• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 One easy way to stop bid shopp...
 Table of Contents
 News and notes
 Naminations for 1963 FAA offic...
 New FAA by-laws
 Urban destiny and organized...
 Advertisers' index
 F/A panorama
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00100
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00100
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    One easy way to stop bid shopping
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    News and notes
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Naminations for 1963 FAA officers
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    New FAA by-laws
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Urban destiny and organized intent
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Advertisers' index
        Page 37
        Page 38
    F/A panorama
        Page 39
    Back Cover
        Page 40
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited- permission-to. digitize- and. make-this. electronic-
version- available- has- been- granted- by-the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of- F lori da.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on- of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed- to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association's-web site.



















One



Easy



Way


To


Stop


Bid


Shopping


I I


1i 11 c .i tf r.,iIi h .r. rpr t I i'h t .I- rc A tini
bI 1.11 t li 'it i I:.d 1, 1 ti ii vilj.. I fr., c Li j~ i Iti' Lit'. .irpi''. --.fI n ii i ii
bu ~ ~ ~ r II il .hld I.it -p fIti: ,irih.] t sd .. ,f.. I ic rI I. t It I '. pp r''-i. 1nd I.- l Ii InIIIN
11 11fiLL. ii. 1, hc f..r.. himr- i tciw ., i~fr thin...- Ill It I.if n I L- I.; l rc '4lL 1CL t hi L ir. Ii i
111i k-Iti' t I 1i I I I I lIM tlL i FIA d 1 I,] 1 hI ,
Butlir 1I I nc-l .1 lapr Ti- I .Iii Ft I I li t ut I'. Ar IleI th~ifIt ht- Ir c !ir iti-Lit I hit-
h.n rn 'i~ijit iii.n ; jI iril' 1111 [ 1 l-1, .'\ 'z r111. urrrri irjt1--. 1 i ti4 ArC- ril 'Ill .ftIi.IL
'\\c /i,* 1 r.-. rcj% t. i hap,, p n' l i- 111A 11 'I/r di i raur Iar Ir tilt. i ~' i
Ii Nr/ Land lit ti 'Iit. f JllO IftII 1 1i-1ii 1~a 1i Ci Ia Ii Ii ji I tri Iii 11- b r i-NdI! '
dii f/ri ,. ii ru ir ,r.i id .ar hid ,.'kr', ith titr.i ir i-hi tecti /rri rhru h s 't lfe
,r~ \X h i I p lIet I it 'I, I U 1s 1ijid .i "ll in' i t C. ail 1MI. f 1- fIf I t1 1C I d Ii I, nt

C ('liultri i rr N -'711 l It 1`111 Iut/I i tilt. Lit IIItL( I.
.I /If, ''iitraiit 'r bid ruinil tiir:u rc s Ni it hrp e lin~ 'aff- .1 arifd tif-'rind
.11 r pm rie-L 1d tI/ri arcIrrIICe ii at o '.tt c ick tH. his grnzn and init 0ns 7 ii xttnII'4
teiL'mt riXd111 1142 l'pTt iir/ Ill afL(t'J 1 11rdi th tr i le.~'rr1~iet/iiie! \ i
the rriaft.i.r rI/naiifhL101CL % ni~i

Th .- --f'.' 1 lit Iiii ii Ii it-ii lii- ili iii i. i -.al iini i r- i~, I lls
r: fudhd I. r A r'.a. i tit, r1. a..-I ii1. i t 0.l ld IN ii a l.Iiti/J.
qnLI r Ci ;.; .1 air hr.11 1p rd Ilil 11 t.l I-i \I d. i n rie _-I n 1- t r .1 ~i~ -I.
'lu 1-r 1 1i i-ii 11u0' fill, ei~ cii di p.: 11t 1 if 1h 1 111 .. i it i -vn m i.r i Iii. 111- 11sIl
'f p r [ it. 1:1 -11 1L' triiii j1.' 5 i tI t Ih II-IIII t I l. [1 : 1-
-\\I I L. !i'aI frri i O il' dild fe'' till'm i I H. lit- i. -I /ii' bl.n I Ju '/ rc'
do :Ift C 11~ripirnrri. t 117 q lt/Lr .' I at '~h' \XC tt il't I llrhi 111 air Vipai arid C
qi.,' i h 11 i .1 i ki L_ Cl /Id '_ Ii bii'iir 1, 1 s' \i i I 7% hi: 11- I/i C I' 'li it 111 'L.It I 'h Ctl.r

a C-1 Bine t Il (LI' 'I f IL 1 "! 1/.'' i 'riJ. I l ) I a i. t ~Irh L b .r i I'd I I U. in Ii I it I/u H ii
"Il'lh ti ll If M lii r 11i tc-. ifx r I ; B.- cai ,,. iii i m it n 'ri cut 'n or a rid fi
''ll1 r riC-I 1 f uliIn I .' i1 r (111. 7 41 I' ht i i.tri0 I f/I i t il .i-liftr i `i 1[01 1n i liiill 0 r n.. i
I if I''It I'I ll d111i' t tiir 1.1' 111 l I' M 1', liil- 1uh-rf1u '11, hi~ i It kn 'r lit 111il. 1
Tha Il air 'I p Ir ralt 'i, I' i I' frtfI..ri c p.!-.- i...'i I rid.. in~ :I I fltiu.



niL.'ilL i I. I i.iL~ iiliI'd i i i ~ pltii itii.


r' I















*i


8











waive your troubles away.. WINDOW TROUBLES, THAT IS.
THE PHOTO ABOVE IS OF OUR SERIES 128/130. IT MERITS OUR SYMBOL OF EXCELLENCE OBVIOUSLY, IT MUST BE OF RUGGED CON-
STRUCTION TO WITHSTAND SUCH ABNORMAL ABUSE. IN FACT, IT'S BUILT TO STAND ALMOST ANY KIND OF TREATMENT AND STILL
GIVE A LIFETIME OF TROUBLE-FREE SERVICE. OUR FENESTRATION ENGINEERS DESIGNED IT SO THAT YOU COULD DEPEND ON IT!
IT'S NOT A MIAMI WINDOW UNLESS IT'S MADE BY
MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 48-877, INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI, FLORIDA
OCTOBER, 1962 1


"Ve 2mri-7-21mr- -------- =" *mr~Ll~l~ll L







74




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


lio 7&i Iae ---


One Easy Way to Stop Bid Shopping .
Editorial By Roger W. Sherman, AIA


News and Notes .. ..


Convention Is "GO"... No Cause for Worry... Reynolds Award ...
New FAA Film ... AIA Honor Awards Program ... S/A Regional Conference
. .. Producers' Council News .. Personal and Professional


Nominations for 1963 FAA Officers . . .

New FAA By-laws ........... .

Urban Destiny and Organized Intent . . .
Part II of an article By Frederick H. Blair, Jr.


Advertisers' Index . .


F/A Panorama .



F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER ...
The absence of pictorial illustration on the cover this month is by no means
accidental. We are carrying in this issue a most important document- the new
By-laws of the FAA. Since these have been presented with a comparative text
frm the current By-laws the issue constitutes a reference to which all FAA
members undoubtedly will often have recourse. Thus we thought it helpful to
title this issue for its reference value.


. 13

. 17

. 30


. 37


. 3rd Cover


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12

NUMBER 10 1962

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. .2nd Cover







V-O..- -'7, -j t



















R -a-r -at corma r' b rick
f ..-.. .r-._ r o_ ..e..y 4..-4^. ... .. S,,


























.yA .n' dAc heck-theecon ro-m .o.'a rger size-..mb-
U l-.t off_-ed-- n 3 of -- h ig-t ....s. fo e amp.
S..:.# .... ;- .j- j..---. .- .. t ;*- 3 # .



















^ a'; Tt**i?, '
^ ^ '.''t I .h-r- -f
B. R .19 2 , ,.
... . r 1 - t -* , .-. ..f4
-Z O-







n: .-, ,-,' $ C ,r.' t-..... -.... .;.-- ,--4






















modular sizes, Barktex or wirecut textures. Though we






tails, or call Merry Brick direct.' '-
r 0 -
"Who AI N
all r F1 s
7I.i. ~ ~
f.~..~.aV~~a ..

























3 -

. ipat flow SWou
Rorumor square hancddown
Therropail glass. 1QO0.300 Wlts..
,. S No tramesJatches pr visible
means of glass support ,.
k. (U.S. Pat. No. 2,826,684).
w "" NEW hinging principle.
P1ewirrecLreceged housings.
FAA Ie ping":
Write for further informanoiio.
PRESCOLITE MFG. CORP.
I[U l2.251 Doolittle Drive
"- San Landro, C.ihlorni.
FACTORIES:
San Leandro. Cal Warrmngton. Pa. El Dorado. Ark.


Introducing . .



of
Atri, Italy

Manufacturers
of Fine

STAINED GLASS
Windows




0



s^NCE O
COMPLETE ART SERVICE
Shown at:
CORAL GABLES GLASS
& MIRROR INC.
21 Almeria Avenue
Telephone HI 3-4643
GEORGE MELCHIORRE, Rep.


News & Notes


Convention Is "Go" . .
The Florida Central Convention
Committee is right now giving the
final polish to plans which the Com-
mittee firmly believes will make next
month's three-day meeting at St.
Petersburg ". . the best Convention
ever from the standpoint of profession-
al program, women's activities, student
participation and entertainment .."
with, the Committee adds, . due
respect to the many fine programs of
former years." Here's a run-down of
the Convention program highlights as
background for the Committee's state-
ment.
In developing the theme "The
Anatomy of Architecture", the profes-
sional program will be an attempt to
evaluate means for coordinating the
various aspects of construction plan-
ning and design. Panelists who will
probe various aspects of the subject
include:
MARIO SALVADORI, Columbia Uni-
versity, internationally known for the
brilliance of his solutions to a host of
problems in structural engineering.
FRED S. DUBIN, whose long experi-
ence with major building projects has
qualified him as expert in the design
of complicated systems of mechanical
equipment.
VINCENT CAFIERO, interior design-
er, who has been largely responsible for
many of the Knoll Associates' most
successful projects.
ALBERT LOCKETT, associated with the
firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
that is continuing to make architec-
tural history on a nation-wide scale.
Programs for the ladies will be
equally as provocative, according to
the Committee; and for the students
a number of special events have been
planned, including a seminar led by
JAMES LUCAS of the Herman Miller
organization. Entertainment, says the
Committee, will be .. the best that
the Golden Triangle affords."

No Cause for Worry . .
Here's a reassuring note for those
FAA members-and wives-who
have viewed with some alarm the inci-
dence of encephalitis in St. Petersburg,
the site of next mqnth's FAA Con-
vention. FAA Convention Commit-
tee Chairman VERNER JOHNSON
checked about this with the Florida
State Board of Health. Last month


he received an answer to his query
from DR. WILLIAM L. WRIGHT, As-
sistant State Health Officer, Director,
Bureau of Local Health Service.
"I know of no reason," wrote Dr.
Wright, "why you cannot continue to
hold your convention in St. Petersburg
at the time now scheduled. The out-
break in St. Petersburg appears to be
ending; and we doubt that there will
be any more encephalitis in that area
this fall. Certainly, by the time of
your meeting this outbreak should
be well over with."
Backing up Dr. Wright's statement
are reports of all-out activity on the
part of practically everybody in the
greater St. Petersburg area. Spray
planes, fogging machines, squirt guns,



RESERVE EARLY!
If you haven't already
done so, make the reser-
vation for your Conven-
tion stay at St. Pete's Sor-
eno Hotel at once. Better
drop everything and do
it now! The Convention
is closer than you think-
and although the hotel
has ample space, early
reservation will get you a
preferred room location.
It will also be a help to
your Convention Commit-
tee in planning and will
avoid last minute hurry
and confusion on your
part. .... So why don't
you DO IT NOW!



pressure bombs all have been used
to lay low the particular type of mos-
quito suspected of carrying the en-
cephalitis virus. By the time Novem-
ber 8 rolls around, St. Pete will prob-
ably be the most bug-free community
in all the Sunshine State.

Reynolds Award ...
If you haven't already done so, note
the change 'in the wording of the
"criteria" for judging submissions for
the 1963 Reynolds Memorial Award.
No longer does aluminum usage need
to be a "first" in its field-nor does
the metal need to dominate the design
as a major material. Submissions will
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I -








Edsoite .. a solid-core door that's


Guaranteed...


Guaranteed as to materials . One
homogeneous core of strong, tough, warp-
resisting Fibron, edge-sealed to solid white
fir stiles and rails and face-bonded on each
side to three layers of cross-banded veneers to
produce the 7-ply construction for which
Thompson doors are famed.
Guaranteed as to production . Pre-
cision controlled at every step, with every
micro-accurate element bonded with plastic
resin and fused by special processing into a
single unit of quality craftsmanship, unusual
durability and stability.
Guaranteed as to performance . Edson-
ite doors stand up under rugged use, indoors
or out, have demonstrated twice the resistance
to warping or twisting specified in the NWMA
door guarantee. Every Edsonite door-in flush
panel gum, luan or birch, and in 11 stand-
ard sizes-is covered by a written guarantee,
backed by the integrity of its manufacturer.


PLASTIC-WELDED
INTO A SINGLE UNLT
Each single element
is process-bonded to
the others with a
special adhesive that's
waterproof, rot-proof,
bug-proof. This pro-
tective coating is
cured into a film that
fills the pores of each
element, guards
against moisture pen-
etration, prevents de-
lamination, assures
dimensional stability.


Sjd so.ite .. WITH THE DIFFERENCE THAT MAKES IT BETTER .

OCTOBER, 1962 5


h.A


For information contact:







Phone: 696-5723


I _







News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 4)
now be considered against the back-
ground of ".. a significant work of
architecture, in the creation of which
aluminum has been an important con-
tributing factor."
This clarification of the Award
jury's policy may encourage entries of
many designs that formerly have been
withheld because the use of aluminum
was not "architecturally unique". If
you know of such a design-or if
you, yourself, have produced one -
submit your nomination as promptly
as possible, but certainly before De-
cember 31, 1962. An award brochure
containing a nomination form has
been sent to all AIA members. If
you haven't received yours, write AIA
headquarters about it.

New Film ...
Now available for use by Chapters
or FAA committee groups is a new
sound and color film addition to the
five already in the FAA's film library.
Produced by the Reynolds Metals
Company, it is titled "The Philadel-
phia Story Form, Design and the
City". Those who have seen it- first


Florida showing was at last month's
meeting of the Florida South Chapter
- rate it as an excellently developed
exposition of the huge urban renewal
program that is virtually re-making
the city of Philadelphia.
Like others in the FAA's film libra-
ry, the new movie is 16mm and
running time of its two reels is approx-
imately an hour. It can be obtained
on a loan basis upon request to the
executive offices of the FAA in Mi-
ami. P/R films now on file for use
include "What Is A House", "A
School for Johnny", "Buildings for
Business", "Designing A Better To-
morrow", and "A Place to Worship".

