• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 F/A panorama
 Table of Contents
 On civic ugliness
 1962 Reynolds memorial award
 1962 professional practice seminar:...
 Miami's international design...
 Know your state board
 The real challenge of urban renewal...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00095
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: May 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00095
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    F/A panorama
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    On civic ugliness
        Page 4
        Page 5
    1962 Reynolds memorial award
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    1962 professional practice seminar: A report on the matter of expanded service
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Miami's international design center
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Know your state board
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The real challenge of urban renewal projects
        Page 20
        Page 21
    News and notes
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text

W A A Flor


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited- permission-to. digitize- and. make-this. electronic-
version- available- has- been- granted- by-the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of- F lori da.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on- of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed- to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association's-web site.













































































Vill lit!






F/A Paioraiima...

LESSON OF THE MONTH THE TENACITY OF TEXANS ...
The 1955 Gruen Plan for the redevelopment of Fort Worth was so thoroughly
praised and publicized that most people probably look its near-future, full-blown
execution for granted. The truth is that it died a-borning. The bond issue which
would have permitted at least a start toward the plan's realization was defeated;
and as a result the Gruen Plan sank to the level of a dead dream. But, through
the efforts of a newspaper editor and a few energetic members of the Fort Worth
Chapter interest in the Plan was revived. Analyzing the reasons for previous
rejection of the Plan, the architects proceeded to successively enlist the co-
operation of various civic groups and departments in its revival. Next a compe-
tion for a new tentative master plan was held, followed by an exhibit and cri-
tique of the submissions by civic officials. Final phase of this monumental pro-
gram now under way is the slow, tedious preparation of a final master
plan . Now this project is for real. And, like the KC-80 program of the Kansas
City Chapter, architects are chiefly responsible for bringing it into being.

SKYHOOK LIFT-DOME IN INDIANA ...
It's a new first. In Anderson, Indiana, a 268-ft. diameter dome for a 7200-seat
auditorium was hiked 26 feet in the air by lift-slab jacks attached to 36 steel
columns. The dome, of thin-shell construction designed for post-tensioning,
was poured and semi-finished on the ground over a compacted earth form. Lift-
ing time for the 3-million pound, lightweight concrete structure was scheduled
for eight hours. Cost of the finished building was $6.50 per square foot about
half the unit cost of conventionally-built auditoriums and about equal to that
of a well-built warehouse. Appropriately enough, the dome was raised by Sky-
hook Lift Slab Co. of Kansas City!

SOMETHING NEW FOR STEEL ...
Fortunately it's not a price rise! It's a new specification developed by the Amer-
ican Institute of Steel Construction in cooperation with other technical and in-
dustrial organizations, and announced early this year. First to be issued by the
AISC since 1945, the new specification covers four new higher strength steels
which, formed into appropriate members, permit a greatly enlarged latitude of
structural design. According to AISC engineers, designs using the new steels
can reduce the weight of required steel from 10 to 20 percent and will support
as much as 35 percent more load or permit use of lighter-weight beams and
slabs to support the same load.

MORE PREFAB HOUSES FOR "THE IMMEDIATE FUTURE" . .
Factory construction has been teamed up with mobility to produce two new
types of prefab houses. One, for which steel is the basic structural material, is
the product of the Rheem Manufacturing Company. The other was developed
by the Panelbild Division of the U.S. Plywood Co. They are similar in that both
involve use of thin, super-insulated walls enclosing standard-sized units that are
factory finished and trucked to the site for assembly. The Rheem units measure
14 by 36 feet, 14 by 14 feet and 14 by 22 feel and are arranged around a
mechanical core containing bathroom and kitchen equipment. Panelbild
models involve assembly of four 12 by 24 foot "modules" each with built-in air
conditioning, electrical, plumbing and lighting facilities. These are grouped
around an open, interior court or patio. One of the steel houses has been erected
at Palm Beach Gardens. The plywood model will be on display at the Century
21 Exposition in Seattle.





















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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


loth 74a ue ---


F/A Panorama .


On Civic Ugliness . . .
By Richard W. Snibbe, AIA


. Second Cover

. 4


1962 Reynolds Memorial Award . . . ..

1962 Professional Practice Seminar . . . .
A Report on the Matter of Expanded Service

Miami's International Design Center . . . .
James Deen, AIA, Architect


Know Your State Board . .


. 9


. 14-15


. 17


Its Functions, Its Background, Its Accomplishments . .

The Real Challenge of Urban Renewal Projects . . .


. 20


. 22


News and Notes . . . .

Advertisers' Index . . .


. 27


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 1 8th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
0. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.

Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami

THE COVER ...
This dramatic picture, for which Ezra Stoller was the photographer, was made
from the mezzanine toward the entrance lobby of the new International Design
Center, newest addition to Miami's Decorators' Row. James Deen, AIA, was
the architect. Other views of the building appear on pages 14 and 15.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
I . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12 962

NUMBER 5 I /

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































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units, backing up exterior walls, were left exposed
inside. Solite structural concrete was used in pre-cast
roof deck and in Flexicore floor slabs with structural
concrete topping.

Solite Accomplishes Multiple Objectives. The use of
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On Civic Ugliness.


This conference was conceived for
the purpose of inspiring community
activity to fight ugliness in our coun-
try. We must engage in this struggle
if we are to develop culturally as well
as scientifically. We are fighting im-
mensity-the corporate mind, a total
machine society-in defense of our
democratic life.
We are fighting the pressure for
cheapness in the midst of our great-
est period of prosperity. We have
never been richer and poorer at the
same time. More production and con-
sumption seems to lead to lower
standards of workmanship instead of
longer lasting and more beautiful
products and buildings. If the aims
of this conference are to continue to
exist as a reality, we must adopt a
plan to continue the work.
This is a gigantic task. It will re-
quire a great deal of our thought and
effort for many years, but it must be
done. It must be done if we are to
say stop to the economic madness,
the senseless waste which destroys our
heritage only to replace it with less
palatable and more disposable con-
struction. If this is progress, then
progress must be slowed down so we
can re-evaluate our aims and goals.
Then, the power of reason giving it
direction, it can move ahead on a
planned and rational basis.
I would like to present a plan for
action in the fight against ugliness.
We must all give our best think-
ing to bringing about the desired
changes for reasons that are as con-
cerned with a healthy economy as
with raising esthetic standards. Poor
construction and neglect mean early
obsolescence; obsolescence means
eventual condemnation and necessary
renewal, and that means displace-
ment, losses in income and taxes,
and is therefore bad business. Con-


versely, good maintenance, higher
standards of new construction and
preservation of historic and renewable
structures mean, first, rising property
values, second, continuity of occcu-
pancy with no loss of income or taxes,
hence good business.
Good business. Progress on a ra-
tional basis: How are these things to
be accomplished?
Citizens' committees must be es-
tablished in every state and major
city-and, hopefully, in smaller ones,
too-to create an awareness of esthetic
values, to lobby in our legislatures,
to bring pressure to bear on public
agencies and influential individuals to
stop the desecration of our country
and to bring about its planned and
orderly growth.
Architects arc responsible for the
largest visible works in our urban
areas. They deal with art and business
every day. Therefore they are the
natural group, probably the only avail-
able group, to start the action on a
broad scale.
Design Committees must be cre-
ated this summer in every chapter of
the American Institute of Architects.
These groups in turn. must form broad
community committees on esthetic
responsibility-committees comprised
of the leading people in business, the
professions, institutions and the arts.
I want to mention here that the
National Board of the AIA has pro-
posed a resolution to admit profes-
sional affiliates to the Institute-engi-
neers, planners, landscape architects,
sculptors, muralists, lighting design-
ers and other artists allied to archi-
tecture. This will facilitate the forma-
tion of broad citizen committees.
How does a plan for action become
a reality? It calls for the spark and
determination of just one dedicated
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. .


