• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 UF faculty protests board of control's...
 Aluminum -- its nature and use
 BRI report III: Shading econom...
 Round-house plan may halve hospital...
 Program, 48th annual FAA conve...
 Directory, 1962 building products...
 How labor sees the architect
 And a builder makes this comme...
 News and notes
 8th annual roll call, 1961-196...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00101
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00101
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Advertising
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
    UF faculty protests board of control's decision on planning
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Aluminum -- its nature and use
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    BRI report III: Shading economies
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Round-house plan may halve hospital costs
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Program, 48th annual FAA convention
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Directory, 1962 building products exhibit
        Page 32
        Page 33
    How labor sees the architect
        Page 34
        Page 35
    And a builder makes this comment
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    News and notes
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    8th annual roll call, 1961-1962
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Advertisers' index
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Back Cover
        Page 55
        Page 56
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited- permission-to. digitize- and. make-this. electronic-
version- available- has- been- granted- by-the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of- F lori da.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on- of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed- to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association's-web site.










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74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


lot 7T Iuae ---

Letters .
Tench to Leave for Panama . . . . . . .
U/F Faculty Protests Board of Control's Decision on Planning .
Aluminum Its Nature and Use . . . . . .
By Robert E. Fisher


BRI Report III Shading Economies .
By John M. Evans, AIA
Round-House Plan May Halve Hospital Costs
Program, 48th Annual FAA Convention .
Directory, 1962 Building Products Exhibit .
How Labor Sees The Architect . . .
By Jerome Belson
And A Builder Makes This Comment . .
By Erwin Wolfson
News and Notes . . . . .
8th Annual Roll Call 1961-1962 . .
Advertisers' Index . . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER . .
We can take little credit for the design of this month's cover. The pattern
developed rather naturally from a repetition of the Convention symbol used by
the Florida Central Chapter's Convention Committee on its promotional
stationery. We don't know who created the symbol, so can't credit him here.
But we thank him and his collective associates for an element of design that
resulted in an unusual and we hope attractive Convention Issue cover.


. 13


. 18

20
. 27-31
. 32
. 34


. 36


. 40
. 50-51
. 53


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12

NUMBER 11 1962


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 4



















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Letters


Suppliers Agree . .
The editorial in the October issue,
"One Easy Way To Stop Bid Shop-
ping", generated a considerable re-
action from various segments of the
building industry. Approval was gen-
eral; and here are three letters typical
of others received.

EDITOR, F/A:
Congratulations on the excellence
of your editorial on the second cover
of The Florida Architect for October,
1962. You have hit on a subject
about which we feel deeply, and you
have made your point forcefully, clear-
ly, and unmistakably.
The kind of dedication to principle
you so well espouse is just the kind
we all need more of always-both in
the architectural profession and in
those professions and businesses as-
sociated with it. As may be common
knowledge, we have been operating
our firm on that principle since its
founding 37 years ago, and we intend
to continue. It may be on many oc-
casions the hard way, but we remain
convinced it is the successful way and,
in fact, the only way.
Congratulations again on the excel-
lence of your thinking and writing.
RICHARD B. PLUMER
The Richard Plumer Company

EDITOR, F/A:
We have just read with great inter-
est, your editorial in the October issue
of The Florida Architect. You have
both pinpointed the problem accurate-
ly and offered an extremely logical so-
lution. We subscribe whole-heartedly
to this type of thinking.
We would like to point out however
that, while the conditions described
do exist, we have noted a definite
trend toward quality. An increasing
number of architects are making an
honest attempt to hold their specifica-
tions and to discourage bid shopping.
Also, surprisingly enough, ethical con-
tractors with a desire to do fine work
do exist in the Florida area.
I'm sure we speak for other quality
fabricators as well when we applaud
you for your efforts to upgrade the
profession and the market.
JAMES S. GRAY
Engineered Building Materials,
Inc.


EDITOR, F/A:
I am sure that this is only one of
many letters you will receive regarding
your editorial in the October issue.
Thank you for the illustrations of
both the good and bad that the qual-
ity building material dealer faces. I
would like to hope that as this com-
munity matures the many segments
of the construction industry will keep
pace.
Keep up the good work.
OTIS DUNAN
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.


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BENMONT TENCH, JR.


Tench To

Leave for

Panama

Last month BENMONT TENCH, JR.,
for nearly fifteen years associated as
legal advisor to the architectural pro-
fession in Florida, was sworn in as
Deputy Director of the Agency for
International Development Mission in
Panama. He is scheduled to leave for
his new post in Panama City in the
near future. His new assignment is
of an economic character and is part
of the program being developed by
the Alliance for Progress.
Mr. Tench, a native of Gainesville,
has been a practicing lawyer in his
home city since his graduation from
the University of Virginia Law School
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Tench To Leave...
(Continued from Page 4)
in 1947. Shortly after graduation he
became associated with the FAA as
legal counsel and legislative reprc-
scntative; and for the past ten years
has also worked closely with the Flor-
ida State Board of Architecture as a
legal representative and investigator
in connection with the Board's con-
tinuing program of law enforcement.
HIe has been senior partner in the
Gainesvillec law firm of Tench and
Reynolds and since 1959 has been
Assistant State Attorney for the
Eighth Judicial Circuit of Florida.
He was president of the Bar Associa-
tion of that Circuit in 1959-60 and
received the Award of Service of the
Junior Bar Section, The Florida Bar,
in 1959. Prior to his legal training
at the University of Virginia he had
been graduated from the University
of Florida and had served as an offi-
cer of field artillery during World
War II. IHe was separated from the
service as a major.
It is understood that Tench's new
appointment is of a relatively perma-
ncnt character and that he has already


terminated his connection with his
Gainesville firm. It is further under-
stood that his association with both
the State Board and the FAA will
necessarily end also. His new post
requires residence in Panama; and cur-
rent plans call for his family his
wife, Catherine, a son and three
daughters to join him there early
next year.



U/F Faculty Protests

Board of Control's

Decision on Planning
The recently announced decision of
the State Board of Control to permit
Florida State University to develop a
curriculum in Community Planning
has stirred vigorous reaction at the
University of Florida in Gainesville.
Twenty-four members of the U/F's
Department of Architecture have is-
sued a statement expressing their con-
cern over the Board's action and call-
ing for cooperative action on the part
of Florida's practicing architects


toward the end of maintaining an
educational program in Community
Planning under the administrative
control of the U/F's College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts. The statement
follows:
"The undersigned members of the
faculty of the Department of Archi-
tecture at the University of Florida,
are anxious to make known our con-
cern over the discovery that the State
Board of Control has decided to
award to Florida State University,
rather than to the University of Flor-
ida, the opportunity to develop a
curriculum leading to a degree in
Community Planning.
"The nature of our concern has
many facets. Central to the entire
issue, however, is the fact that Florida
State University has no program in
several of the specialized areas which
are generally considered to be essen-
tial to the support of a curriculum in
Community Planning. Chief among
these areas are Architecture and En-
gineering. Since it is most unlikely
that duplicating programs will be per-
mitted to be established, it must be
concluded that a course of action has
(Continued on Page 43)


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the ': hcle unit rih;': ,.-, to' Llcj.an. To'p liis
off Itrn i hling in ,Our sink pila-tc-:it.- burner
boAls lift olt for v3a-hri; in \our ,ish a.:.her
Otir full lin.:e f nm ,dEirn, ra,**-' o-inci all gas
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built in. .Coitl.:r i Ie re ne \\ .,rte ..ng
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lust look al these results of laboratory rests, ",
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mril... forr b.-.ne; C m -.ih-, hi-i t .b a 'e
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Civic Center, Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Architects: Cooper and
Perry, Knoxville, Tennessee, and Hubert Bebb, Gatlinburg.


Space provided: Auditorium seating 2,200; banquet and exhibit hall
accommodating 1,300; foyer with checking facilities, concession area,
ticket windows; library; meeting room; council chamber; offices; fire
hall; jail; shower and locker rooms; kitchen; storage areas. Struc-
tural framing: glulam timber arches spaced at 20 feet. Area: 44,000
square feet excluding storage space. Cost: $11.00 a square foot.

With this handsome civic center, the city of Gatlinburg, Ten-
nessee (population 1,764) proves that a small community can
have big ideas without inviting financial disaster. Key to the
effectiveness and economy of the building is engineered timber
construction using glued laminated timber arches by Timber
Structures, Inc. to provide the structural framing.

Product of Experience
Now in the 33rd year of operation, Timber Structures, Inc. has
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the architect convert the product of his imagination into beau-
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experience is one reason why Timber Structures, Inc. is the
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1. ft.
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VISIT BOOTH 17

FLORIDA ASSOCIATION ARCHITECTS
48th ANNUAL CONVENTION

NOVEM BER 8-9-10, 1962
SORENO HOTEL, ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA



SA& R. H. WRIGHT, INC.
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS DIVISION
cordially invites you to visit its booth and see how PRESTRESSED
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produced and used in Florida construction.
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







7Te 40atomI o A4rcrtae ,.


Aluminum


. .


Its Nature and Use


By ROBERT E. FISHER


If structure constitutes the
skeleton of architectural
anatomy, then structural
materials are the bones of
buildings. And, if a material is
is as versatile and as widely
adaptable as aluminum, it can
become as well the skin and
some of the sinews of the
building's body. . Acceptance
of this amazing metal has
been as quick as it has been
extensive so much so that,
perhaps, its employment in
architectural design has
outstripped a basic understand-
ing of its limitations and
potentialities. . This is the
first part of an attempt to
clarify these limitations and
potentialities. The author is
known to many Florida archi-
tects as a former representative
of the Kaiser Aluminum
organization. What he offers
here is not another detailed
textbook, but rather a compil-
ation of facts and commentary
as a guide to architects in
the proper use of a material
which, with the exercise of
understanding and imaginative
skill, appears to be subject
to an almost limitless scope
of application . .


Few materials have had a greater
impact on the building industry dur-
ing the past fifteen years than alumi-
num alloys. Yet very few materials
have been more difficult and confus-
ing for the architect to use. Much of
the confusion stems from the very
nature of the metal; but a certain
percentage arises from the lack of a
coordinated educational program by
the industry.
Here we propose to examine alumi-
num and try to clarify some of its
potentials and limitations. First let us
start by dealing with the metal itself
and with its fabrication. Finishes will
be discussed later. No attempt will be
made to become involved in a highly
technical discussion as this would only
tend to further confuse the issue.
Basically, aluminum is a non-ferrous
metal produced electrolytically from
bauxite ore. It weighs approximately
.1 pound per cubic inch and in its
pure state finds very limited use in
the architectural market. Therefore it
must be alloyed in order to meet the
requirements of specific applications.
The principal alloying elements are
silicon, iron, copper, maganese, mag-
nesium, chromium, nickel, zinc and
titanium.
Many aluminum alloys are available
for the production of everything-
from pots and pans to aircraft parts.
Through the years certain of these
alloys have been found particularly
adaptable to the architectural market.
In addition new alloys have been de-
veloped specifically for use in this
market. Of these alloys a few have be-
come practically standards for build-
ing applications.
The two most popular extrusion
alloys are 6063 and 6061. The major
alloying ingredients of both are silicon
and magnesium which give them ex-


cellent properties for this type of
application. Of the two, 6063 is the
most commonly used due to its combi-
nation of strength, workability, and
excellent finishing characteristics.
6061, in addition to silicon and mag-
nesium, contains small amounts of
copper and chromium which give it
a higher ultimate strength than 6063
but reduce somewhat the workability
and finishing characteristics. Thus it
is used primarily where the require-
ment for high strength dominates.
The most recent addition to the
architectural alloys for extrusion pur-
poses is 6351. This alloy combines
the excellent finishing properties and
workability of 6063 with the strength
qualities of 6061 and is currently
being used primarily in the new in-
tregal color programs. The major in-
gredients of this alloy are silicon,
magnesium, and manganese.
Of the sheet alloys, the two most
familiar to the designer are 3003 and
5005. 3003, a manganese alloy, has
been a mainstay of the architectural
market for years. It does have one
drawback and that is the tendency to
turn slightly yellow when anodized.
Therefore it is being replaced in most
installations by 5005-a magnesium
alloy with not only the excellent prop-
erties of 3003, but also finishing char-
acteristics that closely match those of
6063 extrusions after anodizing. 3003
is still the primary sheet for porcelain-
izing. Where extra fine finishes are
required 1100 sheet is used. This is
the nearest thing to pure aluminum
(other than foil) to be used for archi-
tectural applications. It is 99 percent-
plus pure and because of this purity
is very low in strength. For this reason
1100 is always produced as a clad
product. (Cladding is discussed later
in this article)
(Continued on Page 14)


