• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 F/A panorama
 Table of Contents
 New hotel for San Juan
 The architect as the entrepren...
 The convention at a glance
 The Coral Gables Youth Center
 Solar effects on building...
 Significant quotes
 Advertisers' index
 The task ahead
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00096
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: June 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00096
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    F/A panorama
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    New hotel for San Juan
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The architect as the entrepreneur
        Page 9
    The convention at a glance
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The Coral Gables Youth Center
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Solar effects on building design
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Significant quotes
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The task ahead
        Page 29
    Back Cover
        Page 30
Full Text

W A A Flor


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited- permission-to. digitize- and. make-this. electronic-
version- available- has- been- granted- by-the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of- F lori da.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on- of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed- to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association's-web site.




The June, 1962

FLORIDA ARCHITECT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.




S i .


% a b







F/A Panorama...

DATA AT YOUR FINGER TIPS ...
If you haven't yet ordered your copy of the AIA'S 1962 edition of "Building
Products Register", you'd better hurry.Of 5,000 copies printed more than half
have already been sold; and at the reduced price to architects ($15 instead of
$25) the remainder won't be long on the shelves . The 1962 edition contains
almost twice as much data on standards and specifications than did the original
1960 edition. Comparative data on 1700 individual products in 24 product
categories are included, and in addition 1200 abstracts of technical standards
and specifications.

THERE'S A WELCOME WAITING AT SEATTLE ...
President Hugo W. Osterman of the Seattle Chapter, AIA, has issued a blanket
invitation to Florida architects attending the 1962 World's Fair to visit the Chap-
ter Hospitality and Information Center at the Fair site or contact the Chapter
office, 810 Central Building, MA 2-4938. Members will help you out with infor-
mation and furnish you with a guide to points of architectural interest.
COMPUTER DESIGN HAS ARRIVED ...
A Chicago firm Meissner Engineers, Inc., recently demonstrated the amaz-
ing capabilities of a computer-plotter system which can automatically design a
wide range of engineering and architectural projects directly from information
fed to it. The firm's president predicted that shortly 80 percent of all engineer-
ing design work could be done by the new system in a fraction of the time now
needed. In the demonstration, the system completed designs within 30 sec-
onds; and within 30 minutes delivered completely dimensioned erection draw-
ings and a complete set of shop fabrication details. The machines made designs
for various types of structural frames and in half a minute accomplished what
would otherwise have required 10 hours of engineering time.
BOARD MEETING AND SEMINAR . .
The FAA Board of Directors has scheduled a meeting for July 20 in the St. Pet-
ersburg area. Following this meeting the FAA Public Relations Committee will
conduct a P/R Seminar chairmanned by Edward G. Grafton. Specific location
for both meetings will be announced next month.
NEW SPECIFICATIONS FOR ALUMINUM PRODUCTS ...
The newly formed Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association, with
headquarters in Chicago, has issued the industry's first comprehensive specifi-
cation for sliding doors. The 16-page booklet includes a section on general
requirements applicable to all aluminum doors. Section two covers specific
requirements applicable to various particular types of doors. The third section
contains design information and specifications for doors that must withstand
hurricane conditions of unusually high wind loading . The Association has
also issued a revised and upgraded specification covering all types of
aluminum windows. Performance requirements under water tests have been
specified and include all types of windows.
THEME SET FOR 1962 FAA CONVENTION ...
Chairman of the Convention Committee of the Florida Central Chapter, Dana B.
Johannes, has announced the theme of the 1962 FAA meeting for which the
Chapter will act as hosts. It is to be "ANATOMY OF ARCHITECTURE". A pro-
gram for development of the theme is now being put together by Program
Chairman Mark G. Hampton.




















































THE SYMBOL OF
EXCELLENCE







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


I 7T he -Is --


F/A Panorama . . . . .

New Hotel For San Juan . . .

The Architect as The Entrepreneur .
By William F. L. Pereira, FAIA

Henry Wright Takes The Reins . ..


The Convention at A Glance .


The Coral Gables Youth Center . . . .
Watson, Deutschman and Kruse, Architects


. 10


. 13


Solar Effects on Building Design . . . . . . . . 17
The BRI Spring Conference Report, Part I By John M. Evans, AIA

Significant Quotes . . . . . . . . . 26
Eero Saarinen, FAIA . Philip Will, FAIA . Charles R. Colbert, FAIA


Advertisers' Index .


. 27


. 3rd Cover


The Task Ahead . . . . . .
By Clinton Gamble, FAIA, Secretary, AIA


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.

Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER ...
This photograph, by Joseph Brignolo, pictures one of the most generally
successful buildings in Coral Gables. Successful it is as an architectural accom-
plishment but far beyond that in the guidance and fun it has given to
the community's children for which it was built. It's the Coral Gables Youth
Center; and more illustrations on it start on page 13.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 121962

NUMBER 6 I /

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. . 2nd Cover

















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4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


New Hotel
for San Juan
San Juan is now Puerto Rico's most
important tourist center as well as the
focus of most of the island's commer-
cial and industrial enterprises. To
serve the growing needs of this ba-
sidally old-world city, the H. R.
WEISSBERG CORPORATION is planning
- the construction of a new hotel.
Named the Ponce De Leon, the
400-room project is scheduled for.
completion next year. It is being de-
signed by the Miami firm of M.
TONY SHERMAN & ASSOCIATES; and
CAROL GERMAINE SHERMAN has ac-
cepted the responsibility for designing
the interiors. Site of the new hotel is
a craggy spit of land fronting on both
lagoon and ocean with a difference
of 28 feet between high and low
levels. Pictures here the upper
drawn from the ocean side -suggest
how the designers have taken full
advantage of the double waterfronts
and the differences in elevation. The
hotel will have complete recreational
facilities in addition to luxury hotel
accommodations.







