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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00098
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: August 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00098
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
- .. -... pmtstf& rAW [3 i tA


August, 1962
E, .iv


OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA A


OF ARCHITECTS of tJb BERI'CAN INSTITUTE OF-
.. ,. ".. .' J's "-- F..- -1


















The



Cure



For



The


Cause



Is



Care


Comes now another publication from AIA headquarters called "Batter
Board ands Barriers" and sub-headed "Case Histories of Professional Liability
Claims." Issued by the AIA Committee on Professional Insurance, it's a
suavely-styled piece designed primarily as a warning to architects against the
pitfalls of practice that can trap them into defensive and costly litigation.
As such it does its job. And with that job itself we have no quarrel what-
ever. Forewarned is, of course, forearmed. It behooves every professional man
to realize the dangers that are inherent in his practice and to employ that
realization as a practical guide to the safely-legal conduct of his affairs.
If we were to offer any criticism at all to the laudable efforts of the AIA's
insurance committee or its insurance counselor, VICTOR 0. SCHINNERER, to
publicize the need for professional liability insurance, it would be on the basis
of what is not said rather than what is said.
This is the rapidly accelerating need for greater care and competence in
the professional practice of architecture. Professional liability insurance is no
substitute for meticulous attention to technical detail. A facility to defend
one's self in court has too often proved to be merely a sort of an umbrella
over the mistakes of insufficient technical knowledge or inadequate professional
experience.
Fortunately the umbrella has proved effective in most cases where it has
had to be used. But at best it is a costly piece of professional equipment;
and every time a liability insurance organization is called upon to pay a
claim generated by a professional error or omission that might easily have
been avoided, the cost tends to increase. Thus, the able, conscientious
architectural office is being penalized for its emergency protection by the
mistakes some of which have almost amounted to malpractice of others
less experienced and less knowledgeable.
How can the architectural profession overcome this situation? How can
the "image" of the architect be so strengthened as to rise above the "central
responsibility" blandishments of the package dealers or the efforts of engin-
eering organizations to supplant, in widening technical areas, the traditional
role of the professional architect?
Probably there is no single, pat answer to either question. But part of
the answers might be looked for in at least two areas of current professional
concern. One involves the education of an architect. The other encompasses
the technical standards that state boards and the NCARB have set up as a
measure of technical ability to practice the architectural profession.
Evidence is growing that many thoughtful architectural educators are
becoming acutely conscious of their role and responsibility in the solution to
the overall problem. Changes are being fashioned in cirricula. But they grow
slowly and are yet hardly more than tentative experiments. We need acceler-
ation here. We need wider acceptance by more educators of new attitudes
toward the growing complexities of architectural practice. And, most impor-
tantly perhaps, we desperately need a more effective infusion of the world
of professional practice with the academic world of cloistered customs,
educational theories and wishful, rather than knowledgeable, educational
policies.
As to the matter of registration standards, the consensus of opinion seems
to be that they are now generally too low. The more vocal members of state
boards point to the growing complexity of architectural practice and say that
present experience requirements often controlled by local legislation, as in
our own state are insufficient to assure full competency of most candidates
for registration as independent practitioners. The NCARB is constantly at-
tempting to up-grade its technical standards. But even those currently in effect
seem too high to be met by a large percentage of candidates. And this fact,
say state board members, highlights what they believe to be a general inade-
quacy of both academic training and practical experience.
The careful competence that characterizes any successful, trouble-free
architectural practice must be worked for, not just wished for. If the basis
for it is now too weak, architects themselves must see that it is strengthened.
And soon for the ultimate stake is their own professional existence.
-ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA.










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AUGUST, 1962


. . .......... .


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74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


1T 74i Iae---


The Cure for The Cause Is Care . . . .
Editorial By Roger W. Sherman, AIA
Letters . . . . . .
Draftsmen's Club May Expand Nationally . .
Solar Shading Devices . . . . . .
BRI Report, Part II, By John M. Evans, AIA
Interama Gets The Green Light . . . .

The Land-use Pattern

Cultural and International Areas

Industrial Development Area

The Inter-American Center Authority . . .
State Board Employs New Executive Secretary .
The Challenge of Ugliness . . . . .
By August Heckscher
News and Notes ............. .


. . 2nd Cover


. 6
. 9


. 12


. 19
. 20
. 24


. 26


Advertisers' Index .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER ...
Looks something like a blueprint, doesn't it? Well, it is in a way. It's a
jetcraft-view of the Interama part of the Graves Tract, just north of Miami
on US 1. The buildings shown on this picture-map are largely fanciful; but
the land-use pattern-roads, waterways, greenbelt areas-are definite and the
result of long and intensive study. Target date for the Interama opening? Don't
know for sure-but it might be somewhere near 1965.


. 31

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12

NUMBER 8 I1962


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Letters-


Good Covers . .
EDITOR, F/A:
I want to tell you that I feel the
present covers of The Florida Archi-
tect are the best, design-wise, that I
have seen since the inception of the
magazine. I know it must seem that
I have been critical in the past. But
now the design work on the covers of
The Florida Architect certainly de-
serves recognition.
Keep up the good work!
A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, AIA,
Jacksonville Chapter


Products Register . .
EDITOR, F/A:
Thanks for the prime "plug" which
you gave the 1962 edition of The
Institute's "Building Products Reg-
ister," headed "Data at Your Finger
Tips," under F/A Panorama in the
June issue of The Florida Architect
magazine. As I'm sure you realize, this
Register is designed to be a working
tool in the architect's office to enable
him to render better service to his
clients and at increased efficiency
within his organization, and thereby
at lower cost to himself.
My interest lies in the fact that
I am a member of the Architectural
and Building Information Services
Committee, having been nominated
by Bob Little to represent the Florida
region on this committee which is
responsible for this publication.
In the event that you might wish
to insert another item in a future
issue of The Florida Architect on this
subject, I am pleased to give you the
following information:
The committee welcomes com-
ments from practicing architects using
the present Register on how it can be
improved. A 3rd edition is being con-
sidered for possible publication in
1964. Meanwhile, the committee
wishes to get the present 2nd edition
into general use in all AIA offices.
Although only two editions have been
published, the Register covers a con-
siderable segment of the building in-
dustry. As compared with Sweets
Architectural File, the Register has
50 per cent of the number of manu-
facturers in Sweets within its categor-
ies. In two categories, No. 7, Glass
and Plastics and No. 15, Paints, it


contains more manufacturers than
Sweets. It contains 212 manufactur-
ers who are not in Sweets.
As of 19 July, sales had reached
2,771 copies.
Again, thanks for your cooperation
in this venture.
FRED BUCKY, JR., AIA
Jacksonville, Chapter