NOVEMBER, 1962






Aluminum...
(Continued from Page 13)
Additional alloys have been de-
veloped for the new color processes
and are readily available, as are con-
trolled versions of the above men-
tioned alloys. This additional control
asures the architect of a much closer
color control than has been here to
for possible. It is interesting and
refreshing to note that the alumi-
num producers ask no price premium
for these highly controlled alloys.
These, then, are the most com-
monly used alloys. However, where
castings, fasteners and screen wire are
involved, other alloys listed in indus-
try and manufacturers' catalogs are
used.
Each of the above mentioned alloys
has a temper designation following
the number. In the case of extrusions
this will normally be "T5" for 6063
and "T6" for 6061. The T6 temper
is more difficult to obtain and when
it is to be specified, the architect
should make certain that a true T6
is obtained. Sheet alloys will generally
fall in the range of H12 to H14. Most
qualified fabricators have established
temper ranges to meet the perform-
ance requirements of their products.
The designer may also refer to the
ASTM and Aluminum Association
standards to assure alloy quality.
In any discussion of alloys the sub-
ject of cladding must be considered.
Clad products are obtained by rolling
two ingots, each of a different alloy,
simultaneously to produce a sheet
with a facing of one alloy and a back-
ing of another. Such a product is
designated as "clad one side".
Cladding can also be produced on
both sides of the product in a similar
manner. Clad alloys are usually used
to provide a facing alloy with special
finish or corrosion resistant character-
istics. The clad surface will comprise
from 5 to 10 percent of the total
thickness of the sheet. It might be
added that this process is not readily
adaptable to extrusions.
Without doubt one of the most
difficult problems confronting the
designer or specification writer is that
of the guage, or thickness, to be used
for a specific application. Two points
should be made clear at once: First,
there is a definite limit to what a
given amount of metal can do struc-
turally. This may sound rather ele-
mentary. But we need only look
around us at the abundance of flimsy,


Exposed flashing .
Gutters . .
Termite shields .
Roofing (shingles) .
Roofing (shingles)
Siding . .
Roof Valleys .
Fascia and Gravel Stops
Ventilators .
Bird Screen .


so-called "economy" products to prove
our point. Economy in the use of
aluminum is commendable and de-
sirable. But the metal should, through
intelligent design, be placed where it
will provide adequate resistance to the
forces which will be encountered dur-
ing the life of the product and
enough metal should be used to as-
sure these results. No hard and fast
rule can be established for thickness
because of the multiplicity of condi-
tions that can arise. However, the
fabricator should be able to justify the
use of given thicknesses and shapes
by rational analysis when required.
Second, it should be remembered
that a given guage of metal which
may seem adequate when viewed as a
small sample can become extremely
thin in the larger sizes required on the
job. Again no hard and fast rule can
apply, because size and configuration
will modify the thickness. We are
often asked, "does embossing add
strength?". The answer is yes but
to a very slight degree. The following
chart may be of assistance for some of
the miscellaneous items used from
time to time in both commercial and
residential applications:
Aluminum is guaged on the Browne
and Sharp system. When comparing
aluminum to galvanized steel remem-
ber that galvanized is guaged before
dipping. T he re f o r approximately
.0004" must be added to the final
thickness.
Aluminum is an excellent structural
material. Its modulus of elasticity,
however, is about one-third that of
steel. Therefore, when aluminum is
to replace steel, the sections must be
enlarged accordingly. In most cases
this can be accomplished and the
weight saved will offset the greater
cost per pound of the aluminum. It


Recommended
Min. Thickness (inches)
. 019 (24 ga.)
. . 027 (21 ga.)
. 024 (22 ga.)
. 0.19 (24 ga.)
. 019 (24 ga.)
. . 024 (22 ga.)
. . 019 (24 ga.)
. .024 (22 ga.)
. . 027 (21 ga.)
. 047 (16 ga.)
(V2mesh)


approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.
approx.


must be admitted that where large
sections-such as H-columns or heavy
structural I-beams-are involved the
cost factor will usually rule out use of
aluminum, although stressed skin de-
sign can sometimes circumvent this
problem.
Architects frequently take it upon
themselves to design the extrusions to
be used in a project. While this can
be accomplished successfully, it can,
from time to time, produce problems
for the fabricator. Wherever possible
the fabricator should be allowed to
use his standard sections or, if specials
are required, to assist the designer
with the application.
There are many reasons for this.
The extrusion process contains many
built-in complications. Die costs can
range from about $200 for a simple
solid section, such as an angle or
channel, to $600 for a fairly compli-
cated hollow. The size of the press
and billet used impose rather rigid
limits and the configuration of the
part to be extruded can often create
nightmares for the die designer. Die
correction, extruding speeds, total
length possible-all become part of
this rather complicated procedure.
Arbitrary modification of a fabrica-
tor's standard section can affect ad-
jacent joinery design and may even
require new jigs, fixtures and milling
cutters, thus resulting in revised pro-
duction procedures.
All of this can become expensive!
This is especially true where short runs
are required. Conversely, if large quan-
tities are to be used, the fabricator
may agree to-or even advocate-a
modification or new extrusion to elim-
inate an applied shape or to solve a
tricky problem. In this case the die
(Continued on Page 17)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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NOVEMBER, 1962


















ADJUSTABLE ANCHORING SYSTEMS


SOLVES PROSIEMS *;.3 5r. S 4 7.
3E~ct:N A i.SCA If:~


- INSURES EXTREME RIGIDITY
- REDUCES COSTLY FIELD LABOR
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- ADJUSTABLE FOR POST ALIGNMENT


71tr






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$t~l~E. "JrJI~






Aluminum...
(Continued from Page 14)
costs become a minor part of the over-
all costs and the extrusion will usually
be laid out to fit most of the present
production setups with only some
minor modifications.
If you do wish to use a special ex-
trusion follow these general rules:
1. Assure yourself that it will be
used in reasonably large quantities.
2. As a general rule maintain over-
all dimensions that can be inscribed
within a six inch circle. (Some ex-
truders and all major aluminum pro-
ducers have presses capable of accom-
modating eight to ten inch billets and
should be consulted on large sec-
tions.)
3. Maintain equal wall thickness
wherever possible.
4. Avoid extremely thin wall sec-
tions. Usually the minimum approved
thickness will increase with the size
of the section.
5. Hollow sections will show a
barely perceptible "weld line." This
is caused by metal flowing around the
spider of a porthole die. If the sec-
.125" and over.


tion is to receive a fine finish it is
usual procedure to design so that the
weld line will occur on an unexposed
surface. It is standard practice with
all extrusion layouts to indicate the
exposed surfaces.
Forming and bending is a subject
unto itself. However, over a period of
years certain questions seem to arise
repeatedly. One question often asked
refers to the bending of extrusions. In
practice extrusions are fabricated into
end products by the use of straight
cutoffs, or miters, and then fastened
either mechanically or by welding. If
it becomes necessary to bend an ex-
trusion, the radii should be kept fairly
large unless it is possible to notch the
inner surface to facilitate a tight bend
on a flat surface. It should always be
kept in mind that finishing character-
istics of the part can be affected by
bending. This is due to a grain struc-
ture change caused by stretching the
outer surface and compressing the
inner surface.
Architectural sheet alloys are read-
ily adaptable to bending, particularly
in the 1112 and 14 range. Most will
develop a radius roughly equal to the
thickness of the metal in guages of


It is of utmost importance that the
architect be able to visualize the oper-
ation of the brake-press dies when con-
sidering formed sheet metal shapes.
Deep, narrow channels, for example,
can be extremely difficult, because
there is usually not enough clearance
after the first brake to allow the die
to complete the second operation.
Also, with regard to the length of the
part to be formed it should be re-
membered that brake facilities of 12-
feet are quite normal. However it is
well to consult a fabricator if longer
sections are required.
Fastening aluminum can, for pur-
poses of simplification, be broken into
two basic categories: mechanical and
welded. Very often the feasability of
welding is questioned, but it should
be pointed out that welding tech-
niques have been vastly improved dur-
ing the past few years. Shop welding
is generally preferred to field welding
in as much as the operation can be
carried out under controlled condi-
tions and at a lower labor cost. Local
discoloration (particularly on parts to
be anodized) can be reduced to a
minimum by the use of good welding
(Continued on Page 47)


CHART OF LINEAL EXPANSION RELATIVE TO TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES

Temp. Length in feet
Diff. 2' 5' 7' 10' 12' 14' 16' 18' 20' 22' 24' 261' 28' 30'
100 .00 .008 .0 01 5 .019 .021 .02.028 .031 .035 .038 .041 .04 .047
20 .006 .015 .022 .031 .038 .4 .051 .057 .063 .070 .082 .9 0
30 .009 .024 .033 .0 .07.85 .09510 .10 14 .123 .133 .14
40U .012 .032 .044 63 .071 .089 .101 .114 .127 .139 .152 .1 .177 1 .1
50 .015 .040 .055 .079 .095 .111 .127 .13 .159 .175 .190 .206 .222 .238
60 .019 .048 .067 .095 .114 .133 .152 .171 .190 .209 .228 .247 .266 .285
700 .022 055 .073 .111 .133 .1 .200 .222 .24 .26 .28 310 .333
80 .025 .063 .089 .127 .153 .178 .203 .228 .280 .305 .330 .3
900 .029 .071 .100 .143 .171 .199 .228 .256 .286 .314 .342 .371 400 .428
1000 .032 .079 .111 .158 .190 .222 .258 .285 .316 .348 .380 .412 .44 .475
110 .035 .087 .122 .174 .209 .244 .278 .31 348 .418 .522
1200 .038 .095 .133 .190 .228.2 .304.342 .380 .1 .455 .5 .531 .570
130 .041 .103 .14 .206.24 .288 333 .370 .411 5 .535 .576 .618
140 04 .111 .155 .222 .266 .310 .355 .400 .534 .576 .20 .
1500 .047 .119 .166 .238 28 .333 .380 28 75 .523 .570 .61 .665 .713
1600 .051 .127 .178 .254 .305 .356 .509 .560 .610 60 .711 .762
Example: 10' section of material installed in area where temp. range is
400 to 1000. Aluminum installed at 800. Therefore: 800 400 = 40
10' section will contract .063". In summer if skin temp. goes to 1500 in
1000 weather then: 150- 800 = 700(differential). Material will expand .111"
.111" + .063" = .174" (total dimensional change of section).


NOVEMBER, 1962







74e Anaomy oa Arwitectre...


BRI Report, III


- Shading Economies


This is the concluding part of a Report of the BRI Spring
Conference on the Solar Effects on Building Design . The
first two parts appeared in the June and August, 1962, issues.
All deal with a particularly important anatomical element
of Florida architecture . .


AVERAGE TEMP 84

82

80

78

76

74

72

70

68

86

84

82

60


HOURS AT
FULL LOAD
580


nov dec Jan feb mar apr may jun jul aug sep oct
-OPERATING HRS. AT EQ. FULL LOAD
AVERAGE MONTHLY TEMP GREATER MIAMI
Figure I Heat Gains in Buildings and Air Conditioning Operations


18


O VE R- A L L P E R C E N T A G E H E A T GAIN
P E R C E N T G L A'SS IN F A C A D E 25% 50% 75%

PEOPLE, LIGHTS AND OFFICE EQUIPMENT 32% 24% 19%

WINDOW HEAT INPUT (MAXIMUM) 32% 47% 57%

CONDITIONING OUTDOOR AIR 20% 15% 12%

CONDUCTION THROUGH WALLS 1% 3% 2%

MISCELLANEOUS 12% 11% 10%


By JOHN M. EVANS, AIA




In my last article (August, 1962) I
commented on the various types of
sunshades using as a basis the paper
presented by ALFRED L. JAROS, JR.
before the Building Research Institute
in Washington the past April.
Mr. Jaros had some very interest-
ing data on the cost of sunshades in
relationship to their thermal effeci-
ency and cost and I will try to express
graphically what he said in his paper
and comment on the application of
this data to the Florida area. Of
course, one will encounter some dif-
ficulty in evaluating costs in a manner
that would apply to all areas. Jaros
warns us of the pitfalls involved in
these three factors:
1. Unit costs for mechanical work
vary in different parts of this coun-
try and even more so in foreign
areas.
2. Unit costs of the distribution
system will vary with type of sys-
tem, sill heights, type and usage of
building spaces.
3. The savings obtained through
reduction in refrigeration demand
will not be equivalent to the origi-
nal cost per ton of the system. If,
for an example, a saving of 10 tons
of air conditioning is made in a
100 ton system, it cannot be as-
sumed a similar saving of 10 per
cent in cost of equipment will be
made.
Notwithstanding these obvious
problems Jaros has drawn guidelines
for evaluating sun shade savings in
an extremely fresh and valuable
manner.
Figure 1 expresses the very large
heat gain through windows areas. In
buildings that have large glass areas
(say over 75 percent) more than 57
percent of the over-all percentage of
heat gain will enter through solar in-
trusion. Thus it can be said that the
design and evaluation of shading de-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






vices is a major concern to the archi-
tect and one, I might add, that is
neglected by a majority of archtiects.
Figure 2 is an Evaluated Savings
Chart. It graphically shows the cost
of the shading device, the tonnage
saved and the net investment savings
involved. Note that these are given in
terms of the south, east and west
elevations. The north elevation was
eliminated by Jaros as not being ger-
mane to the Dallas-New York areas
- which were investigated in his
paper. This omision may be subject
to some re-examination for our ex-
treme southerly latitude.
A close examination of this chart
will show the general arrangement
of the data. The savings in tonnage,
according to Jaros, would work out
at about $900 a ton. This includes
associated costs such as plumbing,
electrical and structural work. This is
about 65 percent of the cost per ton


of a complete air conditioning system
for a New York office building of
"good" quality, without unusual ex-
travagance or unusual skimping. If
this seems higher than our own costs,
we must attribute it both to higher
labor costs in the New York area and
more sophisticated distribution and
control systems.
As a standard of comparison Jaros
has made a 1' x 6' glass area his
module. Under each type of shading
the tonnage saved and costs are given
together. Under this the Net Invest-
ment Saving in Dollars is given. Since
the table gives comparisons for cost
savings for the east, west and south
orientations, the relative applicability
of the chart will depend on the rela-
tive proportions of the various facades.
Jaros gives much "backup" data on
this subject in his paper and if one is
interested a copy of this paper can
be obtained from the BRI. My pur-


pose in this article is to give an accu-
rate, instant comparison of the vari-
ous shading methods so that the
architect can have a sound basis for
his facade design.
In Figure II where no data is given
it was determined that the shading
device was inappropriate for the orien-
tation or was economically unfeasible.
In the lower part of Figure I An-
nual Operating Savings are given.
They were based on a study by Jaros
of a building in the Dallas area. Three
factors have stopped me from con-
verting them to the Florida Area.
They are:
1. Difference in KWH annual use
in South, Central and North Flor-
ida.
2. Differences in rate structures of
power companies.
3. Difference in consumption be-
tween different building users.
(Continued on Page 44)