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6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









TERRAZ


How Mu


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Throughout the state member firms of
the Florida Terrazzo Association are
ready to give you any information you
may need regarding the use of TERRAZZO
in any type of building. Their knowledge,
gained from many years of practical
experience, is yours for the asking . .
Call upon it. Use it freely. For in thus
serving you the Florida Terrazzo Associa-
tion membership can be of real help
in the development of higher quality and
more economical construction . .


FLORIDA TERRAZZO ASSOCIATION

AVERY ARENT, Acting Executive Secretary
P. 0. BOX 1879, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA TELEPHONE 446-8373


JUNE, 1962


41


--. -



ch Do Yo Kow About




















Any of the FTA officers listed here will be glad to
answer your questions on the use or technical aspects
of whatever terrazzo installations you may have
of terrazzo. In addition he will arrange for inspection
planned for. Feel free to write him . .ntenance

SEAL W. ADAMS, JR., President
700 N. W. Seventh Ave., Ft. Lauderale, Fla.
JA 2-3422
WILLIAM E. OWENS, Vice President
Box 508, New Smyrna Beach, Fla.
GA 8-9051
AVERY ARENT, Secretary-Treasurer
Box 1879, Clearwater, Fla.
446-8373
LOUIS FRANCESCON, Director, District 1
2500 S. W. 28th Lane, Miami, Fla.
HI 6-6037
CARL V. CESERY, Director, District 2
316 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, Fla.
EL 4-4604
ROLAND D. SAMUELS, Director, District 3
181 Atlantic Drive, Maitland, Fla.
TE 8-2061
HENRY C. GIGLIO, Director, District 4
3719 West Carmen, Tampa, Fla.
RE 6-1341
W. K. WEINHOLD, Director, District 5
2175 12th Street, Sarasota, Fla.
955-1525











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The Architect as The Entrepreneur



The address of a distinguished West Coast architect
during the second of four professional program sessions
contains sound commentary on the problems and possi-
bilities of the expanded service ideal . .


When I was asked to take part in
this panel, and speak on the subject,
"The Architect and the Entrepren-
eur," the first thing I did was to reach
for the dictionary and look up "en-
trepreneur." (In our office we put
great faith in research.)
I discovered that the word comes
from the French, which was not an
overwhelming surprise. Literally I
guess it means the "in-between-taker."
Given just a little more English it
would become "enterpriser," which is
probably as good a definition as any.
Webster says an entrepreneur is "one
who assumes the risk and manage-
ment of business." The Encyclopedia
Brittanica goes a little further. Ac-
cording to it, the entrepreneur is "a
person who assembles the various
means of production and, by mob-
ilizing them, renders them operative


By WILLIAM L. PEREIRA, FAIA
Southern California Chapter


and useful. He is a promoter or initi-
ator of production."
That was as far as I got at the time.
For just then the telephone rang. It
was a friend who happened to own
a good bit of land in Southern Cali-
fornia and who had been approached
by an "entrepreneur" who claimed he
had a company interested in leasing
a facility on his property. Would I
talk to him, my friend asked, and see
what the story was?
I said yes, and immediately found
myself in the familiar round-robin of
conferences and telephone calls. The
promoter, at least in this case, was
serious. The prospective tenant was
interested in a lease, but first there


had to be a commitment from the
mortgage company, and for that there
must be plans. And before they can
be drawn up the architect must sit
down with the client, and then with
the lending institution and then if
it becomes a job-he goes back
through the whole circle again, inter-
preting everyone to everyone else.
Can you blame him if sometimes,
when nobody is watching, he stands
in front of his mirror and, paraphras-
ing Louis XIV, whispers, "L'entre-
preneur, c'est moi!" He, more than
anyone else, has "assembled the va-
rious means of production." He has
mobilized them, and rendered them
operative and useful. He is, in this
instance, the real enterpriser. He could
even be described as the "in-between-
taker" except that he is not taking
(Continued on Page 10)


Henry Wright Takes the Reins


Henry L. Wright, FAIA, of Los Angeles, who has
served for the past two years as first vice president, was
elected president of the AIA at the organization's 94th
annual convention at Dallas.Other new officers of the
Institute are: J. Roy Carroll, Jr., FAIA, of Philadelphia,
first vice president; Arthur G. Odell, Jr., FAIA, of
Carlotte, N. C., second vice president; and Clinton
Gamble, FAIA, of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, secretary.
Raymond S. Kastendieck, FAIA, of Gary, Indiana, was
re-elected as treasurer . In his acceptance speech the
new AIA president noted that in the next 40 years the
number of existing buildings will be doubled. "The
task," he said, "demands solutions of quality as well as
quantity; -and it is the responsibility of our profession
to provide them. The job we have to do as architects is
staggering. It cannot be calculated on a quantitative
basis alone."
JUNE, 1962


s..


Incoming prexy, HENRY L. WRIGHT, left,
and retiring president PHILIP WILL, JR.


