming Pool Heating...


There's a progressive look . an air of
distinction . about so many of the new
Florida residences and commercial buildings
which are going all out for natural gas.


Because progressive architects and engineers
are the ones who are realizing the full potential
of natural gas-its cleanliness, speed, econ-
omy, dependability and complete flexibility.


Now that there's a choice of energy sources, you owe it to
yourself and to your clients to investigate thoroughly the
potential of natural gas. Call us direct or through your
local natural gas distributors.


W FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY
P.O. BOX 44, WINTER PARK, FLORIDA Member: Florida Natural Gas Assn.

JANUARY, 1963 3






Florida Central ...
(Continued from Page 33)
going to hold all of our meetings in
1963 at the Outrigger Inn, which
is located on the north end of the
Sunshine Skyway in St. Petersburg-
this being a central location for our
members in the lower coast area as
well as for those in Polk County,
Tampa, and St. Petersburg.
The meeting dates will be February
9, April 13, June 8, August 10,
October 12, and December 14. An
invitation is extended to all members
of the FAA to attend our meetings
when they are in our area.
Our Ladies Auxiliary re-elected
MRS. I. BLOUNT WAGNER for Presi-
dent for 1963. Other officers are
MRS. JAMES R. DRY, Vice President;
MRS. DONALD MCINTOSH, Secretary;
MRS. JOSEPH L. COGGAN, Treasurer.
Directors are MRS. CLARENCE W.
DOLL, MRS. EDMUND N. MACCOLLIN,
and MRS. EDGAR C. HANNEBUTH.
The Ladies Auxiliary meetings are
held at the same time as our Chapter
Business Meetings, after which they
join their husbands for the scheduled
social activities.


A Challenge to Chapters...
(Continued from Page 9)
on a broad, nationwide scale. Legis-
lative action, for example, commences
at the point where individual members
of Chapters become interested and
active in the affairs of the local
communities. Planning commissions,
building code commissions and urban
development and redevelopment com-
missions in every community can de-
rive benefit from the guidance and
counsel of competent architects. Since
this can only be accomplished when
such aid is available and present, archi-
tects must take a stronger interest in
Chamber of Commerce Committees,
civic organizations and other groups
concerned with municipal, county or
state construction programs. Politics
at the national level commence at
the local level. Senators, Representa-
tives and appointees to important poli-
tical office derive nourishment from
the support of their constituents in
every hamlet, town and city in the
nation. Architects should regard an
interest in the political parties of
their choice as a matter of professional


responsibility as well as one of civic
duty.
The officers and directors of the
AIA are assigned with the additional
task of providing liaison and com-
munications between architects and
other professional and trade organiza-
tions active in the construction field.
Through the Producers' Council, man-
ufacturers of building materials who
seek to measure the trends of design
as well as markets, commenced a pat-
tern of annual meetings more than
twenty-five years ago in which archi-
tects exercise a profound influence in
programs for the research and develop-
ment of new materials, development
of test and specification data and
technical services all of which aid
the architect in his day to day tasks.
In other areas, architects meet with
building and sub-contractors, labor
union officials and others in an un-
ceasing campaign to upgrade the
quality of the job with which they
are identified. These programs are
considered essential because of the
intense concern for the performance
by contractors and building mechanics
entrusted with the responsibility for
translating blueprints and specifica-


How Long Since Your Communications


System Had a Checkup?

You may not fully realize it, but your company's communi-
cations system may not be quite up to the needs of a growing
business or the increasing complexities of doing business.

The cure? A communications checkup and a possible pre-
scription for one or more of the many telephone services
especially designed to increase business efficiency . cut
down wasted time and effort. For instance: Dial TWX Sys-
tems; DATA-PHONE service; Call Directors; Wide Area Tel-
ephone Service; Automatic Dialers; and many others.

Why not make an appointment soon for a communications
checkup and find out the advantages of these new services?
There's no obligation. Just call your telephone business
office.


Southern A Bell

... 0lWwllwd & FUw


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






tions into completed architecture.
These services provided by the
staff of the AIA are intended to meet
the most exacting requirements of
every office regardless of size. Ma-
terial to be used in the planning of
public relations techniques has been
developed to accommodate the needs
of the compact office as well as those
of the major organization with a
large staff of employees. In similar
manner, group insurance programs,
regional seminars and data on profes-
sional practice is intended to rebound
to the best interest of ALL architects
- not "just a few." The Handbook
of Architectural Practice, for instance,
represents a collation of materials and
experiences reflecting the finest and
best knowledge in the profession. It
is available and exceedingly useful
- to every architect.
In the final analysis, the AIA must
be regarded as an instrument of
general service to the chapters and
through them to the individual mem-
bers. Since it reflects the attitudes,
aims and desires of its membership,
it must be concluded that is is wholly
a "member's organization" to date
one that members pridefully regard as
the country's best!