E VALUE, ATED SAVING S SUN S HADES
SINGLE PL.GL. DOUBLE PL. G. SINGLE HEAT SINGLE HEAT 'L GL. SINGLE PL.GL. SINGLE PL.GL. SINGLE PL.L SINLE P.GL INGLE PLGL. SINGLE PL.GL.
ABSORBING GL. ABSORBING GL. I .' ,: WORZ. & INSIDE VERT & HORZ. OUT- A OUTSIDE VER .& OUTSIDE & OOUSIDE HORZ 23 BAR
A SINGLE PL .N-i.i.i VENETIAN I L HORZ.BALCONY LOVER CANOPY EOOLSVBDE
GLASS BLINDS BLINDS OP. LOUVERS LOUVERS





COST FOR 6' HIGH
INDOW I' WIDE WITH $12.00 $4.50 16.D50 $6.00 $9..00 $31.00 $37.00 $18.00 $17.00 $33.00
SHADES AS SHOUN (no shading)
REF IG. SAVING
IVEN IN TONS AD $ 0 .0235/121.15 .0413/137.20 .0510/$45.75 .0450/$110.50 .0450/$40.50 .0720/04.80 .0680/$61.20

NET INVESTMENT I-
SAVING IN DOLLARS 0 $9;.5 $32.70 $29.25 $34.50 $31.50 $27.80 $28.20

REFRIG. SAVING 0 .02S8/$25.N5 .0413/$37.20 .05681$51.00 .0508/$45.60 .0508/$45.60 .0878/$78.80 .0835/$74.80
GIVEN IN TONS AND $

NET INVESTMHENT 0 $13.65 $32.,70 $3.50 $39.80 $38.80 $11.0 $G41.80
SAVING IN DOLLARS y

REFRIG. SAVING 0 .02866/$11.5 .038e/$28.A05 .01i0/$5.76 .0403/$38.30 .0403/$30.30 .0691/$82.10 .05890/53.00 .069i/$82.10 .0660/$59/00
GIVEN IN TONS AND $

NET INVESTMENT '
SAVING IN DOLLARS 0 $11.85 $208.6 $29.2 $27.30 $30.30 $31.10 $35.00 $45.10 $32.00 *

Note: dollar differential computed at $900 per ton Chart from figures by A.L. Jaros BRI Spring Conferences, 1902 Chart by John Evans a..a. 17 bar koolshade
A N N U A L OP ER A T I N G 'SA V I N G alla, Texas Area


Figure II Evaluated Savings Chart



NOVEMBER, 1962






AO"6e ez 6


Client needs may well be as
important an anatomical
element of architecture as any
other . Here is a unique
planning and equipment
concept that has directly
conditioned the design of
the building . .


Round House Plan





May Halve Hospital Costs


A doctor's desire to build the best
possible children's hospital may soon
benefit all Americans and the sick or
injured throughout the world.
DR. HUGH C. MACGUIRE, 43-year-
old pediatric surgeon, started out
simply to plan a hospital for children
that was as efficient and modern as
possible. But this quest stimulated a
study which is materializing today in
the construction of an all-aluminum
hospital at Tuskegee, Ala. The cir-
cular prototype unit could easily revise
many traditional medical care con-
cepts.
Embodied in the hospital concept
-named Atornedic by Dr. MacGuire
-is a way to fill the nation's need for
800,000 new hospital beds at half the
traditional cost. Atomedic also is de-
signed to make the most advanced
diagnostic and surgical talents avail-
able to millions in their own neigh-
borhoods-in hospitals equipped with
scientific equipment far in advance
of that existing elsewhere. Further-
more, the concept could provide an
economical answer to the gigantic de-
mand for movable clinics and hospitals
in underdeveloped countries through-
out the world.
As a basis for bringing his idea to


the prototype stage Dr. MacGuire
organized two national medical sym-
posiums in Montgomery, that were
attended by hundreds of medical and
industrial leaders dedicated to creating
a better hospital. He also enlisted the
material assistance of major U. S. in-
dustrial corporations, and created Ato-
medic Research Center, Inc., a non-
profit organization to perfect advanced
medical and hospital techniques.
Through his own ideas and the sym-
posium's, Dr. MacGuire evolved the
concept of a system of smaller hospi-
tals available for every one in his own
neighborhood, and in constant elec-
tronic contact with medical centers
offering the advantages of highly spe-
cialized diagnosis and advice.
Using the Atomedic Hospital sys-
tem, it is estimated (by one of the
nation's largest private insurance com-
panies) that complete medical care-
free of government involvement-
could be possible for $6.00 per person
per month to include medicines, doc-
tor calls, physical checkups, surgical
fees, and hospitalization.
The prototype unit for the hospital
now under construction at the Tuske-
gee Army Air Base site, will be one of
the world's first all-aluminum struc-


tures, with both exterior skin and
structural members made from the
light metal. The walls and roof will
be made from sandwich panels involv-
ing an outer and inner layer of alumi-
num sheet with a core of insulating
foam plastic.
The hospital is round and 100 feet
in diameter, with a circular sterile
work area in the center. Twenty-two
hospital rooms form a ring around the
core-divided into wedges-with an
administrative area taking up two of
24 portions. The outer ring will be a
corridor for visitors.
The basis for this circular construc-
tion is twofold. Visitors will never
contaminate the work area in the cen-
ter, nor will they interfere with traffic
between patients and nurses or doc-
tors. Secondly, nurses will be able to
handle the work load more efficiently,
since the circular design will save 37
per cent of the steps nurses have to
take in a conventionally designed
hospital.
In spite of the fact that the Ato-
medic hospital will employ equipment
and electronic medical techniques far-
ther advanced than used by any exist-
ing hospital today, it will be far less
(Continued on Page 24)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















i, i ,ji







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,11.1. -- ,














m aso nry with- 'A inch motr e
-, 4 f ",'





)BY NAME
A..; _.-a.. .


B^^^ -^^^B -u* ^*^^4-4 I11 m

S^^^ B f -^^P -f^^^'^?f -- -1 .t -
_.-, 6_ 6





9 SEE SWEET'S CATALOG 4g/Bu for details or write direct:

Tidewater Concrete Block & Pipe Co.
P.O. Box 162, Charleston, S.C.-- Area Code 803, SH 4-5376






E In almost every type of structure today, architects desire a wealth of 'ig/ freedom, in their
creation of lasting exteriors.

The bold simplicity and compatibility of Modu-wall curtainwall components allow ample oppor-
tunity for creative expression of panel and window treatment, colors and textures. A variety
of aluminum mullion sections permits expression of lines which are broad or narrow, projected or
flush, strong or delicate in appearance.

Modu-wall curtainwall installations provide performance-proved design . assured weather tight-
ness . and completely flush interior walls without visible fasteners.
And, with Modu-wall Sun Screen, the Florida architect can choose from three true sun control
systems which install easily on modern curtainwall as well as conventional structures containing
extensive areas of glass. m odu-u all, inc.
modu-wuall, inc.


iq


-. ... .. . .
I ,
A TYPICAL MODU-WALL
SUN SCREEN INSTALLATION :
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, LA
Perkins & Will, Architects





a ..... ", 4i,!' ,, l



METHODIST BUILDING, EVANSTON, ILL.
Perkins & Will, Architects


modu -


KE FO


AMERICAN RADIATOR AND STANDARD SANITARY CORP.,
PISCATAWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J.
SFrank Grad & Sons, Architect

REST, ILL.












MODU-WALL, INC. HOME OFFICE BUILDING, PARCHMENT, MICH.


See us at the iI
FAA Convention )
Booth 23
Write or phone today for additional information and brochure
144 Almeria Avenue, Suite 3 Coral Gables, Florida Phone: 444-5155


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I I


















C.


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4->,
1
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S. ~
art. %i~
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-25


&;;~~rflt>"~~~ir~


aulm
!20 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE: PLAZA 1-6633
WRITE OR CALL:


NOVEMBER, 1962


C- r- I






Hospital...
(Continued from Page 20)
expensive because of its architectural
design. The circular aluminum hos-
pital will cost only 50 per cent as
much-and be better equipped-than
a conventional hospital of similar size.
Conventional hospitals require an
average investment of $30,000 per
bed. The Atomedic hospital will cut
this cost to $15,000 per bed, assuming
each room contains only one bed.
The Atomedic building will also pro-
vide substantial savings in mainten-
ance and operating costs.
As unusual as a circular hospital
may sound, it is not completely new.
The idea of a round design is already
successfully in use in a number of
large, new hospitals including Valley
Presbyterian Hospital, Van Nuys,
Calif., and the St. Frances Xavier Ca-
brini Hospital in Montreal, Canada.
What is really new is the idea of
mass producing more modern, effi-
cient hospitals to help lower costs.
And the concept of thousands of these
smaller hospitals located in towns,
cities, suburbs and neighborhoods to
handle population units located there


is certainly new. Dr. MacGuire plans
to have these multiple units tied to-
gether with an electronics system be-
ing developed by AT&T that will allow
constant monitoring of all patients'
pulse, temperature, respiration, etc.
The communications network feeds
this information into electronic brains
that will signal immediately when a
patient is in danger.
With this sort of constant assist-
ance, nurses can give better personal
care than ever. Nurses now must
spend most of their time keeping rec-
ords, and supervising nurses aides and
orderlies. The new hospital will keep
these records almost automatically,
and most nurses aides or orderlies will
not be needed. Thus, nurses will be
able to get back to the actual nursing
for which they are professionally
equipped.
Dr. MacGuire's search for a better
hospital has resulted in his living vir-
tually on the doorstep of leading in-
dustrial research laboratories to antici-
pate the latest medical and hospital
developments for testing and consid-
eration by Atomedic. Atomedic is
working to achieve research grants for
practical testing and perfection of


medical equipment. As a result of this
approach, the Atomedic Research
plans to equip its hospital units with:
-Television monitoring of patients
in each room so that a nurse has them
in easy view.
-Use of transducers to keep con-
tinual check on patient's pulse, tem-
perature and respiration, just as astro-
nauts are monitored in flight. This
provides a constant check on a patient's
condition.
-Radioactive isotopes as a power
source for X-rays that will double for
use in cold sterilization of instruments
and other equipment.
-Portable operating rooms to be
set up when needed in the center of
the circular hospital.
-Use of a new technique of oper-
ating, with the patient in an inflated
plastic tent, insuring absolute sterile
conditions. Surgeon working outside
the tent uses plastic gloves that are
actually built into the plastic unit.
-Use of a wide selection of frozen
prepared meals, radiant heated in the
patient's room to insure top-quality
food and to eliminate the high cost of
maintaining a kitchen staff.


announcement of a new Tampa office...





-Ay




the Rilco Engineered Wood Products Division

of Weyerhaeuser Company

has now opened a Tampa office to provide you with local assistance on
structural specifications, design details and estimation requirements of
Rilco laminated wood arches, beams, trusses and engineered products.
We will be pleased to assist you.



A Weyerhaeuser Company
Rilco Engineered Wood Prcdu-cts Di,%jiaon


Stop in and -_e, us at Booth 42 during the Florida AIA C,:.n enti,.n


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


- I - I I

































The
Clean A
iLook of- "





L oua lit f
--. . -.





... .CONCRETE N




DRIVEWAYS

Custom-styled driveways of ready-mixed concrete add value, distinction and
individuality to any home, traditional or contemporary.
Concrete never softens, never needs resealing; its surface stays ripple free with
edges neat and trim, regardless of the weather.
Unlimited design with widest selection of textures and colors are available
with concrete.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
NOVEMBER, 1962


I r I I- I


C












The Knoll Furniture and Textile Collections
offer the architect and designer a wide
range of outstanding designs for residential,
office and contract applications. Other
Showrooms: Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit,
Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, St.
Louis, San Francisco, Washington, and in 18
foreign countries.


KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC.
KNOLL TEXTILES, INC.
575 MADISON AVENUE,
NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK

MIAMI SHOWROOM:
131 NORTHEAST 40TH ST., PL 4-6429


7k


nommw W







)th Annual Convention

IOF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS





The Theme THE ANATOMY OF ARCHITECTURE


HENRY L. WRIGHT, FAIA
President, AIA


In order to produce Significant Architecture we must completely
understand the "Anatomy of Architecture." Each part must function
individually as well as functioning within the entire "Body of the Build-
ing." An analogy would be represented by the human body- a machine
made up of many parts each part having to relate to the whole in
order for it to function properly. The "latest model" as we know it has
taken eons to develop. Throughout its long history of evolution, the
anatomy has adopted itself as conditions dictate.
The evolution involved in .t l-: the Anatomy of the Architecture
of our individual building is of a much shorter duration one year
or less. But still in this time we must develop architecture that reflects
our present technological advances in such a way that all of the com-
ponents that make up its anatomy are assembled and integrated into
the most workable, livable, and aesthetically pleasing package possible.
To do this, coordination of many professions is a necessity. Our
program, therefore, is concerned with the coordination of Structural,
Mechanical, and Interior Design to produce Significant Architecture.


ROBERT H. LEVISON, AIA
President, FAA


!iY


H. LESLIE WALKER, AIA
Pres. Fla. Central Chapter


\. ,- ^ ,.
'-' 5. .


i: .5a.
: : i.::, . a .


DANA B. JOHANNES
Convention Chairman


NOVEMBER, 1962 27


a -:







Of What Is Architecture


Made?


Development of the Convention Theme will be through three "Sessions" each dealing with
the specific design phases structural, mechanical and interior design that are involved
with the production of significant architecture. Each Session will be conducted by four panel-
ists an architect, an interior designer, a structural engineer and a mechanical engineer.
. As last year, these Sessions will be, in effect, workshop seminars. The purpose will be to
integrate the subject of each with the basic problems of architectural design. As last year,
also, each Session will be scheduled to provide for questions from the floor; and audience
participation to this extent is invited. . In addition, two important seminars for students
have been planned to which all convention visitors will be welcomed ....







These Are The Main Speakers...


MARIO G. SALVADORI FRED S. DUBIN, PE
Consulting engineer, specialist in Graduate of Carnegie Tech, senior
structures . mathematician, teacher partner in a 90-man organization spe-
since 1932, currently professor of civil cializing in mechanical, electrical,
engineering and architecture at Co- structural and civil engineering. . .
lumbia University . Fellow of ASCE Consulting engineer registered in 24
and ASME, member of N. Y. Academy states . guest lecturer at Pratt
of Sciences . author of three books Institute and architectural schools of
and over 90 technical papers. . Columbia, Rice and N. C. State U . .


ALBERT LOCKETT
Associate Partner, Skidmore, Owings
& Merrill, Chicago office . chief of
design and master planning, Air Base
Complex, French Morocco . chief
architect, Air Force Academy, Colo-
rado . project manager on major
projects of a diversified nature . .
designer, administrator. . .


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I I- I







The Special Program Speakers...


4r I .1


JOHN R. TARR
Native of Tampa, graduate of U/F and
Chicago Art Institute . vice presi-
dent, Tarr's Interiors, Tampa . .
member and director of NSID. . .


VINCENT CAFIERO
Interior designer, member of the Knoll
Planning Unit, Knoll Associates . .
residential designer with educational
background at Pratt Institute, Pace
and Texas Western . frequent
speaker on matters of interior design
before groups of students, architects
and designers. . .


MRS. JOHN DOWNING
Spceialist in flower arrangement with
background in art and interior decora-
tion . teacher, lecturer and demon-
strator of flower arrangement. . .


ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA

AIA Director, Florida Region . Past
President, Fla. South Chapter and FAA
. . own practice in Miami since 1933
. . versatile designer, particularly in
educational field; buildings in Uni-
versities of Miami, South Florida and
Puerto Rico . design lecturer . .
widely published in magazines. . .


For Students...
JAMES LUCAS
Director of public relations, Herman
Miller, Inc. . frequent lecturer be-
fore students of interior and industrial
design, advertising and architecture....


HON. TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State, native of Jackson-
ville, graduate of the University of
Michigan . businessman with di-
verse interests . since 1956 a
member of the State Legislature and a
member of many important legislative
committees . voted outstanding
Senator during 1957 Legislature. . .


NOVEMBER, 1962


For The Ladies...


I I ~III I I I _
































CONVENTION HOSTS
Florida Central Chapter, AIA, H.
Leslie Walker, President; Dana B.
Johannes, Vice President; Donald
Jack West, Secretary; Jack Mc-
Candless, Treasurer.

CONVENTION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes
General Chairman
Mark G. Hampton
Program
Elliott B. Hadley
Registration
H. Leslie Walker
Hospitality
Frank McLane, Jr.
Entertainment
Frank R. Mudano
Architectural Exhibits
Roy M. Henderson
Awards
Horace H. Hamlin, Jr.
Product Exhibits
Harry A. MacEwen
Public Relations
I. Blount Wagner
Arrangements
A. Wynn Howell
Students
Mrs. Edmond N. MacCollin
Women's Events


Program -

THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION

SORENO


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7
9:30 A.M. Installation of Product Exhibits.
to Exhibit Hall.
6:30 P.M.
9:30 A.M. Installation Architectural Exhibits
to Palm Room.
6:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M. Registration for Chapter Members
to Guests, Students and Exhibitor
9:00 P.M. Personnel. Main Lobby.
8:00 P.M. Meeting, FAA Board of Directors,
to President Robert H. Levison,
presiding. Room, as posted on
Bulletin Board in Lobby.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
9:00 A.M. Registration contini
to
6:00 P.M.


9:00 A.M.


9:00 A.M.
to
10:00 A.M.
9:30 A.M.
to
I 1:00 A.M.

10:00 A.M.
to
12 noon



12 noon
to
12:30 P.M.
12:30 P.M.









2:00 P.M.
to
4:30 P.M.


ues. Main Lobb


Opening of Product Exhibit Hall.
Robert H. Levison, FAA President,
officiating. Guests, City and Couni
Officials. Entrance to Exhibit Are,
Main Lobby.
Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hal


First Seminar for Students-Ladie
invited. Terrace Lounge.
"The Client, The Designer and Othc
Divertisements" James Lucas
First FAA Business Meeting.
President Robert H. Levison,
presiding. Invocation by Rev. Alle
B. Purdom, Rector, St. Matthews
Church, St. Petersburg. East Exhibi
Hall.
Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hal


Luncheon Welcome to Conven-
tion, Robert H. Levison, FAA
President, Introduction by Clinton
Gamble, F.A.I.A., Secretary, A.I.A
of Henry L. Wright, F.A.I.A., Presi
A.I.A.-Address, "Current Institut
Affairs." Ballroon
Presentation of Awards to Produc
Exhibitors by H. Leslie Walker,
President, Florida Central Chapter
First Session-"Interior Design"-
Vincent Cafiero. Panel Moderator:
Albert Lockett. Panelists: Vinceni
Cafiero and Fred S. Dubbin. Genera
Meeting Room, East Exhibit Hall.


II ii C- Il-r I I









8th Annual Convention

ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

TEL ST. PETERSBURG NOVEMBER 8, 9, 10, 1962


2:00 P.M.
to
4:00 P.M.




4:30 P.M.
to
6:00 P.M.
6:30 P.M.
to
7:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


Ladies Program. "Vignettes of Fur-
nishings & Flowers for Today's
Architecture." Demonstration and
techniques in coordination of interior
decoration and flower arranging.
Mrs. John Downing and John Tarr.
Florida Room.
Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hall.


President's Reception. Mezzanine.
(Dress optional)

Dinner followed by Night Club
Entertainment and Dancing.
Ballroom.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
9:00 A.M. Final Registrat
to
12 noon
9:00 A.M. Visit Product E
to
9:30 A.M.


9:30 A.M.
to
12:30 P.M.



11:30 A.M.
to
12:30 P.M.
12:30 A.M.




2:00 P.M.
to
4:00 P.M.



4:00 P.M.
to
5:00 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
to
6:30 P.M.
4:30 P.M.
to
6:30 P.M.


ion. Main Lobby.


exhibit. Exhibit Hall.


Second Session "Structural" -
Mario Salvadori. Panel Moderator:
Albert Lockett. Panelists: Vincent
Cafiero, Fred S. Dubbin and Mario
Salvadori. General Meeting Room,
East Exhibit Hall.
Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hall.


Awards Luncheon. Address by
Robert M. Little, F.A.I.A., Director
Florida Region. Presentation of
Architectural Exhibit Awards.
Ballroom.
Third Session "Mechanical" -
Fred S. Dubin. Panel Moderator:
Albert Lockett. Panelists: Vincent
Cafiero, Fred S. Dubin and Mario
Salvadori. General Meeting Room,
East Exhibit Hall.
Balloting. Main Lobby.


Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hall.


Second Seminar for Students -
James Lucas. "The Care and Feed-
ing of the Corporate Image."


General Meeting Room, East Exhibit
Hall.
7:30 P.M. Annual Banquet-Robert H. Levison,
President, FAA, Presiding. Presen-
tation of Anthony L. Pullara Awards.
Introduction by Robert M. Little,
F.A.I.A., of the Hon. Secretary of
State, Thomas Adams. Address:-
"Relation of Architecture to State
Buildings". Announcement of New-
ly Elected Officers. (Dress Optional)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
8:00 A.M. Visit Product Exhibits. Exhibit Hall.
to
9:00 A.M.


9:00 A.M.
to
12 noon
12 noon
to
1 :00 P.M.


Final FAA Business Session. General
Meeting Room, East Exhibit Hall.

Visit Products Exhibits. Exhibit Hall.


1 :00 P.M. Luncheon, Speaker to be announced.
Presentation of Product Exhibit
Visitation. Awards, H. Leslie Walker,
President, Florida Central Chapter,
Ballroom.
Adjournment of 48th Annual Con-
vention Robert H. Levison, FAA
President.


CONVENTION NOTES:
All FAA members may take part in any Convention discussion, but
voting on any question calling for Convention action is restricted to
those Chapter .lI: who have been properly accredited and regis-
tered as such .i -. i, invention .
Admission to Convention meetings and affairs will be accorded only
to those who have previously reigstered for the Convention. Evidence
of registration is a badge, the color of which designates these classifi-
cations: Corporate Members, white; Associate Members, yellow; Student
Members, orange; Exhibitors, pink; Ladies, beige; and Guests, gray.
Only FAA members are eligible for Product Exhibit Attendance
Awards. These are: for Corporate Members, $250, $150, and $100
gift certificates; for Associate Members, $75 and $50 gift certificates;
for Student Members, $25 certificates.
Host Chapter members will be wearing red jackets. They will be
available throughout the Convention to provide information and to
answer questions.
Ladies of the Convention are invited to attend all sessions and
meetings. Information on the Convention Ladies' Program may be
obtained at the registration desk.


HOTEL INFORMATION:
Saturday check-out time will be adjusted to permit all at the
Convention to attend all Saturday meetings.
The Ladies' Lounge and Card Room is located in the Park Room.
Press Headquarters is in Room 235.
Meals are served daily in the Coffee Shop from 7:00 A.M. to
11:00 P.M. In the Terrace Room breakfast is from 8:00 to 9:30 A.M.;
luncheon is from 12:00 M. to 2:00 P.M.; dinner from 6:00 P.M. to
8:00 P.M.
The Terrace Lounge Bar is open from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M.
Special rates on package goods have been established for Convention
registrants.


'I-rllr r






74e 48h ? ,44 e eoneent Sauptte&' Seow...


1962's Building Products Exhibit...


21 20 19 18 17 1 _15 14 1 12 11 10


- 24 :1 25_ :-
S39 38 37 36 26 27 28


35 34 33
II I l


29 30
32 31


4-4" I I 46 7 9


42 5
--* m

43 4

44 3

45 2

46 I
U -


Convention affairs have been scheduled to allow plenty of time to view product exhibits
and to discuss with manufacturers' representatives the ways by which their products and
materials can help solve various problems in architectural design. . Visit all the exhibit
booths. Added to the information you'll get, you'll establish your eligibility for one of the
several booth attendance awards.


1...Compressed Concrete Corp.
2...Herman Miller, Incorporated
3...Pittsburgh Plate Glass
4... Reflectal Corporation-Borg-
Warner Corporation
5...American Olean Tile Co.
6...Concrete Products, Inc.
7...The Mosaic Tile Company
8...Rohm & Haas Company
9...Rohm & Haas Company
10...McPhilben Manufacturing
Co., Incorporated
11 ...The Heifetz Company
12...Zonolite Company
13...Miami Window Corporation
14...Miami Window Corporation
15...The Independent Nail
Corporation
16...Briggs Manufacturing Co.
17...Construction Materials
Division, R. H. Wright, Inc.
18...The Florida Natural Gas
Association


19...The Florida Natural Gas
Association
20...Schlage Lock Co.
21...Schlage Lock Co.
22...Becker County Sand
& Gravel Co.
23...Modu-Wall Incorporated
24...Steward-Mellon Companies
of Tampa and Jacksonville
25...Lee Anderson and William
M. Wood, Manufacturers'
Representatives
26...Florida Terrazzo Association
27...Locklando Manufacturing
Corporation
28...American Society of
Architectural Consultants,
Sunshine State Chapter
29...The Georgia Marble Company
30...Benjamin Moore & Company
31...Lambert Corporation
32...Gulf Power Company, Florida
Power Corporation, Florida


Power & Light Company,
Tampa Electric Company
33...United States Plywood Corp.
34...Harris Standard Paint Co.
35...American Air Filter Company,
Inc. and R. J. Clark Equip-
ment Company, Incorporated,
36...Libby-Owens-Ford Glass Co.
37...Formica Corporation
38...Jiffy Blueprint Service
39...Protection Products Manu-
facturing Company
40...Executone Distributors of
Florida
41 ...Griffco Aluminum, Inc.
42...Clearview Corporation
43...Weyerhaeuser Company-
Rilco Engineered Wood
Products Division
44...Bradley Washfountain Co.
45...F. Graham Williams
Company, Incorporated
46...Glazed Tile Sales
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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How Labor Sees The Architect ..