*,, -"' '
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The Convention At A Glance


T he In-titut.' -tth .\nii u.,I C ..,iiA .it!...n i t D .illa, %1' .%,.11
attended. The official count was "more than 2300" and of
these the Florida Region accounted for 17. Not all chapters sent
delegates, but of those who did (Broward County, Florida Central,
Florida North, Florida Northwest, Florida South and Palm Beach)
Florida South was the most heavily represented six architects
including two of Florida's three new Fellows.
Reactions suggest that this was one of the "speechiest" annual
meetings ever. The four Professional Program Sessions accounted
for 11 more or less lengthy addresses excluding opening and
closing remarks by moderators. There were the inevitable talks at
luncheons and dinners; and even the business sessions were much
more vocal from both rostrum and floor than the majority of past
conventions.
In large part the discussions at the two business sessions were
the result of the issues at stake. There were two chief ones. The
first, considered at the Wednesday session, concerned the estab-
lishment of "affiliated organizations" which the AIA Journal
called "Councils". It was the subject of a lengthy and sometimes
heated debate; and the Board's proposal that the By-laws be
changed to permit formation and operation of such councils was
finally tabled by a vote of 475.67 to 464.93.
Defeat of the measure might well have resulted from a lack
of understanding among those who opposed it a lack that was
not mitigated by the floor presentation of its proponents. Basically
the idea seemed good to many a practical means by which
Architects could promote overall professional and technical capa-
hilities in certain specific fields of building technology and pro-
f,.-sional practice. But implications of "the favored few", "splinter
groups and "big-office specialists" were spotlighted early in the
dUkbate; and with the main purpose of the proposal inadequately
presented and obscured by misundertsanding, its proponents could
n.'t muster sufficient strength for its passage.
The proposal that after 1963 the Institute's first vice president
automaticallyy succeed to the presidency passed handily. In effect
this gives the Institute a president and a president-elect an
.iiangement that has proved both effective and efficient in other
professional organizations; and which, in addition, limits the term
,4 president to a single year. Similarly, the convention put debt-
,Ilinquent members on notice of suspension or termination after
3 50-day chance to achieve "good standing" through payment.
The second important proposal failed of adoption due to
lack of a quorum-for-action at the final business session on Friday.
Ir concerned the general subject of "headquarters expansion" and
involved the construction via a design competition and
financing of a new and larger building for the Institute's operating
,taff. Here the debate was vigorous but abortive. A total of 742
'' tes were required to pass the measure. Attendance at the meeting
, .is but 710. Of these, however, 669 voted "yes"; and presumably
this is an indication that the proposal will be approved at the
rcxt convention.
As usual, everybody seemed to be having a good time!


As Entrepreneur...
(Continued from Page 9)

anything cash or credit for his
entrepreneurial efforts.
And this is the paradox of our pro-
fession. The architect who by experi-
ence, training and natural inclination,
is in the most strategic position to cor-
relate and control the diverse forces
that create environment has had his
place usurped by an individual (or
group) whose livelihood derives from
the liquidation of land, rather than
its preservation, from the manipula-
tion of short-term assets rather than
the maintenance of lasting values.
This entrepreneur is generally a
man of considerable business acumen
who would have done well in any
commercial undertaking. But the at-
tractive economic climate created by
our tax structure and financing tech-
niques has drawn him irresistibly
instead into the field of land develop-
ment or, more precisely, land exploi-
tation. He is found most prevalently,
perhaps, in the tract housing field,
where a combination of architectural
gadgetry, gauranteed mortgages and
the promise of "cheaper than rent"
home ownership allows him to profit
on the increment of the land. His
houses are cheaper to buy than they
are to rent; and they are also, when
something goes wrong, cheaper to
walk away from than to hang on to.
Meanwhile the so-called entrepreneur
has taken his money and gone home,
leaving the seeds of blight to take root
behind him.
The story is much the same in the
commercial field, though the ingredi-
ents are slightly different. Here the
recipe calls for land on option, an
imposing professional document that
we know as schematics, an unprovable
cost, a sackful of prospective tenants,
an if and when mortgage commit-
ment, and an ephemeral equity that
remains poised on the project just long
enough to permit him to dissolve his
tentative ownership. Our cities and
suburbs are pockmarked with the by-
product of this witches' brew.
To this kind of entrepreneur the
architect is important not for the
real service he can render, but as a
lure to attract those who will assume
the risk the enterpreneur is reluctant
to accept himself. And it is curious:
the entrepreneurs have an almost
uncanny faculty for finding the right
architect the one who will render
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







At Dallas-The Florida Region Gained Three New Fellows


With traditional ceremony Chancellor Morris Ketchum Jr., FAIA, welcomed newly-elected members
to the AIA College of Fellows. Three from Florida were accorded the honor. Shown here receiving
the Chancellor's congratulations are, left to right, Herbert H. Johnson, FAIA, Florida South Chapter;
G. Clinton Gamble, FAIA, Broward County Chapter, and H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, Florida South Chapter.


just the services he wants for the fee
he is willing to pay.
Sometimes, of course, the project
has some reality. But more often than
not it has only questionable justifica-
tion; and the architect finds himself
developing the sketchiest kind of ma-
terial and permitting its unlimited
promotional use-for a deservedly pal-
try fee.
Often the architect rationalizes his
participation by telling himself that
when the project is financed he will
be able to study it properly and give
it the research and planning and
thought it needs. But the process of
creation cannot be reversed this way.
The germinal idea, good or bad, has
been planted and what evolves from
it can be pruned, perhaps, but never
basically altered.
Of course not all entrepreneurs fit
this description. Many of them are
men of imagination and good will,
who are sincerely anxious to see the
best job done. But there is one thing
that even the best-intentioned entre-
preneur is not equipped to provide,
and that is continuity of leadership.
In the lineage of all great projects
there has almost always been an entity
that furnishes this continuous direc-
tion-whether it has been the popes
of the Renaissance, the regents of a
university, the stockholders of a cor-
poration, or even an individual owner.
When and where this leadership ex-
ists, the various elements that must be
united in a project the landowner,
JUNE, 1962