Law Revisions . .
(Continued from Page 6)
limitations into square footage terms
to avoid the inequities automatically
deriving from changing monetary
values such as inflation. An archi-
tect's services will not be required
in making plans and specifications
for, or supervision of, the erection,
enlargement or alteration of 1) any
building for farm use upon a farm,
2) any one- or two-family residence
having less than 1,200 square feet
of area or any domestic building ap-
purtenant thereto, regardless of size
or area, or of any other type building
having less than 1,000 square feet
of area (with the exception of schools,
auditoriums or other buildings intend-
ed for the mass assemblage of people).
The second paragraph of Section
467.09 defines interprofessional privi-
leges between architects and engin-
eers. Unchanged from the present
law, this permits the performance by
architects (and employees under their
supervision) of "engineering services
which are purely incidental to their
(Continued on Page 42)
JANUARY, 1963


RALPH KIRSCH


JULIAN PEYSER


Vogue Kitchen Center


* We wish to thank these leading architects with
whom we have been privileged to work and who
have specified the outstanding lines of NEVAMAR
CAREFREE KITCHENS, MUTSCHLER HARD-
WOOD KITCHENS, and ST. CHARLES CUSTOM
KITCHENS that we handle.


LEROY K. ALBERT
CARL H BLOHM
ROBERT J BOEREMA
DAVERMAN AND ASSOCIATES
JAMES DEEN
J. ALDEN FUSCO
T. HUNTER HENDERSON, JR
WALTER J HUBBARD
HUDSON AND ROOT
PETER JEFFERSON
ALFRED BROWNING PARKER, FAIA
SAMUEL M PUDER
EDWIN T REEDER, FAIA
JOHN H SCHMITZ
FRANK H. SHUFLIN
SMITH AND KORACH
JOSEPH N. SMITH
ROBERT FITCH SMITH, FAIA
WILLIAM E. TSCHUMY
MAURICE S WEINTRAUB


0 To those architects who have not yet visited
the South's most beautiful and complete kitchen
showroom, we cordially invite your inspection.


VOGUE KITCHEN CENTER
5400 N. E. 2nd Ave., Miami
Phone: 759-4461


1












when TERRAZZO is properly cured,
beautifully finished and correctly
maintained the Hillyard way!
Hillyard Maintaineers are available to serve you in
Florida, with a two-fold counseling service; "job
captain" service for you, and later, maintenance
planning for your client. They offer free job super-
vision, specialized approved products for terrazzo
care, and a client manual for preventive maintenance.
Materials are conveniently warehoused in Florida,
and the Hillyard Maintaineer is
'OR Jou*t aj. S 1fot o0u[ L Paytopp







LOREN E. ELLIS DAN K. MINNICK
P.O. Box 2343 P.O. Box 2745
Hollywood, Florida Orlando, Florida
Phone: WAbash 2-8121 Phone: GArden 3-8208


Proprietary Chemists Since 1907


Law Revision ...
(Continued from Page 41)

architectural practice" and grants re-
ciprocal privilege to engineers.
The third and fourth paragraphs,
in effect, comprise a definition of
the practice of architecture. The last
two paragrahps of this Section regu-
late the practice of landscape archi-
tecture and in the second draft of
the statute will be amended to per-
mit architects to practice "such land-
scape architecture as is incidental to
their architectural work."
Sections 467.10 through 467.12
cover the required maintenance and
posting of certificates to practice and
admission to practice without exam-
ination. The annual registration fee
can, at the Board's discretion, be in-
creased to a sum not to exceed $50.
The principal provision of Section
467.13 stipulates that no city or
county shall issue an occupational li-
cense without first obtaining evidence
"under the seal of the State Board
of Architecture" that the applicant
is duly authorized by the state to
practice.
Section 467.14 remains substanti-
ally unchanged and deals with revoca-
tion of certificates, their reinstate-
ment, the necessary procedures, etc.
Section 467.15 requires the use by
architects and landscape architects of
their professional seals and prohibits
the application of their seals to work
not produced under their responsible
supervision. In the second draft (cur-
rently under study) of the proposed
new statute, still another step toward
professional practice of architecture
upgrading the ethics and standards of
is being taken by requiring adherence
to certain of the "obligations of good
practice" and "mandatory standards"
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects. Both Alabama and South Caro-
lina laws follow a similar course, and
there are any number of other pro-
fessional fields-law, for example-
where ethical practice requirements
are written into the regulatory sta-
tutes. The public has a right to ex-
pect not only competent, but ethical
practice by any registered professional
person. Certain basic standards of
conduct should be mandatory to in-
sure a minimum level of practice
where the professional's status as an
unprejudiced and honest advisor to
his client cannot be easily com-
promised.