In New York, on April 3, some 500 people met as the "First Con-
ference on Esthetic Responsibility." The group, gathered under
the auspices of the Design Committee of the New York Chapter,
AIA, of which RICHARD W. SNIBBE, AIA, is chairman, included
business men, educators, public officials, writers, artists-many
of whom spoke forcefully about the ugliness of our cities and
what might be done to eliminate it. . As a sort of conference
summary, Mr. Snibbe suggested a program, applicable nationally,
through which the esthetic values of our cities could be strength-
ened. The essence and major portion of his talk is presented here.






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MAY, 1962






French Architectural Team Wins

1962 Reynolds Memorial Award


V
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The $25,000 R.S. Reynolds Memorial Award for 1962 was won by a team of
French architects for their collaborative design of the Museum Cultural Center
in Le Harve, France, shown above. The architects are Guy Lagneau, Michel
Weill and Jean Dimitrijevic, principals in a Paris architectural partnership, and
Le Havre architect Raymond Audigier. Announcement was made late last month
by the AIA which administers the annual award program. One of the unique
features of this building which led the jury to its award decision was the
manner in which aluminum members have been utilized to control natural light.
The building is roofed with a membrane of skylight glass above the roof trusses
and a ceiling of white plastic below. Over the entire roof, supported on ex-
tensions of the building's main columns, is a "floating" framework of aluminum
louvres designed to keep out direct sunlight.


RALPH KIRSCH and JULIAN PEYSER
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architect. One person in each com-
munity who cares about the environ-
ment in which his children, grow to
maturity.
Do you realize that thousands of
esthetic decisions are made daily by
people who don't know they are mak-
ing them? Think of that, and the
work of the committees on esthetic
responsibility looms large and im-
portant. They can hold conferences
such as this to draw attention to the
importance of esthetics. They can.
conduct seminars with builders, mort-
gage men and real estate entrepre-
neurs. They can bring issues into the
open in election years.
Committees can encourage better
design and discourage mediocrity.
Here in New York the Fifth Avenue
Association does it with an annual
award for the best building on the
Avenue. The well-publicized awards
are highly coveted. This means of
improving our visual environment can
be spread throughout the country by
our committees . and can be
breadened to include honor awards
for good design in many fields.
Committees can implement tang-
ible programs. Very few fountains
(Continued on Page 26)







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1962 Professional Practice Seminar


&


GEORGE T. HEERY, AIA


Only about 50 architects a dis-
appointing small number attended
the FAA's Professional Practice Semi-
nar on "Expanded Services for The
Architect," held March 24th at the
Dupont Plaza Center in Miami.
Those who attended were treated to
an inside view of possibilities for the
wider range of professional activity
that the Institute is going all out to
stimulate. Those who did not attend
can get the core of the new expanded
service policy here and during the
coming months from a series of
article in the AIA Journal supple-
mented by what will undoubtedly be
a plethora of inter-organization discus-
sion about it.
The meeting was an informal one
with all participants speaking on an
extemporaneous basis. FAA President
ROBERT H. LEVISON acted as modera-
tor for the three sessions which started
at 10:00 AM and ended at 4:00 PM.
There were three main speakers:
ROBERT F. HASTINGS, FAIA, GEORGE
T. HEERY, AIA and G. CLINTON
GAMBLE, FAIA, who dealt with their
assigned subjects in that order. Each
was there as a sort of special represen-
tative of the Institute Mr. Hast-
ings to clarify the breadth and mean-
ing of "expanded services"; Mr. Heery
to indicate by example how such ser-
vices could actually be handled by
architects; and Mr. Gamble to discuss
the proposed revisions of the AIA's
Standards of Professional Practice.
MAY, 1962


In presenting the Institute's atti-
tude and recommendations relative to
a broader scope of architectural prac-
tice, Mr. Hastings first reviewed the
traditional pattern of professional ac-
tivity. Throughout his talk he referred
to a series of charts (reproduced on
pages 10 and 11), six of which de-
picted the scope and sequence of tra-
ditional services and six others the
possible expansion of these services
into new, but related, fields of profes-
siQnal concern.
Traditionally, architects have been
concerned primarily with design. But
design in the narrow, commonly ac-
cepted sense of creating a happy com-
bination of space allocation, sound
construction and esthetic composition
that best meets the needs of a client's
building program. Heretofore even
currently in the majority of cases -
the basic program has been the con-
cept of the client, not the architect.
The client has obtained the land,
organized his requirements in terms
of space and equipment, arranged for
his financing. The architect has been
charged with the design and pos-
sibly the construction supervision -
of the building. Not much more.
The architect has been doing a
pretty good job in this field, Mr. Hast-
ings continued. But not entirely
alone. He has had to work with the
engineer, with the specification ex-
pert, with the business man specially
versed in contracts and costs, with the


Expanded


Service...



* What It Means


* How It Works

* What It Can Do


* How Far It Can Go


S:"; .*- : -> .. ... .










ROBERT F. HASTINGS, FAIA


"practical" man in charge of building
operations in the field. And he has
had to do all this in terms of his
client's overall interests that, more
often than might be appreciated, pre-
dicate a somewhat less than, desirable
understanding of the involved princi-
ples of cultural environment, psy-
chology, sociology, philosophy.
His training, Mr. Hastings thought,
has given the architect only a com-
paratively poor background for this
multiplicity of concern with the var-
ious aspect of the central design prob-
lem. Our educational system needs
revision and broadening, he suggested,
to provide new disciplines and exper-
iences to solve the increasingly com-
plex problems of current professional
practice.
Mr. Hastings' suggestion went even
beyond the educational disciplines
necessary to the individual architect
practicing as a building professional.
The wide range of modern technology
makes it virtually impossible for all
needed familiarity and experience to
be vested in one person. Actually, he
ventured, today's architect should be
several persons: first, a creative de-
signer; second, a technical organizer,
able to coordinate the various engi-
neering factors of a building with its
design concept, its cost of construction
and the realistic programming of its
field development. In these two seg-
mental phases of the complete archi-
(Continued on Page 10)









This Is The Traditional Pattern of


Currently Standard Architectural Practice



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(Continued from Page 10)
tect is embodied not only the genius
for spatial organization and esthetic
creativity, but a ready understanding
of the basic techniques of structure.
There are other personal abilities
involved the ability to check shop
drawings, to coordinate field bulletins,
keep job costs, supervise and inspect
construction. All these various types
of personalities and different specializ-
ed abilities are, Mr. Hastings pointed
out, involved in an architect's job of
designing buildings within the frame
of traditional professional activities.