Plan Proposal . .
EDITOR, F/A:
Recently in The Miami Herald I
noticed a proposal by a member of
the Metro Commission that a three-
county planning program be insti-
tuted. The counties involved were
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach; and
the idea of the proposal as I under-
stand it was to achieve some sort of
coordination in the overall area rela-
tive to the progressive changes that
are coming about as a result of new
road systems, airport expansions, wat-
erway and harbor development and
the like.
The only quarrel I have with this
idea is that it does not go far enough.
I grant that the three counties men-
tioned are among the-if not the-
most populous in the state. Their rate
of growth is fast. Their development
is such that within a remarkably short
time they will constitute one huge
metropolitan area. But unless some
smart planning is done fast, the area
will be nothing more than haphazard
sprawl-and we will shortly be hear-
ing the same laments about the need
for "renewal" and "slum clearance"
that we now are hearing about Miami
and Fort Lauderdale.
The same sort of thing is happen-
ing in other parts of the state. Is it
not possible for some agency of the
state government-the Development
Commission, perhaps-to recognize
the need for coordinating the growth
factors throughout the state? Could
not some program be started with the
object of controlling the present
spread of strip-suburbs and cheap-john
commercial construction along high-
ways?
It seems to me that architects
should be interested in this idea. It
will cost money of course. But it will
save millions of value in the long run.
JOlIN J. MAGRUDER,
South Miami, Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















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Draftsmen's Club
May Expand Nationally

The Draftsmen's Club of Miami
is now considering a proposal that the
organization spearhead a movement
toward formation of a National
Draftsmen's Club. Though plans are
still very much in the formative stage,
a Club spokesman indicates that a
"Nationalization Committee" of the
Club would take steps to contact
draftsmen in other states, outline an
organization plan and suggest a pro-
gram of activity. Presumably each
state organization thus formed would
become a chapter of a national or-
ganization-akin in principle to such
groups as Women in Construction.
The proposal has not yet gained
the support of all Club members.
Those now opposed to it point to
the fact that even draftsmen in Flor-
ida cities other than Miami have few
local groups worthy of the name.
They say that before any sustained
effort is made toward formation of a
national organization for draftsmen,
the interests of draftsmen in Florida
should be welded into a cohesive
group more fully than now represen-
tative of the state as a whole. With
this "Florida Chapter" as a nucleus,
they say, it might then be timely to
consider formation of a draftsmen's
organization at the national level.
Expansion of the Miami Club's
educational activities was apparently
the basis on which the proposal for a
new national organization was made.
During the past three years the Club's
educational program has been con-
spicuously successful. Under direction
of Louis BROOKULTZ, of the Archi-
tectural Section of the Dade County
Department of Public Works, this
program has included courses in vari-
ous architectural, mechanical and
structural subjects conducted by local
architects and engineers. The courses
have been well attended and have
done much to assist many draftsmen
in passing State Board examinations
for registration.
Pending any decision relative to
all-out action on the expansion-by-
chapter idea, Club officials would wel-
come reactions from other draftsmen
- at both state and national levels.
Correspondence should be addressed
to LORRAINE G. KNAACK, Executive
Secretary, Draftsmen's Club of Mi-
ami, Inc., c/o Dupont Plaza Hotel,
Miami 43, Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























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I ^H^~~~f--- flHH^^






ReAport o 74e B I SprUn 6 ference Part I I


SOLAR



SHADING



DEVICES


By JOHN M. EVANS, AIA


The source of most material in this
article is the BRI Spring Conference
held in Washington this past April.
Specifically, I have used ALFRED L.
JAROS, JR., as a source of detail infor-
mation. Mr. Jaros read a paper on the
subject of Evaluation of Solar Heat in
The Selection of Glass Types and
Solar Shading to Reduce Cool-de-
mand. Mr. Jaros is a consulting engi-
neer in the firm of aJros, Baum and
Bolles, of New York City; and his
research in shading devices has its ori-
gins in his engineering background.
Of his paper Jaros said: "The basic
purpose . is to compare and evalu-
ate the various constructions that
might be used to reduce the 'input'
of heat derived from solar radiation
through windows with particular ref-
erence to cost of installation, savings
in air conditioning capacity, and con-
sequent net savings in total invest-
ment and in annual cost." This article
will concentrate on the relative effec-
iency of shading devices. The cost of
installation will be treated in detail in
another issue of The Florida Architect.
There are four basic methods of
shading against solar intrusion:
1. Outside Shading Devices:
2. Interior Shading Devices:
3. Glass As A Shading Device:
4. Miscellaneous Shading Devices:


TYPE 1:
Outside Shading Devices:
As the sun migrates seasonally it
seems constantly to change both its
azimuth and profile angle. This is, of
course, not astronomically true. It is
our movement around the sun and


the seasonal tilt of the earth on its
axis that causes the sun to appear to
move in relationship to ourselves. It
is this movement that causes the
great difficulty in designing sun shades.
In particular it causes trouble on the
east and west elevations and I would
like to first discuss this aspect of the
problem.
From the point of view of solar
angles the east and west are identical.
The sun, during the winter months,
is in a south-easterly position at sun-
rice and in a south-westerly orienta-
tion at sunset. During the summer
months it moves much farther to the


"Historically the influence of sun
on architectural design has been a
very strong conditioning agent on the
architect's pen. Since the days of
Apropolis, when Greeks built their
temples on the sun-washed Mediter-
ranean, there has been a consistently
respectful handling of building design
in terms of how much sun could be
admitted and still be tenable for
people. Much of the charm of the
great Greek buildings is derived from
the fact that they used shapes of
massive stones with small openings
and captured the sunlight in a very
exciting manner. The deep shadows
and modulating shade effects which
resulted are as much a part of the
design as the sculptured ornamenta-
tion."-VINCENT G. KLING, F.A.I.A.
(B.R.I. Conference, 1962).


north, rising approximately in the
north-east and setting in the north-
west. The change in azimuth involved
is in the neighborhood of 450. While
there is this large variation in azimuth,
the difference in profile angle (the
angle between the sun and ground
level) is less than 15.
Because of these severe azimuth
changes the sun-shade design on the
east and west is one that always chal-
lenges the architect. If he uses fixed
louvers or an egg-crate design, he must
surely block off a great deal of na-
tural light and "outlook" if he is to
block the sun at all seasons. Consid-
ering our geographical location as a
north-south oriented peninsula, our
major views will always be to the
Ocean or Gulf. Loss of outlook by
the visitor would hardly be tolerable.
An office or commercial building
might accept this condition and fixed
shades can be considered as a possible
solution.
Mr. Jaros feels that the most effe-
cient type of shading device on west
elevations is the movable louver. Jaros
also feels that on the east, due to
economic considerations, the venetian
blind has an overall superiority. I
feel that while this might be true in
New York City, it is not true in
Florida. Brazilian architects have made
much use of this element and there
are many examples of it in Rio de
Janiero. Jaros finds these advantages
in movable louvers: 1. Louvers can be
more readily angled to give effective
shading while preserving a reasonable
outlook. 2. They can be combined
(Continued on Page 10)