November Deadline . .
Entry slips for participation in the
AIA's 1963 Honor Awards Program
must be received at AIA Headquarters
in Washington together with a $10
fee for each entry prior to Novem-
ber 28, 1962. Entries will be judged
at the Octagon January 28-30, 1963;
and winning submissions will be ex-
hibited throughout the 1963 AIA
Convention at the Americana Hotel,
Miami Beach, May 5-9, 1963.
There's no time to lose! FAA offi-


cials and also members of the Con-
vention's Host, the Florida South
Chapter are anxious for many Flor-
ida architects to be represented.

S/A Regional Conference .
Florida architects are invited to at-
tend the Conference of the South
Atlantic Region, AIA, to be held in
Atlanta, Ga., October 25, 26, and 27,
1962, at the Architects' and Engi-
neers' Institute, 230 Spring Street,
N.W. Conference theme will be
"Form and Space", particularly as ap-
plied to contemporary architecture.
Among architects who will speak are
PAUL THIRY, FAIA and GEORGE KAS-
SABAUM. Industrial Designer CHARLES
EAMES will also address the Confer-
ence. Part of the Conference program
will be conducted tours of notable
Atlanta buildings.

Producers' Council News .
The. Jacksonville Chapter of the
Producers' Council, now numbering
25 active members, has elected the
following as officers for the current
year: President, R.W. COYLE, repre-
senting Rolscreen Co.; Vice President,
(Continued on Page 36)


V, .



4


let

I CONCEALED

telephone wiring

put more sales

appeal in your homes
More and more today it's the quality
"extras" that sell homebuyers. And
* '' concealed telephone wiring is just such a
prestige feature.
Lifetime concealed wiring provides plenty of
..- built-in outlets throughout the house...
offers maximum flexibility in phone
placement or rearrangement as family needs
grow or change. And there's never any need to
mar walls or woodwork with additional wiring.
Find out soon how easy it is to
give your homes added sales appeal with
concealed telephone wiring.
Just call your Telephone Business Office.


"-, Southern Bell
* ... ,' -,'::" .,:-_:;g fe
l i n,, ,T~s -


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































* In the i.rize-x\ inning nexw Second Presb y-
terian Church of Ft. Lauderdale, for
which Harold E. Wagoner. AIA, xwas archi-
tect. TERRAZZO has been used extensively
with dramatic effect. The broad sweep
of the lighting cove facia was worked out
with white marble chips bedded in
smooth viwhite cement . .


nu:


Membership in FTA is assurance of integrity, experience and skill. Call any
of these officers for help on any phase of terrazzo use or installation . .

SEAL W. ADAMS, JR., President, 700 N. W. 7th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, JA 2-3442 . WM. E.
OWENS, Vice President, Box 508, New Smyrna Beach, GA 8-9051 . AVERY ARENT, Secy-treas.,
Box 1879, Clearwater, 446-8373 . LOUIS FRANCESCON, Director, Dist. 1, 2500 S. W. 28th Lane,
Miami, HI 6-6037 . CARL V. CESERY, Director, Dist. 2, 316 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, EL 4-4604
. ROLAND D. SAMUELS, Director, Dist. 3, 181 Atlantic Drive, Maitland, TE 8-2061 . HENRY C.
GIGLIO, Director, Dist. 4, 3719 W. Carmen, Tampa,RE 6-1341 . W. K. WEINHOLD, Director, Dist. 5,
2175 12th St., Sarasota, 955-1525 . .



FLORIDA TERRAZZO ASSOCIATION

AVERY ARENT, Acting Executive Secretary
I ASSOCIATION P. O. BOX 1879, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA TELEPHONE 446-8373


OCTOBER, 1962
































-b





A;. Rbye,
'i, I


(". )""' 1. i"y "


j W-7';


mule
5220 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE: PLAZA 1-6633
WRITE OR CALL:


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


i i

































RubbermaidJ


kitchen base cabinet


storage program.
*


*; . .


Exclusive


design combines maxi-


mum cabinet flexibility


with minimum


installation time!


STORAGE TURNTABLE spins items you need to
front of cabinet. Stores canned goods, cleaning aids on
sturdy plastic table. Turntable spins on ball bearing.
Rubber ring base holds firm, won't scratch cabinet.
Item Retail Std. Shp.
No. Size Each Ctn. Wt. Color
2302 19' x 21" $7.95 1 44 lbs. White Sand


TURNTABLE BINS give divided storage for Rubber-
maid Turntable. Designed for single or multiple arrange-
ments. Bins also ideal for counter top corner storage.
Unbreakable, dent-proof, wipe clean with damp cloth.
Item Retail Std. Shp.
No. Size Each Ctn. Wt Color
2303 15" wide x 10" $2.98 4 5 lbs. White Sand
deep x 7" high
U.S. PAT. SPEND.


uJLJU-V I vfljclx n n unn n JlVTJ piuviuenn uuLL -
tip storage for fruits, vegetables. Rolls out on nylon
wheels. Holds 17 lbs. of potatoes. Vented sides. Un-
breakable, rust-proof plastic. Wipes clean with damp
cloth. For cabinet openings 10" or wider; will stack
on top of #2308 Storage Drawer (back page).
Item Retail Std. Shp.
No. Size Each Cln. Wt. Color
2312 20" deep x 91" $9.95 1 4 Ibs. White Sand
wide x 6" high u.s. PAT. PEND.








SLIDE -OUT LID RACK organizes, protects lids.
Easy glide rack slides right to you for fast selection.
Rigid wire frame holds cushion-coated rack; keeps lids
safe, clatter-free. For cabinet openings 12 )- W or wider.
Item Retail Std. IShp.
No. Size Each Ctn. Wt. Color
2313 19" deep x 12" $5.95 1 3% Ibs. Sandalwood
wide x 441 high I U.S. PAT. PEND.


See other side for additional storage items mnm11 ) mm.IMM) mmmmm)







Roll-out Storage Drawers
U S. PAT. PEND.
in four sizes... all stackable
Create added storage space and give convenience and organiza-
tion in base cabinets. Sturdy plastic drawers roll out on pre-
lubricated nylon wheels, bring canned goods, cleaning aids, de-
tergents right to you. Durable, dent-proof, wipe clean with damp
cloth. Drawers are stackable. Sizes to fit all cabinets.


F
(
It
N
23


For base cabinet openings 10" or wider
No. Size Each Ctn. Wt. Color
2308 19%"'deepx9" $8.95 1 3/ lbs. White Sand
widex 5" high




942 ri


or base cabinet openings 13" or wider For base cabinet openings 15" or wider For base cabinet openings 17" or wider
wo Drawers Shown-Stacked) It e Retail Sh. Sh Item Retail Std. Shp.
am RetailStd. Shp No. Size Each Ctn. Wt. Color No. Size Each C Wt. Color
o. Size Each Ctn. Wt. Color
0' Size IEach Ctn' I C r 2310 19 deep x 14 $10.95 1 14 lbs. White Sand 2311 19%"deepx 16" $11.95 1 4% lbs. White Sand
09 19" deep x12" $9.95 1 4 lbs. White Sand widex5Y" high wide x 5" high
wide x5" high

Here's why these new products offer big advantages

to both the kitchen industry and housewives alike:


1. They improve function and appearance of both new and remodeled
kitchens.

2. They're easy to install; only a screwdriver is needed; all hardware is
included.

3. Drawers roll out smoothly on pre-lubricated nylon wheels to a positive
stop, yet remove easily.

4. Drawers of same width stack and interlock securely. Make maximum
use of all cabinet space.

5. They may be included in mortgage on new or remodeled kitchens.

6. White sand color harmonizes with all kitchen materials, colors and
finishes.

7. New storage products are designed for good ki aen planning. Orient
foodstuffs and supplies where they are actually used in the kitchen.

These products are available through selected builders' and cabinet hard-
ware distributors, and their dealers.


L=.l


SPECIAL DISPLAY FIXTURE #0893.
Size 21It long x 21" deep x 73" high.
Ask your supplier for details.


RUBBERMAID INC., WOOSTER, OHIO LITHO U.S.A. (7-62) HC-54


~~F~i V.






:0 f: + _

/ .



*. /* "


? L


* "**'". **


i I
Ir



a,' s
LO W *- *


ABOVE: Sw-nging Ihe panels into lace
LEFT: The presiressed components
BELOW: Model of Science complex when finished
.Architcts. Minor Yamasaki & Associates. Detroit
Naramore. Bain, Brady & Johanson. Seattle
Precast Concrete Units Associated Sand & Gravel. Inc.,
Everett, Washington
Engineers Worthingt(in. Killing. Helle & Jackson. Seattle
General Contractor Purvis Construction Co..
Spokane & Seattle


...wherever concrete

must be beautiful


The United States Science Pavillion is one of
two principal theme buildings of the Seattle
World's Fair. After the Fair it becomes the city's
cultural center.
The load-bearing S-type stud wall panels are
32 and 52 feet long. They are faced with Trinity
White portland cement and white quartzite ag-
gregate. They are prestressed. The high strength


- use


of Trinity White and the high-early-strength gray
cement back-up permitted the forms to be stripped
in 12 to 14 hours with steam curing. Panels are
secured in place by either welding or bolting.
Problems of repeated turning, handling and
transporting these massive members were neatly
and ingeniously solved with specially outfitted
lift trucks.


Trinity White
A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


Offices: Chicago, Illinois Chatta-
nooga, Tennessee Dallas, Texas
Fort Worth, Texas Houston, Texas
Fredonia, Kansas Fort Wayne,
Indiana Jackson, Michigan Tampa,
Florida Miami, Florida Los Angeles,
California


OCTOBER, 1962


_ 1' i ^


1iL, F


7~


4


LIX.















ADJUSTABLE ANCHORING SYSTEM:

SOLVES PROBLEMS OF SECUJRIN 1RAIMNGS TO CONCRETE B
BECOMING AN INTEGRAL yA.Rj OF THE S tAlk STRUCTURE

INSURES EXTREME RIGIDITY
REDUCES COSTLY FIELD LABOR
ELIMINATES BREAKAGE IN MASONRY
-- ADJUSTABLE FOR POST ALIGNMENT












ao








Nominations for 1963 FAA Officers


From a nominee slate numbering fifteen next month's Convention
will elect four new FAA officers, name a new Regional Director
and fill two vacancies in the Regional Judiciary Committee . .


The slate of candidates to be offered
by the FAA Nominating Committee
at the FAA's 48th Annual Convention
at St. Petersburg next month is by far
the largest in FAA history. It in-
cludes 15 names-two each for the
1963 FAA offices of president, secre-
tary, treasurer and third vice president;
three for the office of AIA Regional
Director; four to cover the two vacan-
cies occurring in the Regional Judi-
ciary Committee.
The selections were made by a
Nominating Committee composed of
ELLIOTT B. HADLEY, Florida Central
Chapter, Chairman, and FORREST R.
COXEN, Florida North Central Chap-
ter, BARNARD W. HARTMAN, JR., Flor-
ida Northwest Chapter, and HERBERT
R. SAVAGE, Florida South Chapter.
Since the Committee adopted the pol-
icy of naming more than one individ-
ual for each office, a contest in each
vacancy will automatically occur. In
addition to those named by the Com-
mittee, the roster of nominees could
be enlarged by nominations from the
Convention floor for any of the six
offices to be filled by 1963.
This year nominees have been asked
to list briefly their organizational back-


grounds at chapter, state and national
levels, the object being to provide ac-
credited Chapter delegates with out-
lines of experience data as a basis for
voting. Listed here are as complete
records as have been made available
by each nominee. They are noted
alphabetically under each office
vacancy.

For Director,
Florida Region, AIA . .
H. SAMUEL KRUSE, FAIA-AIA
membership dates from 1949, Fellow-
ship from 1962. Florida South Chap-
ter: Member of Executive Committee,
six years; Vice President one year;
President, one year . FAA: Director,
four years; Secretary, one year; Presi-
dent, one year . FAA Committees:
Public Relations, three years; Conven
tion, one year; Community Develop-
ment, four years; Publications, three
years; Resolutions, four years; Chapter
Coordination, one year; Fiscal Policy,
one year; Budget, two years; Budget
and Finance, two years; Long-Range
Program, one year; By-Laws, two years
. . National AIA: P/R Committee,
one year; Materials Research, one year;
Architectural-B uild in g Information


Committee, one year and correspond-
ing member, five years.
ROBERT H. LEVISON, AIA-AIA
membership dates from 1948. Florida
Central Chapter: President, two years
. . FAA: Director, one year; First
Vice President; one year; President,
two years. . FAA Committees: Chair-
man, Office Practice, two years . .
National AIA: Professional Practice
Committee, two years.
JOHN STETSON, AIA AIA mem-
bership dates from 1947. Palm Beach
Chapter: Treasurer, one year; Vice
President, one year; President, one
year . FAA: Director, three years;
Vice President, three years; President,
two years . FAA Committees: Ex-
ecutive, six years; Architect-Engineer
Relations, eight years; Joint Coopera-
tive, eight years, chairman, three; Cap-
itol Building, one year . National
AIA: Executive Board, South Atlantic
Region, three years; Delegate to
RIBA Convention, one year; Delegate,
Pan American Congress, one year; Pan
American Congress Committee, two
years; Home Building Committee,
three years; Disaster Committee, two
years; Documents Review Committee,
(Continued on Page 14)


For Director, Florida Region, AIA


H. SAMUEL KRUSE
OCTOBER, 1962


ROBERT H. LEVISON


JOHN STETSON






For FAA President


VERNER JOHNSON ROY M. POOLEY, JR.

For Secretary


A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR.

For Treasurer


S. .. : ., .


JEFFERSON N. POWELL


Nominations . .
(Continued from Page 13)
one year; AIA-AGC Liaison Commit-
tee, three years, chairman, one.
For AIA President . .
VERNER JOHNSON, AIA-AIA
membership dates from 1949. Florida
South Chapter: Member of Executive
Committee, one year, Treasurer, one
year . FAA: Director, one year; Vice
President, three years; Secretary, two
years . FAA Committees: Execu-
tive, five years; Budget, three years;
Fiscal Policy, one year; Convention,
five years, chairman, three; Executive
Director, chairman, one year . .
National AIA: Producers' Council
Committee, one year.
ROY M. POOLEY, JR., AIA AIA
membership dates from 1955. Jack-
sonville Chapter: No offices held ...
FAA: Alternate director, one year;
Treasurer, three years. FAA Commit-
tees: Executive, two years; Public Re-
lations, chairman, two years; Publica-
tions, two years; By-laws, one year;
Budget and Finance, three years; Fiscal
Policy, one year . National AIA:
No committee memberships held.