But actually architectural planning
and design are only one part of the
overall solution to a building problem.
Such important matters as financing,
promotion and management, process
and operating layout, equipment and
furnishing requirements are all in-
volved. Equally important are such
background factors as basic urban and
site planning, traffic and road design,
feasibility studies relative not only to
building construction and operation,
but also to community development.
As having direct bearings on the
success of any building project, such


matters are the concern of the archi-
tect, said Mr. Hastings. And a more
intimate contact with them toward
the end of coordinating them into a
"package" of all-inclusive professional
activity is the substance of the ex-
panded architectural service program
that the AIA is now earnestly advo-
cating. This, essentially, the speaker
said, constituted the answer to the
growing threat of the contractor- engi-
neer "package dealer."
Not every office would necessarily
offer clients the complete gamut of
(Continued on Page 12)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








This Is The Projected Pattern of


Future, Expanded Architectural Service


i.-1.r -T1 ,. L'L..'^,'


* _.TtC1U-4L f '


.-. LL,


MAY, 1962






Seminar . .
(Continued from Page 10)
fully expanded service, though even
smaller offices having sound working
relationships with a variety of consult-
ing specialists might well be able to
do so. In such a wide service field
there exists many opportunities for
specialization in such categories
as hospitals, schools, office buildings,
industrial complexes much as the
medical profession has developed its
various specialty fields.
However individual offices may
organize their facilities to grasp the
varied opportunities that expanded
service implies, the AIA's point is a
simple and direct one. In the idea of
expanded service lies the chance for
growth far beyond the limits that
traditional organization now imposes.
Mr. Hastings' discussion was neces-
sarily developed from a broad and
theoretical base. As the next speaker,
George T. leery illustrated some of
of the methods by which the idea of
expanded service could develop into
practice to the benefit of all con-
cerned. He had brought copies of two
feasibility reports prepared in his
office one for a relatively small
medical clinic, the other for a
medium-size industrial plant. Prior to
outlining the development of these
reports, he spoke about the specific
services that architects might offer
their clients.
These, Mr. Heering said, were some
areas of expanded service: 1) Econo-
mic feasibility studies on the various
aspects of commercial projects; 2)
Feasibility and facility analyses in con-
nection with institutional and indus-
trial work: 3) Community and urban
land planning studies for government
groups, industrial organizations, real
estate developers; 4) Market analyses
and location surveys for such com-
mercial projects as shopping centers;
5) Locating services on behalf of in-
dustrial organizations involving
such matters as market analyses, labor
surveys, transportation studies, con-
struction cost analyses; 6) Lease-hold
and land acquisition studies; 7) Pro-
cess design and consultation, primarily
concerned with industrial operations;
8) Material-handling design and con-
sultation; 9) Merchandising layout
and consultation; 10) Operating man-
agement a kind of facility-testing
program as an owner's guide to build-
ing management and maintenance;


11) Private party financing assistance
for both commercial and industrial
projects.
Mr. Heery cited these as only a few
of many activities that are part of ex-
panded architectural service. Com-
menting on them he said,
"Obviously one small firm cannot do
all these things; and rarely can even a
large firm offer all these services within
its own organization. But all these ac-
tivities are involved to a greater or less
degree in the design and construction
of buildings. So any architect can con-
tract for these services and then
buy whatever special knowledge and
experience may be needed."
However, he cautioned his audience
not to attempt to deliver any facet
of expanded service without the
ability to do a good job. He pointed
out the possibility of specialization -
where one firm might be specially
equipped to do land planning and
urban renewal projects, another to do
process engineering. And he empha-
sized that coordinating the work of
various specialists was one of the chief
responsibilities of any architect enter-
ing the expanded service field.
In discussing the two case studies
with his audience, Mr. Heery com-
mented on a number of questions.
One had to do with fees that could
be charged for various types of the
services he had outlined. He indicated
that his firm's fee for an economic
survey feasibility study was nor-
inally set at one percent of the
building cost in addition to the usual
percentage fee for the architectural-
engineering service. If the building
does not go ahead, his firm charges
a flat fee for the survey based on



SURVEYS AVAILABLE
Through the courtesy of Mr.
Heery a limited number of cop-
ies of his two case studies have
been made available. One con-
cerns the development of a
small medical clinic. The other
is an economic report on a
medium-size industrial building.
Application for each should be
made to the FAA's executive
office at 414F Dupont Plaza
Center, Miami 43, Florida. They
will be forwarded without charge
while they last.


office costs and a normal profit.
Another question related to the
various types of estimates embodied
in his economic surveys. Did he, or
could he, guarantee these estimates?
Mr. Henry's answer was positive and
direct. Yes, his firm did guarantee the
figures.
"We always guarantee to meet our
estimate at all times." he said. "In
many cases we are forced into it. For
example, the Georgia State School
Building Authority's standard con-
tract form has the construction cost
written into the architectural contract.
The architect has to guarantee to
meet the budget in order to sign the
contract he even has to execute a
thing called a Budget certificate.
"We think architects should guar-
antee their estimates and budgets.
We were doing it before we were
ever forced into it."
Another question referred to the
promotional aspect of professional ex-
panded service as against the offerings
of the "package-dealer." In answer
he commented on a program that the
Institute is now considering the
formation of various "Councils" made
up of firms with special interests in
certain specific building types, as in-
dustrial projects, hospitals, schools.
He indicated that it might be
economically feasible for each Council
to undertake an advertising campaign
as a group. This would be as large
and vigorous as contributions from
each specialty group, or Council,
would permit. But in any case the
advertising program would stress the
professional aspect of expanded service.
Mr. Heery's discussion of this
general subject gave indication that
the Institute has been active in study-
ing all aspects of the Council idea
and that some action toward getting
Councils organized and chartered
would be taken in the near future.
Once operating under the sponsorship
of the Institute, the Councils would
provide both the background and the
mechanics for publicizing the role of
the architect and his facilities for
offering expanded services in various
specialized fields. Through directing
promotional efforts to owner-groups
within various special-interest categor-
ies, it is reasonable to assume, Mr.
Heery observed, that results for dollars
expended would be high.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






U


Look of

Quality... MODERN CONCRETE

From the deepest piling, 135' below ground, stretching
10 stories into Tampa's new skyline, The Marine Bank
building lends a clean refreshing look to one of the nation's
fastest growing cities.
In all, 8,000 cubic yards of concrete went into the reinforced
concrete frame, floor, wall and roof system. The owners
selected this type of construction for economy, speed of
construction, fire safety and overall solidarity.


%uaiDA POTLAN C.FN Dwiio


"**~/k a


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY *r" w f
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA 0 TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
PENINSULAR DIVISION, JACKSON, MICHIGAN VICTOR DIVISION, FREDONIA, KANSAS
MAY, 1962 13


























AI


Ezra Stoller Associates


Miami's New


International


Design Center


International Design Center was
established to serve as a permanent
source of reference for professionals
in the fields of architectural and in-
terior design as well as a showcase
of ideas and decorating know-how for
the public. It is one of two similar
establishments in the country the
other being the National Design
Center in New York. Founded by
HENRY END, AID, the policies are
administered by a nine-man Advisory
Board that includes JAMES DEEN, AIA,
IGOR POLEVITZKY, FAIA, and WAHL
SNYDER, FAIA. Designer members are
JACK CAMERON, AID, HAYGOOD LAS-


SETER, AID, RICHARD PLUMER, AIA.
and HERBEBT SAIGER, AID.
The building contains 14,000 square
feet of display area and was con-
structed for an approximate cost of
$500,000. It is a three-level structure
framed with reinforced concrete and
faced on the exterior with a combina-
tion of gray brick, white cement and
black ceramic tile. It was designed
to accommodate up to 150 types of
varied displays primarily design cl-
ments and accessories for the interiors
of both residential and commercial
structures.
The building's prime function is to






serve as a setting for displays. And
because these differ so widely in size
and character, interior floor levels
have been ingeniously staggered to
provide what appear to be a series of
mezzanines about an open space some
24 feet in clear eighth. In large
measure the floor levels are not en-
closed, thus providing an unusually
wide visual sweep from any level.
Focal point of the interior is the
Centre Stage, shown below, left. This
is a 30 by 60 foot space 14'V2 feet
high designed for "editorial exhibits"
- as contrasted with the commercial
displays of manufacturers and dealers.
On this stage "theme" exhibits will
be developed to stress originality in
interior design; and this exhibit pro-
gram has been geared to constant
change with new design themes
scheduled each month.