AUGUST, 1962





Solar Shading...
(Continued from Page 19)
with horizontal fixed shades to reduce
solar intrusion and to articulate the
facade.
These louvers are not cheap and
Jaros has some reservations on cost of
installation; but their merit is the pos-
sibility that they offer of compensat-
ing for the large azimuth variation on
east-west elevations. Whether or not
they should be mechanically operated
is both an economic and practical
consideration.
EDWARD T. REEDER of Miami noted
at our 1960 Convention (Man, Cli-
mate and the Architect) that he has
had fair success with automatic louver
operators. The only problem lies in
possibilities of power failures that
would require manual re-setting. Mr.
Reeder indicated that no more trouble
exists with motorized louvers than
with automatic doors. Small buildings
could well eliminate the mechanical
adjustment for seasonal change and
substitute manual adjustment on a
monthly basis.
From a different point of view it is
worth noting a method suggested by
VINCENT G. KLING, FAIA, at the BRI
conference. He described his solution
to a shading problem on a new build-
ing in Norfolk, Virginia where the
view was omnidirectional. To make
the building tenable for the occupants
but still preserve the view he used a
"sun break" made up of two layers of
glass, three feet apart. Inner layers
are clear glass panes, nine feet tall
from floor to ceiling, installed flush
with the face of the building. Outer
panes are heavily pigmented heat ab-
sorbing glass supported on lightweight
tubular metal frames projecting off
columns on the building's face. This
projection will air cool the shading
device. A horizontal louver sunshade
was installed at the head of each row
of windows to screen the direct rays
of the sun. It will also serve as a
walkway for the window washers.
While not suggested by Mr. Kling,
pigmented sheets of transparent Plexi-
glas might be substituted for the heat
absorbing glass if one were worried
about a breakage problem.

Shading The Southern Elevation:
While the most common shading de-
vice is the concrete horizontal "eye-
brow" it will, by itself, only do a
reasonably good job on the south
10


elevation. When used on the south-
particularly as a balcony where it has
a dual function it is effective with
the following exceptions: Its neces-
sarily heavy mass absorbs and re-radi-
ates heat back through the window
or through the building structure. Also
a heat pocket is created since the
shade is not vented; and the heat can
be transferred into the building by
either conduction or radiation.
On southern elevations Jaros prefers
to use a cantilevered aluminum hori-
zontal louvered shade hung on brack-
ets. He feels that this would be the
most efficient way of shading this
elevation. With some reservations I
agree with him. I do feel that a case
can be made for pre-cast concrete
horizontal shades with vent holes
poured in them particularly if these
shades are hung on brackets, away
from the building structure. However,
in high rise construction Jaros is un-
doubtedly correct in his assumption.

Screen Walls and Grills: The screen
wall is usually a manufactured item of
a fixed type having sufficient perfora-
tions to admit general light and


having such thickness and design as
to shield most of the direct sunshine
during the critical hours. Jaros only
mentioned them in passing in his
paper. He feels they are "architectural
treatment" and he declines further
analysis of them either for efficiency
or cost of construction. I understand
his point of view, for their complex
geometric shapes make it difficult to
determine the degree of shading effe-
ciency involved. Some of these screen
units will work; some of them are not
designed properly and are sold under
false pretenses. The architect should
demand shading diagrams calculated
for the appropriate latitude.
Outside shading devices mentioned
in the preceding paragraphs will, ac-
cording to Jaros, always give the
largest "thermal savings." This will
vary with conditions, but will average
better than one and one-half times
any other. With some systems the
cost of the installation as balanced
against savings in equipment and
operating cost gives a net result that
is not quite so favorable. These factors
will be discussed in a third article.
(Continued on Page 22)


During what have now become traditional Spring and Fall confer-
ences, the Building Research Institute makes noble attempts to
untangle the skein of American building research and design by ex-
ploring specific areas of interests from a very broad viewpoint. The
Conferences draw together three groups: the Product Engineer, the
Research Technician, the Architect and the Engineer. The amalgam
of their two days' effort is the best base material from which, more and
more, we will be drawing our building products research and tech-
niques. Information in the full and published reports of the Confer-
ence will, in all probability, work increasing changes in our drafting
room practice. With a little luck it may even permit us finally to
design buildings with which the clients are pleased and the users
contented!
Last April the BRI 1962 Spring Conference was held in Washing-
ton, D.C., its two-fold subject being "Solar Effects in Relation to the
Design of Buildings" and "New Joint Sealants: Criteria, Design and
Materials." The program on each subject covered a tightly-organized
period of two days. Unfortunately the programs were run concurrently,
so that those attending that concerned with solar effects had neces-
sarily to forego even a cursory coverage of joint sealants.
One of the attendants at the solar effects seminar was John M.
Evans, AIA, of Fort Lauderdale. At the Editor's request, he served as
an observer for The Florida Architect. He generously consented to
report the four-session meeting. This is the second article on a subject
of first importance to Floridians not only to the professionals who
design buildings, but as well to all those who use buildings and right-
fully demand the high standards of living comfort and convenience
which our expanding technology is making available in ever-increas-
ing degree.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









~.





4
~
a ~
-' ,- ~44


Jc


Interama


...The Land-Use Pattern...


AUGUST, 1962







Cultural and International Areas...


Dr. Irving E. Muskat, Chairman of the Inter-American Center Authority, has been
quoted as saying, "Interama will not be any Coney Island. On the other hand, it's not
going to be any egghead museum, either." Shown here, in reproduction from color
sketches by James Bingham, are suggestions of his meaning. The two pictures at the
left are visualizations of The Cultural Area looking across the lagoon toward The Inter-
national Area, a sketch-idea of which is shown below. . Interama's management hopes
that many of the major buildings needed in The Cultural Area-like the huge tower
symbolizing the Progress-With-Freedom theme, the amphitheater with its floating con-
cert stage, the enclosed arena, the museums and theaters-will be subjects for national,
or even international, design competitions. . In The International Area it is hoped
that the various countries of the Americas will recruit their most able talent toward the
end of producing exhibits which, in colorful accuracy, will reproduce the art and archi-
tecture, the life and customs native to each. ...


i-rf-r-,


















































Industrial Development Area . .