By JEROME BELSON
International Director of Housing, Amalgamated Meat Cutters
and Butchers Workmen of America


During the First Conference
on Esthetic Responsibility
held in New York in April of
this year, many viewpoints
were expressed by many
participants whose workday
interests were widely different.
All, however, were concerned
with the problem of ugliness
in our cities. And all
contributed suggestions -
facets of possible improvement
- toward the end of eradi-
cating ugliness by attempts to
fix the responsibilities for
producing it . Among them
were labor leaders. Of these,
one of the most vocal was
a man who was charged with
the expenditure of many
millions for construction
and whose contacts had been
close and constant with
architects as well as officials .
He spoke to the Conference
informally; but what he had to
say reproduced here in
full should prove of
practical interest to every
architect . .


Under the awesome title of "esthet-
ic responsibilities of government, busi-
ness and institutions," I just wonder
in what particular category, as Direc-
tor of Housing for the Amalgamated
Meat Cutters Union, I speak. I know
we're not government; I know we're
not business. I'm just wondering
which institution they'd like to put
us in.
I must give some background so that
perhaps you will understand why so
unknowledgeable a person such as I
has been invited to talk this morning.
Our Amalgamated Meat Cutters em-
barked upon a program of sponsorship
of housing in 1949. To date we have
some three completed developments,
or four physically in construction, and
a fifth of $100 million dollars going
into construction over the Mott Ha-
ven railroad yards May 1st.
In addition to that, in the course
of these past 13 years I have been
privileged to meet and, on occasion,
to represent architects. I must con-
fess after spending my life represent-
ing labor unions, when we come to a
bargaining table I know the back-
ground of our authority and our posi-
tion. Then when I represent an archi-
tect I think somehow they're not
economically as equipped as a labor
union. We negotiate our position so
that I assume later on when all the
blame and the torrent of abuse is
poured upon your heads for the re-
sponsibility of ugliness-I say this by
way of caution-that I don't think an
architect economically is equipped to
deal with all of the awesome responsi-
bility that their titles very well require
them to assume in many instances.
I have no prepared talk, but if I had
one it perhaps could be how to lose
friends and alienate people, because
in our union activity and in the hous-
ing role that we have occupied in the


past 13 years, I am the one who was
required to shepherd the various hous-
ing developments through their plan-
ning stages and I have been present
and been charged with the daily re-
sponsibility of producing the housing
development. And then I have to go
on the firing line when the people
move in and they don't have the edu-
cation and they're not fully aware of
esthetic value and they want to know
in plain layman's terms why there
can't be a little more beauty; why they
must be relegated to a very limited
type of housing facility. And we have
had to come up with the answers.
So that when you ask what is the
responsibility of a labor union insofar
as our sponsorship of a housing devel-
opment is concerned, I would say that
our primary responsibility is support-
ing the architectural fraternity, to be
present at conferences where initial
designs have been submitted to gov-
ernmental agencies. And we get into
a discussion of economics. It's too
expensive; can't it be done this way,
can't it be done that way? We may
have 15 or 20 persons in the room,
some people from my union, myself,
governmental officials, the architects,
the mechanical engineers, the attor-
neys for the banks, if there may be.
And suddenly there's scrap paper
and they're drawing. And standing
back, I'll suddenly find everyone with
a pencil in their hand, sketching, ex-
cept the architect. He's off in a cor-
ner. They've ignored him and they're
trying to work out the dollar amount
and how this can fit in. And then he
is the one who is responsible for
esthetics. It's like saying 2 and 2
equals four and then having the
architect design the most magnificent
looking 3 imaginable. Well, if some-
one's going to come up and say 2 plus
(Continued on Page 36)
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Labor...
(Continued from Page 34)
3 will allow you to go to 5, it doesn't
make sense. You can't do it. So
what we're trying to say is, well, may-
be we won't reach 5, but we're push-
ing for 42 or 43.
Every now and then we breakaway
from the usual. We say it doesn't
have to be a rectangle in order to be
recognized as a housing development.
Maybe we'll try a little different de-
sign. After all, we have not been
trained, as a labor union, in esthetic
values; we're not consultants. I don't
know what the true end significance
of that concept was, but we're not
consultants, we don't try to dictate in
that regard.
But we will support our architec-
tural team. And I've met some tal-
ented guys, they've done some won-
derful work for us, but they come in
so harried and browbeaten that as
soon as they suggest something and
there's one yell, they run and that's
it. They're off in a corner. And I
have to argue their position and I can
only bluster so far. But they're so
frightened of the builder, they're so
frightened of the governmental agency
with whom they're required to deal-
not merely on my one development.
But I think architects enjoy earning a
living. They've got to come back a
second time, and a third time. But
you've got that responsibility, people.
For when we meet with the families


who live in the buildings that you de-
sign, I want you to know that we be-
come identified with those buildings.
Some of our people are pretty proud
when they say that they live in the
Jinerson apartments, that they've got
a landscape park out front. In fact,
this is a little development-it's only
420 apartments, in Brooklyn. I had
one chap it's near a hospital and
he's a trustee-say, "boy, that butch-
er's union is sure politically minded."
I said "Why?" He said, "How come
you were able to get the Park Com-
missioner, Moses, to let you build the
building in a park?" Because we had
a lot of landscaping. It wasn't per-
mitted. You couldn't tell it was a
development.
See, you gotta be able to tell it's a
development. We didn't have the
brown window shades so you couldn't
really tell. There were the antennas
sticking out of the windows. So you
didn't know. It didn't have a label
on it. This is a development-a pro-
ject. You're not allowed to say devel-
opment, "project". We don't use the
word project at our meetings. And
when we had four acres of a grassed
area and an 8V/2 or 9 percent coverage,
and I have to handle the manage-
ment, I figure how the devil are we
going to water all this lawn area.
Let's look into an artesian well or
perhaps an underground water system.
I could, perhaps at the beginning, not
put on two additional landscape gar-
deners and I could save the cost-


amortize it in three years. I men-
tioned it to the agency-wow! An
underground water system in project?
Wow, what are you doing? How can
the people who live across the street
whose lawns will burn in the summer
time, how can they allow you to have
lawns? This is fine. Then let's pave
the whole thing. We'll have a big
green concrete area.
Fortunately they didn't know I'd
already issued the change order and it
was in. I was arguing after the fact.
I was trying to protect my architect.
And I said, "Alright, now that you've
turned me down, now what do I do?
The entire area has been paved over.
"The walks are over," I said, "if
you're going to rip it out, we've got to
repave, and we're waiting for our
certificate of Occupancy." And we
had to move in, so we did alright
there. Oh, boy!
So, all of my wonderful architects
-I can only say this to you: If esthet-
ics is important to our society-and I
think it is, the people we represent
that live in our buildings think it is-
let's recognize it. Let's permit it to
dwell, if not exactly on an equal plane
with economics, then perhaps as a jun-
ior partner. Let's not just disregard it.
We in ths labor unions-and others
that you have no idea about-will
support everything you do. We don't
say we'll agree with you. We'll argue
with you, we'll let you educate us.
We'll support you. Will you accept
the challenge?


...And a Builder Makes This Comment


ERWIN WOLFSON is
Chairman of the Board of
Diesel Construction Co., Inc.,
of New York. Speaking on the
same program as Mr. Belson
he offered the First Conference
on Esthetic Responsibility
a somewhat different attitude
on the activities of architects.
. . What he says is valid as
a point of view and as a
suggestion for better practice.


I think that it's vital for a builder
to have pride in what he does. I
think it's vital for a builder to think
in terms of more than just brick and
mortar. I think that it's vital for a
builder to think in terms of injecting
some sculpture and some art right into
the architecture of the building. And
I would like to see more builders con-
sider that all the time.
I think it's the architect's job to try
to promote that kind of thing in his
architecture. Going back about a year
or so ago when there was the big
fight in New York for a change in
zoning, I was appalled to find so many


of the architects who were against it.
I can understand how the real estate
people, and perhaps the builders,
might have been against it. But it
just didn't make sense to me why so
many architects were against it. And
yet they were.
It took an awful fight to get it
through and I was quite vocal from
the builder's point of view in trying
to get it through. I was accused by
my own group of being a traitor to
my class the industry would be
ruined, building would be stopped.
Well, on the contrary, I think we're
(Continued on Page 44)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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News & Notes


Plans Forming Up for
New Award Program
Ideas for the design award program
for the "most imaginative use" of
concrete products reported earlier this
year (August, 1962, page 26) are now
taking definite shape. According to a
spokesman for the Florida Concrete
and Products Association, Inc., the
active sponsors of the new award pro-
gram, details relative to it will be
available in the early part of next
year. As now contemplated, submis-
sions of the type of design covered by
the program would constitute a design
exhibit at the FAA's 1963 Conven-
tion. Presentation of awards which
would be a substantial, though pres-
ently undetermined sum of money -
will probably become a part of the
1963 Convention program.
Selection of a nationally- known
jury is now under way. In general,
plans call for invitations to all prac-
ticing members of the FAA to submit
photographic exhibits of recently-com-
pleted work involving the novel use
of concrete products. With the photo-
graphs some sort of description rela-
tive to the design purpose and con-


struction technique will probably be
required. Currently no announcement
has been made as to whether judg-
ment will be on the basis of various
classifications, or types of buildings, or
whether the basis of the award will
bear no reference to the size or char-
acter of the design submitted.
The program was first suggested by
officials of the concrete products
trade association. But it is understood
that the FAA Board of Directors has
expressed interest in it. Assuming that
fully developed details of the program
meet with the Board's approval, co-
operation with the FCPA would con-
stitute at least an informal co-spon-
sorship by the FAA. Readers will be
kept informed through these columns
as more specific information becomes
available.

FAA Medal for
Florida's Governor
Governor FARIS BRYANT was the
recipient, last month, of a gold medal
presented by the FAA in recognition
of his interest in the construction
industry and in particular his leader-
ship in bringing into action the mori-


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


bund program for a new building at
Gainesville for use by the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts. The pre-
sentation ceremony was held in the
Governor's office at Tallahassee. FAA
President ROBERT H. LEVISON pre-
sented the medal on behalf of the
FAA. Among those attending the
ceremony were Florida North Central
Chapter members JOSEPH N. CLEM-
ONS, R. FORREST COXEN and PIERCE
L. BARRETT.
It has been suggested that the
medal presentation become a yearly
tradition with the FAA. The recipient
should be a leading citizen of Florida
prominently identified with affairs in
the State. Basis of the award would be
the candidate's interest in the general
field of architecture and his or her
- leadership or helpful activities on
significant policies, programs of proj-
ects that lie within the field of archi-
tects' professional interests.

FPZA Meeting . .
Members of the Florida Planning
and Zoning Association including
many architects throughout the state
- will hold their 12th annual confer-
ence at the Everglades Hotel in Mi-
ami, November 28 through December
(Continued on Page 42)


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Natural gas air conditioning was adopted by the Uni-
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campus utilities in association with Guy C. Fulton,
AIA, Architect of the Florida State Board of Control.


Says George Stephan, Superintendent of Utilities:
"The system is operating as predicted. In unusually
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Architects, engineers and builders are finding compar-
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NOVEMBER, 1962 41


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News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 40)
1. Some 350 members are expected
to hear discussions on Florida's prep-
arations for continued growth, recent
developments in regional planning
throughout the state, and how the
1963 legislature is expected to meet
the challenge of growth and develop-
ment.
Special sessions in the field of com-
munity planning and zoning have been
planned for architects and engineers.
In the opening day general session,
FRED BAIR will preside and the subject
"Community Planning & Zoning as
We See It" will be discussed, for the
architects, by LESTER PANCOAST, AIA,
of Miami. At the general session on
Friday, November 30, WILLIAM T.
ARNETT, AIA, of Gainesville, a former
president of FPZA, will preside.
Speakers of the afternoon session on
Friday will be WILSON CARRAWAY,
president of the State Senate, and
MALLORY HORNE, speaker of the
House, both of Tallahassee. They will
discuss the ways in which the 1962
legislature can meet the challenge of
Florida's rapid growth.
Architects and all others with an


interest in planning and zoning are
invited to attend the conference. De-
tailed information relative to the pro-
gram can be obtained by addressing
FPZA Local Program Committee,
P. 0. Box 708, Miami 33.