JAMES DEEN, A.I.A.


Architect


Ezra Stoller Associates


4- ,*,

dEI


MAY, 1962















* Precast prestressed concrete
flat slabs are a fairly new
building material in Florida.
They have wide applications for
roofs, floors and walls in all
types of buildings. They speed
construction, eliminate shoring,
provide an immediate work
deck for follow-up trades, their
hollow cores can be used for the
installation of wiring, heating,
and plumbing lines, and their
flat surface reduces finishing
costs. Any manufacturer can
claim and support these benefits.
HOUDAILLE-SPAN GOES BEYOND
BASIC ADVANTAGES TO GIVE
YOU EXTRA VALUE, AND AS A
RESULT HAS BECOME THE
LEADER IN THE FIELD.
Modern manufacturing
techniques, strict inspection
procedures, proper field service
and erection, close cooperation
with the architect and engineer
to adapt standard units to
custom requirements, are factors
which HOUDAILLE-SPAN offers
to give performance beyond
the design specifications.
One of our representatives will
be pleased to give you the
complete story. Call or write
for his assistance.


HOUDAILLE-"SPANS"

BROWARD COUNTY!...
Over I million sq. ft. produced in
18 months means product acceptance
. client satisfaction.


-. ".4. "A ~



Cloud Nine Apartments, 800 S.E. 5th St. OWNER: Mr. and Mrs.
DEERFIELD BEACH Walter R. Huck. ENGINEER: James Bousfield. CONTRACTORS:
J. A. Finfrock and R. A. Baker. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-SPAN:
12,857.
I :. S,' .


-Lafayette Arms, 2866 N.E. 30th St. OWNER: Robert B. Ross
FORT LAUDERDALE Assoc. ARCHITECT: Wolff & Hall. CONTRACTOR: Robert B. Ross
Assoc. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-SPAN: 13,900.


HOLLYWOOD


The Suburbanite Apartments, 3701 Tyler Street, Hollywood
Hills. OWNER: Frontier Corp. ARCHITECT: William H. Peck.
CONTRACTOR: A. J. Collins & Son. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-
SPAN: 25,500.


E T 0> TJT D. A TIT. T. "E S2 F:D- A T. T, I C. Manufactured under SPANCRETE
SU A.liceSAse, by R. H. WRIGHT, INC.,
1050 N.E. 5TH TERRACE FORT LAUDERDALE FLORIDA Fort Lauderdale.
JA 4-0456 JA 5-1661


Say "Hoo-Dye"
16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I A
j








Know Your State Board...


The Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture was created by an act of the
State Legislature in 1915. In the 45
years it has been discharging its legal
responsibility for regulating the prac-
tice of architecture in Florida the pro-
gressive intensification of its author-
ized activities has paralleled the basic
development and overall growth of
the State. Today it operates as one of
the most vital of the State's minor
regulatory boards, in that it establishes
and maintains standards of compe-
tency for the professional practice of
architecture which, in turn, is a
basic element of the construction in-
dustry that in recent years has
achieved an annual dollar volume
ranking with both tourism and agri-
culture.
Legislative authority for the State
Board of Architecture stems from
Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes.
Provisions of this statute have been
variously amended in 1941, 1945,
1951, 1953 and most recently in 1955
as progressive development in the ar-
chitectural profession and in Florida's
building industry have made it desir-
able either to supplement the discre-
tionary authority of the Board or to
strengthen the statutory requirements
for architectural practice in line with
national technical trends.
Two examples will indicate the char-
acter of these amendatory changes.
In 1953, through revision of Section
467.18, the Legislature provided the
Board with authority to bring civil
action against these individuals ap-
pearing to violate either the various
provisions of Chapter 467 or the
Board's own lawful rules, regulations
or orders. This immeasurably strength-
ened the Board's administrative pro-
gram under the statutes by making
it possible to enforce, through legal
proceedings, compliance with the stat-
utory provisions it had been charged
with maintaining.
The other example is the amend-
ment to Section 467.08 passed in
1955. This, in effect, raised the prac-
tical experience standards of appli-
cants for registration to a requirement
more consistent than formerly with
the recommendations of the National
Council of Architectural Registration
Boards, of which the Florida State
MAY, 1962


Board is a member. The proposal, at
that time, was to establish a three-
year period of diversified practical ex-
perience as a prerequisite for registra-
tion-a period which the NCARB
had established as a desirable techni-
cal standard on a national basis. The
Legislature saw fit to reduce this peri-
od to a single year of experience to
supplement the academic require-
ments already set forth in the statute.
Although the five-member status
of the Board designated by the statute
has not been changed since Chapter
467 was signed into law in 1915, the
duties of its membership and the
scope of Board activities has greatly
increased since that time-and most
particularly so during the last five
years. When the newly appointed
Board undertook its statutory respon-
sibilities in 1915, less than 100 archi-
tects were practicing their profession
in our State. Even in 1950, profes-
sional registration was less than 800.
But since then architectural registra-
tion has progressively increased in
line with the rapid development of
our State and the remarkable expan-
sion of the construction industry,
until, as of the current fiscal year, it
stands at more than 1800.
Further, the rate of increase in
registration has soared. From 1950 to
1955 the percentage increase was ap-
proximately 47 percent; and from
1955 to the present the rate of in-
crease was almost another 46 percent.
As one further indication of the
growth of the architectural profession
in Florida-and the consequent in-
tensification of the Board's activities
-the number of applicants admitted


to examination for registration in
January, 1950, was 53. Five years
later, in 1960, 168 were admitted to
examination in January and 189 were
accepted as examinees in -June a
total of 357. By far the greatest pro-
portion of this increase has occurred
since January, 1955, when the exam-
inee count stood at only 94.
This continued trend of profession-
al expansion has made necessary a
number of administrative decisions
and moves to enable the Board to
discharge its statutory responsibilities.
In 1955 the Board's office was re-
moved from Jacksonville to Fort
Lauderdale, where an enlarged opera-
tion was undertaken with a staff ade-
quate to care for the greatly expanded
volume of clerical work incident to
processing applications, accounting for
and issuing new and renewal regis-
trations and the preparation and issu-
ance of annual reports and rosters as
required by law.
Also as a result of growth, examin-
ations for registration in 1956 were
held simultaneously in both Jackson-
ville and Miami, a program which is
still in effect. The Board also found
it necessary to employ technical assist-
ants from the staff of the Department
of Architecture at the University of
Florida to monitor examinations and
to grade papers. Additional office
equipment was acquired to expedite
clerical operations in the most eco-
nomical fashion. And the Board has
found it necessary to somewhat en-
large its administrative staff, not only
to take care of the increased load of
clerical and accounting work involved,
(Continued on Page 18)


In spite of the fact that Florida's State Board of Archi-
tecture is one of the most important factors of profes-
sional existence, too many architects are unaware of its
functions, operations, authorities, responsibilities or
background. This article, adapted from part of a Board
report to the Governor's Office in 1960, is published as
a matter of record and accurate general information.