This imaginative sketch, also executed originally in color by James Bingham, suggests
the type of exhibit that Interama planners hope may be developed in The Industrial
Area. Sponsored by major industries, government agencies and research organizations,
the exhibits could tell the whole story of scientific and technological development-the
tangible results of progress with freedom. . Here will be a place where visitors can
feel and see and learn at first hand the magic and machines that industry has developed
to bring the fruits of progress within the reach of all. Industry's contribution to better
ways of life is great. Interama will provide a place to show it in fascinating detail. . .
18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Interama...
(Continued from Page 14)

may make its own building rules. It
is doing just that. Local or even re-
gional building codes will not be in
force here. Instead all construction-
and thus building design will be
conditioned by a series of performance
criteria set up by the Authority. These
criteria will constitute the code. They
will be stated in terms of minimum
standards of various sorts; and though
the resulting code will be strict in the
sense that it will assure the safety,
convenience and quality of construc-
tion, it will be as flexible as possible
relative to the design means that may
be used to meet the required struc-
tural and equipment standards.
This policy of dual control the
velvet of design opportunity over the
steel of technical requirements for
construction- may well constitute a
major advance, if not completely a
new technique, in large project plan-
ning. At the very least it establishes
a sound basis for "well-building"
while permitting the greatest possible
latitude for the design expression of
every type of spatial need. And this is
the prime objective of Interama
planners.
The resultant of this objective
should be a challenge to every de-
signer who will be at all concerned
with any of Interama's myriad build-
ing projects. The Authority hopes,
according to a Design Staff spokes-
man, that this challenge will attract
the most creative of the world's archi-
tectural talents. And, if this hope is
realized, the 650 gardened acres at
the Graves Tract may well become -
and soon the world's most provoca-
tive architectural showcase.
All sorts of buildings will be re-
quired. The site has been divided into
four major areas-cultural, industrial,
festival and international. Planned for
the first are such monumental struc-
tures as a "Tower of Freedom" -
which Authority officials hope may
rank equally with other great monu-
ments of the world theaters, an
opera house, a concert hall, a huge
amphitheater with a floating stage-
in short, every facility needed to make
this part of Interama a meeting place
for the cultural arts of all the Amer-
icas.
The industrial area is visioned as a
place where governments, major in-
dustries or various research groups can
AUGUST, 1962


develop exhibits of the widest ima-
ginable variety that will document the
tremendous array of the America's
scientific and productive achieve-
ments. Building types may well range
from a simple outdoor shelter to a
complex of structures devoted to por-
traying the new sciences of micro-
cosmology.
The festival area suggests the fun
of games, of exhibits portraying the
life and events of the America's his-
tories, of vicarious thrills in areas
simulating space and its impact on
our future, of many sorts of special
shows and recreational events. Build-
ing types ... ?As varied, perhaps as any
vivid imagination might conjure up.
The International area will be a
meeting place for all the democracies
of the Americas. Here, it is hoped,
will be located a segment of each
country's life and customs, its arts and
crafts, its pulsing contribution to the
freedom of all-American living.
Needed here will be a variety of pa-
vilions to house national exhibits,


shops, restaurants, houses, craft cen-
ters all the elements that can profit-
ably be used to portray the character
of each country to its inter-American
neighbors.
This, then is Interama an idea,
a philosophy, a project. In essence the
idea has not changed much since it
was first vaguely conceived almost 50
years ago. It is still basically an idea
for an exhibit area but an exhibit
of such broad scope and deep purpose
as to dramatize the philosophical con-
cept upon which it is now based.
Interama will be an exhibit of prog-
ress- but progress within the frame-
work of free enterprise, conducted by
free men under free and democratic
institutions.
It is largely this philosophy that
has shaped the policy and program of
the project that Interama has now
become. In this philosophy resides the
myriad opportunities for creative ac-
tivity that Interama promises -of
which the field of dynamic architec-
ture is by no means least.


THE INTER-AMERICAN CENTER AUTHORITY


GOVERNOR FARRIS BRYANT DR. IRVING E. MUSKAT
Chairman ex officio Chairman

These are the two men who are primarily responsible for sparking
Interama into its present new and vigorous lease on life. Working
with them are these other members of the Authority: W. W. WALKER,
Sr., Lifetime Honorary Chairman; ROBERT KING HIGH, Vice Chair-
man; DAVID W. WALTERS, Secretary-Treasurer; HARRY HOOD
BASSETT; MILTON E. GRUSMARK; B. E. HEARN; LOUIS J. HESTOR;
J. N. McARTHUR; JOSEPH J. ORR; FRANK SMATHERS, JR.



19






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State Board Employs



New Executive Secretary


The State Board of Architecture
has hired a new full-time executive
secretary and has also moved its head-
quarters office from Fort Lauderdale
to Ormond Beach. Announcement of
the staff addition and address change
was made last month by MORTON
T. IRONMONGER, AIA, the Board's
secretary-treasurer, who said the new
arrangement would become effective
immediately.
The new staff member is C. RICH-
ARD GLAVIN. The Board's new address
is now 282 North Shore Drive, Or-
mond Beach, Florida. The mailing
address is P. O. Box 2185, Ellinor Vil-
lage Station, Ormond Beach; and the
telephone is Ormond Beach 677-4201.
As a full-time employee of the Board
Glavin will take over all administra-
tive details of the Board's varied activ-
ities. Part of his duties will be the
maintenance of a close liaison with
the Board's legal staff that will in-
clude a more or less constant activity
of investigation relative to various
complaints of improper practice with
which the Board must deal.
The secretarial work and the keep-
ing of the Board's financial records
which Glavin's new office will now
handle, were formerly a part-time ac-
tivity for the Board's secretary-treas-
urer, MORTON T. IRONMONGER. How-
ever, it has been apparent during the
past few years that the sharp increase
in detail work required by the increase
in architectural registrations has re-
quired more and more time on the
part of the secretary-treasurer. Coupled
with the increasing amount of corres-
pondence relative to candidate appli-
cations and the Board's law enforce-
ment program, this placed an unreas-
onable burden on the secretary-treas-
urer's office. Under the new arrange-
ment Ironmonger will be relieved of
these routine detail duties, though he
will still retain his function as a Board
official during the remainder of his
term of appointment. His term of
service will end July 1, 1963.
Ironmonger was appointed to the
State Board in August, 1955, by Gov-
ernor LEROY COLLINS and was im-
mediately named as secretary-treasurer


C. RICHARD GLAVIN
. . new job, new office


to succeed MELLEN C. GREELEY, FA-
IA, who retired from the Board in
July, 1955, after serving as its secre-
tary continuously for 32 years. The
Board's administrative office was then
moved from Jacksonville to Iron-
monger's office in Fort Lauderdale.
C. RICHARD GLAVIN has been a part-
time employee of the State Board for
the past three years. Formerly a mem-
ber of the Federal Bureau of Investi-
gation in Washington where he held
an important position as assistant to
Director J. Edgar Hoover, Glavin's
work with the Board has been largely
concerned with the Board's enforce-
ment program. He has worked closely
with the Board's legal staff and
through his investigative work has
been notably successful in assembling
evidence necessary to the conduct of
legal actions against those charged by
the Board with violations of the arch-
itect's law.
His past experience has also in-
cluded much general administrative
activity; and through his work with
the FBI he has become completely
familiar with various governmental
procedures relative to the keeping of
financial records, development of bud-
gets, preparation of reports. Thus he
brings seasoned experience to his new
duties as well as a familiarity with the
Board's routine activities.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









NATURAL


GAS


Big "breakthrough" in
natural gas air condition-
ing is reflected in these
typical installations.