For FAA Secretary . .
A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR., AIA
- AIA membership dates from 1955.
Jacksonville Chapter: Secretary, one
year. FAA: Director, four years. No
offices held . FAA Committees:
Collaboration with Design Industry,
chairman, two years . National
AIA: No committee memberships
held.

For the AIA Regional


*r-^ C.







t
A ES DEE .

:-: "S *.-. .- .
\ .. '* ... .
... .:



JAMES DEEN


ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






JEFFERSON N. POWELL, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1950. Palm
Beach Chapter: Director, eight years;
Secretary, one year; Vice President,
two years; President, one year . .
FAA: Director, five years. No offices
held . FAA Committees: Member-
ship, two years, chairman, one; Uni-
form Building Code, one year; Public
Relations, one year; By-laws Revision,
chairman, three years . National
AIA: S/A Regional Council, two
years; Regional Judiciary Committee,
(Florida Region) two years, chairman,
one.

For FAA Treasurer . .
JAMES DEEN, AIA AIA member-
ship dates from 1955. Florida South
Chapter: Director, five years. No of-
fices held. FAA: Director, five years.
No offices held . FAA Committees:
Small Homes, chairman, one year;
Nominating, chairman, one year; Dues
Structure, chairman, one year . Na-
tional AIA: No committee member-
ships held.
KENNETH JACOBSON, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1954. Palm
Beach Chapter: Director, two years;
Secretary, one year; Vice President,
one year; President, one year . .
FAA: Director, two years. No offices
held . FAA Committees: Commu-
nity Betterment, two years; Conven-
tion, three years . National AIA:
No committee memberships held.

For Third Vice President ...
RICHARD BOONE ROGERS, AIA -
AIA membership dates from 1956.


Mid-Florida Chapter: No offices held.
. . FAA Committees: Education, two
years . National AIA: No commit-
tee memberships held . Member,
State Board of Architecture, seven
years, president, two years.
ROLAND W. SELLEW, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1954. Flor-
ida Central Chapter: Executive Com-
mittee, one year; President, two years.
. .FAA: No offices held . .FAA
Committees: Chapter Affairs, one
year; Education, one year; Member-
ship, one year . National AIA: No
committee memberships held.

For Regional
Judiciary Committee . .
Two candidates were named for a
three-year term and two for a one-year
term as alternate. The three-year
nominees were:
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1947 in the
Florida North Chapter in which he
held offices of secretary, treasurer and
president. He was a four-year vice
president of the FAA and has served
on six FAA Committees, including
Office Practice, Uniform Building
Codes, Education, Research (chair-
man), and Awards and Scholarships.
ROBERT E. HANSEN, AIA AIA
membership dates from 1951 in the
Broward County Chapter, of which
he has been president and a member
of twelve committees, on four of
which he served as chairman. As a
director of FAA he served three one-
(Continued on Page 37)


For 3rd V-President-


RICHARD B. ROGERS


Judiciary Committee


ROBERT E. HANSEN
OCTOBER, 1962


HUGH J. LEITCH


WILLIAM S. MORRISON









The best ideas ar

in COIl


'C

I





CInu
..,


*e more exciting
crete |af.













W. ll J
ili!i : '


lll:--iuiL4


Architects: Ladd & Kelsey, Pasadena, Calif. Structural Engineer: R. R. Bradshaw, Van Nuys, Calif General Contractor: Encino Construction Inc., Encino, Calif.



Gull-winged roof of concrete fits

a restaurant to its seaside setting


Elegance keynotes the Stuft Shirt's
long, vaulted dining room. The 71'
x 146' building perches 16' above
water. Docking facilities below.


Restless blue water, white sails, sleek hulls! Add to this scene on California's
Newport Bay the strikingly designed Stuft Shirt Restaurant. The building is
concrete throughout. Thirty-six domes of thin-shell concrete form the roof, with
cantilevered half-domes on the perimeter creating the feeling of winged grace.
Concrete quatrefoil arches atop the 50 supporting columns rising from
the water effect added beauty-inside as well as out.
Today, the versatility of modern concrete is being recognized by more and
more architects seeking to broaden their design explorations.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION 1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
.4 national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-.' ". ..


I


, ;tnlft.


r _rratn~e








BY-LAWS

FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

Pursuant to a charge by the FAA Board of Directors and action of the 1961 FAA Convention, the By-laws Committee
has reorganized and rewritten the FAA By-laws that have been current since their adoption, as revised, at the FAA's
1959 Convention. As published here, new By-laws as proposed for adoption are printed in Roman type. Sections of the
old By-laws upon which new By-law articles and sections are based are printed in italics to provide a helpful means for
study and comparison.


ARTICLE 1. THE ORGANIZATION
Section 1. Name.
a. The name of this organization is the FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS, INC., a non-profit incorporated, State or-
ganization chartered by The American Institue of Archi-
tects and the State of Florida.
b. In these By-laws the corporation is called the Asso-
ciation, the American Institute of Architects, The Institute,
and the Articles of Reincorporation, the Charter.
ARTICLE I.-NAME OF SOCIETY
Section 1
(A) The NAME of this organization shall be the "FLOR-
IDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERI-
CAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.," hereinafter
referred to as the "Association," which is a non-profit incor-
porated State organization duly chartered by the American Insti-
tute of Architects and the State of Florida.
(B) Application of terms. All reference in the By-Laws to
"Charter" shall refer to Articles of Incorporation; and references
to "Association," "board," committee," "officer," "members,"
"meeting," or other similar designations shall pertain or refer to
the Florida Association of Architects of The American Institute
of Architects, Inc.

Section 2. Objects.
a. The objects of the Association are to organize and
unite the architects of the State of Florida, to promote and
forward the objects of The Institute and to represent and
act for the architectural profession in the State of Florida.
b. The Association shall encourage and foster the
continual improvement of the aesthetic, scientific and prac-
tical efficiency of the profession; to cooperate with other
professions and to participate in matters of general public
welfare to insure the advancement of the living standards
of the people through their improved environment; and
to conduct educational and public relation programs to
achieve the Association's objects.
ARTICLE II.-THE OBJECTS OF THE
ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
Section 1
(A) To unite the Architectural profession within the State J
of Florida to promote and forward the objects of the American
Institute of Architects.
(B) To stimulate and encourage continual improvement
within the profession, cooperate with other professions, promote
and participate in the matters of general public welfare, and
represent and act for the architectural profession in the State.
(C) To promote educational and public relation programs
for the advancement of the profession.
Section 3. Composition.
a. The Association shall consist of all members of
The Institute in its component chapter organizations in
the State of Florida.


OCTOBER, 1962


b. The domain of the Association is the State of
Florida and is divided in groups of counties, herein re-
ferred to as Areas as follows:
(1) North Florida Area: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Oka-
loosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Cal-
houn, Gulf, Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla,
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee, Lafay-
ette, Dixie, Columbia, Gilchrist, Levy, Baker, Union,
Bradford, Alachua, Marion, Putnam, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
St. Johns.
(2) Central Florida Area: Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Pinellas, Hillsboro, Manatee, Sarasota, Sumter, Polk,
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands, Lake, Volusia, Seminole,
Orange, Osceola, Brevard, Flagler, Lee, Charlotte.
(3) South Florida Area: Indian River, Okeechobee,
St. Lucie, Martin, Glades, Hendry, Palm Beach, Broward,
Dade, Monroe, Collier.
c. The membership is organized into members, Board
of Directors, (herein called the Board), officers and com-
mittees with dues, privileges and classifications of mem-
bership; functions and responsibilities of the Board and
committees; and the qualifications and duties of officers,
all as set forth hereinafter.
ARTICLE III.-ORGANIZATION
Section 1
The Association shall be a non-profit organization composed
of members of classifications and with qualifications, dues, and
privileges as set forth in these Articles.
Section 2
Corporate and Associate members of the Chapters in North
Florida shall constitute the North Florida Area of the Associa-
tion, those in Central Florida shall constitute the Central Florida
Area, and those in South Florida shall constitute the South Flor-
ida Area. Student members of the Student Chapters shall consti-
tute the Student Area of the Association.
The Areas shall include the counties in the State of Florida
as follows:
North Florida Area: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa,
Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf,
Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison,
Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee, Lafayette, Dixie, Columbia, Gil-
christ, Levy, Baker, Union, Bradford, Alachua, Marion, Putnam,
Clay, Duval, Nassau, St. Johns.
Central Florida Area: Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Pinellas,
Hillsboro, Manatee, Sarasota, Sumter, Polk, Hardee, DeSoto,
Highlands, Lake, Volusia, Seminole, Orange, Osceola, Brevard,
Flagler, Lee, Charlotte.
South Florida Area: Indian River, Okeechobee, St. Lucie,
Martin, Glades, Hendry, Palm Beach, Broward, Dade, Monroe,
Collier.

ARTICLE II. MEMBERSHIP
Section 1. Corporate Member.
a. Every registered architect practicing or residing in
the State of Florida is assigned by The Institute to one of
(Continued on Page 18)
17






FAA BY-LAWS
(Continued from Page 17)
its component Chapters in the State. When such an
architect is a bona fide member in good standing with
The Institute, he shall be a Corporate Member of the
Association.
b. A Corporate Member shall have all the rights and
privileges, benefits and obligations embodied in full
membership including the right to vote, hold office, and
represent the Association as a delegate or as otherwise
designated.
ARTICLE IV.-MEMBERSHIP
Section 1
(A) The Association shall conisist of all corporate members
and all associate members of all Florida Chapters of The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects. Every registered architect in the State
of Florida is assigned to the jurisdiction of the Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects which covers the area in which
he practices or resides.
(B) A corporate member shall be defined for use throughout
this document to be a bonafide member in good standing of the
American Institute of Architects and the Florida Association of
Architects. A corporate member shall have all of the rights, privi-
leges and obligations embodied in full membership including the
right to vote, hold office and represent the Association as a dele-
gate or otherwise.
Section 2. Associate Member.
a. An Associate Member of the Association shall be
any classification of Chapter membership recognized by
The Institute other than corporate membership.
b. An Associate shall have privileges and benefits of
membership commensurate with his obligations, but shall
not have the right to vote, hold office or to represent the
Association.
An Associate member shall be defined for use throughout
these By-Laws as any other classification of Chapter membership
recognized by the Institute.
Section 3. Student Associate.
a. A student in an architectural school or college in
the State of Florida who is a member of a Student Chap-
ter of The Institute is a Student Associate of the Associa-
tion.
b. The Association or any Florida Chapter may
establish and sponsor student chapters in schools of archi-
tetcure in Florida under conditions established by The
Institute. When sponsorship is by a Chapter, the Student
Chapter is related to the Association through the spon-
soring Chapter. When the Association sponsors a Student
Chapter, the relationship will be directly with the Board
which will supervise the preparation of its constitution
and by-laws and obtain approval of them from The
Institute.
Student Associates shall consist of under graduate and gradu-
ate students in Architecture in Colleges and Schools of Archi-
tecture in the State of Florida who are members of a Student
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.
(C) The Association may sponsor Student Associate
Branches in Colleges and Schools of Architecture in the State of
Florida as may be recognized by the Association.
Student Associate Branches may function under the sponsor-
ship of Chapters or under the direct sponsorship of the Associa-
tion. When they function under Chapters, their relationship to
the Association shall be through the sponsoring Chapter. When
they function directly under the Association, their relationship
shall be directly with the Board of Directors of the Association
who shall be authorized to approve the Constitution and By-
Laws under which the Student Associate Branch operates.
Section 4. Member Emeritus.
A member, who qualifies for status as Member Emeri-
tus of The Institute, shall be a Member Emeritus of the


Association and shall be exempted from payment of dues,
but his rights and privileges, benefits and obligations of
full membership shall remain unabridged.
RETIRED MEMBERS
(D) A member who ceases to practice architecture as a
gainful occupation and further ceases all other gainful occupation
shall be eligible for "Retired Membership".
Section 5. Honorary Membership.
a. A person of esteemed character who is not eligi-
ble for corporate membership in The Institute, but who
has rendered a distinguished service to the profession of
architecture or to the arts and sciences allied therewith
may become an Honorary Member.
b. The nomination for Honorary Membership may
be made in writing by any member of the Board at any
regular Board meeting. The written nomination shall be
signed by the nominator and shall give the full name of
the nominee, reasons for the nomination, the biography
of the nominee, a history of his attainments and his
qualifications for the honor. When he is elected by two-
thirds vote of the Board membership, the Secretary shall
ascertain if the nominee desires to accept the honor. If
he accepts, he shall be presented with a certificate of
membership at the next annual meeting of the Associa-
tion.
c. An Honorary Member shall be privileged to attend
the annual conventions of the Association and speak and
take part in the discussions threat on all matters except
those relating to the corporate affairs of the Association,
but he may not vote threat nor shall he pay dues.
Section 4
HONORARY MEMBERSHIP: Any person of good char-
acter who is in sympathy with the objects of this Association and
who has rendered meritorious service to it or the profession of
architecture or its allied arts, shall be eligible for Honorary Mem-
bership, without the right to vote.
Section 6. Other Membership.
Other types of membership may be created as the
need arises and when permitted by The Institute.
OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIP
(E) Other types of memberships may be created as the
necessity arises in accordance with American Institute of Archi-
tects chapter By-Laws.
Section 7. Status of Members.
a. The status of a member admitted prior to an
amendment of the By-laws relating to the eligibility or
qualifications for membership shall not be changed be-
cause of the amendment.
b. The grant to and the exercise and use by a mem-
ber of the rights and privileges vested in him by the
Charter and By-laws shall be conditioned upon his pro-
fessional conduct and the payment of dues to his Chapter,
the Association, and The Institute.
c. The secretaries of the Florida Chapters of The
Institute at the beginning of the fiscal year and semester
shall file with the Secretary of the Association lists of
their Chapter members in good standing by name and
classification and shall inform the Secretary of the Asso-
ciation at all times any additions or changes to the lists
filed. The Secretary of the Association shall issue cards
indicating membership in the Association to those mem-
bers who become in good standing.
Section 3
Each year the Association shall promote Corporate or Asso-
ciate membership in The American Institute of Architects for all
Registered Architects in Florida who are not then Corporate or
Associate Members. Applications, as received, shall be referred
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