Know Your State Board...
(Continued from Page 17)
but also to carry through the pro-
grams of examination for registration
and enforcement of statutory provi-
sions with which it is charged.
As presently constituted, the Board
employs two full-time clerical assist-
ants to its secretary-treasurer. The
periodic, part-time employment of
technical examination assistants has
already been noted. On a part-time
basis also, the Board retains a legal
counsel and a legal investigator, plus
an assistant relative to the enforce-
ment segment of its activities. A part-
time technical assistant is also em-
ployed to aid in the program of inter-
professional education and informa-
tion which the Board instituted in
1954 as part of its regulatory and en-
forcement activities.
This administrative and operating
extension of the Board's personnel-
made necessary by the growth of pro-
fessional activity-has been possible
through careful budgeting of funds
made available by fees derived from
applicants for registration, from new
registrations and from renewals of ex-


isting registrations. In spite of the
fact that the state agencies fund re-
tains 10 percent of fees collected by
the Board, increased income to the
Board, particularly during the past
five years, has permitted a substantial
increase in enforcement activities in
addition to caring for the greatly en-
larged examination program already
noted.
As might be expected, the phenom-
enal growth of construction activity
in our State during the past several
years has been attended with a
marked increase in more or less fla-
grant attempts to violate provisions
of Chapter 467 relative to the prac-
tice of architecture by unregistered
persons-and to a somewhat less de-
gree by an increase in the number of
violations on the part of architects
duly registered to practice.
Thus, during the past five years the
enforcement segment of the Board's
legal responsibilities has necessarily
become of increasing importance. Due
primarily to budgetary limitations, the
Board has refrained from instituting
legal proceedings on all warranted in-
stances of violation brought to its at-
tention. It has proceeded under its


authority to prosecute those cases in
various sections of the State wherein
disciplinary action against one vio-
lator would hopefully tend to serve as
a practical deterrent to the continu-
ation of similar violations by others.
In instances of less flagrant viola-
tions the Board has often been able
to accomplish its regulatory objectives
through the simple expedient of warn-
ing the individual involved. But where
facts justified it has not hesitated-to
the limit of its financial ability-to
throw the full weight of its statutory
authority behind legal actions to en-
force compliance with the various pro-
visions of Chapter 467. During the
past six years the Board has sought
and obtained 23 injunctions against
persons practicing architecture with-
out registration. During the same
period it has suspended or revoked the
registrations of 9 practicing architects
for improper use of an architect's seal.
The Board's action in the latter
type of case was recently unheld by
the Circuit Court of Broward County.
As a result of a formal hearing in
July 1959, the Board had revoked the
registration of an architect for im-
properly sealing a set of architectural


18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






documents which had not been devel-
oped under his responsible supervis-
ing control in accordance with law.
The Board's decision was challenged
and a petition entered to reverse it.
The court denied the petition; and
the practical effect of this action will
undoubtedly be to command a wider
understanding and respect not only
for the statutory authority of the
Board, but also for the character of
its disciplinary decisions.
In line with its efforts to administer
the law fairly and at the same time
to maintain high professional stand-
ards in conformation with progressive
trends on the national level, the Board
has instituted a number of technical
changes in its rules and procedures
during the past several years. In 1955,
for example, it accomplished the diffi-
cult task of changing its examination
techniques and routines to accord with
revisions recommended on a national
basis by the NCARB. Again, in 1958,
after an intensive two-year study, the
Board substantially revised its "Circu-
lar of Information" containing its
Rules and Regulations relative to reg-
istration and the regulation of archi-
tectural practice.


As presently organized, the Board
could undoubtedly expand or contract
its essentially administrative functions
as economic conditions in the State
might make necessary. However, the
growth of registration and the pro-
gressive complication of technologies
necessarily involved in architectural
practice have placed what is proving
to be an increasing burden of personal
effort and responsibility on each
Board member. In contrast to the
practice in some other states, mem-
bers of the Florida State Board of
Architecture personally prepare all ex-
amination questions. Each individual
application is scrutinized and passed
upon by the Board sitting as a com-
mittee of the whole. Personal inter-
views are conducted with each appli-
cant. And processing the routine of
application, examination, grading and
registration has inevitably demanded
a larger and larger share of each mem-
ber's time and attention during suc-
cesive years.
Methods of solving the problem
that this situation presents have been
considered by the Board. Future rec-
ommendations may involve the possi-
bility of enlarging the Board -


through an amendment to the present
statute-or the employment of tech-
nical assistants capable of assuming
some of the Board's present routine
activities.
Another problem with which the
Board is now-and will continue to
be-faced concerns the conduct of
its enforcement program. This pro-
gram entails substantial investigation
as a necessary preliminary to a Board
decision in each case. Instances of
alleged violation are continually being
brought to the Board's attention from
every section of the State. And
though the active cooperation of prac-
ticing professionals has been welcome
and helpful in the past, experience
has shown that the Board's legal and
technical requirements can most ef-
fectively be met through the services
of an expanded investigative staff un-
der its own immediate administrative
control.
Some practical solution to both
problems is in the public interest.
The first involves the mechanics of
maintaining the present high stand-
ards of technical competence as a
requisite for registration and subse-
(Continued on Page 24)


"unseen influence" which hangs over every Florida
itect's drafting table is a generations-old American
ition of "cooking with gas." No doubt about it ...
e's a great and growing army of homemakers who
i preferred gas to any other fuel for all their lifetimes
and who keep right on preferring it. Just look at the
rd: 1961 A.G.A. figures show 34-million American
lies cook with gas. Three-quarters of all Americans
mnd on gas service to operate the 110-million gas
iances now in daily use. And the trend is upward:


A million new customers have decided for gas in the
past three years. Such popularity must be deserved ..
and the natural gas people are ready, willing and eager
to provide architects and builders with facts and figures
which show why. Their theme: It just doesn't add up to
use only one household service, when there are a half-
dozen jobs natural gas can do demonstrably better,
faster, and cheaper. Modern Florida homemakers de-
serve the best of both . your natural gas representative
can help you make sure they get it!


-R HEATING GAS COOKING GAS HEATING I I S R CONDITION G GAS CLOTHS DRYER




.ORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY Member: Florida
0. BOX 10400, ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA Natural GasAssn.


MAY, 1962 19







The Real Challenge of

Urban Renewal Projects

This commentary on a statement by Dr. Robert C. Weaver
first appeared in the "Blueprint" of the Westchester,
N. Y., Chapter, AIA, and is reprinted with appreciation.