Special new low rates now in effect in many Florida
areas make natural gas air conditioning cheapest .
versatile equipment in a full range of sizes* and
types make it best. Your local natural gas office
will supply full details.


TAMPA'S University of
South Florida is adding
1,200 tons to 1,080 installed
in original buildings.


-A JACKSONVILLE'S
fabulous Robert Meyer
Hotel cools with 800-ton
natural gas absorption unit.


DELAND'S West Volusia Memorial Hospital features
,W 260-ton natural gas air conditioning installation.


j ORLANDO'S Executive Office Building installed
110-ton natural gas engine-driven compressor type.
MIAMI home has 12-ton completely self-
W enclosed residential chiller-heater
Installation.


*Now available from 2.8 tons up.
FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION
P. O. Box 2842, St. Petersburg 31, Florida
AUGUST, 1962


Elf






Solar Shading...
(Continued from Page 10)

TYPE 2:
Interior Shading Devices:
Let us now consider means of
shading against solar intrusion on the
inside of the fenestration. Four types
are involved.
1. Inside polished or "satin" alu-
minum venetian blinds.
2. Inside painted venetian blinds.
3. Drapery.
4. Roller shades of "glazed
cloth."
Whether vertical or horizontal in
design, blinds have an equal efficiency
if properly manipulated. Therefore the
choice depends on esthetics or a per-
sonal preference. Jaros believes the
horizontal type to be less complicated,
need less maintenance. Vertical fabric
slats appear less "reflective" than light
colored metal. By the same token
painted venetian blinds are slightly
less efficient than those of polished
aluminum. If fabric is used in vertical
blinds then it should be the reflective
glass fabric type. It must be empha-
sized that blinds of darker colors will
give progressively smaller savings.


Draperies of white or pale cream-
colored materials will approximate the
same results as white or cream-colored
inside venetian blinds. Darker colored
(or dirty) drapes will not reflect much
infra-red radiation and will convert it
into interior sensible heat. Really dark
drapes will have a negligible reflective
effect and will merely convert the
infra-red into sensible heat in room
air temperature inside the window.
Roller shades of "glazed cloth"
drawn down are as efficient a shading
device as inside blinds of the same
color.

TYPE 3:
Glass As A Shading Device:
Basically Jaros feels that with no
shading device some sort of glazing
other than polished plate should be
considered and would be economically
justified without question. He feels
that the overall best choice, with no
shading device, would be heat absorb-
ing glass, this despite certain criti-
cisms regarding discomfort from the
hot glass and possibilities of thermal
breakage.
While theoretically the combina-
tion of heat-absorbing glass plus a


interior layer of clear plate glass offers
some greater savings than heat absorb-
ing glass alone, Jaros says that serious
mechanical maintenance objections to
this combination might exist, espe-
cially for large areas of glass. From a
pure thermal efficiency standpoint the
heat-reflective glass can save more air
conditioning cost than any other glass.
Present installation costs for this ma-
terial will not yet justify its economical
usage. Since new manufacturers are
entering this field and this can only
mean lower prices, I would not dis-
count reflective glass completely as a
possible material to use.

TYPE 4:
Miscellaneous Shading Devices:
Awnings: I have said little about
awnings as a shading device, although
Mr. Jaros has included them in his
list. They certainly have a place in
low buildings where they can add
lightness and color to a facade that
lacks articulation. In high rise build-
ings they have no place at all. Main-
tenance costs based on rapid deterior-
ation would make these devices a poor
choice.
(Continued on Page 30)


*I.


4 \


Today's Knowing Buyers

Look for Homes with

I CONCEALED


Telephone Wiring

Today's quality-conscious homebuyers
demand more and more convenience features
for their money.
That's why they go for homes with
concealed telephone wiring.
Concealed wiring puts outlets throughout the
house wherever they'll be handiest for
present and future use. Makes relocating
phones easier ... provides ready
connections for additional extensions.
No need for extra wiring. No wires to
mar walls and woodwork.
Put concealed wiring to work helping you
sell your homes. Just call your telephone
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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AUGUST, 1962


AS USUAL THERE IS SOMETHING EXCITINGLY NEW in the use of con-
crete in architecture . precast white concrete structural members.
Here, for example, are giant precast concrete crosses made with
Trinity White portland cement and white quartz aggregate. More
than 250 of these crosses form the exterior structural frame on all
four sides of this seven-story building. They are decorative in ap-
pearance and functional both as sun shades and structural support.
The crosses are temporarily braced in position and become inte-
grated into the structure as the concrete floors are poured, which
operation fills a groove in the spandrel beam of the cross.







The Challenge of Ugliness


Excerpts from an address by AUGUST HECKSCHER,
Special White House Consultant on The Arts, at The
First Conference on Esthetic Responsibility, New


York City, April, 1962.

In the past history of this country,
the outward pattern of things has, to
an extraordinary degree, been left to
chance-to the haphazard actions of
special interests and groups. Some-
times it has seemed that as a nation
we simply did not concern ourselves
with the face of the land. The Amer-
ican continent was so huge, its re-
sources of land and forests and water so
unbounded, that though men chopped
away at them with only their own
interests in mind we trusted that the
great bulk of things would remain un-
spoiled. Sometimes we have assumed
that private interests working compe-
titively would create their own kind
of fitness.
In strange ways this has often hap-
pened. The farming landscape, wheth-
er tightly knit in New England or
spread across the mid-western miles,


has its peculiar beauty. The New York
skyline reveals a spirit that no sculp-
ture could have matched. But there
are limits beyond which this faith in
automatic artistry cannot be pushed.
Where these limits are passed over, as
in the sprawling roadside slum or the
monotonous housing developments,
the results have often been appalling.
And the public has appeared to stand
by helplessly.
Public agencies undertaking to mold
the landscape or drastically alter the
environment have most frequently
acted with a single interest in mind-
to speed up traffic, to stop floods, to
put roofs over needy people. All these
separate things may be to the good.
But the fact that these interventions
were the work of lonely enthusiasts,
or of bureaucratic experts, suggests
that something has been amiss. Where


was that sense of the whole which
alone can give beauty and meaning to
what men accomplish by their com-
mon toil?
When we look about us at the en-
vironment today, we are struck by the
degree to which it is subject to human
designs. No part of it is safe from the
bulldozer, from the land speculator,
from the engineer and road-builder.
When Theodore Roosevelt and Gov-
ernor Pinchot started the conserva-
tion movement in 1908, their problem
was essentially that of preserving a
few key areas, or of instituting prac-
tices which allowed natural resources
to endure and to reproduce them-
selves. Since then, the power of man
over nature has increased enormously.
The great advances in human organi-
zation, in science and technology,
have literally put into our hands the
fate of a vast continental expanse.
What we do with it is for us to
decide. The forests that sheltered our
grandfathers we now shelter and pre-
serve. The land that kept them is now
in our keeping. We possess the earth
as in no sense could it have been said
of any previous generation.
Alas, what we do with it is often
discouraging enough. The natural


RESIDENTIAL


INTERIORS



Modern or traditional . .
a pleased client is assured
when architecture is enhanced
with a gracious interior.