the architect, the builder, the lending
institution-are given ar collective force
and effectiveness frequently greater
than the sum of their parts.
Where such leadership does not
exist, the competent entrepreneur be-
comes an essential element-the cata-
lyst -in project development. He
deserves our help, our knowledge, and
our integrity no more, no less. But
what's more, the project deserves at
least the same. The architect still
bears the basic responsibility for auth-
ership and the ethical entrepreneur
will have it so. The professional lead-
ership is there and must be main-
tained.
When such leadership does not
exist, however, a vacuum is created
which the hit and run entrepreneur
often rushes in to fill. But the leader-
ship he offers is of only the most
desultory and limited kind. In fact, it
is usually only the illusion of leader-
ship, a mirage. Where, then, shall we
look for guidance? Who is going to
call the signals in this increasingly
complex game of "society-planning"?
I submit that it must be the archi-
tect. I have already mentioned that
many of us are already performing
many of the functions of the entre-
preneur, though not profiting particu-
larly thereby. We are agreed, I am
sure, that no one is better placed voca-
tionally to act as liaison among the
various agencies whose combined re-
sources are need to shape our brave
new world. What do we have to do


before we get our badge, the one that
says LEADER in letters big enough
for everyone to read including the
entrepreneur?
Firstly, we must look at ourselves-
at our own individual ability to be-
come both judge and jury of our own
competencies. We have agreed that
it almost always takes a good client
combined with a good architect to
make a good job. This means a high-
standard goal on the part of both.
The entrepreneur is not the goal-he
is the "midwife." The child is ours-
the goal is our responsibility.
So in the final analysis it matters
little whether the architect is at work
today on a project which has a con-
ventional or traditional origin, or one
in which the catalyst is an entrepre-
neur. The standards of performance
can and must be the same. Our op-
portunities are no more and no less.
To meet them, we have suggested to
ourselves the need for the expansion
of our services.
There are many ways to interpret
that magical phrase, "expanded serv-
ices." It can be equated with expanded
professional responsibility-an exten-
sion of the visible spectrum of archi-
tectural practice to include, at one
end, planning and at the other, inter-
ior design. It means taking a good
hard look at the services we already
offer, and making sure that they can-
not be improved, expanded in quality.
It may even mean finding someone
(Continued on Page 12)





























































R&dd square hanid,
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10 Na fra~hs, ratchesv=11
medns ofvgiass'sl~port. g
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~~eovnxd resed hotdsings;"

~W hte ,fo urfber informalionl.
PEOC13LITE MEG. dDRP.
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Introducing . .



of
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Manufacturers
of Fine

STAINED GLASS
Windows
o L D C R4







A1NC E *
COMPLETE ART SERVICE
Shown at:
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& MIRROR INC.
21 Almeria Avenue
Telephone HI 3-4643
GEORGE MELCHIORRE, Rep.


As Entrepreneur...
(Continued from Page 11)
else besides ourselves to perform the
service.
We like to compare ourselves to
doctors as a professional caste, and yet
we are reluctant to be specialists. An
obstetrician, confronted with a cardiac
patient, sends her to a heart man
without giving it a second thought.
And yet how many of us, offered a
job a school, a store, a factory -
that we know is not our forte and
that someone else could do far better
-how many of us, honestly, are going
to refer that job, to another office? In
our effort to be all things to all men
we run the risk of becoming profes-
sional amateurs. And by refusing to
relinquish the little authorities, we
compromise our claim to the larger
leadership.
As well as expanded responsibility,
expanded service demands expanded
knowledge. I know this sounds like
one of those vague, safe generalities
that find their way into speeches of
this kind, but I mean it in a very
practical and, yes, profitable sense.
What our growing, changing, con-
fused world wants of our profession,
and is willing to pay for, is knowledge
-knowledge of the forces that shape
our society and its environment, and
the ability to distill from this knowl-
edge physical solutions to the prob-
lems that beset us and the promises
that beckon to us. Call it master-plan-
ning in its broadest sense if you like,
but this is the manifest destiny of
architecture and where I firmly be-
lieve our future lies.
In my own experience, for instance,
one of our most important expanded
services is research. Our library is as
significant a center of operations as
our drafting room; and our director of
research enjoys equal status with my
partners. And when I speak of a li-
brary I do not mean just a repository
for Sweet's catalog and back issues of
the architectural magazines, but a
place where we can conserve and con-
sult source books in literature, geo-
graphy, history, philosophy.
Economics is another area where
the architect must be knowledgeable
if he is to expand his services. I do
not suggest he become a professional
economist he should not try to ap-
propriate the place of the expert-but
he must educate himself sufficiently
to be able to interpret to, and for, the
economist. Science is still another field


for study; if the architect is going to
practice effectively in the world of
today and tomorrow he must be
at least literate in the new technolog-
ies that will in large part determine
our way of life. And, as always, the
architect must know history and in-
form his design for the future with
his knowledge of the past.
We are prone to think of architec-
ture as a graphic art. Yet, in its true
dimension, the drawings we make are
only part of our professional responsi-
bility and really not the most impor-
tant part at all. We must spend as
much time at our desks as at our
drafting-boards, as much time reading
and writing as we do drawing, as
much time listening as we do talking,
if we are to fulfil our function as the
new entrepreneur of environment de-
sign.
We must acquire knowledge, re-
membering that its acquisition takes
time. At the moment our firm is plan-
ning a new campus for the University
of California. Only within the last few
weeks have we even begun to consider
the configuration of the buildings. Yet
my associates and I have been prepar-
ing ourselves for this project for al-
most ten years. During that time we
have studied universities, and how
they came to be, over the last two
thousand years. We have filled a dozen
volumes with our background studies.
We still feel we have much to learn.
Yet a few days ago an architect
friend telephoned me to say he had
a contract for a comparable project
and that he had 90 days to come up
with something. Could he look over
our stuff? I said yes, but I don't think
I was doing him or his client who-
ever it may be, a favor. In this case
a little knowledge is a very dangerous
thing indeed.
Francis Bacon claimed that he had
taken all knowledge to be his prov-
ince. I do not recommend this as a
panacea for our profession. But I do
suggest a broadening of professional
horizons as the best way to expand
our services and eventually our in-
comes. Whatever we call ourselves-
architects, planners, environmental
designers-our obligation and our op-
portunity is to provide leadership. If
we do not, someone else will. And
we will all find ourselves at future
conventions still trying to decide, in
panel discussions like this one, why
someone else is getting a bigger piece
of our birthday cake than we are.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