for action to the respective Chapter to which the applicant would
be assigned.
Section 5
The Secretary of each Florida Chapter and of each Student
Chapter in Florida of the American Institute of Architects shall
file with the Secretary of the Association the names of all mem-
bers in good standing at the beginning of each fiscal year or
semester and shall keep said list up-to-date at all times. The
Association shall issue to all persons, who have been thus certi-
fied, cards indicating their membership in the Association.
The grant to and the exercise and use by a member of each
Section 6
and every right and privilege granted by the Charter and By-Laws
shall be conditioned upon the professional conduct and by pay-
ment of Association and Chapter dues of the member in his
Chapter.
ARTICLE III. MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1. Annual.
a. There shall be an annual Meeting, herein referred
to as the Convention.
b. Time and place of the annual Convention shall
be fixed by the Board if not fixed by the preceding Con-
vention.
c. Business of the Convention shall be conducted by
the Officers of the Association and the Chapter Delegates.
d. Delegates to the Convention shall be selected by
each Chapter.
(1) The number of delegate votes entitled to each
Chapter shall be based on its number of Corporate Mem-
bers in good standing with Chapter, Association and
Institute and whose dues have been paid in full to the
Association on or before the first day of October of the
current year, as certified by the Secretary of the Associa-
tion.
2. Each Chapter shall have one delegate vote for the
first six and one additional delegate vote for each addi-
tional fifteen (or fraction thereof) such certified Cor-
porate Members.
(3) At the discretion of each chapter, its delegation
may consist of a single delegate, or as many as two dele-
gates for each certified delegate-vote.
(4) Chapters shall be furnished with credential cards
by the Secretary of the Association and these shall be
certified by the president or secretary of the Chapter that
each delegate is in good standing with his Chapter, the
Association and The Institute.
e. An Annual Report shall be made in writing to the
Convention by each of the following: President, Secre-
tary, Treasurer, Director-at-Large, and Board. The report
of the Board shall include such committee reports and
special reports as the Board deems advisable.
f. Approval by the Convention of the Annual Re-
ports and the recommendations contained therein shall
constitute Convention endorsement of the policies and
proposals reflected by the reports.
g. New Officers for the ensuing year shall be elected
to succeed those whose terms are about to expire.
(1) Nominations shall be made during the first
business session of the Convention.
(2) The nominating committee shall report its
nominations to the Convention following which nomina-
tions may be made from the floor. If the Nominating
Committee finds the member nominated from the floor
eligible to hold office and his nomination is seconded by
two accredited delegates from different Chapters, then
he is nominated for office.
(3) In the event no contest develops, the election
may be declared by acclamation.
OCTOBER, 1962


(4) For contested elections, voting shall be by
ballots made available to each delegation. A ballot box
shall be open for voting for not less than four hours after
nominations have been closed.
(5) The President shall announce the results of all
balloting at the last business session of the Convention
and declare all elections.

ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1-Annual Meetings
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold an Annual
Meeting, herein called the Annual Convention; the time and
place shall be fixed by the Board of Directors if not fixed by the
preceding Annual Convention.
(B) Delegates at Annual Convention. Each Corporate Chap-
ter shall have delegates to the Annual Convention as follows:
Then the number of mem-
If the number of corporate ber delegates entitled to be
members in the Charpter are: accredited to represent
More than-and not more than them shall be
1 6 1
7 21 2
22 36 3
37 51 4
and so forth, with one additional delegate for each additional 15
members or fraction thereof.
Members must be in good standing with The Institute and
The Association thirty days prior to the Annual Meeting as shall
be determined by the Secretary. Delegates shall be duly certified
to by the President or Secretary of each Chapter and shall be
provided with a credential card furnished by the Secretary.
(C) Reports: The President, the Secretary, the Treasurer
and the Director-at-Large of the Association shall each make an
annual report in writing to the Annual Convention.
(D) Election of Officers: New Officers for the ensuing year
shall be elected to succeed those whose terms of office are about
to expire.
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by the Nomi-
nating Committee, other Nominations for any or all of the
offices about to become vacant may be made from the floor in
the Convention. Elections may proceed by acclamation or ballot
at the will of the Convention.

Section 2. Special.
a. A special meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is made by any of the
following:
(1) The Convention, by concurring majority vote.
(2) The Board, by concurring vote of two-thirds of
the Board.
(3) Not less than one-half of the Chapters, provided
each such Chapter has obtained the concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the membership of its gov-
erning body.
(4) Written petition to the Board signed by not
less than twenty-five per cent of the total number of
members in good standing of the Association.
b. Chapter representation shall be by delegate,
under the same rules governing the conduct of the Con-
vention.
c. The number of delegates for each Chapter shall
be the same as for the last preceding Convention.
d. A new Chapter chartered subsequent to the last
previous Convention shall be entitled to delegate votes
in accordance with the Secretary's count of such Chapter's
Corporate Members in good standing fifteen days prior to
the special meeting.
Section 2-Special Meetings
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held if a call
therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a meeting of the Asso-
ciation or is voted by the Board upon the concurring vote of
two-thirds of the Board, or is voted by not less than one-half of
the Florida Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of the respective governing boards
thereof, or by a written petition to the Board, signed by not less
(Continued on Page 20)






FAA BY-LAWS
(Continued from Page 19)
than twenty-five percent of the total number of members in
good standing of the Association.
Section 3. Notice.
Notice of the Convention or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association by letter or in an official publication of
the Association. Notice of the Convention shall be served
not less than thirty days before the opening session, and
in case of Special Meetings, not less than fifteen days
before such meetings.
Section 3-Notice of Meetings
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the Association
shall be served on each member and Chapter of the Association,
by letter or in official publication of the Association, stating time
and place of meeting thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention
shall be served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less than fifteen
(15) days before such meetings.
Section 4. Rules of Order.
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance with
Robert's Rules of Order.
Unchanged from current By-Laws.
Section 5. Voting.
a. Voting may be by affirmation, unless a vote by
roll call is requested by a qualified delegate, at which time
a roll call vote of the delegations shall be taken.
b. The Chairman or acting Chairman of each dele-
gation shall cast the votes for his Chapter's delegation,
but Chapters shall not be required to vote as a unit.
c. No Chapter may vote by proxy.
d. An officer of the Association shall be entitled to
vote only as a member of his Chapter delegation except
that the President shall have an independent vote in the
event of a tie.
Section 4-Votes
Voting may be by affirmation unless a vote by ballot is
requested by a qualified delegate, at which time a roll call vote
of delegates shall be taken with a concurring vote of a majority,
or otherwise, as required by the By-Laws, deciding the question.
Delegates present may vote the number of votes assigned at the
time of accrediting for the meeting at which the question is
being considered.
Section 6. Letter Ballots.
No vote shall be taken by letter ballot.
Unchanged from current By-laws.
Section 7.
Delegates to American Institute of Architects Convention
The Delegate, or Delegates representing the Associa-
tion at the Annual Convention of the American Institute
of Architects shall be Corporate Members of The Intitute
selected by the Board.
Section 6-Delegates to American Institute of
Architects Convention
The State Delegate, or Delegates representing this organiza-
tion at the Annual AIA Convention shall be corporate members
of The Institute selected by the Board of Directors of this
Association.
Section 8. Suspension of By-laws.
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting for
the transaction of any special business by a two-thirds roll
call vote of the delegates present. When the special busi-
ness has been consummated, the By-laws shall be immedi-
ately in force again.


Section 7-Suspension of By-Laws
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting, for the
transaction of any special business by a two-thirds vote of the
members present. When the special business has been disposed
of, the By-Lawsshall immediately be in force again.

ARTICLE IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 1. Membership.
a. There shall be a Board of Directors, in these By-
laws referred to as the Board. The Board shall consist of:
(1) The Officers of the Association.
(2) One or more Directors elected from each Florida
Chapter of The American Institute of Architects as here-
inafter provided;
(3) A Director-at-Large, who shall be the Director
of the Florida Region of The American Institute of
Architects; and
(4) The immediate past president, who shall be a
member of the Board the year following his term as
president.
b. The Directors, one or more from each Chapter,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting.
(1) An Alternate Director, one for each Director,
shall be elected by each Chapter at its annual meeting
to function for the Director when the Director cannot
attend Board meetings or serve as a Director.
(2) The number of Directors from each Chapter
shall be based on The Institute membership in the various
Chapters as determined by the current membership roster
of The Institute as follows:
No. of Members in Chapter No. of Directors
1 to 19 1
20 to 59 2
60 or more 3
c. The Florida Student Chapters of The American
Institute of Architects shall be represented on the Board
by Student Representatives who shall maintain liaison
between the Association and their Student Chapter.
ARTICLE VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 1-Membership of Board of Directors
(A) The membership of the Board of Directors shall consist
of the same officers, with the same terms of office, as of the
Association and one or more Directors elected from each Florida
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects as provided in
these articles. Directors shall be Corporate Members of The
American Institute of Architects. The Director of the Florida
District A.I.A. shall be Director-at-Large.
(B) The Directors, one or more from each corporate Chap-
ter as provided in Article VI, shall be elected by each Chapter
at its Annual Meeting. An Alternate Director, one for each
Director, shall be elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting
to function for the Director in case of his inability to serve. Each
Chapter having up to 19 Institute members shall have one
Director; each chapter having from 20 to 59 Institute members
shall have two Directors; and each chapter having 60 or more
Institute members shall have three Directors. Institute member-
ship shall be determined by the current membership roster of the
Institute.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall be
represented on the Board by a Student Representative whose
duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the Association and
the Student Chapter.
(D) Upon the effective date Florida becomes a regional
district of the Institute, the office of the director for the Florida
district shall take office in accordance with the provisions set
forth in the Institute By-Laws of the American Institute of
Architects then in effect.
Section 2. Vacancies.
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled as
set forth in the Charter.
Unchanged from current By-laws.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Section 3. Authority.
a. The Board shall manage, direct, control, conduct
and administer the property, affairs and business of the
Association, and between annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directives and instructions adopted by the Asso-
ciation at a meeting of the Association.
b. The Board shall issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and to others as determined
by the Board.
c. The Board shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations supplementing, but not in conflict with the
Charter and these By-laws, to govern the use of the
property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of the Asso-
ciation and to govern the affairs and business of the
Association.
d. Each Director, and Alternate Director in the ab-
sence of the Director, shall convey to the Board the
actions and requests of the Chapter he represents.
Section 1-Authority of the Board
The Board shall be vested with the authority to manage,
direct, control, conduct and administer the property, affairs and
business of the Association, and in the interim between Annual
Conventions, within the appropriations made therefore, put into
effect all general policies, directions and instructions adopted at
a meeting of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems expedient,
and shall establish and adopt rules and regulations, supplement-
ing but not in conflict with the Charter and these By-Laws, to
govern the use of the property, name, initials, symbol and insignia
of the Association, to govern the affairs and business of the Asso-
ciation. Each director (and alternate director in the absence of
the director) shall convey to the Chapter which he represents all
decisions and actions of the Board and shall convey to the Board
the actions and requests of the Chapter he represents.
Section 4. Meetings.
a. Regular Meetings: The Board shall hold at least
four regular meetings each year.
(1) Time and place of the meetings shall be fixed
by the Board.
(2) One regular meeting shall be held immediately
preceding the opening of the annual Convention and
another meeting within thirty days after the beginning of
the new fiscal year.
(3) Ten members-ef the Board shall constitute a
quorum and all decisions shall be made by concurring vote
of not less than a majority of those members present.
b. Special Meetings: A special meeting of the Board
may be called by the President, or by a written notice by
a majority of the Officers or by six members of the Board.
(1) Time and place for the special meeting shall be
fixed by the person or persons calling the meeting.
c. Notices and Minutes:
(1) Notice of each meeting of the Board shall be
sent in writing by the Secretary to each member of the
Board at least five days before the date fixed for the
meeting.
(2) Minutes of the meetings of the Board shall be
recorded by the Secretary and approved by the Board in
its succeeding meeting.
Section 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall hold at
least four regular meetings each year and shall fix the time and
place of its meetings. One meeting shall be held immediately
prior to the opening of the Annual Convention of the Association
and one meeting within thirty days after the beginning of the
fiscal year following the adjournment of said convention. Ten
members of the Board shall constitute a quorum, and all deci-
sions shall be rendered by concurring vote of not less than the
OCTOBER, 1962


majority of its total membership present, unless otherwise required
by these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meeting of the
Board may be called by the President, or on the written request
of a majority of the Officers of the. Association, or of six mem-
bers of the Board, at time and place so designated by Party or
Parties who called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting of the
Board shall be sent in writing by the Secretary to each member
of the Board not less than five days before the date fixed for the
meeting. Minutes of the meetings of the Board shall be recorded
by the Secretary and approved by the Board in its succeeding
meeting.
ARTICLE V. OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1. Election.
a. The Officers of the Association shall be members
of the Board and elected by a majority vote of accredited
delegates present and voting at the annual meeting.
b. The Officers of the Association shall be a Presi-
dent; Vice-Presidents, one from each Area; Secretary;
Treasurer and shall be Corporate Members in good stand-
ing with their Chapters, the Association and The Institute.
c. All officers with the exception of the Vice-Presi-
dents shall be elected for terms of one year. No officer
shall be eligible for re-election to succeed himself more
than once, except that the Secretary and Treasurer may
hold office longer than two consecutive terms when re-
elected for additional terms by two-thirds ballot vote.
d. One Vice-President shall be elected each year for
a term of three years. Vice-Presidents, one from each
Area, shall be designated, in declining order of seniority
of length of service as Vice-President, as First Vice-Presi-
dent, Second Vice-President and Third Vice-President.
e. All terms of office shall begin with the fiscal year.
f. Any or all officers shall hold office until their
successors have been elected and qualified.If a vacancy
occurs in any office of the Association, other than the
expiration of the term of office, such vacancy shall be
filled as set forth in the Charter.
g. Only such members who have been officers or
who have served on the Board for at least one year are
eligible for nomination for President.
ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Section 1
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a President;
Vice-Presidents, one from each Area; Secretary; Treasurer; and
the immediate Past President of the Association. All elective offi-
cers shall be corporate members of the Institute. Officers shall be
elected at the annual meeting of the Association beginning with
the annual meeting to be held in 1960, by a majority vote of the
accredited delegates present and voting at said meeting.
(B) All officers with the exception of the Vice-Presidents
shall be elected for terms of one year. No officer shall be eligible
for re-election to succeed himself more than once, except the
Secretary or Treasurer, who may not hold office longer than two
.consecutive years, unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at
the annual Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be elected
for a term of one year, one for a term of two years, and one for
a term of three years. Thereafter, one Vice-President shall be
elected each year for a term of three years. The Vice-Presidents,
one from each area shall be designated First Vice-President, Sec-
ond Vice-President and Third Vice-President, as such relative to
seniority of service, by ballot at the Annual Meeting.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or members
of the Board for at least one year shall be eligible for the office
of President.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until their succes-
sors have been elected and qualified. If a vacancy occurs in any
office of the Association, other than the expiration of the term
of office, then such vacancy shall be filled as set forth in the
Charter.
(F) Officers of the Association shall -take office at the
beginning of the fiscal year.
(Continued on Page 22)