Architect: Polevitzky-Johnson & Assoc.
Contractor: Feldman Building Co.
Interior Designer: Richard Plumer-Miami



RICHARD PLMIER


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





scenery may survive in its grander as-
pects; the great parks and monuments
have been preserved and are appreci-
ated yearly by increasing numbers of
citizens. Elsewhere, however, the rash
of cities spreads ominously from what
were once tight and focused settle-
ments; the roads bring their burden
of stretched-out, undefined structures
and habitations. These suburbs are
strip cities, seen from within, bear out
the disturbing impression gained from
the sky: too often they are difile-
ments of the natural scene, wasteful
desecrators of what have been free
space and green land.


On sentimental journeys, on cam-
paigns and outings of a summer sea-
son, the Americans show themselves
still affectingly aware of the values
implicit in a noble environment. If
only they could heed as attentively
the landscape which surrounds them
through the rest of the year! It is one
thing, they seem to feel, to retreat
into the silence and loneliness of a
forest (at least as much silence and
loneliness as their ever-increasing
numbers afford)-but another thing
to expect beauty or fitness in their


everyday surroundings. They want a
national park 3,000 miles away; they
do not seem to care or to care
enough-if there is no park to which
they can motor on a Sunday, or one
to which they can walk in their lunch
hour. They want the wilderness to be
forever wild; but they seem unheed-
ing if the roadsides are forever clut-
tered with billboards.
Judged by the apaprent attitude of
too many present-day Americans,
there is doubt whether we shall ever
be able to extricate ourselves from a
descending spiral of ugliness and irra-
tionality. What is required is readi-
ness to undertake on a large scale the
kind of public works which are truly
public-in the sense that they serve
the highest interests of the citizenry;
and truly works-in the sense that
they are made to endure and to be
judged by future generations. Yet it is
this kind of undertaking for which it
is often most difficult to muster sup-
port among the people. No foreign
threat is so intangible but it can evoke
a readiness to sacrifice and even a
positive enthusiasm for the ordeal.
No project, however costly or tenuous
its returns, will be seriously chal-
lenged by the public if it can be


shown that undertaking it will in-
crease of material power. But if it is
proposed that something be done by
the people for their own delight and
for the enchantment of their common
life, a dead silence ensues. If someone
suggests elegance in a public building,
the matter is hushed up as if it were
a scandal.
We have been prepared to call on
the best architects in the country
when it has been a matter of building
abroad. The embassies and consulates
that have been constructed in various
countries over the past decade remind
us what the United States can do-
and what government can do-when
it sets beauty and excellence as a
goal. The cultural center built by the
nation for the people of West Berlin
shows that we are not unmindful of
the value of a setting in which great
events can be fittingly held. At home,
however, the story is different. We
still wait to see accomplished a na-
tional cultural center in Washington.
We might well feel impelled to ask,
in regard to our own public buildings,
whether we consider ourselves to be
so backward or uncivilized that we
cannot enjoy the kind of beauty which
we prepare for others.


AND


B U S I


NESS


INTERIORS


Another success story in ...
providing architects and
their clients with
distinctive interiors.. r


Architect: Harry MacEwen, A. I.A.
Contractor: Frank J. Rooney, Inc.
interior Design: Richard Plumer
Business Interiors, Inc.

RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORS







155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775


AUGUST, 1962






News & Notes


1962 Convention Plans
Are Now Taking Shape
The 1962 Convention Committee
of the Florida Central Chapter, chair-
manned by DANA B. JOHANNES of
Clearwater is now concerned with the
problem of filling out its speaker
roster for a program themed as the
"Anatomy of Architecture." Thus far
the Committee has declined to an-
nounce the panel of experts which
will be on hand to explore the theme
when the Convention opens at the
Soreno Hotel in St. Petersburg on
November 8.
In the meantime other phase of
Convention activity are being worked
out by committees headed by the
following chairmen: Architectural Ex-
hibits, FRANK R. MUDANO; Arrange-
nients, I. BLOUNT WAGNER; Awards
and Prizes, RoY M. HENDERSON; En-
tertainment, FRANK E. McLANE; Hos-
pitality, H. LESLIE WALKER; Program,
MARK G. HAMPTON; Product Exhibit,
HORACE H. HAMLIN, JR.; Public Rela-
tions, HARRY A. McEwEN; Registra-
tion, ELLIOTT B. HADLEY; Student
Activities, A. WYNN HOWELL; Fi-
nance, JACK MCCANDLESS, MRS. ED-
MOND N. MCCOLLIN will be in charge
of the Women's Events.


Cornwell Appointed As
Supervising Architect for
New H&R Commission Dist.
NAT S. CORNWELL, of Fort Myers,
has been appointed Supervising Arch-
itect for the Hotel and Restaurant
Commission's newly designated
"Southwest" architectural district,
according to a recent announcement
by Commissioner ROBERT A. REIDEL.
He is a partner in the Fort Meyers
firm of Cornwell and Stroud, archi-
tects, is a graduate of Clemson Col-
lege and a member of the Building
Code Appeals Board of Fort Meyers.
The newly formed district comprises
Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry
and Lee counties. These were form-
crly combined in one district with
Citrus, Hardee, Hernando, Highlands,
Hillsborough, Pasco and Polk coun-
ties which have now been redesig-
nated as the "West Central District."
The Commissioner's announcement
said the new district had been created


to keep pace with the "hospitality
industry's" building program in the
western section of the state.
Florida law requires that all plans
and specifications for new public
lodging and food service establish-
ments be submitted to the Commis-
sion's architects for approval before a
building permit is issued. The archi-
tect serves as a deputy of the Hotel
and Restaurant Commission and is
authorized to handle all matters per-
taining to the inspection of plans and
specifications, the issuance of build-
ing permits and the inspection of
construction.

Small Office P/R . .
Recently the AIA issued an attrac-
tive eight-page booklet on Public
Relations for the small architectural
office. If your office is small and you
have not read the booklet, better do
so soon. It contains a lot of sound,
practical information on what to do
and-just as important-how to do it.
A small-office P/R program is some-
thing like the weather everybody
talks about it, but few people actually
do much about it. Those that do find
it pays. This booklet won't turn an
architect into a top-notch P/R man.
But it will help the small-office archi-
tect to analyze his own P/R needs,
which is the first sound step toward
an effective program. After that's done


there are several ways to project the
"image" of your office and profes-
sional activities.