i ot-








: A *










The Coral Gables Youth Center


WATSON, DEUTSCHMAN and KRUSE
Architects

This is the type of building that is
encountered too seldom in most
American communities. It is the sort
of facility that is vitally needed in
crowded city areas and might well
be included as a necessity in a variety
of urban renewal plans. But its prac- -
tical popularity in the heart of one "'. iz
of Florida's most thriving and notable .
suburbs attest its value as a place where
juniors of both genders can gather to
play, to learn, to make friends. ...
Grown-ups promoted it, planned
it, operate it, supervise its use. But
it has been designed and built for
children. It has been scaled for chil-
dren; and it offers to them varied out-
lets for their energies and interests.
Because children use it, individu-
ally and in groups, it has become an
important center of activity to which
parents, too, are inevitably drawn. ." .
And thus it has brought a cooperative ic-. -.. .
richness to the adult community. ,
JUNE, 1962




















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The Youth Center is a have
age to the middle-teens. Or
less segregated according to .
and landscaping elements. B
here. Even the interior spaces
find a natural location in the
arated from quieter activities:
central concourse serving as e
type of facility of which any
proud. And it is the kind ol
practical civic service in deve














































Brignolo photos


.~ 2X







-w


20 0 00 40 o









for youngsters from the pre-school
oor recreation areas are more or
-interests by shrewd use of fences
there is no sense of confinement
e disposed so that organized games
;ym and patio; and these are sep-
ike reading and craft work by a
, access to all areas . This is the
immunity, large or small, could be
project that architects could be of
)ing.


tt .- ^ .A y s .' r" *v i






































A view of the service areas
and gymnasium from across
the apparatus area. At the
far left is the end of the
activity concourse with the
wood crafts, indoor games,
lounge and library areas
adjoining.


.. .


The activity concourse is pri-
marily an open, airy canopy-
or a sort of cool and shady
cloister-walk. This is a view
from entrance at the very
east end of the Center, with
the memorial court at the
left and the gym structure
behind it.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






7Te BRI Spring oneretce-Part /


Solar Effects on



Building Design



By JOHN M. EVANS, AIA


"We should think of a modern
building as a selective filter which
takes the load of natural environment
off man's body and frees his body for
social productivity." That is a quota-
tion from a speech by DR. HENRY L.
LOGAN, vice president in charge of
research for the Holophane Company,
that keynoted the BRI sessions on
Solar Effects in Relation to the De-
sign of Buildings. It made me realize
that we have reached the end of an
era-an era in which the architect's
intuition and limited experience con-
stituted the basis for his design de-
cisions. Whether he likes it or not,
the architect must now rely on the
researcher, the scientist and the in-
formed building product engineer to
provide him with information that
will enable him to design a good
building.
Most architects, I think, have been
dragged screaming into the twentieth
century. They are finally beginning to
realize that their clients do not expect
just a beautiful building. They expect
a building to have the characteristics
of permanence and function. They
expect the air conditioning to cool and
the heating to heat and the roof not
to leak-not to mention the curtain
walls. All this and heaven too!
The architect who thinks I'm over-
stating the problem might worry a
moment about a comment from one
of the seminar's panelists. It was his
opinion that technical people lose
about ten percent of their knowledge
each year because of obsolescence of
their training. After ten years we
might find ourselves back where we all
started. A modern corporation should
JUNE, 1962


During what have now become traditional Spring and Fall conferences, the
Building Research Institute makes noble attempts to untangle the skein of
American building research and design by exploring specific areas of interests
from a very broad viewpoint. The Conferences draw together three groups: the
Product Engineer, the Research Technician, the Architect and Engineer. The
amalgum of their two days' efforts is the base material from which, more and
more, we will be drawing our building products research and techniques. Infor-
mation in the full and published proceedings of the Conferences will, in all
probability, work increasing changes in our drafting room practice. With a little
luck it may even permit us finally to design buildings with which the cilents are
pleased and the users contented!
Last month the BRI 1962 Spring Conference was held in Washington,
D.C., its two-fold subject being "Solar Effects in Relation to the Design of
Buildings" and "New Joint Sealants: Criteria, Design and Materials." The
program on each subject covered a tightly-organized period of two days. Unfor-
tunately the programs were run concurrently, so that those attending that con-
cerned with solar effects had necessarily to forego even a cursory coverage of
joint sealants.
One of the attendants at the solar effects seminar was JOHN M. EVANS, AIA
of Fort Lauderdale. At the Editor's request, he served as an observer for The
Florida Architect. He generously consented to report the four-session meeting.
This is the first of two articles on a subject of first importance to Floridians-
not only to the professionals who design buildings, but as well to all those who
use buildings and rightfully demand the high standards of living comfort and
convenience which our expanding technology is making available in ever-increas-
ing degree.


spend about ten percent of its income
for research; and, placed in slightly
different terms, an architect should
spend ten percent of his time each
year for basic research. And this means
more than thumbing through a trade
journal. Unless the architect really
keeps up with his private research
program, he might become so obso-
lescent that he could become extinct.
Adaptation to changing conditions is


a fundamental law of nature-and it
behooves every architect to remember
this.
In most conferences it is hard to
say which is more important-what
you hear during the official proceed-
ings, or the comments that follow
during bull-sessions or over martinis
at the end of the day's session. I
appreciated the frankness of the engi-
(Continued on Page 18)