"It is not often that a nation re-
builds its cities. And when it does, it
should do it well. You will have in
your hands in the years ahead a major
part in shaping the urban life of this
country. What you will do will in-
fluence the lives of millions yet un-
born for decades to come. No other
generation of architects had before it
such an opportunity or such a chal-
lenge.
"America waits for your response."
-DR. ROBERT C. WEAVER

Every architect the world over will
agree with Dr. Weaver that whatever
is rebuilt should be done well. There
are a number of reasons why the re-
building may not be done as well as
it could be. The biggest road block
to complete success is the "all or noth-


ing" sponsorship system used in re-
newal projects.
Sponsors and architects approach a
rebuilding project differently. The
difference is basic and may be cov-
ered as follows: A sponsor thinks of
a project statistically and legalistic-
ally. So many square feet at so many
dollars at such percentage of coverage
and so and so many stories of how
many rooms at how much rent per
room equals per cent return on his
investment. A sponsor brings to a
project a proven capacity to make
money.
An architect thinks of a project in
terms of five or six years intensive
study of construction, esthetics, eco-
nomics, sociology, history, logic, phil-
oshophy, political science, govern-
ment. finance. etc.. at the college


level-which means he thinks of a
project in terms of its value and use-
fullness to the community as well as
its tenants and owners. He knows the
principles of good practice that lie be-
hind the zoning laws and building
codes, and he uses his complete
knowledge to design order, conveni-
ence, structural efficiency, esthetic
validity, safety, comfort, and pride of
possession into the project, thus in-
suring its social success as well as its
financial productivity. An architect
brings to a project the proven ability
to enhance human and capital values.
These qualifications are enough to
meet any challenge. The trouble is
that they are not used to their fullest
extent. Rebuilding projects as devel-
oped under urban renewal are not the
result of natural growth. They are
the result of broad-axe surgery. They
are the end result of elaborate real
property surveys, research, projections,
analyses, and educated presumptions
which contain just enough uncertain-
ty to make them slightly speculative.
That is where the sponsor comes
in. Sponsors are actually speculators
under the present system; and in order
to progress from idea to reality they


*f ^,V- **: -...*,*" '
. ;. o ,,.,


4 .. ,- .- ** ,
. 4 l ,
Am
.AEm



y L- ii- i
y ^^ **;^ .^ i' ^ jn to-'5"

^*'^^A~j.^&JIi .-


RESIDENTIAL

INTERIORS


Working closely with architect

and client for residential

decorations and furnishings

of distinction


Architect: Henry Harding, A.I.A.
Interior Designer: Richard Plumer Miami


RICHARD PLUMER

-A WaML


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775
20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






must prepare a complete package that
will have the best possible chance for
success from their point of view and
the point of view of their stockhold-
ers. And that point of view is profits.
Although a sponsor's package deal
is based upon statistics and is gener-
ally approved on its statistical merits,
a certain amount of illustrative effort
is considered desirable for the benefit
of the investors, the public, and the
interested officials. Here is where the
architect comes in-as an illustrator
of a sponsor's statistical program.
Sponsors like to run things their way.
So when they call in an architect to
illustrate their project, they are apt
to call in one they have reason to be-
lieve will squeeze all the rental space
possible out of the lot, will cut all
possible corners, will get building per-
mits, certificates of occupancy, etc.,
etc., expeditiously, will provide an ap-
pearance of architecture to the proj-
ect, and will generally do as he is
told.
The sponsor's budget for "archi-
tecture," is very limited, especially
in the early speculative stages of the
project. And once it is in the works
with all papers signed, why bother?


Also, once the papers are signed, it
becomes increasingly difficult to re-
vise the designs, even when the need
is obvious to all concerned. A kind of
rigor mortis sets in which is called
"finalizing the contract documents,"
and which insures a generous amount
of built-in, prenatal obsolescence.
There is a similarity between to-
day's Sponsors and yesterday's Pro-
moters in that neither seem interested
in operating their projects once these
are built. They are more interested
in the immediate aspect of full occu-
pancy, fat rent rolls and a quick sale
than in long haul efficiency, low
maintenance costs and happy tenants.
Esthetic validity, environmental
congeniality, and many other impoTr-
tant considerations are provided more
often by fortunate circumstances than
by the requirements of a project pro-
gram. And right here is where a lot
of hard thinking and work has to be
done if tax money is to be spent wise-
ly. Programming a project is not easy.
It takes a lot of time, knowledge, ex-
perience, imagination, and ability.
Programs should be prepared for each
important segment of a project.
Professional architects, engineers,


financiers, planners, builders, admin-
istrators, and operators should com-
bine their efforts to describe and illus-
trate what should be done. The pub-
lic, whose money is being spent,
should approve the whole idea; and
public officials should enforce the
program to the last detail. This
method will eliminate the element of
speculation-which is not very great
anyway, but which has produced some
handsome, unexpected windfall prof-
its for sponsors. There should be noth-
ing unexpected in the financial con-
duct of a renewal project. The fact
that such unexpected things happen
is proof of faulty planning.
The architect's share in planning
some of these projects is relatively
minor compared to what it would be
if he were translating a well-defined
program into capital improvements.
Architects would like to accept Dr.
Weaver's challenge in the spirit of
public service, and they would per-
form their professional duties to their
communities with the same responsi-
ble devotion and the same profession-
al skill that characterizes the active
interest of the legal, medical, and
other professions in public affairs.


Fulfilling the original
concept of architect
and client for
outstanding business
interior designs.


Architect: Kemp, Bunch and Jackson
Interior Design: Richard Plumer
Business Interiors


RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORS


1,



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BUS


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Telephone PLaza 1-9775
MAY, 1962 21







News & Notes


The Georgia Council . .
Operations of AIA State Organiza-
tions have proved so effective that
more interest than ever is being shown
in them. Latest state to adopt the
idea is Georgia. Representatives of
Georgia's three AIA chapters have
drawn up a set of tentative by-laws
for what will be called -assuming a
charter is forthcoming from the Insti-
tute the "Georgia Council of the
AIA." This will be a State Organiza-
tion of the AIA, similar in functions
and operations to the FAA. As such
it will ". . promote and forward the
objects of the AIA within the state
of Georgia" .... and will give ". .
unified representation in all state-wide
matters affecting the architectural pro-
fession within the State."
So far as is now known, architects in
Georgia are not now seeking regional
status from the AIA. However, since
Florida became a region of the AIA,
several other states with strong and
active state associations have sought
and have gained regional status.


Florida's first Regional Director, the
late SANFORD W. GOING, FAIA, was a
strong supporter of the regional idea.
Hle advocated regional status for each
state as the most effective way in
which the Institute could become
active in meeting and solving an im-
portant series of problems peculiar to
each regional area.
A strong organization capable of
representing interests of AIA chapters
at a state level appears to be a pre-
requisite for the Institute's consider-
ing new applications for regional
status. Thus, if the Georgia Council
is chartered by the AIA, and if it
develops rapidly into a strong and
effective state-wide body, Georgia
might well achieve regional status in
the reasonably near future.