Trade Association Mulls
Over New Design Award
Program for Architects
An annual design award program
centering around the "most imagina-
tive" use of various concrete products
is now under active consideration by
the Florida Concrete and Products
Association, Inc., headquarters of
which are in Winter Park. As now
proposed, the program would involve
design submissions by architects. On
the basis of a jury selection, a sub-
stantial prize would be given to the
premiated entry. The award program
would be open to all practicing mem-
bers of the FAA and would hopefully
coincide with the FAA's annual con-
vention.
As now contemplated, architects
would be invited to submit examples
of their finished work in photographic
form supported with some description
of the design purpose and construc-
tion technique involved. Work would
cover use of poured concrete and vari-
ous types of concert products, either
separately or in combination.
Full details have not as yet been
worked out. Though initiative for
(Continued on Page 29)


Gold Dome for Riviera Beach...

,1/



A gold anodized alumi-
num geodisic dome crowns '
the new home of the t,..
First Methodist Church '
in Riviera Beach. It's said
to be the first application
of the structural form for
a church facility. Charles
F. McKirahan &Associates -
were architects for the .-
new building. The dome
spans 85 feet and covers
6,300 sq. ft. of floor *
space.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








7fhp be't jildoa ari- more exciting
I 1~concret~e


An if ,'|/,-


_______________


Architects: Ladd & Kelsey, Pasadena, Calif. Structural Engineer: R. R. Bradshaw, Van Nuys, Calif. General Contractor: Encino Construction Inc., Encino, Calif.


Gull-winged roof of concrete fits

a restaurant to its seaside setting

B J Restless blue water, white sails, sleek hulls! Add to this scene on California's
i Newport Bay the strikingly designed Stuft Shirt Restaurant. The building is
41 concrete throughout. Thirty-six domes of thin-shell concrete form the roof, with
7 L cantilevered half-domes on the perimeter creating the feeling of winged grace.
Concrete quatrefoil arches atop the 50 supporting columns rising from
the water effect added beauty-inside as well as out.
En kToday, the versatility of modern concrete is being recognized by more and
Elegance keynotes the Stuft Shirt's
long, vaulted dining room. The 71' more architects seeking to broaden their design explorations.
x 146' building perches 16' above
water. Docking facilities below.
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION 1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
AUGUST, 1962 2


I J.















Problems Eliminated
When you use


PRESTRESSED


CONCRETE


Teredo worms, barnacles, salt water and other rot- I
causing threats to piling have met their match in pre-
stressed concrete piles. These piles won't rot or
corrode . periodic maintenance, replacement or
repair is eliminated. Prestressed concrete piles have '
exceptional strength to withstand severe driving forces -
and to resist lateral buckling. Due to their load-carry-
ing capacities it is often possible to reduce the num-
ber of piles required in comparison to conventional
types and save on materials. The clean, slim lines, the
availability of standardized sections produced to SRD
designs, and the ease of handling, are other reasons
why prestressed concrete piling is being specified for
bridges, overpasses, piers, docks and structural foun-
dations.




MEMBERS
Capitol Prestress Co., Jacksonville Pre-Cast Corp., Miami
Dura-Stress, Inc., Leesburg Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Lakeland
Florida Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Tampa Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc.,
Houdaille-Duval, Inc., Jacksonville Panama City
Juno Prestressors, Inc., West Palm Beach Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Pensacola
Meekins-Bamman Precast Corp., Hallandale West Coast Shell Corp., Sarasota
Perma-Stress, Inc., Holly Hill R. H. Wright, Inc., Fort Lauderdale

florida prestressed concrete assn.
P.O. BOX 4006 FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA
HAPTER Buy prestressed concrete . . the building material
produced in Florida by Florida businessmen such as you.


?R THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 26)
conducting the program would spring
from the FCPA, active cooperation
on the part of the FAA would appear
necessary according to association
spokesmen. Further information on
the contemplated program will be
made available as soon as the program
has been completely mapped and ap-
proved by both organizations.

Changes . .
HARRY E. PENNY has established a
new office in the recently-completed
South Miami Federal Savings and
Loan Association Building for which
he was the architect. His new address
is Suite 301, 6075 Sunset Drive,
South Miami.
ROBERT WV. ENING, JR., has moved
to a new office at 321 N. Lake Blvd.,
Suite 203, North Palm Beach. Phone
is VI 4-6677.
WILLIAM RILLON UPTHEGORVE has
a new office location at 230 Royal
Palm Way, Room 311, Palm Beach.
The new phone ise 832-7714.
ALLEN E. ARTHUR, JR., architect,
WILLIAM A. Cox, architect, and ROB-
ERT REICHE have announced the
opening of a new office location at
305 North Fern Creek Avenue, Or-
lando. The phone is CH 1-1181.
STEPHEN CURTIS LITTLE, AIA, has
opened his own office for the practice
of architecture at 180 S. W. 13th
Street, Miami. The phone is FR
1-4760.
DAN C. DUCKHAM, AIA, has moved
to a new headquarters in his own
studio office building located at 3197
N. E. 18th Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale.
His new phone is LO 4-5730.



Significant Quotes . .
"Might I suggest to you architects
that you survey the empty buildings
in your own downtown areas? . .
Who, better than the architect, is
qualified to pass on whether an edifice
has outlived all its useful capabilities?
Some one of your number probably
designed it years ago for a purpose
which it has served long and well.
Isn't it possible that another of your
number has the imagination to envis-
ion another use for it which would be
(Continued on Page 30)
AUGUST, 1962


Here's A Panel

That Captures

All Tlhe Beauty

WXood Can Offer...


Uhr.zc'OD


A_ an. interior feature wall, this
Serlic-allv patternedI redwood plywood
.IlI- draniatic \igor and beauty to
aiiny room.

.A exterior -iding. Rusticwood's
narrow erlical liin-. serve as an
aitractlive c aonhterialance to the long,
1(\i, line. of contemporary architecture.

For lull details. cull or write today.


1
I






IhRANSEYI
1 CE~RTIFIEw
QWQUAUTV '
PRODUCTS





















































A new, dynamic industrial Florida blooms into maturity as
hundreds of industries seek the natural advantages of the state.
Already built into the framework of the new Florida is more
than a million tons of Florida Steel structural steel, rein-
forcing steel, special fabrications.
Always specify Florida Steel, the only reinforcing steel
manufactured in Florida a limitless source of quality-con-
trolled steel right at your finger-tips.


You build a better Florida
when you build
with Florida products.