BRI Conference . .
(Continued from Page 17)
neers of large corporations who could
comment bluntly on the virtues and
vices of their respective products-a
frankness which could well be adopted
by lesser-fry salesmen who, either in
enthusiasm or ignorance, fail to spell
out the limitations of their products.
If you are struck by the selection of
the Solar Effect theme for upper lati-
tude building specialists, you must
consider that the problem of solar in-
trusion is as germane to New York
during the summer months as it is in
Florida ten months a year. Our 1960
Convention in Hollywood dwelt at
length on the theme of "Man, Cli-
mate and the Architect"; and the BRI
in Washington further explored the
problem of solar heat gain through
glass areas. Since this solar heat repre-
sents close to 25 percent of the air
conditioning load, considerable cost
factors are involved here.
As a graphic illustration of these
DR. BENJAMIN Y. H. Liu, of the Uni-
veresity of Minnesota, presented a
paper which included some startling
statistics. In an experimental house at
the University electrical heating de-


mands virtually ceased during the
sunny January days when the temp-
erature was 18F on the outside. Of
course, this house had a proper south-
ern orientation and was well insul-
ated; but it is a vivid illustration of
the importance of solar heat gain.
The problem of heat gain in a high
rise building which has as a minimum
55 percent glass and a maximum of
85 percent glass is not a minor one;
and the proper design of sun shades
(The Florida Architect, July, 1960)
is not one that should be approached
lightly. One of the panelists, MR.
VINCENT G. KLING, FAIA, had strong
criticisms of the "fish bowl" style of
architecture and predicted its decline.
I wish all architects could have heard
Mr. Kling's excellent description of
designing technique for sun shades
and openings on his buildings. Elab-


Figure One. Comparative
data on the solar radia-
tion characteristics of
some typical glass
products.


orate full size mock ups are con-
structed, complete rooms built with
typical furniture layouts, and heat gain
is measured before final drawings are
done.
In a former article (The Florida
Architect, July, 1960) I made some
comment on heat absorbing glass.
Now I hope to be permitted some
second thoughts on the subject. For
the spectrum of glass products, includ-
ing heat absorbing glass, laminated re-
flecting glass and new refractory glass,
needs some clarification as results
come in from years of experimenta-
tation and usage.
Figure One gives total solar radia-
tion passed to the interior of some
typical glass products. The pigmented
glass products offer a halfway solution
to solar intrusion. They have, by their
(Continued on Page 22)


G L & [DATA
TYPE OF CI.AJI 70OrL QAD1ATIiL*CO1s-r/f/5.F



PEPFLECTIVE -LAS5 15% Zo o t 4-G~.0

* N OT INCLUDINa I R TA LL A.T V >


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Today's Knowing Buyers

Look for Homes with

CONCEALED


Telephone Wiring

Today's quality-conscious homebuyers
demand more and more convenience features
for their money.
That's why they go for homes with
concealed telephone wiring.
Concealed wiring puts outlets throughout the
house wherever they'll be handiest for
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No need for extra wiring. No wires to
mar walls and woodwork.
Put concealed wiring to work helping you
sell your homes. Just call your telephone
business office.

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... Awwlqwdk 4f6 Fut,


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













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General Engineering Building, University of Washington, Seattle,
and reflection mirrored in Frosh Pond.

Precast Concrete Curtain Walls and Column Covers-The
problem here was to design a building in harmony with
the Tudor Gothic of the upper campus. q Precast con-
crete curtain walls made with Trinity White portland
cement were selected. q The fins are white cement and
quartz; the interior of the diamond is white cement and
very coarse aggregate mixed with orange-colored crushed
glass; the column covers and end walls are coarse
aggregate with the matrix tinted slightly to a tan.
4 Precast exposed aggregate concrete (Mo-Sai) by
Olympian Stone Company. Wick Construction Com-
pany, General Contractors. Harmon, Pray & Detrich,
Architects.


TRINITY WHITE IS A PRODUCT OF GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


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JUNE, 1962


...where
Portland Cement Concrete
must be beautiful
USE


_-W
'A ow IN
0AZ





.7 ~ ~


-~ .. ~ W


Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, Calif. Architect: Edward D. Stone, New York. Structural Engineers: Pregnoff & Matheu, San Francisco, Calif.



Decorative patterns in concrete

give unity and beauty to new medical center!



Hospital, clinic, school, research laboratory-the many activities of the new Stanford Medical Center
require 7 separate buildings. To bring this complex into one harmonious whole, ingenious use has
been made of modern concrete. Precast grilles provide a strong light-and-shadow pattern over large areas.
They also set a design theme which is repeated in bold relief on other concrete surfaces throughout
the Center. The elegant beauty achieved gives dramatic evidence of concrete's esthetic versatility
and its structural advantages. Today, more than one architect is acquiring a reputation
through the creative uses of modern concrete.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION 1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








cool idea, hot seller:


Homes Electrically


AIR-CONDITIONED


CIO~


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electric range and flameless
electric water heater in ad-
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electric appliances-one of
which could beair-condition-
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Also Full Housepower wir-
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Year-round Electric Air Conditioning adds a powerful
"selling punch" in today's competitive home-building
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They want year-round Electric Air-Conditioning for summer
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Electric Air-Conditioning is optional in MEDALLION HOME
certification, but you'll be amply repaid in easier
sales (and now it's cheaper to install than ever before!)
Call any FP&L office and obtain the money-saving facts
you should know. There is no obligation.


-7'A^e ^? /fa~j2flameless 69weZ^^
... IT'S CHEAPER, TOO!