BRI Fall Conference . .
The Building Research Institute -
formerly the division of engineering
and industrial research of the National
Academy of Sciences National Re-
search Council and since June of
this year an independent technical so-
ciety will hold a series of three-day
conferences in Washington, D. C.
Headquarters are the Mayflower
Hotel.
Of chief interest to Florida's archi-
tects will be the conference on School
Buildings Research. The tightly or-
ganized, nine-to-five three day pro-
gram will provide discussions on such
subjects as school building needs, cam-
pus planning relative to long-range
programs, recent research in school
design, equipment and services, school
management and operation, and needs
for further school research. Speakers
at the various sessions are top-flight
specialists; and the sessions should


prove to be highly valuable to those
able to attend them.
Two other conferences of interest
to architects have been scheduled.
They are: Pump and Spray Applica-
tion of Materials In Building Con-
struction and Masonry Practices Based
on Recent Tests and Field Investiga-
tions. Unfortunately these sessions
are scheduled at the same time session
on School Buildings are to be held,
thus making it impossible for visiting
architects to attend programs of both.
However by selecting subject seminars
of greatest individual interest it would
be possible for an architect to cover
both in significant part.
For further information and hotel
reservations write MILTON C. COON,
JR., Executive Vice President, BRI,
2101 Constitution Avenue, N. W.,
Washington 25, D. C.

Changes . .
ABBOTT HARLE, formerly a partner
in the Miami Beach firm of Morris
Lapidus, Harle and Liebman, has
formed his own firm, Abbott Harle &
Associates. New offices are at 2212
Biscayne Boulevard, Miami 37. Phone
is 373-7689.
(Continued on Page 43)


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42 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 42)
LAWRENCE L. ANGLIN has an-
nounced the removal of his offices to
3014 Corrine Drive, Orlando. The
new phone is GArden 5-7255.
ROBERT JEROME FILER has opened
an office for the practice of architec-
ture at 4701 S. W. 95th Avenue,
Miami 55. Phone is CAnal 6-1997.
GEORGE D. STORRS, JR., has moved
his office from 1429 N. Federal High-
way to 2701 E. Sunrise Boulevard, Ft.
Lauderdale. Phone is the same -
LOgan 4-2094.
NORMAN ROBSON has moved into
new offices at 2025 Okeechobee Road,
West Palm Beach. His new phone
number is 683-5050.
DONALD MOWRY has opened a new
architectural office at 740 Sandlewood
Lane, Plantation.
LUCAs E. BANNON has opened an
office for the practice of architecture
at Reservoir Lake, Sanford 10. A
member of AIA and NCARB, Mr.
Bannon previously practiced in New
Jersey. Though he will still maintain
his office at Hohokus, N. J., the major
part of his practice will be conducted
from his Sanford office.


Faculty Protests . .
(Continued from Page 6)
been decided upon which will result
in an ineffectual substitute for the
program which the State of Florida
needs and which its potential deserves.
Students in the separated areas will
be deprived of experiences which
would be beyond value in the devel-
opment of their understanding; the
academic status of our institutions of
higher learning will be weakened; and
the State will be deprived of the qual-
ity of service it should be able to ex-
pect from its graduates. These are
serious consequences.
"Some of us have devoted many
years of patient effort toward trying
to develop an effective interest in a
curriculum in Community Planning
for this state and its students. This
decision of the Board of Control to
establish a curriculum bearing such a
title might represent a victory if it
were not so apparent from the assign-
ment of responsibility for it that there
is a tragic misunderstanding of the
nature of the subject and the resources
that are necessary for dealing with it
effectively. The fact that successful
community planning is primarily


made manifest in terms of physical
reality, and that those with a working
knowledge of these terms are indis-
pensable throughout the process,
seems to have had no consideration
in this decision.
"If you would like more informa-
tion, we will try to provide it. This
statement of the issue is brief out of
respect for your time. We hope that
you will similarly respect our sincere
concern and pursue the matter as far
as that respect, or your own knowl-
edge and interest, will carry you."
The statement was signed by the
following members of the Depart-
ment of Architecture: WILLIAM T.
ARNETT, D. P. BRANCH, J. L. CLARK,
R. S. DAVIs, G. D. EVERETT, R. W.
GRAHAM, W. C. GROBE, H. B. HAM-
ACHER, M. H. JOHNSON, B. Y. KINSEY,
S. S. KORU.
Also, J. T. LENDRUM, T. C. LIT-
TLER, J. McFARLAN, H. C. MERRITT,
JR., F. B. REEVES, H. R. SEYBOLD,
W. A. STEWART, W. J. TILLMAN,
P. M. TORRACA, R. H. TUCKER, B. F.
VOICHYSONK, C. K. M. YOUNG and
J. J. SABATELLA.


..... .. ..

Natural gas for air conditioning and
water heating, all-gas kitchen.


O. BOX 44, WINTER PARK, FLORIDA


Member: Florida Natural Gas Association


LORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY


NOVEMBER, 1962 43


7








Mr. Architect... A
H anre %on striouli{v ..... l





.e... ,i .
in the ,Yorth Dttde_



aire o01' renting
in Vorth Dade's Newes't ianed Ilost MIodern Office
Building. Northwlesi 188th Sitreet and .I -/11

-a I EILEDING
CONVENIENT TO ALL MAJOR THOROUGH-
FARES IN DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES
RENT INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES CENTRAL AIR
CONDITIONING AND HEATING ELEVATOR
AMPLE PARKING


Phone 757-2565 -
.II I


K 'W"I4 AL X


Is Your Kitchen Data Current?

On ...


H ...NEVAMAR Carefree KITCHENS

I ...MUTSCHLER Hardwood KITCHENS

...ST. CHARLES custom KITCHENS

If not .

Call us at 759-4461 . or visit us at the
only complete display in Florida featuring
these outstanding kitchens, appliances and
accessories. Technical and planning coopera-
tion is yours for the asking.

- VOGUE KITCHEN CENTER
5400 N. E. Znd Ave., Miami
Phone: 759-4461
L RALPH KIRSCH JULIAN PEYSER


Builder's Comment...
(Continued from Page 36)
going to get, as a result of the change
in zoning, some very much better
looking buildings.
I have taken the position of trying
to back-up the criticism that has been
leveled at a lot of architects for some
of the things they've done, and blame
it on the builder. I think that a lot
of the architects' clients have demand-
ed certain things be done which may
or may not have had to be done-but
on which the architects may have been
able to take a firmer stand, still live
with the client and been better for it.
I think the architects are forced to
do a lot of things, by virtue of com-
promising too far. And to that extent
I think they should be a little firmer
in their position with the builders.



BRI Report...
(Continued from Page 15)
Since power consumption for air
conditioning follows the temperature
curve closely (See Figure III)we find
that while Dallas consumption was
based on 1750 KWH/ton, a similar
Miami area consumption would be
2600 KWH/ton. On this basis we
could follow a rough rule of thumb
and multiply the data-Figure I by
1.48 to give an equivalent figure.
As to whether the 2.50/ton/hr. can
be considered typical, I can only say
from my own research on buildings
having tonnage from 150 tons to 600
tons that the KWH (Or ton hr.)
costs ranged from 1.750/KWH to
2.2/KWH on the total power bill. As
you saved tonnage by using proper
shading devices, you might slip into
another rate structure; but this would
not be likely to erase your savings.
Electric power rates are very complex
and to find precise annual KWH sav-
ings a close collaboration with the
power company is required.
The final variable in computing
Annual Operating Saving is the func-
tion or habits of the user. Hotels, as
an example, show a considerable in-
crease in consumption over office
buildings which will average out to
2578 KWH/ton, or very close to the
2600 KWH/ton figure that the Flor-
ida Power and Light Co. uses for the
Miami area. Some governmental
(Continued on Page 47)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


4C Cb WR ]RD 4Cb AM AM W X 4Cb Dir


I I I I -


I- Ir i














































Weldwood plain sliced 3" Architectural walnut, installed in a carefully mismatched plank style. Office of the president, Southland Life
Insurance Company, Southland Center, Dallas. Arch: Welton Becket, FAIA & Assoc., Los Angeles. Inst: Adleta Show Case & Fixture Mfg. Co., Dallas.


How many faces has walnut paneling?


THREE POPULAR TYPES OF VENEER CUTS
Type of cut Result in the panel





Plain slicing-The log is cut in
half, then sliced with a razor sharp A unique and variegated figure, as
blade moving parallel to a line strikingly illustrated above.
through the log's center.





Quarter slicing-The log is E
quartered and sliced so the blade A series of stripes, straight in some
strikes the log at right angles to woods, varied in others
the growth rings.





Half-round-Segments or flitch-
es of the log are mounted off- A bold variegated grain marking
center on a lathe so the blade that differs from plain slicing be-
cuts slightly across the annular cause the blade artially follows
growth rings. the annular rigs.


It all depends on how you slice it...

Walnut can be many woods when it is made into paneling by
Weldwood. It can be quarter sliced, half round, or plain sliced
as in the office above. However it's cut, it is dignity, it is
warmth, formal yet friendly, luxury without maintenance.
And like Benge, rosewood, teak, and Korina -among
others-walnut is just one of the many species in Weldwood
Algoma-Made paneling.
A visit by a Weldwood Architects' Service Representative
places at your command the incomparable production facili-
ties and experience of United States Plywood. He will be
happy to help you plan a Weldwood paneling installation in
your next commercial or residential design. For details plus
a free copy of Weldwood's 40-page illustrated guide to veneer
cuts, flitch matching, and specifications, write: United States
Plywood, Dept. FA 11-61, 55 West 44th Street, New York
36, N. Y.


WELDWOOD
REAL WOOD PANELING
JACKSONVILLE 6, 603 East 8th St., ELgin 5-3592
MIAMI 47, 3675 N.W. 62nd St., OXford 1-3830
ORLANDO, 140 West Miller, GArden 5-9005
SARASOTA, Route 301 (P.O. Box 3091), 355-5183
TALLAHASSEE, 717 South Woodward Ave., 224-5143
TAMPA, 5510 North Hesperides, 877-6091
WEST PALM BEACH, 531 Southern Boulevard, TEmple 3-3796


NOVEMBER, 1962


I~ I -










O Y@ 'J ~NOVEMBER, 1962

Good NEWS about Natural Gas...


FLORIDA is now one of top consumers of natural gas for industrial purposes
among the fifty states. So says Florida State Chamber of Commerce. Last year,
Chamber reports, manufacturing plants consumed 128, 427 million cubic feet. This
ranked Florida 11th in use of natural gas for industrial purposes. In addition,
state's electric utilities consumed more than 84, 527 million cubic feet in genera-
tion of electricity.

PERFECT CLIMATE CONTROL has been achieved by Perry Printing Process
Company, Ocala, with more than 36 tons of gas air conditioning. System provides
zone controlled cooling and heating for plant and offices. In addition, gas is used
for quick drying of ink on high speed printing presses and for heating water.

NEW BUILDING of First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Pinellas Park,
uses natural gas for dehumidification, incineration, water heating and for operation
of stand-by electric generator which takes over when commercial supply of elec-
tricity fails.

SAVINGS OF 35. 6% per year in operating cost of gas absorption heating and
cooling system in comparison with electric heat pump unit reported by California
school. Comparison made at Gardenhill School, La Mirada, California. Test
made with 3. 5-ton gas absorption unit and 3-ton heat pump unit. Results of test re-
ported by trade publication AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING AND VENTILATING.

ALL-GAS KITCHEN for cooking and baking is feature of new Harlequin
Restaurant, St. Petersburg. Newest unit of Palm Beach's Newberry Pharmacy
chain in Lake Park has year 'round climate control with gas air conditioning.

PANAMA CITY AREA boosting gas air conditioning tonnage at fast pace.
Recent installations this area include: Waiting room and office', Sowell Aviation,
Panama City Airport; new district office, Liberty National Life Insurance Co.;
Fisher-Stinson hardware store and all-gas home of P. T. Heath on Beach Drive.

SOUTH MIAMI City Council voted unanimously on September 18 to grant a
30-year natural gas franchise to Florida Gas Utilities Company.

MODERN CAFETERIA in Allstate Insurance Company's new regional district
office building, St. Petersburg, is all-gas, including serving counter and coffee
urn. Building also heated and dehydrated by gas-fired boiler. Liberty National
Life Insurance Company's new office building, Ocala, has gas heating-cooling
system.

HOW LONG will U. S. reserves of natural gas last is a question frequently
asked. American Gas Association estimated proved reserves at the beginning of
1962 to be 267 trillion cubic feet and ultimate reserves to be from 1200 to 1700
trillion cubic feet. Consumption last year was 13. 5 trillion cubic feet, and in
each of the years that statistics have been kept by the American Gas Association,
more natural gas has been discovered than has been used. Facts on natural gas
and other forms of energy reported in recent publication American Gas Associa-
tion "Energy .... Today and Tomorrow. Copy available free on application to
Florida Natural Gas Association.