TAMPA ORLANDO MIAMI
JACKSONVILLE FT. MYERS
WEST PALM BEACH


Significant Quotes...
(Continued from Page 29)
compatible to whatever changes might
have occurred in living patterns which
have rendered it not dead but dor-
mant?
"Must you delegate this function
to the interior decorator, the engineer,
or the planner who decrees demo-
lition with a wave of his mighty arm?
I do not think so. I charge you that
you are overlooking one of the respon-
sibilities of your profession if you do
not take steps to obliterate massive
waste of structural utility.
"Show me the owner who would
not welcome a plan for restoring the
vitality of an idle building from an
architect, and I will show you a fool-
ish person."

"If slum clearance is a must for ur-
ban living, then urban renewal is a
must. Urbal renewal alone is not the
ultimate therapy for slums. Urban re-
newal should be used primarily as an
inertia dispeller. Momentum could
find a source of power in pride, civic
loyalty, encouragement of private ini-
tiative, and presentation of a wide
freedom of choice.
"Are slums the product of an en-
vironment, or is the environment the
product of the slums? Urban renewal
can cover some of the blemishes on
the municipal corporate face, but will
fall far short of the goal if we permit
unhealthy conditions to cause acne to
erupt elsewhere. Urban renewal-not
urban destruction-is the aim; and
the bulldozer is not the only instru-
ment available to accomplish it . ."
-HON. BEN WEST, Mayor of Nash-
ville, Tenn., 1962 AIA Convention.



Solar Shading ...
(Continued from Page 22)
If used, they should be of a light
color. What applied to venetian
blinds and drapes would apply to
awnings. The material used should
have a high reflectivity. If possible
awnings should not have closed sides
and should be vented at the high
point to enable trapped hot air to
escape.

Koolshade Type Screeening: Kool-
shade type of insect screening can be
considered a legitimate solar screen.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION


"Stel Uie o"





It will give a degree of efficiency
when the sun is relatively high in
profile angle. When the sun angle
is less than 400, precautions should
be taken to be sure the screen will
block the sun. It can be used well for
remedial work on existing buildings.
On high rise buildings it presents a
cleaning problem and some solution
to this should be considered. The
screening to be effective should be on
the exterior of the building, with a
maximum air space between the screen
and the window.

Acrylic Plastic Shades: Acrylic plas-
tics such as "Plexiglas" should be
given serious consideration for forming
into vertical louvers, horizontal sun
shades and transparent heat shields.
The darker plastics made by Rohm
& Haas have a transmission of solar
energy as low as 25 percent and yet
provide some degree of "look-out."
Others vary from that figure to 86
percent. The colors available offer
another dimension in design for the
architect to investigate. Lower install-
ation costs and additional breakage
resistance are "plus" features of this
material.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 8
Coral Gables Glass &
Mirror, Inc. . .. 20
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 6
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 20
Florida Home Heating Institute 32
Florida Natural Gas Assn. . 21
Florida Power &
Light Co. . 3rd Cover
Florida Prestressed
Concrete Assn. . . 28
Florida Steel Corp . .. 30
Florida Terrazzo Assn. . 1 1
General Portland Cement Co. 23
Hillyard Sales Co. . . 4
Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co. . . 7
Miami Window Corp. . 1
Richard Plumer . 24-25
Portland Cement Assn. . 27
Prescolite . . 4
A. H. Ramsey &
Sons, Inc . . .. 29
Southern Bell Tel. &
Tel. Co. . . 22
Thompson Door Co. 3
Vogue Industries, Inc. 6
F. Graham Williams Co 31

AUGUST, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" AND ALUMINUM

PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

JAMES C. ("Jamie") GILLESPIE

115 Orangeview Avenue


Clearwater, Florida


Telephone: 446-7271






WEhh, mR. ARCHITECT: WUH NHOT?
Why not beat the heat and kill the chill with the year 'round com-
fort combination proved best and by far most economical for Florida
homes? Through our ads like the one below, your prospective clients
have been informed about central oil heating and electric air condi-
tioning. This money-saving home comfort team will win their
approval on the blueprints and through the years.


r


Electric air conditioning is probably the
greatest man-made blessing ever bestowed
on Florida. Every home needs it every
summer . needs the crisp, cool, dry
indoor weather it provides. Your home
needs it now.
But why not beat the heat and kill the
chill while you're at it? Why not arrange


for perfect indoor climate all 12 months?
How to do it and save money? Choose
one of the super-economical combinations
of electric air conditioning and oil home
heating. They work for pennies an hour.
Why not install them now and give
your family 365 "nicest days of the year"
.. every year!


INSTALL YEAR 'ROUND HOME COMFORT...COSTS SO LITTLE...WORTH SO MUCH!

FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N.W. 7th Street, Miami, Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


F JU


SEPT I


--^^ &:-_,


0 7-7
CT NOV DEC








THE STORY OF TEN LITTLE FREE WORKERS


REDDY KILOWATT.


MINER STEELWORKER FARMER LAWYER


Ten little free workers in this country fine and fair.
But if you cherish your freedom-worker have a care!
Ten little free workers-Reddy was doing fine
Until the socialists got him-then there were nine.


Nine little free workers laughed at Reddy's fate
Along came federal medicine-then there were eight.


Eight little free workers thought this country heaven
But the government took over the railroads, then there were


Seven little free workers-'till the miners got in a fix.
Uncle said coal's essential and took over leaving six.


Six little free workers 'till the day did arrive
The steel mills too were federalized-then there were five.


Five little free workers-but the farmers are free no more
The farms have been collectivized-that leaves only four.


Four little free workers till the government did decree
All must have free legal advice-then there were three.


Three little free workers-the number is getting few,
But with government groceries selling food-then there were

Two little free workers-our story's almost done,
With clerks at work in federal stores-that leaves only one.


GROCER SALESCLERK R

4j-.\


REPORTER

I


seven.


two.


One little free worker-the reporter son-of-a-gun
Mustn't criticize the government-so now there are none.




Ten little free workers-but they are no longer free
They work when and where ordered, and at a fixed rate you see,
And it 'all could have been prevented if they'd only seen fit to agree
And work together instead of saying "it never can happen to me!"
Yes... this could happen to you. This little story could come true unless each of us works to preserve
free enterprise. What can you do? Write your Congressman and ask him to keep government out
of business. Copyright 1961

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA_


1


<
(










On Tampa Bay...


It's St. Petersburg in 1962 . and the

Convention's Host will be the Florida Central

Chapter- whose red-coated hospitality in 1957

sparked a memorable meeting and established

an attractive and unique new FAA tradition . .


.M - '
R. RM
pn.


b
nu, Li
4 N


IT 4-' -' ._ '* -' *


Headquarters of the FAA's 1962 Convention will be the Soreno
Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!


IUAL FAA CONVENTION

1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG


I'i'i


LAY


1'


I _1WW




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