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HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


JUNE, 1962


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BRI Conference . .
(Continued from Page 18)
nature, developed problems related to
the high temperatures that occur in
the glass as they absorb radiant heat.
This can raise temperatures so high
that thermal breakage has occurred by
expansion of the glass against mold-
ings or frames. MR. ALFRED L. JAROS
of Jaros, Baum & Bolles, New York
consulting engineers, and Mr. Kling
both mentioned the problem of this
expansion causing water intrusion.
In some cases where twin glazing
was used a rise of temperature in the
. .. closed-in area caused rubber gasketing
to explode. Since this has happened in
the north, it certainly can happen in
Florida where high radiant tempera-
tures are year-round and not merely
summer conditions. Heat absorbing
glass can also be a source of consider-
able discomfort to a person who is
obliged to sit or work near it. Heat-
absorbing glass does just that. It ab-
sorbs the radiant heat, radiates one-
half back to the outside, re-radiates
one-half into the interior. This must
be considered as a problem where
rows of desks are planned to be lo-
cated near the glass areas.
The newest glass on the market is
heat reflecting glass. Like reflective
aluminum insulation, it reflects the
infra-red spectrum back through the
glass permitting only 15-25 percent to
enter. As Figure One indicates, this is
a considerable efficiency over the heat-
absorbing glass and vastly superior to
ordinary plate glass. One manufac-
turer applies a film of aluminum to
the glass by a vacuum process and
laminates another sheet to this to pre-
vent damage to the film. This glass
approaches the efficiency of the most
efficient sun shades. It has a mirror-
like look to it which might, or might
not, be appreciated by the architect.
The Corning Glass Co. has a similar
product, just out the experimental lab
-a glass on which has been fired a
refractory reflective coating to accom-
plish results. Currently the cost of
this glass is extremely high, but pro-
duction can certainly lower it to the
point of economic suitability as an
alternate to complex sun shades.
It is well to remember that solar
shading units such as grills, eyebrows,
vertical louvers, etc. can be an esthetic
devices as well as mere shading screens
against solar intrusion. The architect
must weigh the cost factor of the va-
(Continued on Page 25)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















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DES GN




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JUNE, 1962


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. .. .. 11











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MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE: PLAZA 1-6633
WRITE OR CALL:


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






BRI Conference...
(Continued from Page 22)
rious glass types against the pleasing
effects shading devices can give the
eye as compared to bare glass.
Insofar as the specific design of sun
shades is concerned, the ventilation of
the shades was mentioned several
times as being very necessary. A heavy,
unventilated eyebrow of concrete has


NO HEAT

Figure Two, above; and Figure Three

basic deficiencies because the concrete
absorbs radiant energy and re-radiates
a good part of this back into the build-
ing through the opening or through
the structure. Figure Two and Figure
Three illustrate graphically this prob-
lem. An attempt should be made to
have as little mass as possible in the
sun shades. In one instance the steel
supports of the sun shades were finned
for efficient heat transfer-a precau-
tion taken to insure a minimum
amount of heat being transferred to
the building structure.

NOTE-The practical influence of
solar shading devices on the costs of
air conditioning equipment installa-
tion and operation was the subject of
substantial comment during the con-
ference. This matter will be discussed
in the second part of Mr. Evans' BRI
Conference report. Also included will
be commentary on the third and
fourth sessions of the Conference.
JUNE, 1962


A new, exciting industrial Florida becomes manifest as hundreds
of new industries discover the advantages of Florida locations for
manufacturing plants, distribution centers, executive offices.
Already built into the framework of the new Florida is more than
a million tons of Florida Steel structural steel, reinforcing steel,
special fabrications.
Florida Steel is the only reinforcing steel manufactured and fab-
ricated in Florida to give Florida a limitless source of quality-
controlled steel right at her finger-tips.


FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION

S-- "


Specify Florida Steel. When
you build with Florida prod-
ucts, you build a sounder
economy for Florida.

TAMPA ORLANDO MIAMI
JACKSONVILLE FT. MYERS
WEST PALM BEACH


wrow-







Planning an apartment? motel? hotel?





.. . - fk.


Or an office, school or institutional building?
Specify the Dwyer Compact Kitchen in the
size and capacity required for the applica-
tion. There's a full line ol Dwyers trom 39 to '
72 in length, for conventional or recess in-
stallation. Include refrigerator, gas or elec- -- -
tric range and bake/broil oven, deep sink and
storage. Heavy-duty construction and vit- -
reous porcelain finish assure lasting dura- I p !
ability and beauty. I sal I
1Write or phone loday for L
W Arcerect's Dita File
el Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc., Suite 621, DuPont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Boulevard Way, Miami 32, Phone FRanklin 1-4344


Another Job with featheroch Veneer...

O M A Natural Stone
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The rugged and lasting
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0 Low weight factor.

S't, Attractive color ranges of
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Hs wic -AND-
Has low initial cost.


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rucson, Arizona

For more details on this unique stone write:

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n, INC. LOS ANGELES 28, CALIFORNIA


Significant Quotes . .
"It is on the individual, his sensi-
tivities and understanding, that our
whole success or failure rests. He must
recognize that this is a new kind of
civilization in which the artist will be
used in a new and different way. The
neat categories of bygone days do not
hold true any longer. His job requires
a curious combination of intuition and
crust. He must be sensitive and adapt-
able to trends and needs; he must be
part of, and understand, our civiliza-
tion. At the same time, he is not just
a mirror; he is also a co-creator and
must have the strength and urge to
produce form, not compromise.
"Architecture is not just to fulfill
man's need for shelter, but also to
fulfill man's belief in the nobility of
his existence on earth. Our architec-
ture is too humble. It should be
prouder, more aggressive, much richer
and larger than we see it today . ."
-EERO SAARINEN, FAIA, 1962 AIA
Gold Medalist.
"Fantastic as it may sound, we are
literally facing an age when, in the
western world at least, the problem
will be to consume rather than pro-


Custom-Cast

Plaques
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We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
orative bas-reliefs
FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






duce. .... We may be within 20 years
of a time when whole classes of people
will be without usable skills and our
politico economic system will be
tested as never before . ."-PHILIP
WILL, JR., FAIA, Retiring AIA Pres-
ident.