NEW

PLASTIC FOAM

ROOF

INSULATION
STRONG
LIGHTWEIGHT
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FEWER JOINTS
LOWEST C FACTOR
ARCHITECTS -ENGINEERS- Write
for free complete Information
Brochure...








ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Anchor Lock of Florida . 30
American Granwood
Flooring Co. .. 7
A. R. Cogswell . . 42
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 38
Dyfoam Corporation . 42
Florida Home
Heating Institute . 44
Florida Gas Transmission 38-39
Florida Portland Cement Div. 32
Florida Investor Owned
Electric Utilities . 22-23
Florida Natural Gas Co. 34
General Portland Cement . 15
Hillyard Sales 42
Insulation Manufacturing Corp. 35
Merry Bros. Brick & Tile . 3
Maule Industries . . 8
Miami Window Corp. . 1
Peoples Gas Co . .. 16
Richard Plumer . 4th Cover
Perico Tennis Courts . 6
Portland Cement Association 29
Solite Corp. . 21
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 40
Thompson Door . . 5
Timber Structures Inc. . 24
Vogue Kitchens . . 41
Weyerhaeuser Co. Rilco Div. 36
F. Graham Williams Co. . 43
R. H. Wright Co. . . 37

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A. .COGSWELL
"SINCE 1921"


THE BEST
in
Architects' Supplies


Complete Reproduction
Service

433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


I UJAL.
NWE


1H_%`--*E I






Sections 467.16 through 467.18
remain substantially unchanged.
In conclusion, it might be well to
include a few relevant reflections upon
the guiding principles which should
permeate any effort at writing or
modernization of law. First, although
with justification we may say that
"that which is indisputably right is
right," yet we must ever be mindful
that the justifiable, but nevertheless
potent police powers of the state, in
pursuit of protecting the public wel-
fare, can in the wrong hands be used
to produce precisely the reverse result,
and in the process deny many of our
basic Constitutional and human
rights.
Second, if we perceptively observe
the world around us, it is immediately
obvious that the degree of public re-
spect for, and compliance with, any
law is primarily dependent upon the
degree to which the law appears reas-
onable and logical to the majority
and, inseparably therefore, the extent
to which this majority is well-educated
and adequately informed of the pub-
lic need which inspired the law. To
the extent that a law is either un-
enforceable or unenforced, it is detri-
mental to the public interest in that
it encourages disrespect for, and eva-
sion of, the law. This in itself is
reason enough for the periodic review
and revision of all law.
Third, and last, our laws-and, in
fact, the written word-can go only
so far in resolving those differences
which inevitably arise in the increas-
ingly complex affairs of men. Within
reason we should always seek the ab-
solute, but in the realm of design
for human environment-as is typical
in other fields-there are bound to
be nagging grey areas of overlapping
spheres of interest and practice. These
areas will still persist, or under time-
induced change, others will take their
place, when all now living are gone
from this earth.
In any event, the very best law
can, under unethical, unfair or un-
enlightened enforcement, be used not
to stimulate superiority, but to main-
tain mediocrity. And so, in the final
analysis, after we have done our best
at legislating, we must still constantly
strive for ever-better performance
levels, self-education, public educa-
tion, communication and-perhaps
most important of all-more har-
monious and considerate human re-
lations.


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


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Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.


RIepresented in Florida by

MACK E. PALMER
103 Riviera St., Apt. 1, South Side
Jacksonville 7, Florida Telephone: 398-7255
AND
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115 Orangeview Avenue


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Telephone: 446-7271


JANUARY, 1963


ATLANTA

GA.





,AnR. ARCHITECT: For several years our ads (see below)
lMln. AH RCH TEC : have been beamed to "Dad". They
have reminded him again and again that he owes his loved ones adequate
home heating. And that OIL cuts home heating bills in HALF. "Dad" has
the word and so does "Mommy". That's why your recommendation of
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S- :-- '" I


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oA6o


r .;


A. , ,


To Dads Who Care...and Prepare:
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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Everett Greiner, Contractor


Donovan Dean, A.I.A., Architect
Vern Currie, A.I.D., Interior Designer


RICHARD PLUMER


BUSINESS INTERIORS, INC.


155 N.E. 40th ST.. MIAMI PLaza 1-9775




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