FAA BY-LAWS
(Continued from Page 21)
Section 2. President.
a. The President shall be the administrative head of
the Association and shall exercise general supervision of
its business and affairs, except such thereof as are placed
under the administration and supervision of the Secretary
and of the Treasurer, respectively, and he shall perform
all the duties incidental to his office and those that are
required to be performed by him by law, the Charter,
these By-laws, and those that are properly delegated to
him by the Board.
b. The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and the Board and shall be Chairman of the
Executive Committee.
Section 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the Association
and of the Board, shall exercise general supervision of its affairs,
and shall perform all the usual duties that are required to be
performed by him by law and by the Charter and By-Laws,
incidental to his office.
Section 3. Vice-Presidents.
a. Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of Association
affairs in his Area.
b. They shall perform other duties that are properly
assigned to them by the Board.
c. The First Vice-President shall possess all the
powers and shall perform all the duties of the President
in the event of the absence of the President or his dis-
ability, refusal or failure to act. In the event, that for any
reason, the President and the First Vice-President are
absent, unable or refuse to perform the duties, the order
of succession shall be the Second Vice-President, then the
Third Vice-President.
Section 3
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-President
shall exercise general supervision of the affairs of his Area. The
Vice-Presidents in their order of election shall, in the absence of
the President, preside and perform all the duties imposed upon
the President.
Section 4. The Secretary.
a. General Duties of the Secretary. The Secretary
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall act as its recording secretary and its corresponding
secretary and as the secretary of each meeting of the Asso-
ciation, the Board and the Executive Committee. He shall
perform the duties usual and incidental to his office and
the duties that are required to be performed by the law,
the Charter, these By-laws and the duties properly as-
signed to him by the Board.
b. Specific Duties of the Secretary.
(1) Custody of Property. The Secretary shall have
custody of and shall safeguard and shall keep in order all
property of the Association, except that property with
which the Treasurer is charged.
(2) Issue Notices. He shall be responsible for the
preparation and issuance of all notices and all calls and
notices of all meetings of the Association, the Board and
the Executive Committee.
(3) Conduct Correspondence and Maintain Records.
He shall conduct the correspondence, keep the member-
ship roll and corporate records, minutes, annual reports.
(4) Affix Seal and Sign Papers. He shall keep the
seal of the Association and affix it on such instruments as


require it and sign all papers that require the attest or
approval of the Association.
(5) Prepare the Board's Annual Report. In collabor-
ation with the Officers of the Association, he shall prepare
the annual report of the Board.
(6) Meetings. He shall have charge of all matters
pertaining to the arrangements for and recording of
meetings.
c. Delegation of Duties. Delegation of the actual
performance of his duties is the prerogative of the Secre-
tary, however, he shall not delegate his responsibility for
the property of the Association, or affixing the seal of the
Association, or the making of any attestation or certifica-
tion required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
Section 4-The Secretary
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative officer of this
Association. He shall act as its recording and its corresponding
secretary and as secretary of meetings of this Association and of
the Board of Directors. He shall have custody of and shall safe-
guard and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge of the Treas-
urer. He shall issue all notices of this Association, keep its mem-
bership rolls, sign all instruments and matters that require the
attest or approval of this Association, except as otherwise provided
in these By-Laws; keep its seal, and affix it on such instruments
as require it, prepare the reports of the Board of Directors and
this Association, in collaboration with the President, have charge
of all matters pertaining to the meetings of this Association and
perform all duties usual and incidental to his office.
(B) The Secretary may delegate to an assistant secretary the
actual performance of any or all of his duties as recording or as
corresponding secretary, but he shall not delegate his responsibil-
ity for the property of this Association, or the affixing of the seal
of this Association, or the making of any attestation or certifica-
tion required to be given by him, or the signing of any document
requiring his signature.
Section 5. The Treasurer.
a. General Duties of the Treasurer. The Treasurer
shall be an administrative officer of the Association and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs,
keeping the records and books of account thereof. He
shall assist the Finance and Budget Committee to prepare
the budget, collect amounts due the Association and shall
have the custody of its securities, funds and moneys making
the disbursements for the Association therefrom. He shall
have charge of all matters relating to insurance, taxes,
bonds, instruments and papers involving financial trans-
actions. He shall conduct the correspondence relating to
his office. He shall sign all instruments of the Association
whereon his signature is required, and perform all duties
required to be performed by him by law, these By-laws,
and the duties that are properly assigned to him by the
Board.
b. Reports of the Treasurer. The Treasurer shall
make a written report to the Board at its regular meetings
and to the delegates at each annual meeting and other
meetings of the Association if required. Each report shall
describe the financial condition of the Association, a
comparison of the budget to appropriations as of the date
of the report, the income and expenditures for the period
of the report, and the Treasurer's recommendations on
financial matters.
c. Liability of the Treasurer. The Treasurer, per-
sonally, shall not be liable for any decrease of the capital,
surplus, income, balance or reserve of any fund or account
resulting from any of his acts performed in good faith in
conducting the usual business of his office. When a new
treasurer takes office, the retiring treasurer shall turn over
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






to his successor a copy of the closing audit of the treasury
and all the records and books of account and all moneys,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belonging
to the Association that are in his custody and possession.
The incoming treasurer shall check the same and, if found
correct, shall give the retiring treasurer his receipt therefore
and a complete release of the retiring treasurer from any
liability thereafter with respect thereto.
d. Delegation of Duties. The Treasurer may not
authorize any person to sign any financial instrument,
notice or agreement of the Association that requires the
signature of the Treasurer, unless such delegation or
authorization is expressly permitted by these By-laws or
the Board, but he may delegate to assistants the actual
performance of the clerical, bookkeeping, statistical, col-
lecting, and recording work of his office and may author-
ize designated assistants to sign, .under their respective
titles, records, vouchers, receipts and other documents if
such is not prohibited by the By-laws.
Section 5-The Treasurer
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative officer of this
Association. He shall have charge and exercise general supervision
of its financial affairs and keep the records and books of account
thereof. He shall assist the Budget Committee to prepare the
budget, collect amounts due this Association, and receipt for and
have the custody of its funds and monies and make all disburse-
ments thereof. He shall have custody of its securities and of its
instruments and papers involving finances and financial commit-
ments. He shall conduct the correspondence relating to his office
and perform all duties usual and incidental to his office.
(B) The Treasurer shall make a written report to each annual
meeting of this Association and a written report at each meeting
of the Board of Directors. Each of said reports shall set forth
the financial condition of this Association, the state of its budget
and appropriations at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures for the period of the report, and the treasurer's
recommendations on matters relating to the finances and general
welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person to sign
any order, statement, agreement, check or other financial instru-
ment of this Association that requires his signature, unless such
delegation is expressly permitted in these By-Laws.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring treasurer
shall turn over to his successor a copy of the closing financial
statement and audit of the treasury, all the records and books of
account, and all monies, securities, and other valuable items and
papers belonging to this Association that are in his custody and
possession. The incoming treasurer shall check the same, and if
found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer his receipt
therefore and a complete release of the retiring treasurer from any
liability thereafter with respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer, personally, shall not be liable for any loss
of money or funds of this Association or for any decrease in the
capital, surplus, income or reserve of any fund or account result-
ing from any of his acts performed in good faith in conducting
the usual business of his office.
ARTICLE VI.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD
Section 1. Composition.
There shall be an Executive Committee of the Board
composed of the President, a Vice-President, the Secre-
tary, the Treasurer and the Director-at-Large of the Asso-
ciation. The Immediate Past President shall serve on the
Executive Committee the year following his term as
President as an ex officio member.
Section 2. Powers Delegated to the Committee.
The Executive Committee shall have full authority,
right and power to act for the Board during periods be-
tween Board meetings on all matters except that it shall
not:
(1) adopt a general budget;
(2) change the policies, rules of the Board or the
By-laws;
OCTOBER, 1962


(3) make an award of honor;
(4) purchase, sell, lease, or hypothecate any real
property;
(5) form an affiliation;
(6) fix assessments and annual dues; however, it
shall be allowed to act for the Board on any of the fore-
going excepted matters which have been delegated spec-
ifically to it by two-thirds vote of the Board.

Section 3. Decisions of the Committee.
a. The President, who shall be the chairman of the
Executive Committee, shall fix the time and place for the
meetings of the Executive Committee.
b. A quorum of two-thirds of its members shall be
necessary to transact business at a meeting. Every decision
of the Executive Committee shall not be less than a
majority of votes.
c. The Executive Committee must actually meet in
order to transact business, otherwise the acts and decisions
of the Executive Committee are not binding on the
Board or the Association.
d. The actions of the Executive Committee shall be
recorded in minutes and ratified by the Board at its
meeting following such action.
This is a new Article, not embodied in the current By-laws.
ARTICLE VII. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Section 1. Executive Officer.
a. There shall be an executive officer, employed by
the Board and responsible to the Board, in charge of the
administrative and executive offices of the Association and
he shall be known as the Executive Director.
b. The Executive Director shall be the chief execu-
tive officer of the Assocation and shall have general man-
agement of the administrative affairs subject to the general
direction and control of the Board and supervision by the
Officers of the Association.
c. The Executive Director shall be the Assistant
Treasurer and shall perform such duties in this capacity
as the Treasurer may direct and under his direct super-
vision.
Section 5-Executive Director
(A) Executive Officer: The administrative and executive
offices shall be in charge of an executive officer, who shall be
known as the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall
be employed by and shall report to the Board.
Upon appointment by the Board the Executive Director shall
act as Assistant Treasurer.
(B) Duties of Executive Director: The Executive Director
shall be and act as the chief executive officer of the Association
and as such shall have general management of the administration
of its affairs, subject to the general direction and control of the
Board and the supervision of the administrative officers of the
Association.
Section 2. Duties.
a. The Executive Director shall have general over-
sight of all the departments of the Association, carrying
out Board directives, and interpreting Board policies.
b. He shall stimulate programs under the various
departments and coordinate all inter-departmental affairs.
c. He shall maintain liaison with other professional
societies, especially those allied with architecture, and
with trade associations related to the construction industry
so that he and the Association are apprised of the activities
of these societies and associations and so that timely co-
operation of the Association can be given when such
cooperation is warranted.
(Continued on Page 24)






FAA BY-LAWS
(Continued from Page 23)
The Executive Director shall have general oversight of all of
the departments of the Association, and in general shall be the
interpreter of the directives of the Board.
He shall be the officer in whom the Board shall place the
responsibilities for carrying out its general policies.
He shall be charged with the duty of stimulating the pro-
grams under the various departments and shall check the coordin-
ation of all inter-departmental affairs.
He shall maintain contacts with other professional societies
particularly those in the fields allied to architecture and with
trade associations in the construction industry so that he may be
constantly informed as to activities in those fields, extending the
cooperation of the Association as circumstances may warrant.
Section 3. Assistants.
The Board may employ assistants to the Executive
Director to perform such duties of the Executive Director
as assigned by the Executive Director with the consent
of the Board.
(C) Assistant to Executive Director and Duties: The Board
may employ assistants to the Executive Director to perform such
duties as may be assigned to him by the Board and by the Exec-
utive Director, including the details of the administrative work
of the Association.

ARTICLE VIII. COMMITTEES
Section 1. Classes.
a. There shall be standing committees and special
committees.
(1) Standing committees shall be vertical and non-
vertical; vertical standing committees shall be those desig-
nated by The Institute; non-vertical standing committees,
those necessary to accomplish the operations of the Asso-
ciation.
(2) Special committees shall be those required for
specific short term activities of the Association.
b. There shall be a Nominating Committee, a
Regional Judiciary Committee, and a Committee on
Finance and Budget.
ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
Section 1-Class of Committees
There shall be standing committees and special committees.
Standing committees shall be vertical and non-vertical; vertical
standing committees shall be those designated by the Institute
and non-vertical committees those necessary to the administrative
operations of the Association. Special committees may be estab-
lished by the Board of Directors or the President.
Section 2. Structure.
a. The vertical standing committees shall be those
designated by The Institute to be organized on the district
and chapter levels and whose functions parallel those of
national committees of The Institute. These committees
shall be called Regional FAA-AIA Committees.
(1) The membership of these committees shall be
the Chairmen of the Chapter Committees performing
the same functions as the Association committee at
Chapter level; one from each of the chapters.
(2) The Chairmen of these committees shall be
Corporate Members appointed by The Institute. Recom-
mendations from the President with the consent of the
Board shall be given to the Director of the Florida Region
for submission to The Institute.
b. Non-vertical standing committees shall be those
required to accomplish the operations of the Association
and are not parallel with functions of the National Com-
mittees of The Institute.
(1) The membership of these committees shall be


selected by the President from the membership according
to policies established by the Board.
(2) The chairmen of these committees shall be ap-
pointed for three-year terms by the President with the
consent of the Board.
c. Special committees may be created by the Presi-
dent or by the Board for specific, short term activities.
When created by the President, the Board, at its next
meeting thereafter, shall review such action and may con-
tinue or discontinue such committees, or make changes
in personnel as it may deem proper. Special committees
shall expire with the fiscal year, but may be re-created to
continue to function into the following fiscal year.
(1) Chairmen and members for special committees
shall be appointed from the membership and their terms
shall expire with the Committee.
d. The President's recommendations for Committee
Chairmen for the following fiscal year shall be presented
to the Board at its regular meeting immediately prior to
the Convention of the Association for Board approval and
advice. The committee chairmen for the following fiscal
year shall be announced at a business session of the pre-
ceding Convention.
Section 2-Committee Structure
(A) The vertical standing committees shall be composed of
a chairman and of the chairmen of the chapter committees per-
forming the same functions as the Association committee. When-
ever functions are combined at chapter level, the chairman of the
chapter committee will serve as a member of each of the Asso-
cation Committees he represents functionally at the Chapter
level. Committee chairmen shall be appointed by the President
with the advice of the Board of Directors for three year terms.
(B) Every special committee shall expire with the fiscal year,
but any thereof may be recreated. Members of special committees
shall be appointed by the President and their terms of office shall
expire with the committee.
(C) Regional F.A.A.-A.I.A. Committees: These committees
shall serve in the Florida district A.I.A. and parallel national
committees. The Chairmen of these committees will be appointed
by the Board of Directors of the A.I.A. The membership of these
Committees shall consist of one member from each of the chap-
ters.in the district and be appointed by the Board of Directors,
F.A.A. These Committees shall be those national committees
designated by the Board of Directors, A.I.A. to be organized on
the district and chapter levels.
Section 3. Reorganization.
The President may, at any time, discontinue non-
vertical standing committees, and special committees, alter
their classifications, or make any changes in their person-
nel without regard to the terms of appointment of the
committee members, however at the next meeting after
such action, the Board shall review the changes and take
any action it regards proper.
Section 5-Reorganization
The President may, at any time, discontinue a committee,
alter its classification, or make any changes in its personnel
without regard to the terms of appointment of the committee
members.
Section 4. Nominating Committee.
a. There shall be a Nominating Committee whose
duty shall be to nominate members qualified to become
Officers in the Association for each of the offices about
to be vacated.
b. The Board, at least sixty days before the
Convention of the Association, shall elect the committee
composed of a Chairman and not less than one member
from each Area. Chairman and members shall be Cor-
porate Members.
c. The Committee shall apprise the membership of
their nominations prior to the convening of the Conven-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