New Competition . .
A . L i 1 '- i-' L -L .. .. .. '. ^' --


Announcement nas just Deen r
of an AIA approved competit
the development of an historic
morial park for Cincinnati's


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A,'.~


For .~- c ulic convenri.-r,,e .and c u toivter .
l-i :'ip- l s -l-,- >-r 's' ; ,-rvtlr.,q ,OuJ nr t .. '
h l..I Il.in i it. i rj1eir _. .ii ii.irrn lure
p ,. : e C o r ,1 ,-i n _, r l I .:. r l.-r > -r i ', i n f r e O- 6 r
(pl.r lv o. .: .uIl:.- ), l.:-..burrn r .le-,!inc :
rang C-iop, deerp inl '.0l l r.i, 1,'l :..:ln-
r,,ner, l'%:..:I-up s1,r-
ag-.Ju.; I in rl r,._Cr,r
wyer

BUFFETT KITCHENS v


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:*;.r. -f I r :ni] l p .:ci m-' :
or full information, write
Dwyer Products of Florida
nc. Suite 621, Dupont Plaza
Center, 300 Biscayne Boule
'ard Way, Miami 32, Florida


decclvc If figures released last month by
ion for the F. W. Dodge Corp. are indica-
cal-me- tive, this year's construction volume
water- promises to live up to the forecast
-- estimates made last year. They showed
that, relative to Metropolitan Miami,
the cumulative total of building con-
tracts for the first two months of 1962
amounted to more than $43-million
-an 18 percent increase over the cor-
A responding period of 1961. A break-
down of totals showed non- resi-
dential construction up 25 percent,
at $14,331,000; and residential con-
tracts up 15 percent at $28,698,000.
As to the state as a whole, a cumu-
-" lative total for the January-February
period this year amounted to $249,-
980,000, a figure 24 percent larger
than that for the first two months
total in 1961. A categorical break-
down of this total showed non-resi-
S dential building up 16 percent at
$61,713,000; residential construction
up 23 percent, at $154,726,000; and
heavy engineering up a whopping 44
percent at $33,523,000.
These figures are notable in that
they reflect only aggregate totals of
construction contracts. They do not
include estimates of future construc-
"- '..: tion; nor do they report volumes of
contracts for future construction dur-
ing the period noted. If the 1962 vol-
ume of construction in Florida were
to continue along the same upward
(Continued on Page 24)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


front. The competition is open to all
architects residing in the U. S. and
registered to practice. It carries three
awards of $6,500, $2,500 and $1,000
-and a commission for architectural
services to the first-place competitor.
Closing date for registration as a
competitor is May 15, 1962, and clos-
ing date for questions relative to the
terms of the program is June 8, 1962.
Submissions must be in the hands of
the competition committee by Sep-
tember 14. Announcement of awards
has been scheduled for October 15.
Sponsor of the competition is The
Cincinnatus Association, a non-profit
civic organization. The professional
advisor is WALTER A. TAYLOR, FAIA,
and applications for a copy of the
competition program and registration
form should be addressed to him at
School of Architecture, Ohio Uni-
versity, Athens, Ohio.



Trend Is Still Up . .


w



































Planned "Light-for-Living"*

MSells More Homes


E BETTE Ample Light-for-Living, in every Medallion Home -
indoors and outdoors adds much, much more to the visible
value of the house than the cost of the lighting itself (just a
tiny percentage of the total cost). It's an inexpensive way to
E DALLION enhance the glamour and decorative beauty of a home... to
make a small area look larger... to accentuate the safety and
to Light-for-Living and
usepower wiring with comfort of working areas (so important to homemakers). It's a
itlets and switches to silent salesman that helps put every Medallion Home in the
hting fixtures and best possible light. .. and sparks an emotional appeal that pays
tomorrow's electrical off in more sales.
Also wth all-electric Light-for-Living is another Medallion Home advantage
ic appliances, includ- stressed in the multi-million dollar national campaign to help
ss electric range and sell homes easier and faster. You can gain by recommending
electric water heater, the MEDALLION standards of electrical excellence for homes
in every price range. Call any FP&L office for full details.

-7..S fCEame lessTO
/-..S CHEAPER, TOO!


POWER & LIGHT
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


COMPANY


MAY, 1962 2:


IV


THE M
* Certifies
to Full Hoi
plenty of ou
handle lig
today's and
appliances.
kitchen equ
major electr
ing flamele
flameless e


FLORIDA






News & Notes____
(Continued from Page 22)

trend line, the year's total could reach
just under $1.5-billion an all-time
high and a figure that would probably
equal, or even exceed, the state's two
traditionally foremost revenue produc-
ers-agriculture and tourism.


Changes . .
JOHN B. GESBOCKER has announced
the opening of his own office at 365
5th Avenue South, Naples. He was
formerly a principal in the West Palm
Beach firm of Robson and Gesbocker.
NORMAN N. ROBSON will retain his
office at the firm's former address,
937 Belvedere Road, West Palm
Beach.
TIMOTHY H. BARROWS, has opened
an office for the practice of archi-
tecture at 110 E. Palmetto Park Road,
Boca Raton. Phone is 399-4997.
GORDON SEVERUD and C. FRASUER
KNIGHT have announced the forma-
tion of a partnership with a firm name
of SEVERUD AND KNIGHT, AIA Archi-


tects. The new firm's address is 2971
Coral Way, Miami 45. Phone is
HI 4-6114.

STEPHEN M. DAVIs has moved his
office to a new location at 4700 Le
June Rd., Coral Gables. Phone is
667-6409.

A. H. HOSKING has opened a new
professional office at 2123 East At-
lantic Boulevard, Suite 4, Pompano
Beach. Phone is WH 2-0303.
JOSEPH J. DE BRITA and ROBERT
R. MURPHY have formed an associa-
tion for the practice of architecture
at 12865 W. Dixie Highway, North
Miami.

LAMP-BROWARD & ASSOCIATES, arch-
itects and engineers, have announced
three new office locations: 372 Al-
meria Ave., Coral Gables: 419 W.
Causeway, Merritt Island, P. 0. Box
562 Cocoa; and 112 E. Osceola, Stu-
art, P. 0. Drawer 315.

The Bradenton firm of CROLL AND
WILKINSON has been dissolved. DOUG-
LAS E. CROLL'S new address is 205
Walcaid Building, Bradenton.


State Board...
(Continued from Page 19)
quent architectural practice. The sec-
ond involves the legal means for pro-
tecting the public from operations of
unregistered, therefore irresponsible-
and often incompetent and unscrupu-
lous-individuals.
Solutions to both problems are
linked, to a substantial degree, to
budgetary considerations. Currently,
it appears that the Board's activities
have been expanded to a point be-
yond which it is impractical to go
without additional financial resources.
The Board firmly believes in the basic
principle of professional self-regula-
tion which is implicit in the statute
from which it derives its operating
authority. Thus, it appears that any
substantial enlargement of its present
regulatory program must be financed
by the architectural profession
through an increase in registration
and registration renewal fees. In fact,
this course has already been sug-
gested by certain thoughtful leaders
in the profession; and it may well be
that a future proposal will be made
to the Legislature toward the end of


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let

ICONCEALEDI

telephone wiring

put more sales

appeal in your homes
More and more today it's the quality
"extras" that sell homebuyers. And
concealed telephone wiring is just such a
prestige feature.
Lifetime concealed wiring provides plenty of
built-in outlets throughout the house ...
offers maximum flexibility in phone
placement or rearrangement as family needs
grow or change. And there's never any need to
mar walls or woodwork with additional wiring.
Find out soon how easy it is to
give your homes added sales appeal with
concealed telephone wiring.
Just call your Telephone Business Office.