"We are surrounded by a crumb-
ling social system and amoebic new
ones that all of us know too well
through our practices. We again come
to the platitude of the total responsi-
bility of architecture. It must be re-
weighed in terms of social responsi-
bility of our acts.
"It seems to me we must conceive
of architecture in its very broadest
terms as the all-encompassing mother
art that creates order out of space
and harmony in all man-made things.
But with broader knowledge and
against the total spectrum of our ob-
jective, we must recognize that none
of us individually can do the whole
job; that we must accept a small slice
of that total knowledge and give it a
depth of understanding that has not
heretofore existed."
CHARLES R. COLBERT, FAIA
Dean, Columbia University.
School of Architecture


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh 8
Brumos Porsche Car Corp. 6
Coral Gables Glass
& Mirror, Inc. . .. 12
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 26
Featherock, Inc . .. 26
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 26
Florida Home Heating
Institute . . . 28
Florida Power and Light Co. 21
Florida Prestressed Concrete
Concrete Assn. . . 23
Florida Steel Corp . . 25
Florida Terrazzo Assn. . 7
General Portland Cement Co. 19
Maule Industries . . 24
Merry 'Brothers Brick
and Tile Co . . 5
Miami Window Corp. . 1
Peoples Gas System . . 3
Portland Cement Association 20
Prescolite . . . 12
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 22
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 18
Vogue Industries Inc. . 4
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27


JUNE, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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OFFICES AND YARD


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LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
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PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154







mR. ARCHITECT:
Advertisements like the one below are reminding your prospective
clients that oil home heating combined with electric air conditioning
will deliver year 'round comfort for a few cents an hour. We believe
you will find ready acceptance when you recommend central oil-elec-
tric cooling and heating equipment the money-saving "comfort"
team" proved best and the most economical for Florida homes.


, --a__ .


Here is a Florida family on a hot, sticky
summer evening. But how come they look
so happy and comfortable? What's hap-
pened here?
Electric air conditioning, that's what. It
has given this home cool, crisp indoor
weather . slammed the door on heat,
dampness, dust, pollen and airborne mil-
dew . helped these people feel better,
sleep better, live better. It can do the same
for your family.


But keep this in mind: It's just as easy to
enjoy year 'round comfort-the kind that
beats the heat and kills the chill. Espe-
cially if you choose one of the super-
economical combinations of electric air
conditioning and oil home heating. This
comfort team works for a few cents an
hour. If you already have one, you can
easily add the other. Together, they give
your family a happy houseful of comfort
every day of the year... summer and winter
... at lowest possible cost.


INSTALL YEAR 'ROUND HOME COMFORT...COSTS SO LITTLE...WORTH SO MUCH!

FLORIDA HOME4 HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N.W. 7th Street, Miami, Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











,4 W4"tte4e ?7om


74e Semienv...1~


The Task Ahead




By CLINTON GAMBLE, FAIA
Secretary, American Institute of Architects


The culmination of much hard work by a really dedi-
cated group of architects resulted in my being elected
Secretary of AIA, the first time a Floridian has been elected
to national office. I feel certain that I happened to be in
the position where time and circumstance produced this
result rather than through any personal ability. Florida
with its growing importance in the national scene is bound
sooner or later to have a larger voice in national affairs.
Now, of course, I must turn from any regional attitudes
that the foregoing statements might indicate and devote
myself to the truly national affairs of the Institute. It is an
exciting prospect. Over the past several years the Institute
has been in an upheaval of changing its structure, reorga-
nizing the headquarters staff and very recently examining
the basic concepts of architectural practice itself and the
ethic standards the AIA represents as being vital to our
profession. "It is time now," President HENRY WRIGHT
said in his acceptance speech, "to consolidate our gains."
It was a wonderful experience to stand behind him on the
platform at the convention and know that all of us on
the national Board are in total and real agreement that
this is the task.
It might be interesting to tell you of some of the
Secretary's duties. All membership questions go through
the Secretary's office, all competitions held under the AIA
code are administrated by this office, and a considerable
amount of the correspondence on questions of ethics also
is handled through the Secretary. When I said the chal-
lenge of the Secretary's position was to maintain and
improve two-way communication between chapters, states,
and the national level, I did not myself at the time quite


recognize the formidable task this represents. As the full
impact of the size of the job has come home to me in
these few days since taking over the office, you may be
sure it has been a humbling experience. However if sin-
cere effort and determination to warrant the responsibility
will see the job done, then I shall merit the confidence
that has been given me.
The major program that was generated during Presi-
dent PHIL WILL'S term is "comprehensive services." It is
clear that to translate this idea from generalizations into
practical action is going to require that we examine our
own professional knowledge and be very certain that when
we offer these expanded services we will be thoroughly
able to deliver them. As our buildings become more com-
plex through the mechanical devices that we can use, so
do the problems multiply. One of the ways that the na-
tional organization can help is to see that we are given
all the continuing education possible, not only on a high
plane of inspirational communication, but at the "nuts
and bolts" level as well.
Finally, I would hope that there is to be real effort
made toward our profession accepting a major role in our
present day responsibilities to society. Like our buildings,
our total lives are becoming more complicated in our rela-
tions with other people. In having this responsibility we
are no different than all the other professions or other
occupational groups. But we do have a significantly dif-
ferent part to play. It is our unique opportunity to see
that the esthetics of human environment keep pace with
our technical advancement since we do stand at the
crossroads where these two disciplines meet.









SOn Tampa Bay...

o It's St. Petersburg in 1962 . and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
.' Chapter- whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
i .* sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition .

S C













1 r







U,'.F: -.. .





Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!



48th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION


NOVEMBER 8, 9, 10, 1962 SORENO HOTEL


- ST. PETERSBURG




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