tion and shall report their nominations to the Convention
at the first business session.
d. The powers of the Committee shall terminate
with the adjournment of the Convention.
Section 3-Nominating Committee
(A) The President, at least thirty (30) days before the annual
Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Committee, composed
of a Chairman and not less than one member from each Area,
whose duty it shall be to nominate members qualified to hold
office in the Association for each of the Offices about to be
vacated.
Section 5. Regional Judiciary Committee.
a. The Regional Judiciary Committee shall conduct
initial hearings on charges of unprofessional conduct
against a Corporate Member of the Association which have
been referred to it by The Institute and which hearings
shall be conducted according to the By-laws and Rules
of The Board of The Institute.
b. The Regional Judiciary Committee shall be com-
posed of three Corporate Members, elected to serve stag-
gered three year terms, and an Alternate, elected to serve
a one year term. Members and Alternate shall be members
in good standing in The Institute, shall be from different
chapters in the Region, and shall not be the Regional
Director nor Officers of The Institute.
c. The senior member shall be Chairman during his
last year of service.
d. The Regional Judiciary Committee normally shall
hold meetings to conduct hearings one day in advance
of the annual Convention and meetings one day in ad-
vance of the Spring meeting of the Board, providing cases
referred to it by The Institute are pending.
(D) Regional Judiciary Committee:
Duties: The duties of the Regional Judiciary Committee shall
be to conduct initial hearings on charges of unprofessional con-
duct against a Corporate Member of the Association which have
been preferred to it by the Institute. All such initial hearings and
procedures shall be in strict accordance with the By-Laws of the
Institute and the Rules of the Board.
Composition: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall be
composed of three Corporate Members and one alternate, nor-
mally serving staggered three year terms, and the alternate a one
year term. Members and alternate shall be members in good
standing in the Institute and shall each be from different chap-
ters in the District. The District Director and the officers of the
Institute shall not be eligible for service on the Regional judiciary
Committee.
During the initial year of the Regional Judiciary Committee,
three members shall be elected to serve one, two and three year
terms, respectively. The one receiving the highest number of
votes shall be elected to the three year term, next highest the
two year term, third highest one year term and the fourth highest
shall be designated as alternate.
Chairman: During the initial year of the Regional Judiciary
Committee, the member serving the one year term shall be
Chairman. Thereafter, the senior member shall be Chairman
during his last year of service.
Meetings: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall normally
hold meetings to conduct hearings one day in advance of the
convention and meetings one day in advance of the spring meet-
ing of the Board, providing it has cases before it referred to it by
the Institute.
Expenses of the committee members attending the meetings
shall be reimbursed by the Institute in the manner and in the
amount as prescribed by the Treasurer of the Institute.
Section 6. Committee on Finance and Budget.
a. There shall be a Committee on Finance and
Budget whose duty shall be to prepare the annual budget
for the Board and to recommend fiscal policies for
adoption by the Association.
b. The Committee shall consist of five members who
are serving or have served as a Director or who have held
office in the Association, appointed by the President with
the Board approval, to serve for the initial year terms as
OCTOBER, 1962


follows: 2 members for one year; 2 members for two years;
1 member for three years. As their terms expire appoint-

ments shall be made for three year terms. The President
annually shall designate one of the senior members to act
as chairman.
c. The annual budget for the fiscal year following
the annual meeting shall be presented in draft for the
Board meeting immediately before the Convention for
its comments and report to the Convention.
d. The final recommended budget shall be prepared
for the Board approval at the first meeting of the Board
in the new fiscal year.
e. The Committee shall provide for long-range fiscal
planning for the Association and recommend policies
related to funding, investments, travel and expense ac-
counts, control of service projects, supplemental income
and other financial matters which will enhance the Asso-
ciation's financial stability and accrue benefits to the
members and the total profession, present and future.

Section 7. Operations.
a. The Secretary shall notify the chairmen and mem-
bers of the various committees the names and addresses
of their respective committee members and their various
assignments.
b. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all
committees, and the Secretary may act as secretary for
the committee if so selected by the committee.
c. Committees have the right to request and receive
all information and records in possession of the Association
and necessary to discharge the duties assigned them.
d. Committees shall act as advisors to the Board and
shall report their findings, recommendations and actions
to the Board.
e. The majority of members of a committee shall
constitute a quorum. Findings, recommendations and
actions of a committee shall be made according to the
concurring vote of the majority of members present at a
committee meeting or a concurring majority vote of
letter ballots.
f. The chairman of any committee requiring an
appropriation shall submit a written request to the Board
for the amount required and reasons thereof, and if
granted, file with the final report of the committee a
detailed accounting of moneys appropriated and expended.
(1) Expenses of the members of the Regional
Judiciary Committee attending meetings shall be reim-
bursed by The Institute in the manner and amount as
prescribed by the Treasurer of The Institute.
g. No committee nor any member or chairman
thereof shall incur financial obligations unless funds are
available in its appropriation and it is authorized to do so
by the Board. No committee nor any member or chairman,
shall commit the Association, orally or otherwise, on any
matter unless specifically authorized to do so by the
Board.
h. When their terms expire, committee chairmen
and members shall transmit to their successors all informa-
tion and records necessary to continue the work of the
committees.
Section 4-Operations
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity with the
right to request and receive all information in possession of the
Association and all records necessary to discharge the duties
imposed upon them.
(Continued on Page 26)






FAA BY-LAWS
(Continued from Page 25)
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the Chairman
and/or the members of the various committees of their commit-
tee assignments, and furnish them the names and addresses of
all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member of all com-
mittees, and the secretary may act as secretary for the committee
if so selected by the committee. The majority of members of the
committee shall constitute a quorum. Committees shall report
their findings, recommendations and actions to the body which
created it. Decisions, recommendations and other actions of the
Committee shall be made in accordance with the concurring vote
of the majority of members present or by a majority vote of a
letter ballot.
(D) Appropriations: The chairman of any committee requir-
ing appropriations shall submit written request to the Board for
the amount required and the reasons thereof, and if granted,
file with the final report of the Committee a detailed statement
of all monies, if any expended.
(E) When their terms expire, committee chairmen and
members will transmit to their successors all records necessary to
the continuing work of the committee.
ARTICLE IX. FINANCIAL
Section 1. Fiscal Year.
The fiscal year of this Association shall be the calendar
year.
ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
Section 1-Fiscal Year
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on the first day
of January and end on the thirty-first day of December of the
same calendar year.
Section 2. Dues.
a. Annual dues equal to the pro-rata share required
to defray the expenses of the Association for the ensuing
fiscal year shall be recommended by the Board and deter-
mined and fixed by the Convention.
b. Each member shall contribute annual dues in an
amount determined by the Convention.
c. Dues shall be for the Association's fiscal year and
shall be due and payable on the first day of the fiscal
year, January 1st.
d. Any Member whose dues for the current year
have not been paid by the first day of July shall be con-
sidered delinquent and the Secretary shall, at that time,
send written notice of such delinquency to each such
member and to the secretary of his Chapter.
e. The Secretary shall request The Institute to sus-
pend the membership of any Corporate Member whose
dues remain unpaid on the last day of the previous year,
on or about the tenth day of each January. The Secretary
shall notify each such member and the secretary of his
Chapter of this action at the same time.
f. The Secretary ipso facto shall suspend the Mem-
bership of any Associate Member whose dues remain
unpaid on the last day of the previous year on or about
the tenth day of each January, and shall so notify each
such member and the secretary of his Chapter at that
time.
g. Termination of Membership for any Corporate
Member shall be only by action of The Institute.
h. The Board may terminate the membership of
any Associate Member for non-payment of dues twelve
months after such Member has been suspended by the
Secretary. The Secretary shall remove from the rolls of
the Association the name of any Associate Member upon
receiving notice of termination of membership by his
Chapter.
i. Each Chapter treasurer shall collect dues from


each member assigned to his Chapter and shall promptly
remit dues collected to the Treasurer of the Association
at the office of the Association. On request of any Chapter
and with approval of the Board, its Chapter treasurer
may delegate his dues collecting responsibility to the
Treasurer of the Association.
Section 2-Collection of Dues
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually from
each corporate member and associate member assigned to that
chapter, and shall remit promptly to the Treasurer of the Asso-
ciation, an amount for the succeeding year, to be determined by
the Association at its Annual Convention which shall be con-
tributed by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expenses of every kind
of the Association.
Section 3. Contributions.
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend, or terminate the
privileges and rights of any member.
Section 3-Contributions
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring vote of
two-thirds of the members present, or at any special meeting
called therefore, may authorize the raising of, and thereupon raise,
money by voluntary contribution from its members, in addition to
annual dues, for any designated special purpose consistent with
the objectives of the Association, and prescribe the manner in
which such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate the privil-
eges ad rights of any member.
Section 4. Funds and Securities.
a. All moneys received by the Association shall be
promptly deposited, in their original form, in a depository
approved by the Board.
b. Every disbursement of money, except for petty
cash, shall be by check of the Association, signed by the
Treasurer and countersigned by another officer designated
by the Board.
c. The Treasurer shall establish petty cash accounts
as authorized by the Board. These funds shall be disbursed
for the usual petty cash purposes, by the person named
in the Board's authorization of the account. Statements of
expenditures shall be duly recorded and the expenditures
approved by the Treasurer before the account is re-
plenished.
d. Reserve or funds in excess of required operating
funds shall be deposited by the Treasurer in an interest-
bearing depository approved by the Board, or when
authorized by the Board. Such funds may be invested in
short term government or municipal bonds or equivalent
securities.
Section 4-Deposits and Withdrawals of Money
and Securities
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all monies of
this Association in the name of this Association, when, as, and in
the original form received by him, in one or more depositories
designated by the Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Each disbursement of money of this
Association, except from petty cash, shall be by check of this
Association, signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by another
officer designated by the Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall establish
petty cash accounts as authorized by the Board which may be
disbursed for the usual petty cash purposes by the person desig-
nated in said authorization of the Board. Statements of the petty
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






cash expenditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and the
expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the cash is
replenished.

Section 5. Annual Budget.
a. The Board shall adopt an annual budget at its
first meeting each year, by a concurring vote of not less
than two-thirds of its membership present. The Budget
shall show in detail the anticipated income and expendi-
tures of the Association for the fiscal year.
b. Unless authorized and directed to do so at a
Convention or special meeting of the Association, the
Board shall not adopt any budget, make any appropria-
tions, or authorize any expenditure or in any way obligate
or incur obligation for the Association, which, in the
aggregate of any fiscal year, exceeds the estimated income
of the Association for such year.
c. Each expenditure of money and each financial
liability of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher,
or other appropriate instrument, signed by the person
or persons authorized to incur the expense or liability,
except petty cash expenditures which shall be subject to
the approval of the Treasurer, and shall be accounted
against appropriated and/or budgeted items.
Section 5-Annual Budget
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual budget, by
the concurring vote of not less than two-thirds of its membership
present, showing in detail the anticipated income and expendi-
tures of the Association for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial liability of
the Association and every expenditure of money of the Associa-
tion shall be evidenced by a voucher or other appropriate instru-
ment signed by the person or persons properly authorized to
incur the expense, liability or expenditure, except a petty cash
item as per paragraph (c) Section 4, Article VIII.
(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed to do so at
an annual Convention or Special Meeting of the Association, the
Board shall not adopt any budget, make any appropriations, or
authorize any expenditures or in any way obligate or incur obliga-
tion for the Association, which, in the aggregate of any fiscal
year, exceeds the estimated income of the Association for such
year.

Section 6. Audits.
The Board shall authorize employment of a Certified
Public Accountant to audit the books and accounts of
the Association for report at the first Board meeting of
each fiscal year.
Unchanged from current By-laws.

ARTICLE X. AMENDMENTS
Section 1. By Meetings of the Association.
The Charter and By-laws of the Association may be
amended at any annual or special meeting of the Asso-
ciation provided:
(1) Written notice stating the purpose and reason
for each proposed amendment is sent to each Corporate
and Associate Member not less than thirty days
prior to the date of the meeting at which the proposed
amendment is to be voted on. A copy of the proposed
amendments shall be included with the notice circulated
as set forth in the Charter.
(2) Voting shall be by roll-call only and shall
require the concurring vote of not less than two-thirds
of the total delegates-votes present at the meeting.
(3) Every resolution or motion of this Association
amending its Charter or By-laws shall state that it will
OCTOBER, 1962


becomes effective only if and when it is approved by The
American Institute of Architects.
(4) Immediately following adoption of such reso-
lution or motion, the Secretary shall submit a copy of
the amendment and the resolution to the Secretary of The
Institute requesting Institute approval. Upon receipt
of such approval, the Secretary shall enter the amendment
and record its approval in the proper place in the docu-
ments with the date of the amendment and its approval.
ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS
Section 1-Amendments by Meetings of the Association
(A) The Charter of the Association and the By-Laws may be
amended at any regular annual meeting of this Association, pro-
vided that a notice stating the purpose of each proposed amend-
ment is sent to every member and associate not less than thirty
(30) days prior to the date of the meeting at which the proposed
amendment is to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of not less than
two-thirds of the total number of corporate members present at
a meeting of this Association to amend the Charter of the Asso-
amendment is to be voted on.
(C) Every resolution of this Association amending these
By-Laws shall state that the amendment will become effective
only if and when it is approved by the Institute. Immediately
following the adoption of such a resolution, the Secretary shall
submit a copy of the amendment and the adopting resolution
to the Secretary of the Institute for such approval. Upon receipt
of said approval the amendment shall become effective and the
Secretary shall enter the amendment and the approval at the
proper place in these By-Laws, with the date of the amendment
and approval.