Reproduction of information contained in this advertisement is authorized without re-
striction by the Florida Natural Gas Association, P.O. Box 11147, St. Petersburg, Fla.
46 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






BRI Report...
(Continued from Page 44)
buildings had 4000-600 KWH/ton
figures. From these figures you can
see the wide diversity between differ-
ent building users. The old advice of
running air conditioning equipment
all night for economy of operation is
not true; and perhaps some of the
higher figures I found in researching
this problem represent this old fash-
ioned point of view.
From the charts and data it can be
seen that all sun shades can be
"proved out" to save money both in
terms of initial investment cost and
annual savings. It might be said that
in making his feasibility study for his
client the architect will always hold
the winning hand. Not only can he
enrich and embellish the facade. He
can also prove to his client that in
doing it he can save him money. I
know of no better possible combina-
tion of professional advice and coun-
sel.



Aluminum...
(Continued from Page 17)
practices and the proper filler rod.
Welding does not seriously effect the
structural properties of adjacent areas.
There exist a multitude of methods
for mechanical fastening. All have
been developed to handle specific ap-
plications and prompt very few ques-
tions. The most recent development
has been the use of adhesives. Un-
fortunately performance has been
rather spotty over the past few years-
particularly where moisture can gain
access to the joint. New adhesives
are being developed and this field
shows a great deal of promise in the
near future.
Two characteristics of aluminum
that create a wealth of controversy
and conversation arc corrosion and
expansion. Neither need be a problem
if recognized. Corrosion will be cov-
ered in greater detail in a future
article on finishing. However, electro-
lytic action in conjunction with dis-
similar metals bears mentioning here.
The degree of action is directly re-
lated to the respective positions of the
metals in the electromotive scale.
Extreme moisture and corrosive at-
mospheres can compound the situa-
tion provided no preventative mcas-
(Continued on Page 49)
NOVEMBER, 1962


How many of these

services are you get-

ting from your present

insulation source


You can get them

all from your..


PROFESSIONAL INSULATION
COUNSEL AND INSTALLATION
Yes, all of the above services are now available to you
... through Borg-Warner's comprehensive new A. C. T.
program. Without extra cost, your Alfol Consulting
Technician is now geared to offer you total insulation
service . from accurate problem-analysis . right
through scheduling and installation. Why not find out
now how this professional kind of service can save you
real money.
Send today for a free brochure outlining the benefits you
receive through Borg-Warner's new A. C. T. program.
There's no cost or obligation.



FOII R\ EREFLECTAL CORPORATION
fIBu A Subsidiary of Borg-Warner Corporation
FO L ^ 200 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 4, Illinois
,Mn .......


- I I









Give the lady

what she wants
(An ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN
and the benefits that a Live Better
Electrically MEDALLION signifies)


Ii t


~?~Crrurl1r


*THE MEDALLION certifies
to an all-electric kitchen equipped
with at least 4 major electric appli-
ances, including flameless electric
range and flameless electric water
heater (and a choice of 2 others,
such as dishwasher, clothes dryer,
refrigerator, air conditioner, etc.).
Also Full Housepower wiring and
ample Light for Living.

F L O R ID A P O W


r Potential home-buyers may differ in taste, income
and size of family, but they all want to Live Better...
Electrically! When a home is "Medallioned" you can be
sure that more prospects will become buyers... and that
you'll gain both prestige and profit.
The confidence that people have in the MEDALLION
as the hallmark of electrical excellence serves to attract
more real prospects, closes more sales. Smart builders
throughout Florida are making it their "ace in the hole."
Last year 73% more Medallion living units were certified
in the FP&L service area than in 1960. This year, fifty
million dollars is being spent nationally to promote the
Medallion Home program. You can profit by recommend-
ing the MEDALLION standards for homes in every price
range. Call any FP&L office for full details.


...IT'S CHEAPER, TOO0


ER & LI HT COMPANY
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


48 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


LZt" P






Aluminum...
(Continued from Page 47)
ures have been taken. But these pre-
ventative measures are simple to
achieve and result in most satisfactory
performance. They consist of apply-
ing a bituminous or zinc chromate
paint to either, or both, metal contact
surfaces-or the use of a non-metallic
insulating strip between the surfaces.
Incidently, the painting procedure is
also advisable for aluminum and
wood. It is also advisable to use fas-
teners (screws, rivets, etc.) of either
aluminum or stainless steel.
Expansion is purely a mechanical
condition. Aluminum can and often
will attain a skin temperature of 1600
in direct sunlight. Armed with this in-
formation along with the formula for
the rate of expansion (13.2 x 10-6/in/
OF) the designer can, by use of slid-
ing joints and proper allowances, over-
come the problem with no difficulty.
The chart on page 17 is offered to
simplify the calculations.



Those

Suprise

Visits

This commentary, which will no
doubt hit home to Florida archi-
tects, is reprinted with apprecia-
tion from the "Blueprint," journal
of the Westchester (NY) Society
of Architects.

These notes relate mainly to clients
who have more to learn about con-
struction than we do, and conse-
quently learn faster than we do. Even
so, they don't learn fast enough, and
they learn last what they should have
learned first-to watch and listen if
they must, but to keep quiet and not
discuss materials, methods or costs
with the contractors or workmen on
their jobs. A construction job is one
place where the operatives can get
paid to amuse themselves, and they
rarely pass up an opportunity to have
some fun at the expense of someone
else anybody else the owner, the
architect, their bosses, or each other
- it's all in the game.
It goes something like this. Your
client pays a surprise visit to his job,
(Continued on Page 52)
NOVEMBER, 1962


/ 0..


'.






S' ,
.? ; .." *' f .f ,
*A-r:,'. 7 'V-^,- 4. _- .,,' a.

'i.f .f ,,y ..-,.,-
,'iap .'-,'.- .-.-t/' iL.- '..,, .-'


n / I


If you offer Quality to give the Service architects
demand they want to know about it. And the best
place to tell them is in THEIR VERY OWN MAGAZINE.

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers and general contractors.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building"-for through draw.
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create . .

Architects' specifications control your sales. To help
them specify the product or service you offer, tell ther-
about it where they'll see it regularly HERE . .



For s ONLY OFFICIAL l
FAA Journa . Owned,. read "








Florida Architect


7225 S. W. 82nd Ct., Miami 43


MO 5-5032


- I L II


--- -- eI


~1 I~ lr -' I I I' 1 3


1/"T










8th Annual Roll Call


--- 1961


-1962


Listed here are firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA
grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they

make or sell are of quality to merit specification. They seek your approval.


ANCHOR LOCK OF FLORIDA, INC.
1950 N. 30th Ave., Hollywood, Fla.
Roof Trusses
Agency-E. J. Scheaffer &
Associates Advertising Agency, Inc.
1 101 N. E. 79th St., Miami, Fla.

ARMSTRONG CORK COMPANY
Lancaster, Penna.
Roofing Material
Agency-Batten, Barton, Durstine &
Osborn, Inc., 383 Madison Ave.,
New York, N. Y.

BECKER COUNTY SAND & GRAVEL CO.
P. 0. Box 848, Cheraw, S. C.
Aggregates

BETTER FUEL COUNCIL OF DADE
COUNTY
Oil Heating
Agency-Woody Kepner & Associates,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood Street, Pittsburgh, Penna.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts, aluminum
grilles

BOCA RATON HOTEL & CLUB
Boca Raton, Fla.
Convention Hotel
Agency-Adams & Keyes, Inc.
Advertising, 2103 N. Federal Hwy.,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

BOIARDI TILE MANUFACTURING
CORP.
General offices-Cleveland, Ohio
1800 N. 4th Ave., Lake Worth, Fla.
Agency-Tobias Advertising, 230
Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach, Fla.

CLEARVIEW CORPORATION
3318 S. W. Second Ave.,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Louver Window Window Wall
Agency-R. B. Moreland & Co.
1534 Fidelity Union Bldg.
Dallas, Texas

A. R. COGSWELL
433 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Architects' supplies & reproduction
service

CONSUMERS UTILITIES CORP.
P. 0. Box 872A, Sarasota, Fla.
Water & sewer systems
Agency-Gilbert Waters Associates
21 Lemon Ave. N., Sarasota, Fla.


CONTINENTAL CAN CO., BOND
CROWN & CORK DIV.
Wilmington, Delaware
Cork-Tex
Agency-Patten, Barton, Durstine &
Osborn, Inc., Palmolive Bldg.,
Chicago, Illinois

CORAL GABLES GLASS & MIRROR CO.
21 Almeria Ave., Coral Gables, Fla.
Stained Glass

DARYL PRODUCTS CORP.
7240 N. E. 4th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Sliding glass doors
Agency-Gold, Hancock & Berg, Inc.
Advertising 21 1 N. E. 97th St.
Suite 208, Miami, Fla.

DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th St., Hialeah, Fla.
Decorative masonry materials

DWOSKIN, INC.
Main Office-Atlanta, Ga.
4029 N. Miami Ave., Miami, Fla.
Wallcovering and Wallpaper
Agency- Bearden-Thompson-Frankel,
Inc. & Eastman-Scott Advertising,
22 8th St. N. E., Atlanta, Ga.

DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
621 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Manufacturer kitchens for motels
resorts and hotels
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency,
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Ind.

FEATHEROCK, INC.
6331 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal.
Lightweight garden and landscape rock
Agency-Sierra Advertisers, 6331
Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal.

FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami, Fa.
Custom-cast plaques

FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th St., Miami, Fla.
Oil and gas heating
Agency-Bevis Associates, Advertising
928 S. W. 10th St., Miami 36, Fla.

FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSN.
Deland, Florida
Gas-cooking and heating
Agency-Palmer Tyler & Co., Biscayne
Plaza Bldg. at 79th St., Miami, Fla.


FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION CO.
P. 0. Box 44, Winter Park, Fla.
Gas-cooking and heating
Agency-Palmer Tyler & Co.
Biscayne Plaza Bldg., at 79th St.,
Miami, Fla.

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa, Fla.
Portland cement
Agency-Gray Advertising, Inc.
Daugherty Bldg., Tampa, Fla.

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Miami, Fla.
Electric utility
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE
ASSN.
P. 0. Box 217, Hallandale, Fla.
Precast, prestressed concrete
Agency-Peter Larkin, P. 0. Box 4006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
215 So. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.
Reinforcing steel and accessories
Agency-R. E. McCarty & Assoc., Inc.
206 S. Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.

FLORIDA TERRAZZO ASSN.
P. 0. Box 1879, Clearwater, Fla.

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
1 11 West Monroe St., Chicago, III.
Trinity White cements
Agency-Harris, Wilson & Walt, Inc.
221 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, III.

HAMILTON PLYWOOD
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Fort Lauderdale
Cabinet and Paneling plywoods
Agency-Travis Messer, Advertising
P. 0. Box 7368, Orlando, Fla.

HARRIS STANDARD PAINT COMPANY
1022-26 No. 19th St., Tampa
Paints and paint products
Agency-Louis Benito Advertising, Inc.
507 Morgan St., Tampa, Fla.


HILLYARD SALES CO.
St. Joseph, Missouri
Floor maintenance products
Agency-Bozell & Jacobs, Inc.
1016 Baltimore, Kansas City, Mo.


50 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


srrrsr%l~*sl~pp~l~~ spq~ ~









HOUDAILLE-SPAN INC.
1776 E. Sunrise Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida
Prestressed concrete units
Agency-Peter Larkin, P.O. Box 4006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Bridgewater, Mass.
Special nails and fastening devices
Agency-Warner Alden Morse
P. 0. Box 720, Brockton, Mass.

THE JANIS CORPORATION
1680 N. E. 123rd St., North Miami, Fla.
Real Estate
Agency-Long Advertising Agency,
Inc.
20 S. E. Eighth St., Miami, Fla.

KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC.
131 N. E. 40th Street, Miami, Fla.
Furniture & Fabrics
Agency-Zlowe Co., Inc.
770 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y.

LAMBERT CORPORATION
2125 W. Central Ave., Orlando, Fla.
Waterproofing materials, concrete

LIBBEY-OWE'NS-FORD GLASS CO.
811 Madison Ave., LOF Bldg., Toledo, 0.
Sheet glass
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
55 Public Square, Cleveland, Ohio

THE MABIE-BELL COMPANY
Greensboro, North Carolina
Precast, lightweight concrete panels
Agency-David W. Evans & Associates
Evans Bldg., 110 Social Hall Ave.,
Salt Lake City, Utah

MAROLF HYGIENIC EQUIPMENT, INC.
1627 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd., Clearwater, Fla.
Sewage disposal systems
Agency-Wesco Advertising
811 Court St., Clearwater, Fla.

MAULE INDUSTRIES
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
Concrete products

MERRY BROTHERS BRICK & TILE CO.
Augusta, Georgia
Structural clay products
Agency-Withers & Carson PR &
Advertising, 700 Security Federal
Bldg., Columbia, S. C.

MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
5671 N. W. 37th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Aluminum awning windows
Agency-E. J. Scheaffer & Associates
Advertising Agency, Inc.
1101 N. E. 79th St., Miami, Fla.

MEEKINS, INC.
P .0. Box 3657, Hollywood, Fla.
Concrete products
Agency-Patrick Duffy Advertising
1785 Broad Causeway, Miami, Fla.


MODU-WALL, INC.
Kalamazoo, Mich.
Curtain-walls
Agency-Grant, Miller Barrett Adv.
Agency, 315 Park Bldg.,
Kalamazoo, Mich.

MOSAIC TILE COMPANY
Zanesville, Ohio, & Beverly Hills, Cal.
Ceramic tile
Agency Farson, Huff & Northlich,
Inc., 700 Terrace Hilton Bldg.,
Cincinnati, Ohio

RICHARD PLUMER
155 N. E. 40th St., Miami, Fla.
Business, residential interiors

PEOPLES GAS SYSTEM North Miami,
Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale,
Hollywood, Tampa
Gas-cooking, heating and cooling

PANEL STRUCTURES, INC.
45 Greenwood Ave., East Orange, N. J.
Sanpan Panels
Agency-Building Industry Promotions
16 East 52nd St., New York, N. Y.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Dr., Orlando, Fla.
Portland cement and products
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.
410 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.

PORSCHE CAR CORPORATION,
1444 N. Main St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Agency Newman, Lynde & Associ-
ates, Inc., 1628 San Marco Blvd.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
1251 Doolittle Dr., San Leandro, Calif.
Lighting fixtures
Agency-L. C. Cole Co., Inc.
406 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal.

A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th Terr., Miami, Fla.
Architectural woodwork and supplies

REFLECTAL CORPORATION
200 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.
Insulating material
Agency-The Biddle Co.
108 E. Market St., Bloomington, III.

RUBBERMAID, INC.
1205 E. Bowman St., Wooster, Ohio
Kitchen specialties
Agency-Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove,
Inc., Four Gateway Center,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

RUBBER PRODUCTS, INC.
4521 W. Crest, Tampa, Fla.
Rubber tile floor covering
Agency-Taliaferro & Associates
330 W. Platt, Tampa, Fla.

SOLITE CORPORATION
Richmond, Va.
Lightweight aggregates for structural
concrete and masonry units
Agency-Cabell Eanes, Inc.
509 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va.


SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE &
TELEGRAPH CO.
Atlanta, Georgia
Communications
Agency-Tucker Wayne & Co.
1 175 Peachtree St., N. E., Atlanta, Ga.

SUPERIOR WINDOW CO.
625 E. 10th Ave., Hialeah, Fla.
Curtain wall and window wall
Agency-Robert S. Hurwitz Advertis-
ing, VIP Bldg., Coral Gables, Fla.

TEMPERA CORPORATION
4035 N. Interstate Ave.,
Portland 17, Oregon
Anti-scald valves
Agency-Harry Watson Advertising
924 E. Burnside St., Portland, Ore.

TERRA-TYLE, BOIARDI TILE MFG.
CORP.
1800 4th Ave. No., Lake Worth, Fla.
Outdoor patio stone

THOMPSON DOOR CO., INC.
3300 N. W. 67th St., Miami, Fla.
Hollow and solid core doors

TIDEWATER CONCRETE BLOCK &
PIPE CO.
Box 162, Charleston, So. Carolina
Glazed concrete units
Agency-C. Richard MacLellan Adver-
tising, 11 8 Butler Rd., Glyndon, Md.

TIMBER STRUCTURES, INC.
P. 0. Box 3782, Portland, Ore.
Structural timbers
Agency-Arthur E. Smith, Advertising
Terminal Sales Bldg., Portland, Ore.

UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CO.
55 West 44th St., New York, N. Y.
Plywood and plywood products
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Ave., New York, N. Y.

VOGUE INDUSTRIES, INC.
5400 N. E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla.
Kitchens, appliances and accessories

WEYERHAEUSER CO., RILCO ENGI-
NEERED WOOD PRODUCTS DIV.
Main office Tacoma, Wash.
P. 0. Box 17735, Forest Hills Station,
Tampa 12, Fla.
Laminated wood products
Agency-Cole & Weber Inc.
100 Perkins Bldg., Tacoma 2, Wash.

WASTE KING CORPORATION
Kitchen equipment
Agency-Hixson & Jorgensen, Inc.
3540 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5,
Calif.

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
1690 Monroe Dr., Atlanta, Ga.
Masonry building materials, products

ZONOLITE COMPANY
125 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, III.
Lightweight insulating fill
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
105 W. Adams St., Chicago, III.


NOVEMBER, 1962 51


1~PllrpP~P~ller~llII~~












when TERRAZZO is properly cured,
beautifully finished and correctly
maintained the Hillyard way!
Hillyard Maintaineers are available to serve you in
Florida, with a two-fold counseling service; "job
captain" service for you, and later, maintenance
planning for your client. They offer free job super-
vision, specialized approved products for terrazzo
care, and a client manual for preventive maintenance.
Materials are conveniently warehoused in Florida,
and the Hillyard Maintaineer is
lg Jou ta AJ0 cout o PaAoQQ


LOREN E. ELLIS
P.O. Box 2343
Hollywood, Florida
Phone: WAbash 2-8121


DAN K. MINNICK
P.O. Box 2745
Orlando, Florida
Phone: GArden 3-8208


Proprietary Chemists Since 190

DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?

If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect . . We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address" ....


Surprise Visits...
(Continued from Page 49)
unchaperoned. He wants to enjoy see-
ing his money spent, just as you told
him he should. Only he wants to test
a few notions he has acquired from
a motley crew of disinterested, unre-
sponsible wise-guys- namely, his
bridge gang, his barber, and his gar-
dener. They have all heard of the pit-
falls of construction and advised him
to watch his step.
The advice, which is free and
worth it, adds up to a notion that, by
going to the job unescorted by you
or anybody else from headquarters, he
can get a better comprehension of the
neolithic mysteries of the construction
business. He has noticed that, when
he is given a guided tour of his proj-
ect, he is led around, through, under
and over numerous activities which
are not explained, to a set of prepared
displays and demonstrations which
are explained in such a way as almost
to require approval. They look rigged.
And they are rigged to demonstrate
something that was selected and
approved way back when the draw-
ings were being made.
Your client is merely getting a
chance to confirm his selection before
it is built in. He can still change it
if he thinks he understands it well
enough to dislike it, and if he knows
enough to select a proper substitute,
and if he is willing to pay for the
privilege of making the change.
Nobody seems to know why this prac-
tice of job inspection by owners per-
sists. But it does; and it proves only
that architects are pathological opti-
mists.
One thing leads to another. So by
admitting your client to his premises
and inviting his participation in a very
limited way in a few activities, you
appear to be excluding him from all
the other activities -which you are.
And he gets the feeling that he is
missing a lot which he is. So he
decides to pay a surprise visit to the
job on his own, which he does; and
the results thereof are as predictable
as tomorrow's sunrise.
It is a day of surprises. First, his
visit is a surprise to the workmen who
splatter him with mortar, cover him
with dust, and nearly run over him
with a loaded dolly. Next, he is sur-
prised to learn that his job is being
built in spite of the goofy drawings
and the silly specifications. He is sur-
prised to learn that the workmen are


surprised to learn that his architect
really wanted reinforcing bars in the
footings wasteful extravagance; pre-
stressed masonry components im-
practical nonsense; plastic pipe-
"man, you can have it!"; gravity re-
tracting hardware "never heard of
it."
He is surprised to find that he is
not asking simple questions and get-
ting comprehensible answers, but is
being asked incomprehensible ques-
tions and feeling simple. Doesn't he
know that he could have galvanized
stock for the same price as the coated
stuff specified? Does he really think
that these magnetic retractors will
hold? How long does he think it will
be before the underlayment will start
to eliminate? Does he have any idea
what condensation will do to that
reflective insulation? And so on and
so on and so on.
What a good time is had by every-
body but your client, whose money is
obviously being wasted faster and
"foolisher" than what he dropped at
Vegas. Any how, he knew how he lost
it there. And it was a nice clean break,
not a concrete and steel rathole down
which his entire fortune is being
drained away under your supervision.
We all know that the more interest
that is taken in a job by all concerned
the better the job. Discouraging an
owner from visiting his job is im-
proper and unworkable. Trying to
silence workmen, some of the best
of whom are the worst rascals, would
be foolish. Preparing the owner for
what might happen on his unsched-
uled safaris into the construction
jungle might work and should be
tried.
An owner, blundering around his
half-finished job alone, looks to some
contractors like a snail out of its shell
looks to some black bass tempting.
This is especially true if the contrac-
tor is not making as much as he
thinks he should, or is chafing for
some other reason which is usual.
Contractors always seem to have some
bargain to offer an owner at this
casual meeting anything from a
full-grown tree to a set of precast
post holes always for an on the
spot but immediate decision, and, of
course, in writing just like the con-
tract says it should be.
Some way should be found and
used to condition owners so they
will not be less interested in their
jobs but more panic-proof in un-
familiar surroundings.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


11 '-3-- - I -I I ' i








ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Anchor Lock of Fla., Inc.___ 15
Armstrong Cork Co. _._ 10-11
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh ___ 16
Becker County Sand &
Gravel Co. 9
Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc. ________ 3rd Cover
Dwoskin, Inc. ____ 5
Dwyer Products of Florida,
Inc. __________2nd Cover
Florida Home Heating
Institute ...... ..... 54
Florida Gas Transmission __42-43
Florida Natural Gas Co..___ 46
Florida Portland Cement Div. 25
Florida Power & Light Co.__ 48
Florida Prestressed ______ 37
Harris Standard Paint Co._ 38
Hillyard Sales ___ 52
Houdaille-Span, Inc.
(R. H. W right, Inc.) --- 12
The Janis Corp. _____ 44
Knoll Associates, Inc. _____ 26
Maule Industries, Inc.__ 23
Merry Bros. Brick & Tile Co. 3
Miami Window Corp. ____ 1
Modu-Wall Inc. __________ 22
Mosaic Tile Co. ____ 6
Peoples Gas Co. 41
Richard Plumer ___4th Cover
Reflectal Corp. .. .... .. 47
Solite Corp. ___ 33
Southern Bell Telephone &
Telegraph Co. 40
Thompson Door Co. 35
Tidewater Concrete Block
& Pipe Co. 21
Timber Structures, Inc. 8
United States Plywood Co._ 45
Vogue Kitchen Center ---- 44
Waste King Corp........ 7
Weyerhaeuser Co. Rilco Div._ 24
F. Graham Williams Co.---- 53
Zonolite Company ___ 39


NOVEMBER, 1962


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA 1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
GA. OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" AND ALUMINUM

PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS

We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

JAMES C. ("Jamie") GILLESPIE

115 Orangeview Avenue


Clearwater, Florida


Telephone: 446-7271


I~ I












MR.

ARCHITECT I
Ads like this one are now
appearing in newspapers .
all over Florida. They re- to
mind Florida folks that oil
home heating assures
"healthier, happier living
in cold snap weather at
lowest possible cost".
They'll help you gain
ready acceptance of your
recommendation of safer,
more dependable, more
economical oil home heat-
ing.








To Dads Who Care...and Prepare:
Last winter was mild. Perhaps you "got by" with
makeshift home heating methods. But what if this
winter is average? Even in South Florida that means
42 days when temperatures drop into the chilly 50's
or lower. And what if the coming winter is below
average like 1957-58? Your loved ones could suffer
weeks of discomfort and perhaps illness!

Install OIL home heating now!
If you have a heating problem...... OIL is the one
right solution. It's safer and more dependable; and
it cuts home heating bills in half. If you decide on a
duct system, make sure the ducts will also accom-
modate the central electric air conditioning you're
going to need next summer. Whatever system you
select, you can install it now with little or no cash
down and terms to 36 months or longer.

FLORIDA HOME & HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET, MIAMI


He is installing an oil home
heating system to keep
[ us healthier and happier
this winter. He chose OIL
because it's safe and de-
pendable, and cuts home
..... heating bills in half!


See Your Home Heating Dealer Now
for a free home heating survey and cost estimate
to help you select the right size and type of oil
heating equipment for your home. Do it now and
assure your family of healthier, happier living
in cold snap weather at lowest possible cost!


For YEAR 'ROUND COMFORT: OIL home heating and ELECTRIC
air conditioning the comfort team that works for pennies!
54 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I

















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This is a full-color portrayal of our Rainbow Range Slumped
Brick. First presented more than fifteen years ago, we are
re-running it here to remind you that our Slumped Brick is
still being widely used from Key West to Cleveland. We make
"'~ ~ ** .* ' 1^* a t ~iif !i ^ ^ - -












it also in other color ranges red, tan, chalk-white, oyster
and gray. Your inquiries are welcomed . .
..f*: #*f -4 -*".. ..*'**;. "-" _.e- "*' *. I -f' .rr
~ 4 ',c '*; ;. *, .^ .~r -^ *:; 1"g .r ^ t ^ ; ^ .A ^ ~ :ic


^~~ ~~ -.^ts&^..^^* "<'
U t *'* * '. *.*.;> '- -" .',:?**: ?* '*.,** t14 *t



stil bing widey ued rom Ke et oCevln Wemake^j"

Titaso in otherl-color prranges -f ored tain, chalk-hie, oStumer


and gray. Your inquiries are welcomed ..


I '1UE


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.


I I


MIAMI, FLORIDA


TUXEDO 7-1525





11A



I WWI.


a). -I .,I)D-w -1 / I. 1'


RICHARD PLUMER


BUSINESS INTERIORS, INC.


155 N.E.40th ST.. MIAMI PLaza 1-9775


I -II---~I - I -r I




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