Southern Bell

V 14~w~ LU#. ku


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






setting a new maximum registration
fee schedule through an amendment
to Section 467.12 of the current stat-
ute.
In setting standards of technical
competency, education and practical
experience as prerequisites for regis-
tration, the Board has followed as
closely as possible recommendations
of the NCARB for two chief reasons.
First, these provide a carefully con-
sidered method for testing the knowl-
edge and abilities of candidates for
registration. Second, conformation
with NCARB standards enables can-
didates who gain registration in Flor-
ida more easily to gain registration
in other states as well and thus pro-
vides a basis for a wider and more
generally successful practice.
However, as noted above, Seection
467.08 of the statute has restricted
what the NCARB considers to be a
practical minimum of practical ex-
perience as a basis for registration. The
NCARB standard sets three years as
a sort of professional internship for
graduates of architectural schools.
Currently Florida's law designates
only a single year as sufficient; and
thus the Board has no choice but to
accept for examination, those appli-
cants who are otherwise qualified, but
who lack the amount of practical ex-
perience deemed necessary by
NCARB.
This condition is showing itself as
unfortunate by the large percentage
of failures at each examination ses-
sion. .It is showing as such also in
the relatively large number of can-
didates who apply for re-examination
after past unsuccessful attempts. This
involves, of course, an item of consid-
erable expenditure for which the
Board must budget. But chiefly it is
wasteful of the time and energies of
Board members who must process and
too often re-process applicants who
are insufficiently prepared for archi-
tectural practice.
Improvement of this situation -
and a consequent improvement, the
Board believes, in the quality of fu-
ture architectural service to the pub-
lic-could come from a revision in
Section 467.08 to provide the three-
year term of practical experience
called for by the NCARB. This
would serve the public interest
through improved technical stand-
ards; and it would also tend to re-
duce the severity of some problems of
administration and technical routine
the Board now faces.
MAY, 1962


REVOLUTIONARY

i. ,New .


Sohui Core Flush Doors ......


No Exposed
Crossbands at
Stiles Edges
0
1/2 Inch Trim
*
Inbuilt
Resistance to
Moisture


Lifetime
Guarantee


4.~4
~ii


"THE NAME ON THE DOOR MEANS EVERYTHING"

Architect". of discrimination specify -Sal

for sheer beauty, prestige and unsurpassed

quality. For more moderate installations s)pecify

Timemiaster or Doormaster for quality only

IPIK can provide.

IPIK Solid Core Construction is Engineered

for Endurance Proved I) Performance.


' For ac/citional inlormrttiont and brochure e, ntact: ..

A1 d l




ait Palmetto lCll Palmeto 2-1011






KEEP YOUR CLIENTS COOL


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4 these








iwith .
_
with

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MASONRY ILL
D INSUlATIO.



Water repellent Zonolite Masonry Fill Insula-
tion cuts heat transfer through concrete block
or brick cavity walls up to 50% and more. It
costs as little as 100 per square foot, installed.
Zonolite is also bug-proof; it's treated with
Kepone, a long-lived chemical that kills in-
sects, including termites. For complete infor-
mation about water-repellent Zonolite Masonry
Fill Insulation, write or call


Zonolite Company
135 So. La Salle Street, Chicago 3, Illinois


Utilities Plan for

DEVELOPERS
Consumers Utilities Corp. offers a
plan for developers and builders to
aid in the financing, construction and
operation of water and sewer systems.
A publicly owned company, Consumers
Utilities has constructed and operates
systems serving numerous Florida
communities. Our resources and know-
how result in our "full service" plan
for assisting in providing for your
utility needs.
For complete details and brochure, write,
wire or phone: Office of the President,
Consumers Utilities Corp.,
4 P.O. Box 872A, Sarasota, Fla.
S Phone 355-7174


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


S
:5









4..
4S*


41-


t filling

~ ~ ~ 0 .,.. .. -


Civic Ugliness...
(Continued from Page 6)
have been built in our country lately;
not many public commissions for
sculpture or murals have been auth-
orized; very few museums, parks, bo-
tanical gardens or even zoos have
been built since W.P.A. days. Any
one of these could be a real project
for a committee, working closely with
schools of art and architecture to do
studies of such projects. Instituting
competitions and awarding prizes is
a good way to inspire the widest par-
ticipation.
Our present administration has
sponsored the growth of the arts by
associating itself with men like ROB-
ERT FROST and AUGUST HECKSCHER,
Special Consultant to the White
House on the Arts. This sponsorship
must be supported -and supported
widely-by active committees. They
should offer aid and endorsement to
the appointees on matters concerning
the arts in their own communities.
This could lead to official national
recognition of the arts as an aid to
the survival of democratic life. Now
is the time to show that freedom of






expression in the arts is a national
policy.
It is not difficult to envision influ-
ential committees creating an atmos-
phere in which discussion of esthetic
values and responsibility is no longer
considered bad taste-or slightly
effeminate! Recognition of the cre-
ative individual is gradually growing
in opposition to the "personality
cult."
Can we also end this baffling con-
tradiction: As long as a product or
building "works" and sells, it is, by
our distorted definition, "beautiful."
What a frightening disregard for
beauty as a desirable end result!
Broad public education and activity
is needed to change this distorted
definition. It must be changed and
we intend to start work tomorrow,
here in New York, developing the
first committee on esthetic responsi-
bility. I am certain you will respond
when called upon to participate in
this movement of national necessity.
I am sure that many have questions
concerning the formation of com-
mittees, You are invited to send them
to me at 200 East 37th Street, New
York 16.



ADVERTISER'S INDEX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 8
Consumers Utilties Corp. . 26
Dunan Brick Yards . 3rd Cover
Dwyer Products of Florida . 22
Florida Gas Transmission Co. 18-19
Florida Home Heating Institute 28
Florida Portland Cement Div. 13
Florida Power and Light Co. 23
Houdialle-Span, Inc. . 16
Merry Brothers Brick & Tile Co. 7
Miami Window Corp. . .1
Panel Structures, Inc. . 4
Richard Plumer . . 20-21
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. . 25
Reflectal Corp. . . 5
Solite . . . 3
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. . 24
Vogue Industries, Inc. . 6
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27
Zonolite Company . . 26

MAY, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


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TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


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HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
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We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
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OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154











inR.
ARCHITECT:
We borrowed this
Woe bouncing babe from
S-the Roaring Twenties
. to illustrate an oil
Seating ad. She is
demonstrating one
fi way to keep warm in
a chilly house: dance
the Charleston. But
the ad goes on to say
there's a smarter, eas-
ier way: warm up the
house. And that the
smartest, easiest,
most economical
method it to install
A OIL home heating
equipment, the kind
that cuts heating bills
half.
This is no new story
to your clients and
-prospective clients.
They know by now
that oil's the right
answer for home heat-
ing in Florida. They
will welcome your
S1 recommendation of
S: cheaper, safer, all
'round better OIL
home heating.











FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET MIAMI
28 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





- .1 1-


Ornamental
Barandas

These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay %\e
import from Vene=uela
They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama.
But they have the same
sort of slight color
variations anc occa;.:oral
kiln markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished x\all.


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iltll l ;g


"5"5FA.
Lo .i 4.',_ ,-.--"
7.7*'*


I N


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS,
INCORPORATED
MIAMI, FLORIDA TU 7-1525


F


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On Tampa Bay...


It's St. Petersburg in 1962 . and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
Chapter- whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition . .


-IM


.* __ . ..

-. . ,... -,/ -.-- ., : -


S .. .; .. -


Headquarters of the FAA's 1962 Convention will be the Soreno
Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!



UAL FAA CONVENTION
1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG


.NtP3 -




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