Section 2. By The Institute.
The Institute, unless the statutes forbid, may amend
any provision of these By-laws when the Association fails
to enact amendments properly requested by The Institute.
Each amendment made by The Institute shall have the
same force and effect as if made by the Association, and
shall be effective immediately on receipt of the notice
of the Secretary of The Institute containing the amend-
ment. The Secretary shall enter such amendment in the
proper place in these By-laws and notify the Chapters
of the change.
Section 2-Amendments by the Institute
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may amend
any provision of these By-Laws that the Association fails to
amend after due notice so to do from the Institute. Each amend-
ment made by said Board shall have the same force and effect
as if made by this Association in the manner hereinabove pro-
vided, and shall be effective immediately on receipt of the notice
of the Secretary of The Institute containing the amendment, and
the Secretary shall enter the amendment at the proper place in
these By-Laws with the date it was made.

Section 3. Title and Numbering.
The Secretary may rearrange, retitle, renumber or
correct obvious errors in the various articles, sections and
paragraphs of these By-laws as becomes necessary.
Section 3-Title and Numbering
From time to time and without further action of the Asso-
ciation, the Secretary may rearrange, retitle, renumber or correct
obvious errors in the various articles, sections and paragraphs of
these By-Laws as becomes necessary.

ARTICLE XI. RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any vote
or statement of its officers or members nor be pledged or
bound in any manner except by the approval of the Board,
in conformity with these By-laws.
Unchanged from current By-laws.














































A&, Miami Beach home or Philip Consolo is heated and cooled
ear 'round b\ 15-ton natural gas climatee control" installation.
..A Spectacular Sand Dollar Restaurant. St. Petersburg. adds special
4 gas-fired dishwasher to all-natural-gas kitchen and heating plant.


,*-_. '. . ..
-. ** *
^f..'V..' '


A Univis Plant, a Fort Lauderdale showplace, uses
natural gas for 300 tons of air conditioning . and in
its world-famous optical lens processing.


SNew $1.5 million, 100-bed Clyatt
Memorial Geriatric Center, Daytona
Beach, uses natural gas for air condition-
ing, heating, waste incineration even
standby power equipment.


SLovely Tampa home of Herbert Hill is natural gas
"all the way"- cooking, heating, air conditioning even
patio lighting for swimming pool.


A ,
.o ., .*


FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION
P. O. Box 1107, North Miami 61, Florida


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~S~f~


''""
"""
'''' '"' "' "'
"'


ap~-
















Problems Eliminated -
When you use


PRESTRESSED


CONCRETE a

Teredo worms, barnacles, salt water and other rot-
causing threats to piling have met their match in pre-
stressed concrete piles. These piles won't rot or
corrode . periodic maintenance, replacement or
repair is eliminated. Prestressed concrete piles have
exceptional strength to withstand severe driving forces
and to resist lateral buckling. Due to their load-carry- I
ing capacities it is often possible to reduce the num-
ber of piles required in comparison to conventional
types and save on materials. The clean, slim lines, the
availability of standardized sections produced to SRD
designs, and the ease of handling, are other reasons i
why prestressed concrete piling is being specified for
bridges, overpasses, piers, docks and structural foun-
dations.




MEMBERS
Capitol Prestress Co., Jacksonville Pre-Cast Corp., Miami
Dura-Stress, Inc., Leesburg Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Lakeland
SFlorida Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Tampa Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc.,
Houdaille-Duval, Inc., Jacksonville Panama City
SJuno Prestressors, Inc., West Palm Beach Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Pensacola
Meekins-Bamman Precast Corp., Hallandale West Coast Shell Corp., Sarasota
Perma-Stress, Inc., Holly Hill R. H. Wright, Inc., Fort Lauderdale

florida prestressed concrete assn
P.O. BOX 4006 FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE CHAPTER
k w Buy prestressed concrete . . the building material
produced in Florida by Florida businessmen such as you.


OCTOBER, 1962 29







Planning an apartment? motel? hotel?





10 . A


Or an office, school or institutional building?
Specify the Dwyer Compact Kitchen in the
size and capacity required for the applica-
tion. There's a full line of Dwyers from 39 to -.,
72 in length, for conventional or recess in-
stallation. Include refrigerator, gas or elec- ,
tric range and bake/broil oven, deep sinlk and -' '
storage. Heavy-duty construction and vit- EU,-, "I
reous porcelain finish assure lasting dura-
bility and beauty. I .a I
W ,,,te or phone toda), fo f o
Archilecl's Data Fdle.
ij efi Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc., Suite 621, DuPont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Boulevard Way, Miami 32, Phone FRanklin 1-4344


If we could agree on desirable ob-
jectives for the city of the long-range
future or if we can take the more
practical approach and start attacking
the problems around us on an intelli-
gent basis, working toward a near fu-
ture in which visibility is considerably
fore-shortened by accelerated change
-what elements of technology increase
our ability to do what needs doing?
The short inventory attempted here
is merely suggestive.
Advances in lighting and air con-
ditioning, plus the prospect of tele-
vision refinements, make it possible to
do away with windows and still im-
prove light, air, temperature, humid-
ity control and view. This means that
if we want them, we can build mas-
sive structures surrounded by exten-
sive open spaces. We could develop
a possible city-form with components
of 2 5,000 people if that's what we
are after in buildings 500 feet in
diameter and ten or fifteen stories
high (or deep) surrounded by a square
mile of grounds. This is about the
density of New York City without
many of New York City's problems.
If urban sprawl is what we are after
(going to the other end of the scale)


Is plenty of LOW-COST, DEPENDABLE, PIPING-HOT WAI


CASE NO. 1 A 54-unit apart-
ment paid fuel oil bills totalling
$1,109.46 for calendar 1959. Fol-
lowing changeover to natural gas
in 1960, gas bills for full calendar
year of 1961 were cut more than
half to $527.90. Saving of $581.56
is 52%!


CASE NO. 2 Combined h
apartment boiler converted
oil to natural gas. Last 3 year
oil bills were $380, $383 and
First full year for natural g
$240, or 33% below average
fuel oil. Expense of cleaning 1
and stack also eliminated.


*Names and complete details of each case
cited will be furnished on request.


GET THE FACTS! Florida Architects may call on o01
qualified engineers and consultants for detailed perform
ance and spec sheets, estimates and feasibility studies. G,
in touch with us direct or through your natural gas utility:
No obligation, of course.


0n THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Let these actual

CASE HISTORIES*
give you
the Answer!







Urban Destiny...

and Organized Intent

Part II of a provocative observation on urban planning
by FREDERICK H. BAIR, JR., first presented as an address
before the Florida Central Chapter at its August meeting.


the independent home appliance for
sewage, garbage and trash disposal
would remove much of the cost. The
visiphone with the built-in photostat
and the electronic lawn-trimmer
would remove much of the inconveni-
ence. Commercial and industrial per-
formance standards should make it
possible to move shopping and em-
ployment opportunities into residen-
tial neighborhoods.
We can clean up a substantial part
of the traffic mess by judicious use of
monorail or other new gimmicks in
mass transportation. I bet on mono-
rail because most traffic engineers say
it isn't practical. Monorail has another
application which hasn't been talked
about much. There was an article
about it in the April issue of Florida


Planning and Development. The idea
is that we might well use high-level
transportation nets in big-city CBD's.
The electric elevator, first used com-
mercially in 1889, was a prime mover
in piling central business districts
high. The very density of high-rise
development in major cities may help
solve some of the problems. With
high buildings up, or soon to be built,
in every block of the core, opportunity
grows for a systematic high-level trans-
portation network for pedestrians, sup-
ported largely by the buildings them-
selves, and running partly through,
partly between, buildings.
The elevators continue to provide
vertical transport. The hallways, link-
ed by bridges between buildings, pro-
vide minor streets, Moving walkways


coming through near the elevators act
as collector streets. Monorail sur-
rounds and perhaps cuts through the
CBD at the 10th floor level (or what-
ever is selected as the optimum) to
provide the equivalent of arterial traf-
fic-handling, running from parking
garages and high-rise apartments at
the rim. We could multiply the effi-
ciency of the CBD by such a system
-and we could build it if we want to.
Other technological advances are
social and economic, and some of
them are terrifying. Convinced in the
late '30s that everyone should own his
own single-family mortgage, we sold
the nation on the idea and developed
a bungaloid culture on 6,000-square-
foot lots, through the medium of
FHA. We are now apparently ap-
proaching the town-house and high-
rise epoch, fighting off those with a
vested interest in single-family houses
and 6,000-foot lots. Through mass
communication media we can induce
a high degree of conformity in an
alarmingly short time.
What happens to a culture in
which technology makes possible so
wide a variety of choices, in which
(Continued on Page 32)


Dur problem


SE NO. 3 Major resort motel
averted from oil boiler to natu-
gas. Too early for comparative
its, but president says, "Our
t water system has been entirely
t-free, completely reliable and
ry economical. We are delighted
th natural gas!"


"OLD FAITHFUL"
has become a symbol of
dependability to millions
of Americans. We feel it
is an apt symbol, too, for
natural gas water heating
. . plenty of piping-hot
water, dependably de-
livered, and at the lowest
possible cost.


:LORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY
,0. BOX 44, WINTER PARK, FLORIDA Member: Florida Natural Gas Association

OCTOBER, 1962 3


6:







How -many of these

services are you get-

ting from your present

insulation source


You can get them

all from your...,


PROFESSIONAL INSULATION
COUNSEL AND INSTALLATION
Yes, all of the above services are now available to you
... through Borg-Warner's comprehensive new A. C. T.
program. Without extra cost, your Alfol Consulting
Technician is now geared to offer you total insulation
service . from accurate problem-analysis . right
through scheduling and installation. Why not find out
now how this professional kind of service can save you
real money.
Send today for a free brochure outlining the benefits you
receive through Borg-Warner's new A. C. T. program.
There's no cost or obligation.


I ALUMINUM
FOI L REFLECTAL CORPORATION
A Subsidiary of Borg-Warner Corporation
d Fumo 200 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 4, Illinois


Urban Destiny . .
(Continued from Page 31)
communication is so terribly effective
in convincing people that this or that
choice is right, and in which neither
the planner nor anyone else is in a
position to give wise guidance?
This hasn't covered much of the
territory we should have covered. We
have not discussed the manner in
which planning is being misused to
prevent needed tax reforms, for in-
stance. In how many cities does plan-
ning, through the zoning instrument,
inhibit the erection of good low-cost
housing because the tax system is
obsolete? How much planning aims
at defending an indefensible tax base
- and so shapes the city of the future
to fit past lethargy in the tax depart-
ment?
We haven't discussed zoning, on
which reform is long overdue. Devel-
oped in New York City in times even
more primitive than these, zoning was
a magnificent first step. After that
first step, zoning sat down among its
withering laurels. It is still sitting.
What should we do about better
public control of land use and timing
of development? About better devices
for acquiring land for public purposes?
About improved means for clearance
and redevelopment of residential, com-
mercial and industrial slums? How do
we assure that land developers are
neither subsidized by the public nor
unduly penalized? Present law and
administrative policy errs in both di-
rections on occasion. Certainly it is
not good sense to force developers to
adopt obsolescent subdivision patterns
simply because planners are living in
the past or don't know what they are
after or should be after. Neither is it
good sense to permit developers to
saddle the taxpayer, present or future,
with costs which should be met by
the developer, or with patterns of
development which wreak havoc with
the urban environment.

Some Inconclusive
Conclusions
The purpose of all this has not been
to convince you that we have the
answers and that if everyone will fol-
low the planning book we are headed
for Utopia. What I have tried to say
is that we are headed into planning
by necessity and on a massive scale
and that we are not as ready for it
as we might be.
(Continued on Page 34)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

































Planned "Light-for-Living"*

Sells More Homes


.. BM Ample Light-for-Living, in every Medallion Home -
indoors and outdoors adds much, much more to the visible
value of the house than the cost of the lighting itself (just a
tiny percentage of the total cost). It's an inexpensive way to
i E DA L IO N enhance the glamour and decorative beauty of a home... to
make a small area look larger... to accentuate the safety and
usepower wiring with comfort of working areas (so important to homemakers). It's a
itlets and switches to silent salesman that helps put every Medallion Home in the
hting fixtures and best possible light...and sparks an emotional appeal that pays
tomorrow's electrical off in more sales.
Also an all-electric Light-for-Living is another Medallion Home advantage
ipped with at least 4
ic appliances, includ- stressed in the multi-million dollar national campaign to help
ss electric range and sell homes easier and faster. You can gain by recommending
electric water heater, the MEDALLION standards of electrical excellence for homes
in every price range. Call any FP&L office for full details.

-7 / flCHEAmPER, TO Z
.. 1IT-S CHEA'P'ER,'TOO*!-*


FLORIDA POWER


& LIGHT COMPANY


HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


OCTOBER, 1962 3


Ir


THE M
* Certifies
to Full Hoi
plenty of ou
handle lig
today's and
appliances.
kitchen equ
major electr
ing flamele
flameless e







Is Your Kitchen Data Current?

On ...


| ...NEVAMAR Carefree KITCHENS

b I ...MUTSCHLER Hardwood KITCHENS

...ST. CHARLES custom KITCHENS

If not ...

Call us at 759-4461 . or visit us at the
only complete display in Florida featuring
these outstanding kitchens, appliances and
accessories. Technical and planning coopera-
tion is yours for the asking.

Y VOGUE KITCHEN CENTER
5400 N. E. 2nd Ave., Miami
Phone: 759-4461
RALPH KIRSCH JULIAN PEYSER


Urban Destiny .*.
(Continued from Page 32)
We have not learned as much as
we should have from the experience
behind us. We have accepted without
question certain untested procedures
and formulas and have applied them
over and over, assuming that they
would fit the future. It is inexcusable
that there has been so little appraisal
of what the same formulas and pro-
cedures produced in the past, so little
comparison of what planners planned
for as a future and the future which
came along.
There is little reason for compla-
cency about planning. But there is no
reason whatever to throw up our
hands. I think planning will survive
and prosper, but it will have to change
some of its ways. First it will have to
sort out what it can and cannot do.
Second it will have to go about its
job a little differently.
To begin with, we should abandon
the detailed Master Plan for the year
2000 in favor of something useful.
There remain a few permanent gen-
eral objectives which planning should
defend. For example, cities must have
land, water and air.
On air, the problem is pollution,
and one of the eternal objectives of
planning should be to hold air pollu-
tion to a minimum.
On water, the problem is quantity
and quality. Mark quantity down as
unknown, prepare plausible projec-
tions, multiply by a fat safety factor,
and then operate consistently to con-
serve plenty of watershed and plenty
of water supply, and to prevent or
correct pollution of surface water and
water in the ground.
On land, the problem in long-range
terms can probably be stated only in
such general language as "suitable
division between private and public
lands." The purpose is to provide an
ample and convenient framework for
public and private uses without know-
ing in detail what those uses will be.
It will be hard for planners to stop
at this. We will want to make long-
range assumptions on population den-
sities and traffic flow and areas for
residence, commerce and industry and
so on all for an unknown popula-
tion with an unknown technology and
unknown social and cultural values.
This is a waste of time we should save
for working closer at hand.
The long-range plan for land use
should be a framework within which
(Continued on Page 35)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


K -I- E



A. COGSWELL
"SINCE 1921"


THE BEST
in
Architects' Supplies


Complete Reproduction
Service


433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


K-I- E


REGISTERED ARCHITECT
or ARCHITECT- ENGINEER
with broad experience, for
position of CHIEF ARCHI-
TECT for METRO DADE
COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS.
In charge of design, con-
struction, alterations, main-
tenance, and operational
features of county buildings
and related facilities, and in
control of consulting services
and contracts for such proj-
ects.
Salary range $8568 to $10,-
944. Appointment may be
made at intermediate pay
scale depending upon quali-
fications of applicant.
Apply-
Dade County Public
Works Dept.
Engineering Division
Justice Bldg., Rm. 823
1351 N. W. 1Zth Street
Miami 35, Florida
Tel. 377-7951






(Continued from, Page 34)
many kinds of public and private uses,
balanced out in detailed short-range
plans, can shift and change and mix
and separate through the centuries.
And we should start with public land.
On this, we should move consist-
ently toward an extensive and, where
possible, continuous network of public
land adapted to multiple purposes-
open space, recreation, protection of
water sheds, parks, schools, public
and quasi-public buildings, transporta-
tion in whatever form it may take,
and things as yet unknown. The pub-
lic land net is the permanent objec-
tive, the historic goal. It can be
achieved by pursuit of a series of
short-range ends which in relation to
it become means. As present and fu-
ture short-range public requirements
unfold in a succession of related plans
adapted to their particular times, lands
contributing to the net should be ac-
quired and held.
Except for these things, the blind-
folded broadjump into the millennium
should cease.
In the years ahead, I believe plan-
ning will become more a part of
normal local government functioning,
less a dilettante operation around the
fringes of government. Planning
should be the intelligence arm of the
executive body. Planning should be
handled by a trained staff reporting
to the executive. Planning should be
responsible for keeping a constant
finger on the urban pulse, for collect-
ing, analyzing the reporting on a cur-
rent basis vital information about
what is happening to the city and its
parts.
And, of course, the planning de-
partment should be responsible for the
preparation and maintenance of the
comprehensive plan.
I see the comprehensive plan as a
series of elements time-scaled to us-
able foresight, always in the process of
being fitted together, and usually be-
ing adapted to new needs, new infor-
mation, new urban objectives. In its
broader outlines, the plan should be
a statement that this is what the city
is trying to do, this is why it is doing
it, this is how it is proposed to do it,
and this is the order in which it should
be done. Against this statement of
objectives, policies, reasons, measures
and priorities, which should be adopt-
ed in principal by the legislative body,
the executive branch (including the
planning department) should measure
(Continued on Page 36)
OCTOBER, 1962


84 4'AN
I.N






f. lip


A new, dynamic industrial Florida blooms into maturity as
hundreds of industries seek the natural advantages of the state.
Already built into the framework of the new Florida is more
than a million tons of Florida Steel structural steel, rein-
forcing steel, special fabrications.
Always specify Florida Steel, the only reinforcing steel
manufactured in Florida a limitless source of quality-con-
trolled steel right at your finger-tips.


FLORIDA STEEL


You build a better Florida
when you build
with Florida products.

TAMPA ORLANDO MIAMI
JACKSONVILLE FT. MYERS
WEST PALM BEACH


--


~


t % :












when TERRAZZO is properly cured,
beautifully finished and correctly
maintained the Hillyard way!
Hillyard Maintaineers are available to serve you in
Florida, with a two-fold counseling service; "job
captain" service for you, and later, maintenance
planning for your client. They offer free job super-
vision, specialized approved products for terrazzo
care, and a client manual for preventive maintenance.
Materials are conveniently warehoused in Florida,
and the Hillyard Maintaineer is
'OR qjouh Sta. 0ot IJOu cpa0hoQ








LOREN E. ELLIS DAN K. MINNICK
P.O. Box 2343 P.O. Box 2745
Hollywood, Florida Orlando, Florida
Phone: WAbash 2-8121 Phone: GArden 3-8208


Custom-Cast

Plac


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs
FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


Urban Destiny ...
(Continued from Page 35)
and fit and schedule programs of the
line agencies of the city and should
exercise controls approved by the leg-
islative body to insure that private
actions do not upset the public apple-
cart.
This kind of planning, in this kind
of local government, would inevitably
be closer to the working problems of
the present and near future than is
the kind of planning we have present-
ly established as a model. It would
work toward the few long-range ob-
jectives which appear to have lasting


validity, but it would do so by build-
ing a better tomorrow solidly on today
rather than by spinning, visions of the
City Beautiful for the Year 2000.
I believe that if we can work in this
direction locally-and if we can make
our suggestions heard in higher levels
of government-we. can make plan-
ning a great deal more useful and ef-
fective. I believe that if we do not,
historians may write off the city plan-
ning movement as an interesting phase
in governmental administration which
was succeeded by the slum clearance
and public housing movement, which
was succeeded in its turn by some-
thing else fragmentary and appealing.


News & Notes was "Formica is Changing" and it
(Continued from Page 6) was carried out by various executives
0. D. LUETSCHER, JR., representing of the Formica Corporation via a series
H. H. Robertson Co.; Secretary, VEL- of speeches and three-dimensional
MA LAMB, representing Pittsburgh demonstrations.
Plate Glass Co.; and Treasurer, C. D. Next informational meeting of the
SHAW, representing Allied Chemical Miami Chapter will be held October
Corp., Barrett Division. Program 25 at the Coral Gables Country Club.
Chairman is RUDY FISCHER of the Host company will be the Mosaic Tile
Florida Glass and Mirror of Jackson- Company; and moderator for the
ville. meeting will be the Chapter's past


Planned for the 1962-63 season are
fourteen meetings to be held jointly
with architects of the area. Of these
three will be "satellite" meetings -
one in Tallahassee this month, another
at Gainesville during February, and
the third at Daytona Beach to be held
early in March next year. Last
month's meeting with Jacksonville
architects was a "Table Top Exhibit"
luncheon. Next month's affair will
be a dinner meeting in connection
with the Craftsmanship Award pro-
gram of the Jacksonville AIA Chapter.
Ten informational meetings are
planned for the Jacksonville area; and
the wind-up gathering in June, 1963,
will be an "Architects' Fun Outing"
sponsored by the P/C Jacksonville
Chapter as a whole.
Information relative to the time and
place of meetings planned for the cur-
rent year can be obtained from the
Chapter's program chairman, RUDY
FISCHER, P.O. Box 2304, Jacksonville.
The Miami Chapter also started
their 1962-63 program with a flourish.
The dinner meeting last month was
at the Miami Shores Country Club
and was attended by almost 200 archi-
tects and special guests. Host organi-
zation was the Formica Company; and
moderator of the informational pro-
gram was GEORGE HAAS, Formica's
south-Florida representative. Theme


presentative for Mosaic, ALLEN KERN.

Personal & Professional . .
AIA Secretary CLINTON GAMBLE,
FAIA, will have a busy month. On
October 20 he is scheduled to partici-
pate in the Conference of the Penn-
sylvania Region at Hershey, Pa. From
there he goes to Houston, Texas, for
the Texas Regional Conference Octo-
ber 26. Last month he was a guest
participant at the Ohio Regional Con-
ference, held aboard the Great Lakes
steamship North American plying be-
tween Detroit and Cleveland.
The AIA Secretary was one of a
number of AIA officers and directors
taking part in a series of seminars be-
fore regional meetings on the subject
of "Comprehensive Architectural Ser-
vice." FAA members who attended
the Professional Practice Seminar in
Miami March 24 of this year were
treated to a preview of the AIA's edu-
cational program now under way.

DON HAMPTON has announced the
opening of an office for the practice
of architecture at 201 W. Clinton
Avenue, Winter Park. Phone is
MIdway 4-2606.
OTTO H. OPPENHEIMER has moved
his office to 462 S. Dixie Highway,
Coral Gables. The new phone is
667-6449.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Nominations. ..
(Continued from Page 15)
year terms and has been active on six
FAA Committees, including Office
Practice, Uniform Building Codes,
Education and Research, Research
(chairman), Awards and Scholarships,
and Education.
The two candidates for the one-year
term as alternate are:
HUGH J. LEITCH, AIA AIA mem-
bership dates from 1951 in the Florida
Northwest Chapter in which he held
office as Secretary and President for a
year each. He was a one-year director
of the FAA and his FAA Committee
memberships include Hospitals and
Health, four years; Office Practice,
two years; Publications, two years;
Public Relations, one year.
WILLIAM S. MORRISON, AIA -
AIA membership dates from 1949.
He was President of the Florida
Northwest Chapter for two years and
a Director for two years, a Vice Presi-
dent for one year of the FAA. His
FAA Committee memberships include
Awards and Scholarships, two years;
Legislative, chairman, one year; Gov-
ernment Relations, one year.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 12
Coral Gables Glass & Mirror,
Inc. . . . . 4
A. R. Cogswell . . 34
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 30
Dade County
Public Works Dept. . 34
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 36
Florida Gas Transmission
Co. .. . . 30-31
Florida Home Heating Institute 38
Florida Natural Gas Assn. . 28
'Florida Power & Light Co. . 33
Florida Prestressed Concrete
Assn ........ .29
Florida Steel Corp .. 35
Florida Terrazzo Assn. . 7
General Portland Cement Co. 11
Hillyard Sales Co. . . 36
Maule Industries . . 8
Merry 'Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 3
Miami Window Corp. . 1
Portland Cement Assn. . 16
Prescolite . . . 4
Reflectal Corp . .. 32
Rubbermaid, Inc. Insert, 9-10
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 6
Thompson Door Co . . 5
Vogue Industries, Inc. . 34
F. Graham Williams Co. 37

OCTOBER, 1962


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" AND ALUMINUM

PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

JAMES C. ("Jamie") GILLESPIE

115 Orangeview Avenue


Clearwater, Florida


Telephone: 446-7271


ATLANTA

GA.









Dear Daddy...


Yes, MR. ARCHITECT, Susan "lays it on the line"
... in newspapers all over Florida. And thousands of Daddies and Mommies
are getting the message ..
"Kill the chill this winter with OIL heating, the kind that cuts home
heating bills in half.
"Beat the heat next summer with ELECTRIC air conditioning-it works
for pennies an hour.
"This super-economical comfort team will give your family 365 'nicest
days of the year' every year at lowest possible cost!"
You'll continue to find ready acceptance for the year 'round money
saving oil-electric combination among your home building clients.


FLORIDA HOME A4e HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET MIAMI


38 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







F/A Panorama...

IT'S BEEN A GOOD YEAR THUS FAR . .
Figures just released by the F. W. Dodge Corporation show, on a national basis,
that the volume of construction in August this year was up two percent over a
year ago. Non-residential building showed an eight percent gain, residential
building a gain of four percent. For the first eight months of this year total con-
struction was up 12 percent over the corresponding period last year with resi-
dential building up 15 percent and the non-residential category showing a 10
percent increase. Biggest jump was in contracts for manufacturing plants. Fig-
ures for this month of August showed a 24 percent gain1 and in early months
of this year volume of contracts spurted as much as 40 percent over 1961.
NOW IT'S BUILDINGS BY THE MILE . .
Given the ground space, it's perfectly practical to build a structure five miles
long, according to the conviction of Professor Henry Charles Burge of the Uni-
versity of Southern California's School of Architecture and Fine Arts. Advocated
for use in low-density areas, the horizontal structure would employ moving side-
walks in place of elevators needed in a vertical building. Cost might be $20 per
sq. ft., ". . as compared with a possible cost of $100 per sq. ft. for a mile-high
building." As a further buttress to the soundness of his five-mile building con-
cept Professor Burge cites the force ratio the energy required to move one
pound vertically for one foot will move the same pound five feet horizontally.
The ratio works, says the professor, from the time construction starts through its
completion and continues in the service and maintenance of the structure and
relative to all operations within it, regardless of character. The logical result is
less work or energy therefore higher efficiencies which, translated into
dollars mean lower costs and proportionately greater returns.
CARPETING IT'S NOW IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS . .
Carpeting has recently assumed a new character as a construction material in
public schools. A report just issued by the American Carpet Institute covered use
of heavy-duty carpeting as basic flooring in two high schools and one elemen-
tary school. In two of these schools precise performance and maintenance records
have been kept part of these in comparison with other types of flooring mater-
ials installed in other properties of the local school system. In each instance main-
tenance costs were substantially lower for carpeting, though initial costs were
higher. It was found that the material greatly improved acoustical qualities in
all areas where it had been used. Furthermore a psychological advantage result-
ed from use of carpeting. Educators have commented on the "de-institutionaliz-
ing" effect of carpet on school interiors and have noted a marked reduction in
"loud talking and horseplay" by students entering carpeted areas. John Lyon
Reid, FAIA, architect of the high school on which comparative records were kept,
noted the "dignified environment" resulting from use of carpeting. In his opin-
ion, ". . behavior patterns of students will be enormously improved by this kind
of environment".
ERECTION TIME 20 MINUTES PER HOUSE . .
Application of urethane foam as rigid insulation for building panels is constantly
expanding. Now a California organization has produced panels of the material
in curved hexagonal and pentagonal sections which can be fitted together to
form geodesic domes. The domes with a range of use from vacation cabins to
storage depots in sub-arctic temperatures are prefabricated in various sizes.
The smallest, with a diameter of 16 feet and a height of 8 feet, will withstand
winds up to 160 miles per hour. Dismantled, its components form a package
lx6x7-feet. Two people using wrenches only can erect it in about 20 minutes.









It's Next Month...

The Florida Central Chapter is the Host for the
FAA's 1962 Convention. .. The Red Coats
have sparked a stimulating program on the
Convention's theme "Anatomy of
Architecture" . Mark your calendar -
be sure to be in St. Pete next month . .


! I'l


in -


1*4.1
~ 7


Headquarters of the FAA's 1962 Convention will be the Soreno
Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!


IUAL FAA CONVENTION
1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG


.- M




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs