• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Look replaces bunch as state board...
 New incinerator standards
 A new downtown for Sarasota
 Three from East coast elected to...
 Seven pointers toward a new and...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00094
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: April 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00094
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Look replaces bunch as state board member
        Page 4
        Page 5
    New incinerator standards
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A new downtown for Sarasota
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Three from East coast elected to fellowship
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Seven pointers toward a new and better lien law
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














































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On Tampa Bay...


It's St. Petersburg in 1962 . and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
Chapter whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition . .


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Headquarters of the FAA's 1962 Convention will be the Soreno
Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!


IUAL FAA CONVENTION

1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBUR(


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


In 7hi Issue ---




Look Replaces Bunch as State Board Member . .

New Incinerator Standards . . . . .
By Frank L. Cross, Jr., and David B. Lee

A New Downtown for Sarasota . . . .
By Jack West, AIA

Three From East Coast Elected to Fellowship . .


Seven Pointers Toward a New and Better
By Roy M. Pooley, Jr., AIA


News and Notes . ...

Advertisers' Index . .


F/A Panorama .




F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
O. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER...
This is part of a sketch by Jack West, AIA, to suggest how downtown
Sarasota might look from the air if current efforts to start an important
urban renewal project are successful. The project, details of which start on
page 14, would span the bayfront sweep of US Routes 41 and 301 and would
wipe out four blocks of "business slums" that are now blighting the center
of the city.


Lien Law .


. 19


. 20


. 27

. Third Cover



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
.Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 50 cents; sub-
scription, $5.00 per year . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Bernard W. Hartman

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12 962

NUMBER 4 196

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 14


. 16











































* In the prize-w inning new Second Presby-
terian Church t.,f Ft. Lauderdale. for
iw which Harold E. Wagoner. AIA. was archi-
tect. TERRAZZO has been used extenively
\\ith dramatic effect. The broad .sweep
off the lighting cove facia \\wa worked o.ut
with \\hite marble? chips bedded in
smooth white cement . .


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Membership in FTA is assurance of integrity, experience and skill. Call any
of these officers for help on any phase of terrazzo use or installation . .

SEAL W. ADAMS, JR., President, 700 N. W. 7th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, JA 2-3442 . WM. E.
OWENS, Vice President, Box 508, New Smyrna Beach, GA 8-9051 . AVERY ARENT, Secy-treas.,
Box 1879, Clearwater, 446-8373 . LOUIS FRANCESCON, Director, Dist. 1, 2500 S. W. 28th Lane,
Miami, HI 6-6037 . CARL V. CESERY, Director, Dist. 2, 316 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, EL 4-4604
.. ROLAND D. SAMUELS, Director, Dist. 3, 181 Atlantic Drive, Maitland, TE 8-2061 . HENRY C.
GIGLIO, Director, Dist. 4, 3719 W. Carmen, Tampa,RE 6-1341 . W. K. WEINHOLD, Director, Dist. 5,
2175 12th St., Sarasota, 955-1525 . .



FLORIDA TERRAZZO ASSOCIATION

i AVERY ARENT, Acting Executive Secretary
ASSOCIATrON P. O. BOX 1879, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA TELEPHONE 446-8373


APRIL, 1962








Look Replaces Bunch



As State Board Member


JAMES H. LOOK, AIA, partner in
the Pensacola firm of Look and Mor-
rison, has been appointed to fill the
vacancy in the State Board of Archi-
tecture created by the recent resigna-
tion of FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, FAIA,
of Jacksonville. The appointment was
made by Governor FARRIS BRYANT
under provision of Chapter 467 of the
Florida Statutes and will extend to
June 30, 1965, to cover the unexpired
portion of the four-year term to which
Mr. Bunch was re-appointed-last year.
Resignation of Mr. Bunch, who
was first appointed to the Board in
1957, and has served two terms as
the Board's president, was relatively
sudden and unexpected. It was made
necessary, according to Mr. Bunch,
through the pressure of private affairs
in connection with the Jacksonville
firm of Kemp, Bunch and Jackson of
which he is a particularly active part-
ner.
The new Board member is a native
Floridian, born in Panama City and
a 1935 graduate of the U/F College
of Architecture and Fine Arts. He
became a principal in the firm of
Yonge, Look and Morrison in 1951,
which after the death of Mr. Yonge
in 1957, became the present firm of
Look and Morrison. His AIA mem-
bership dates from 1946; and he was
a charter member and treasurer of
the Florida Northwest Chapter when
it was organized in 1956.
Civic activities include member-
ships in the Pensacola Building Code
Board of Appeals, the Quadricenten-
nial Board of Governors, the Pensa-
cola Chamber of Commerce, Art As-
sociation and Historical Society. He
is also an advisory member of the
Escambia County Advisory Board.


Three New Legal
Actions Completed
Complaints of improper practices
on the part of registered architects
and the illegal practice of architecture
by unregistered persons continue to
be filed with the Florida State Board
of Architecture. Some of them are
4


what the legal profession might call
"capricious"-or of insufficient legal
weight to merit more than acknow-
ledgment. Some are not backed up
with evidence legally sufficient to
justify an immediate course of action
on the Board's part. Most, however,
are valid in that they disclose some
phase of really improper practice.
All complaints, however, are inves-
tigated by the Board. And in every
case the Board takes such action as
the situation basic, to the complaint
may indicate as necessary. Thus the
law-enforcement phase of the Board's
continuing activities has become one
of the most important of phases of
its work. At a recent special meeting
held in Ft. Lauderdale last month,
the Board's "legal agenda" showed a
total of 74 complaints alleging im-
proper practice. Of these, at least
eight have been investigated and
shown to be substantial enough to
call for legal action by the Board to
enjoin continuance of the practice
on which the original complaint was
based.
Three such actions have recently
been completed, all against individ-
uals practicing architecture without
first having been qualified by registra-
tion to do so. One was in West Palm
Beach. The judge of the circuit court
for Palm Beach County issued a final
decree of injunction against GENE
ARMSTRONG, individually and doing
business as Gene Armstrong, Designer
and Builder. Another was signed by
the judge of the circuit court for Vo-
lusia County and enjoined R. A.
GRAHAM from "violating the laws of
the State of Florida relating to the
practice of architecture . .," which,
the court said, ". . shall include prac-
ticing architecture, holding himself
out as'an architect, or offering to prac-
tice architecture, all within the State
of Florida, without being first duly
qualified and registered to do so as
provided by law . ."
The third court order was issued
in Lakeland by the judge of the cir-
cuit court for Polk County. It en-
joined ROY A. SHAFFER, an unreg-
istered man doing business as Shafco


:*,u 41


Q ill" t?


JAMES H. LOOK, AIA


Engineering Limited, from continu-
ing his illegal practice of architecture.
As in all similar cases where the
Board has had to seek a court order
to enforce compliance with the law
regulating architectural practice, these
final decrees of injunction probably
mark the close of each individual's
case as far as the Board is concerned.
Should any person disregard the
court's order and resume the practice
of architecture without having first
been qualified and registered to do
so, he is then in contempt of court.
The further discipline of such an
individual is then up to the court
itself-which can impose any penalty
it deems advisable. The only con-
nection of the Board with such a
situation would be merely that of
bringing information and evidence of
disregard of a court order to the at-
tention of the court.

Seventy-two New
Registrations Granted
Seventy-two more persons have
been registered to practice architec-
ture in Florida. This was the total
number of registrations issued by the
State Board of Architecture as a result
of its week-long meeting in Ft. Laud-
erdale during January, this year. Of
the total, 34 registrations were granted
by examination to residents of Flor-
ida. The remaining 38 were granted
on the basis of the applicants having
been already registered and practicing
in other states.
Those passing the examinations for
registration are:
(Continued on Page 26)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Design for Color and Efficiency

with


UT4IoTY Lni.L

and

CODE-APPROVED* UTILITY WALL
Take advantage of these newly-approved cavity wall features obtainable when
you use Merry Jumbo Utility Brick! Increase in allowable height makes this wall
suitable for almost any type of industrial building Increased cavity width (now
a full 412") gives greater insulating value and provides ample space for chasing
of conduits and pipe. New beauty is possible through use of Merry Brick's pleas-
ing selection of pastel colors for light-colored, permanent-finish interiors, rather
than designing wall with a concrete back-up requiring frequent painting. And,
of course, Merry's Controlled-Color Jumbo Utility Brick goes up fast, cuts construc-
tion costs.

Jumbo Closures to Jumbo Utility Headers
maintain bond. as masonry ties.



ENGINEERING DATA
Allowable Working Stress: 14,400 Ibs.
per linear foot (Type B mortar)
Maximum Distance Between Supports:
18 ft. (Hor. or Vert.)
Maximum Height (Bearing): 35 ft.
Sound Resistance (Noise Reduction):
50-60 db.
U Value (Uninsulated): .33
U Value (Insulated: Hollow space filled
with coated Vermiculite or 1" Sty- Southern
rofoam): .12-.13 Slandard Building
Fire Rating: 4 hrs. Code, 1962 Revision

Call or write for more information or ask the Merry Brick
representative who calls on you



Bhirll d6n24 Td2 6 upa
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APRIL, 1962







New Incinerator Standards

By FRANK L. CROSS, JR. and DAVID B. LEE
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering, Florida State Board of Health


Due to the growing interest in air
pollution and the increasing number
of incinerators being installed in the
state, the Bureau of Sanitary Engi-
neering of the Florida State Board of
Health in April, 1961, initiated a
program for the review of plans for
the approval of refuse disposal facil-
ities.
With the cooperation of the in-
cinerator manufacturers operating in
the state, we were able to compile a
list of the units which were installed
prior to, 1961. Although this list is
not complete, it includes 266 installa-
tions. In addition to these installa-
tions, this Agency has reviewed and
approved the plans for an adidtional
83 installations since January of 1961.
The following graph is representative
of the current trend in Florida incin-
erator installations and clearly indi-
cates the need for reasonable regula-
tions in this field.


During July of 1961, the Bureau of
Sanitary Engineering established an
incinerator design guide based upon
the current trends in the incinerator
field in this and other states. In
January, 1962, three different types
of units were tested by personnel from
the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering
in Southwest Florida. The results of
these tests were compared with our
guide; and we found that a close cor-
relation existed between the test re-
sults and the proposed design guide.
There were some minor changes, but
essentially the guide remained the
same.
In March, 1962, a memorandum
from this Agency was forwarded to all
architects and consulting engineers in
the state indicating the proper sub-
mittal procedures for review of plans
by this Agency and a copy of our
finalized incinerator design guide. We
believe the guide to be very flexible


and specifically indicates that every
incinerator unit and each installation
will be reviewed according to its own
individual merits. This guide is gen-
erally for chain stores, apartment
buildings, etc., for units with a capac-
ity less than 1,000 pounds per hour.
This guide is now available from the
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering upon
request.
The Bureau recognizes that archi-
tects are probably most interested in
information concerning units which
are to be installed in multiple family
dwellings. So far, we have encoun-
tered four types of installations for
apartment style dwellings:
(1) Single chamber flue-fed units.
(2) Multiple chamber flue-fed units
with connecting stack.
(3) Multiple chamber unit with
single stack and separate charg-
ing chute. (Incinerator is hand
fed.)
(4) Multiple chamber unit with
separate stack and charging
chute both entering the in-
cinerator. The charging chute
is specially equipped for this
purpose.
(Continued on Page 26)


Be SURE of Shower-Scald Protection


...you can with



TEMPERA


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within one degree for
any type of building
S. .Prevents scalds,
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;- a". i-i^ .,iF&I Ir TEMPF'ER.A iir rh.e t.h.rtr.r T,:.%,rs ar
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SDade Pln.mb ,It.. Inr: l-.,allri

For literature and technical information
u tcmt MO 5-5032
P ew44su e 6eomen4atin 7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43.
LEEWARD SALES, INC.
WE 6-2973
)RATION 4035 N. Interstate, 1339 Stadler Dr., Ft. Myers
JI IUN PORTLAND, OREGON
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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ABOVE: Swnging lhe panels inlo place
LEFT: The prestressed components
BELOW: Model of Science complex when finished


.4rchitbctl: Minoru Yamasaki & Associates. Detroit
Naramore. Bain. Bradv & Johanson. S.attle
Precast Concrete i'nati A.sociated Sand & Gravel, Inc..
EverEtL. Washington
Enginer4 Worth;ngton. Killing. Helle & Jackson. Seattle


...wherever concrete


must be beautiful


The United States Science Pavillion is one of
two principal theme buildings of the Seattle
World's Fair. After the Fair it becomes the city's
cultural center.
The load-bearing S-type stud wall panels are
32 and 52 feet long. They are faced with Trinity
White portland cement and white quartzite ag-
gregate. They are prestressed. The high strength


of Trinity White and the high-early-strength gray
cement back-up permitted the forms to be stripped
in 12 to 14 hours with steam curing. Panels are
secured in place by either welding or bolting.
Problems of repeated turning, handling and
transporting these massive members were neatly
and ingeniously solved with specially outfitted
lift trucks.


- use



APRIL, 1962


Trinity White

A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY



Offices: Chicago, Illinois Chatta-
nooga, Tennessee Dallas, Texas
Fort Worth, Texas Houston, Texas
Fredonia, Kansas Fort Wayne,
Indiana Jackson, Michigan Tampa,
Florida Miami, Florida Los Angeles,
California
7











Of ,U^ APRIL, 1962
Good NEWS about Natural Gas...


UP TO MODERN STANDARDS This term used by Housing Authority,
City of Orlando, to describe results of conversion of 250 units at Griffin
Park from oil to natural gas. Conversion made on recommendation of en-
gineering firm employed to determine MOST ECONOMICAL UTILITY to
replace OBSOLETE fuel oil equipment tenants had been using for cooking,
water heating and space heating. After installing 250 gas ranges, 250 gas
water heaters and 252 gas fired space heaters, Housing Authority noted in
its 1961 annual report, "This change-over brings the 250 apartments at
Griffin Park up to modern standards. "

SAFETY! Continuing our study of municipal records to find out which
form of energy is SAFEST in Homes, Businesses and Factories, we found
the following:

Records of City of Miami Fire Department show that in period from Jan.
1, 1960 through Dec. 31, 1960 --- 176 fires attributed to ELECTRICITY,
78 to FUEL OIL and ONLY 27 to GAS, including bottle gas, natural gas and
manufactured gas.

Records of DeLand Fire Department show that in six-year period 1955
to'1960, inclusive, 56 fires attributed to FUEL OIL, 30 to ELECTRICITY
and ONLY 7 to GAS, including bottle gas, natural gas, manufactured gas.

SPECIAL REPORT for municipal and private water systems in Florida:
A 25% saving in pumping costs was achieved by the Monrovia, Calif., muni-
cipal water system by switching from ELECTRIC MOTORS to NATURAL
GAS ENGINES. For free copy of case history report on Monrovia's exper-
ience write National Engine Use Council, P. O. Box 76175, Los Angeles 5,
Calif., or The Florida Natural Gas Association, 206 E. New York Avenue,
DeLand, Florida.

ANOTHER BIG SWITCHI Two 60 KW generators driven by natural gas
engines have been installed by Central Florida Gas. Corp. at State Restaur-
ant and Motel on U.S. No. 27 near Haines City. These gas-powered gener-
ators supply all electricity for lighting, air conditioning, heating, cooking,
water heating and largest electric sign on Route 27 in Florida.

SALES SOARING! Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association reports that
in November, 1961 (latest month for which data are available) manufacturers
shipped 11.7% more GAS RANGES and 19.3% more AUTOMATIC GAS WATER
HEATERS than in same month of 1960.

COOKING WITH GAS! American Baking Co., Miami, (MERITA BREAD)
has converted its 90-foot-long battery of ovens to natural gas. Florida Gas
Utilities Co. has also converted boilers of Sanitary Linen Service, City
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Co. and Colonial Cafeteria, a unit in the Polly
Davis chain, from oil to natural gas.



Reproduction of any or all items on this pake prohibited without written permission
from Florida Natural Gas Association, 206 E. New York Ave., DeLand, Florida.
8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











FOR


THE

0


E MAN There are cars you buy for "finned" status
symbols. Cars you buy for economy or compactness.
N THE But this European race and rally-winner is for men
who are accustomed to making quick decisions and
M OVE getting immediate accurate response. This is for
men who admire precise performance. This is for
U men who like a car to "look like" a car-and have it
U P prove its roadworthiness at every turn. This is...


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APRIL, 1962


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)IA


":l ILLUMINATED WALL BRACKET spotlights handrails
in corridors and stairways * Incandescent recessed lighting
provides added safety and decorative night lighting for:

HOSPITALS HOMES FOR AGED THEATRES HOTELS SHIPS


mA / I/D A/ O F P I T T S B U R G H

GENERAL CATALOG OF CO M P L E T E B L U M C R A FT LINE AVA I LABLE ON REQUEST
COPYRIGHT 1961 BY BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH 460 MELWOOD STREET, PITTSBURGH 13, PENNSYLVANIA


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FRANK E. WATSON, AIA, The Sage of Florida
South, presented this learned discourse last month
to the membership of Miami's Architectural Secre-
taries Association. As a masterpiece of innuendo,
it accurately reflects the long and careful research
on which it has been developed. Only the names
have been changed to protect the innocent . .










The Making of...




The Perfect Secretary


This happens to be a subject about
which I have given considerable
thought over the years and you
cannot give considerable thought to
a matter as tantalizing as this without
a plan. And planning is my business.
And if planning is my business, how
am I going to keep it to myself, so
that my secretary won't know? And
as she knows everything about my
business, she must also know every-
thing about my plans which were
primarily concerned with a plan as to
what it takes to make the perfect
secretary. Do I make myself clear?
Well, let's try again Take it from
the top.
I am sure that you ladies here
assembled must also have ratiocinated
- conversely to be sure along
similar lines; and, as you know, the
best defense is to be offensive. Well,
I've met plenty of offensive people
in my time present company in-
cluded, of course but none so
offensive as that ornery, no goodnik,
former secretary of mine who taught
me the twist. And it was quite a
twist, believe me; she sure straight-
ened me out on a number of things
- the desk, the waste basket and
finally the floor! As I said, my former
secretary but that was long ago:
22 BM before MILLIE.


I was going to give tonight's talk
strictly off the cuff. But on second
thought and after the third, and
the fourth I thought maybe you
might be interested in one of those
prepared speeches. They come under
the name of instant talks they
have instant everything else, why not
instant talks? So you take the paper
they come in, mix it with three mar-
tinis and you get the damnedest talk
you ever heard.
So, without further adieu . You
know, I never did know what that
meant. I've heard it used by accom-
plished speakers also neophytes
(that's another word for Jaycees) -
and on the Telly, and I'm always
puzzled: is it adieu from the French,
meaning good-bye? If so, this would
be a good place to quit while I'm
still ahead. Or is it the ado like in
the play "Much Ado About Nothing"
- which would have made a good
title for this talk, too or better,
a sub-title. The Making of a Perfect
Secretary, or Much Ado About No-
thing.
But let's go back for the making
of the perfect secretary begins in the
Back Office naturally. Most archi-
tects' offices, like innumerable other
things, have a front and a back and
rarely the twain shall meet except


possibly during coffee breaks and
then only if the Boss is buying and
you alone know how often that is.
Perfect Secretaries are hard to
come by a mere matter of sta-
tistics, the most vital of which are
38 26 38. Those among you who
have complied may disregard that
which is to follow and complacently
feel you're classified. But those who
fail this simple test must find their
catalog among the rest (notice
the similarity so far to the old bard's
style and the manner in which he
ended a scene) Deathless prose,
that's what it is.
Speaking of perfect secretaries -
and I believe we were there was
LUCILLE. She was perfect well,
almost perfect. Maybe she had a half
inch missing here or there, but if so,
not enough so you would notice it.
Lucille was a sort of July Holliday -
born yesterday type. Oh, that reminds
me, she couldn't type but those
personalized letters, written in long-
hand . They were quite effective
for a while-but then we got another
client and she couldn't stand the
pace. So we let her go.
Sometime later I saw her again, at
our annual Christmas party. You
know what they're like all the old
(Continued on Page 12)


APRIL, 1962






The Perfect Secretary...
(Continued from Page 11)
Grads come back for a drink and my
Partner sings Good King Wences-
laus off-key. I wouldn't even try
to sing it; I can't even pronounce
Wenceslaus. Anyway, Lucille came
back this one time and after a drink
and a kiss under the place where the
mistletoe was supposed to be, she
told me she really enjoyed working
for us, but that she was black and
blue the entire time she was with us.
Boy! was I mad! I never got a single
black, not even a blue!
Meanwhile, back at the office, the
quest goes on and I find after much
research that there are all kinds of
Secretaries, slightly imperfect, to be
sure, but they all have their points.
Fr'instance . .
THE PRIMP Old fussy fingers
- different colored nails every day-
they are more in her hair than they
are on the keys. Very efficient,
though over the years she has
become the only one-handed typist
in town. The boss raves. What a
secretary she would be if she would
only use both hands!
THE DIETER Gradually losing
the battle of the bulge, but in
so doing, she has passed through
some interesting phases. She used to
be a Bunny at the Playboy Club
until there were complaints from the
other Bunnies that they were being
outbunnied so where would she
go with her talents? Naturally -
Front Office AIA.
THE BUFFER This one is
dedicated makes her boss look
good. She protects him from the
public, schedules his time most effi-
ciently. She is a master of the brush-
off.
I recall two articles on the Wo-
men's Page of the Miami Herald
about three weeks ago. You know
what the women's page is for in a
daily newspaper. It's published pri-
marily for the men so that they
can keep abreast of the latest female
thinking and tactics. And by keeping
informed, they are almost able to face
the combat on equal terms almost.
The first article complained about
the difficulty various characters had
getting through to the Boss. It
showed a cartoon which depicted a
menacing Secretary towering, over a
puny visitor and with a huge whisk


broom poised for the brush-off. The
second article answered the first and
blamed it all on the Boss, thereby
proving the Secretary has not only
the First, but also the Last Word.
Nobody talked to the Boss or got his
opinion they couldn't get past the
buffer.

LEGS When this one graces
the Front Desk the Reception Room
looks like a dentist's office. Every
seat in the Outer Office taken. As
the dresses got shorter, the desk
seemed to get higher until we added
a chastity panel to the front of the
desk. Did I hear somebody say some-
thing? Oh! pardon me, a modesty
panel. Thank you.

OLD G A B B Y Invaluable stra-
tegically; knows all about other archi-
tects' business unfortunately, she
tells all about yours never satisfied
with the monosyllabic answer.
Samples:
"Mr. Klotsky is not available; he
is in conference with the Income Tax
Investigators."
"Mr. Klotsky can't keep his ap-
pointment with you this afternoon,
Mr. Dillingham. He has gone to
Nassau for the weekend with Mrs.
Dillingham, I believe."
"I know I promised the contract
for your signature this morning. But,
Mr. Cohen, I've been busy making
Mr. Klotsky's coffee."

THE HOARDER Types clear
down to the bottom of the page
rather than use a second sheet not
even room for the signature. Saves
paper clips, old manilla envelopes.
Has the best collection of Used Rub-
her Bands in town needs only one
red, real rubber, spiral, pre-World
War I, 32-millimeter caliber to com-
plete the set. Anyone knowing the
whereabouts of such a prize contact
BILLY THOMPSON at 1410 N. E. 2nd
Avenue.

MOTHER I don't mean this
literally, although it has been tried
and she was a jewel of a secretary.
You've met her. The salesmen love
her always has time to hear about
the kids, look at the Sales Kit. Every-
body drops in for gossip and coffee.
Not much of the Architect's work
gets done; but it is a real comfort for
him to know that his office is known
throughout the trade as "Mother's
Place."


THE ROBOT Miss Univac of
1954 never smiles, quips, or takes
a coffee break. Give her the facts
and out it comes original and six
copies; proper colors; completely
annotated; ready for signature in
proper sequence, with envelopes ad-
dressed all mailed and filed at
closing and desk clear, ready for the
next day. And so on, ad infinitum -
until one day we lost her.
She married that interesting IBM
salesman who demonstrated that
marvel "The Electronic Secretary"
which now occupies the front desk.
It never smiles, quips, or takes a
coffee break. Feed it the facts and
out it comes original and six
copies; proper colors; completely
annotated; ready for signature, in
proper sequence with envelopes ad-
dressed all mailed and filed at
closing and desk clear, ready for the
next day. And so on, ad infinitum -
until one day we lost It. It was
repossessed!

THE CLOTHES HORSE -
Makes the Boss look shabby. Sub-
scribes to all the fashion magazines.
She has, and gets, all the Looks -
new, old, women, as well as men -
accentuates the positive, eliminates
the negative. Her advice: "Girls,
you've heard of putting up a good
front. Well, don't wait to be uplifted.
If you can't face up to it, go derriere.
Develop the posterior-the backward
look. Look good walking away from
it, and you will end up at the head of
the secretary pool. Remember girls,
behindsight is better than foresight."

THE MALE SECRETARY He
naturally follows The Clothes Horse.
Very fastidious, neat, also places for
everything and nothing in them. He
is not perfect by any means, especi-
ally when judged by our strict stand-
ards, but he does have his place in
the ASA it gives you a warm
feeling to hear him politely answer
his Boss on the intercom "Yes, Miss
Manley?"
And finally

THE BOSS'S DAUGHTER -
No, no, not that, anything but that!!
And so the search for the Perfect
Secretary goes on. But ladies, and
members of the ASA (Architectural
Secretaries Anonymous) don't be dis-
couraged, for the Perfect Secretary
hasn't been made yet. So don't give
in beg your pardon up!
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















* Precast prestressed concrete
flat slabs are a fairly new
building material in Florida.
They have wide applications for
roofs, floors and walls in all
types of buildings. They speed
construction, eliminate shoring,
provide an immediate work
deck for follow-up trades, their
hollow cores can be used for the
installation of wiring, heating,
and plumbing lines, and their
flat surface reduces finishing
costs. Any manufacturer can
claim and support these benefits.
HOUDAILLE-SPAN GOES BEYOND
BASIC ADVANTAGES TO GIVE
YOU EXTRA VALUE, AND AS A
RESULT HAS BECOME THE
LEADER IN THE FIELD.
Modern manufacturing
techniques, strict inspection
procedures, proper field service
and erection, close cooperation
with the architect and engineer
to adapt standard units to
custom requirements, are factors
which HOUDAILLE-SPAN offers
to give performance beyond
the design specifications.
One of our representatives will
be pleased to give you the
complete story. Call or write
for his assistance.


HOUDAILLE-"SPANS"

BROWARD COUNTY!...
Over I million sq. ft. produced in
18 months means product acceptance
. client satisfaction.


Cloud Nine Apartments, 800 S.E. 5th St. OWNER: Mr. and Mrs.
DEERFIELD BEACH Walter R. Huck. ENGINEER: James Bousfield. CONTRACTORS:
J. A. Finfrock and R.A. Baker. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-SPAN:
12,857.


-Lafayette Arms, 2866 N.E. 30th St. OWNER: Robert-B. Ross
FORT LAUDERDALE Assoc. ARCHITECT: Wolff & Hall. CONTRACTOR: Robert B. Ross
Assoc. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-SPAN: 13,900.


HOLLYWOOD


The Suburbanite Apartments, 3701 Tyler Street, Hollywood
Hills. OWNER: Frontier Corp. ARCHITECT: William H. Peck.
CONTRACTOR: A. J. Collins & Son. SQ. FT. OF HOUDAILLE-
SPAN: 25,500.


T D A. .T I A T L 2 3- -S A. T, IT : Cf Manufactured under SPANCRETE
--A -, license by R. H. WRIGHT, INC.,
1050 N.E. 5TH TERRACE FORT LAUDERDALE FLORIDA Fort Lauderdale.
SJA 4-0456 JA 5-1661

Say "Hoo-Dye"


APRIL, 1962












-. ,


Urba Renewactl oa 74e West Cdast...


A New Downtown For Sarasota


By JACK WEST, AIA


In the core of downtown Sarasota
the civic cancer of blight has
been growing until it has now
spread from Five Points to the
Bay. Today it is an eyesore of
empty and decaying buildings,
a barren island of dead hopes
and dying businesses . .
But tomororw may see its
dramatic rebirth if the hopes
and efforts of a group of
dedicated citizens are supported.
Sketches here-developed
as graphic indications of a broad,
dramatic plan-suggest how
Downtown Sarasota might look
and what it might offer in the
way of new facilities and a new
lease on economic life and civic
progress . Feasibility studies,
now nearly complete, affirm the
soundness of the project. Most
of the necessary property has
been assembled under options.
And Sarasota citizens hope that
in the near future this bright
new dream will become a
striking reality ..


The downtown business area of Sar-
asota began through the construction
of businesses along the main street-
literally Main Street. This street was
the "Tamiami Trail," the main traffic
route along the west coast of Florida.
It was designed for the horse and
buggy; in fact, "Five Points," the con-
vergence of the five downtown streets,
formerly had a watering trough and
a Civil War monument at its center.
Sarasota grew because of the street;
its pattern of growth was based on
the street. And now, and for this
reason, its pattern is obsolete. During
this growth period, no account was
taken of:
1...Efficient vehicular access in-
cluding both customers and
service.
2 ... Sufficient and conveniently lo-
cated parking.
3...A functional grouping of
buildings to facilitate pedes-
trian access.
4... Urban design, to give beauty
and excitement to downtown.
5 ... The magnificent natural bay
front setting.
Downtown is now a blighted, dying
section. Stores stand vacant; buildings


are run-down; quality business is lo-
cating elsewhere. Often it is prudent
to write off a failing central business
area and allow this section to become
an essentially service core to new,
emerging urban centers. In Sarasota,
however, I believe that the reasons
for retaining and revitalizing our pres-
ent business core are too strong and
too practicable to be set aside.
On the entire Central Florida West
Coast there does not exist a location
with Downtown Sarasota's inherent
advantages:
1 ... A stunning bay front location
with ample expansion possi-
bilities.
2... Splendid existing local and
regional access from all direc-
tions: an area embraced by
two major west coast arteries,
U.S. Routes 41 and 301, re-
cently improved highways east,
and a new multi-million dol-
lar bay front drive and cause-
way westward to the Keys.
3 ... A considerable existing com-
mitment, including a large
portion of the tax base, prox-
imity to the cultural center,
the major beaches, the five
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Three From East Coast



Elected To Fellowship


This year the AIA Jury of Fellows
selected three architects from two
East coast chapters for advancement
to Fellowship. They are: H. SAMUEL
KRUSE, HERBERT H. JOHNSON, both
of the Florida South Chapter, and G.
CLINTON GAMBLE, Broward County
Chapter. The Florida Architect, on
behalf of all their professional col-
leagues, congratulates them.
H. Samuel Kruse and G. Clinton
Gamble were elected to Fellowship
on the basis of Service to The Insti-
tute and Public Service. Herbert R.
Johnson was awarded the honor on
the basis of Design. All three men
have a long record of both profes-
sional and community activities.
Kruse has been particularly active in
Dade County affairs and organiza-
tions. Born in St. Louis, he studied at
the Beaux Arts Institute and Univer-
sity of Illinois and, prior to World


War II, had established offices in
Chicago and Centralia, Illinois.
He came to Florida in 1946 and in
1951 became a partner in the Miami
firm of WATSON AND DEUTSCHMAN,
which, in 1960, became WATSON,
DEUTSCHMAN AND KRUSE. His AIA
membership dates from 1949; and
since that time he has held many
offices in the Florida South Chapter
and the FAA. He is a former presi-
dent and currently a director of both
groups. His community service in-
cludes active membership in the Fla.
Planning and Zoning Association, the
Welfare Building Council, the Dade
County Research Foundation, the
Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce
and the Miami Economic Research
Society. He is married and the father
of a son and two daughters.
Herbert H. Johnson was born in
El Campo, Texas, graduated from


H. SAMUEL KRUSE, FAIA

Rice Institute, moved to Florida fol-
lowing World War II and since 1950
has been associated as a partner with
the late ROBERT LAW WEED, FAIA.
He has been directly involved with
the design of many buildings which
have won widespread recognition for
his firm; and he has been particularly
concerned, as part of his design inter-
ests, with use of new materials and
systems of construction. Combination
of such interests has led to active


---------
GAS AVA
ItS.4

Ill





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MOE AN MO *"








* _________rm. *rt- ** ***
0i 0
hUST MR S i*.l


GREATEST_ USE EVER!
BIG BEAKTROUG







lrlk

























HERBERT H. JOHNSON, FAIA


participation in programs of the Build-
ing Research Institute, especially those
dealing with application of structural
and design elements proposed for the
construction of high efficiency work-
ing areas at lower costs through the
novel uses of improved structural
techniques and materials, His work in
such fields as this has been widely
acclaimed both here and abroad.
His membership in the AIA dates
from 1946; and lie has since tlat


time been active in both the Florida
South Chapter and the FAA, having
served as a two-term Vice President
and Director of the FAA.
The new AIA Fellow from the Bro-
ward County Chapter. G. Clinton
Gamble, was born in Ncwark, N. J.,
but has lived moth of his life in Flor-
ida. A graduate in architecture from
the University of Miami in 1931, he
was registered to practice in Florida
in 1936; and in 1946 formed in Fort


Laudcrdale, the firm of GAMBLE,
POWNALL AND GILROY, of which he
is presently senior partner. His AIA
membership dates from 1936; and
he was a charter member and first
president of the Broward County
Chapter. He served as a director of
the FAA for two years and was a two.
term secretary and president of that
organization. For two years he was
also a Regional Director of the AIA;
and currently he is a nominee for the
office of AIA Secretary.
He has also held numerous com-
mnittee memberships at both state and
national levels; was one of the chief
organizers, and first chairman of the
state Joint Cooperative Committee;
and for several years has headed the
Publication Committee of the FAA.
He was the chairman and organizer of
the AIA's National Disaster Commit-
tee and is currently an active member
of important AIA groups studying
the structure of the Institute and the
possibilities of expanding professional
services.
His community services include
membership on a number of civic
organizations in Fort Lauderdale. He
is married and the father of two
children.


FLORIDA'S HOMES AND BUILDINGS OF
TOMORROW WILL ENJOY THE
"BEST OF BOTH"...
It takes lots of energy to run a modern home.
So much in fact. that it no longer makes sense
to limit all the energy-using appliances to one
source, in the hope of earning a lower rate. A
truly modern home or building, taking advnn-
tage of all the best features of both gas and
electric service, will very likely achieve the
lowest "step" in both.
FOR So the final choice should be based on which
service will do which jobs best. And Llut's
where niturni gas cones in. When fast, efficient,
ecnomicnl production of heat is the determining
factor ... as in cooking, clothes drying, water
heating and year-round air conditioning . .
natural gas is "just naturally better!"
HOW WE CAN HELP: Your local natural gas
people can quickly bring you up to date on the
fabulous new appliances, the automatic controls.
the advantages of gas air conditioning . the
new time-saving, work-saving. monev-y.ving
features being developed through the millions
of dollars poured into research hv the natural
gas industry. They'll give you color brochures
and detailed spec sheets. namwer questions,
supply cost estimates ... nil without obligation.
Won't you call them today?


FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION COMPANY
. 0. BOX 10400, ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA

APRIL, 1962 17










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f a ts ,\ atsiLo al tl.. Intr. I,, cTl (U l,, l ien,. .&,hi!.' t l t Ln ne,'r.: ,/Cl Ianl T.l,'. ne
& Associates, Tulsa. Contractor: Tulsa Rig, Reel & Manufacturing Company, Tulsa.


Folded roof to glamour walls...

concrete adds new attraction to drive-in banking


g\ " ""-----
Over 600 cars daily use the drive-up windows. A
half million transactions were handled at the
Autobank the first year. Tom-Tom Room, to the
right of two-story bank lobby, is provided for
meetings of Tulsa civic groups. It's reached di-
rectly from upper parking deck.


Out of a need for drive-up tellers' windows, as well as parking facilities,
came this handsome banking center. Tulsa's First National Autobank
is a delightful example of the many ways concrete can combine
structural practicality with good design.
Here, concrete plays a major decorative role in many different ways.
You see everything from folded plate canopies over the parking arcade to
walls and sunscreens in high-style masonry shapes. Drives are black
concrete. Upper deck parking area is a hollow-core concrete deck.
Today's architects find there is no ceiling on imagination when they
design with modern concrete.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Seven Pointers Toward A


New and Better Lien Law

By ROY M. POOLEY, JR., AIA


It is my opinion that a Lien Law
can be made simple only when we
recognize and adopt the basic prin-
ciple that legal protection of business
interests must be equated with busi-
ness responsibility. On this premise,
the following points merit considera-
tion as part of the basis for a new
law:
1...Form of Claim-Simple, one-
side-of-one-sheet statement to be re-
corded.
2...Time for Filing-Claims to be
filed within 45 days after last day of
month in which materials or services
were furnished to preserve lien rights
-though 90 days might be more
appropriate for mechanics. Ten to 20
per cent of the value of work com-
pleted might be carried to final
month of performance to allow for
normal retainage practices.


3...Disbursements by Lender -
Provide for liability of a lender on
disbursements made subsequent to the
filing of a claim of lien. However,
full first lien rights could be retained
and disbursements made if amount
of unsatisfied claims were protected
by escrow deposits.
4...Time for Prosecution of Claims
-One year from date of claim-filing
-or from date of final claim in the
case of cumulative claims on a single
project under a single contract.
5...Notice of Claim to Owner-
Owner is entitled to notice of claim.
This should be via registered mail,
possibly as copy of claim filed or
notice of intention to file. Could also
be accomplished by Owner's witness-
ing claim, without prejudice to his
rights.
6...Payments by Owner-Owner


must be responsible for "improper"
payments. Progress or interim pay-
ments to a contractor subsequent to
a notice of intention to file a claim-
or actual filing-without claim having
been satisfied, should expose owner
to liability for claim or possibly
twice its amount. Escrow deposits to
cover claims would allow payments
to continue properly. Unless owner
makes sure all obligations have been
met prior to final payment, he should
be exposed to liability of 20 to 25
per cent of his contract.
7...Claims for Work or Services
not Performed at Site-Lien protec-
tion for such work or services as fabri-
cation of assemblies and systems, con-
struction of special equipment, prep-
aration of plans and specifications,
and even prefabrication of entire
buildings could be accomplished by
recording a simple notice of a poten-
tial claim.
The foregoing, though neither com-
plete nor detailed, does, I believe,
clarify the principle that should be
the basis for a simple, flexible and
easily understood Lien Law. Further,
this clarification should result in a
(Continued on Page 24)


*IL I t


Saluting -

The Architects and
Engineers of Dade County


THE FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION BUILDING


Architect -
Alfred Browning Parker, F.A.I.A.
Consulting Engineers-
Norman Dignum Associates



THE BETTER FUEL COUNCIL
of Dade County
'HEATl r" 7400 N.W. 30th Avenue
S Miami, Florida


APRIL, 1962
APRIL, 1962







News & Notes


Hurry, Hurry, Hurry . !
The reservation deadline for the
AIA Convention in Dallas, Texas, is
almost here. It's April 16th--and
y o u r pre-registration and advance
ticket orders must be in the office
of the Institute before that time.
Otherwise you'll have to wait your
turn at crowded reservation tables in
a hotel lobby. Also, you'd better see
to your hotel reservation pronto! The
AIA is not maintaining a housing
bureau this year; and at both the
Statler-Hilton the headquarters
hotel and the Sheraton, accommo-
dations will be allocated strictly on a
first-come, first-served basis.
So dig through the mail pile on
your desk. Fill out the reservation
forms. Write out the necessary check.
Then mail it in and do it now!

Who's Responsible
for Ugliness in Cities?
That's a question that should have
been asked many years ago and
one that a conference sponsored by
the New York Chapter, AIA, hopes


to find some practical answer to. The
conference has been scheduled for
early this month; and since several
architects from Florida are planning
to attend, we hope to carry some re-
port of the results in a future issue.
Object of the day-long meeting was
expressed by Richard W. Snibbe,
chairman of the New York Chapter's
Design Committee. "We do not
want the conference to conclude with
a mere resolution. We hope to see
it start a national movement toward
a more beautiful country."
Our growing Florida cities could
make good use of whatever construc-
tive policies, programs and procedures
may develop from the conference.
Our Florida landscape is lush, unique,
beautiful. But in too many Florida
communities urban blight, suburban
sprawl, blatant commercialism and
tawdry design have wiped out natural
beauty and brought a drab and dreary
ugliness in its place.
Perhaps the Community Develop-
ment Committee of the FAA could
sponsor a similar program on a state-
(Continued on Page 23)


Chief Architect
Becomes Vice President
Herbert R. Savage, AIA, was re-
cently elected a Vice President of
General Development Corporation, one
of the country's leading community
building firms. One of the company's
key executives for the past three years,
he will head a 60-man technical staff
responsible for the firm's planning, de-
sign and engineering operations. Before
joining General Development he was
a partner in the Coral Gables firm of
Severud-Savage and Associates.


Designs for
Modern Living

include


Conceded geQeph0ce



New homes sell easier when provided with facili-
ties for additional phones as they are needed.
Buyers today are quick to recognize the ad-
vantages of telephone planning. The idea of
adding phones, or moving them to new loca-
tions easily and neatly is an important "plus"
feature to prospective buyers.
For more information on the advantages of
concealed telephone wiring, just call your Tele-
phone Business Office.


Southern Bell

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













WHEN YOU BUILD WITH


PRESTRESSED CONCRETE










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usable, rentable floor space. U And, this modern building material is virtually maintenance-free which
eliminates periodic chipping, sanding and painting. U Prestressed
concrete units are "factory produced" in a casting plant under close
supervision and control of materials by a specialized work force. U In
most cases they are erected directly from the hauling vehicle which
eliminates stockpiling and rehandling. U As a result, the building
goes up faster . you occupy it sooner. U One of the producers listed below can give you more infor-
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Dura-Stress, Inc., Leesburg Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Lakeland
Florida Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Tampa Southern Prestress Concrete, Inc.,
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Juno Prestressors, Inc., West Palm Beach Southern Prestress Concrete, Inc., Pensacola
Meekins-Bamman Precast Corp., Hallandale West Coast Shell Corp., Sarasota
Perma-Stress, Inc., Holly Hill R. H. Wright, Inc., Fort Lauderdale

florida prestressed concrete assn.
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APRIL, 1962






lMollie Lewis. left. Fenimore tenant,
baked cakes and pastries on the old
electric range for n-an% %ears. Says;
"E\-r\ thing turns out perfect.
and it iis o ei'a to use electric."
Another tenant. '6.-vear-old
Bessf Weinarten. regularly baked bread
for the past 16 years on her electric range.


Flameless Electric

Ranges still operating perfectly

after 33 years of service in these apartments


-31







iA



When the 48-unit Fenimore Apartment building was built on Miami Beach in
1928, it was the first apartment house to feature all-electric kitchens in that
area. Now, after 33 years of trouble-free service, the original ranges are being
replaced by modern electric ranges as part of the general, overall modernization
of the property. The original ranges, however, were still in good condition and
operated as well as they did when they were installed in 1928. As testimony
to the excellent condition of these old ranges, inspection by the Florida Hotel
and Restaurant Commission rated the establishment 100% on August 23, 1961,
before the old ranges were replaced.
This is another proof of the dependability and lasting convenience of flameless
electric cooking that keeps your kitchen cooler, cleaner and safer. When you
add or replace kitchen equipment, remember .. .

_'f / Ma Jzvl j blameless ciwu, Ziw, ^
..T'S CHEAPER, TOO!
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA
7o THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 20)
wide basis. And each Chapter could
develop a program geared to the
problems of its own community.

Conference on Concrete . .
The University of Miami's Depart-
ment of Civil Engineering and the
Florida Structural Precast-Prestressed
Concrete Association will be co-spon-
sors of a conference on "Precast-Pre-
stressed Concrete" to be held at Ever-
glades Hotel in Miami, April 30, May
1 and May 2. Conference sessions
will be in the evening, from 7:30 to
10:00 p.m. and will be open to all
architects, engineers and contractors
who are interested in the design, pro-
duction, application and future devel-
opment of precast and prestresssed
concrete members.
The conference has been endorsed
by an impressive number of profes-
sional and trade associates, including
the FAA. Detailed information re-
garding the program can be obtained
from the University of Miami. Regi-
strations should also be sent to the
U-M's Department of Civil Engineer-
ing. Registration fee is $6.

CSI Convention ...
The sixth annual Convention of
the Construction Specifications Insti-
tute is slated for April 23, 24 and 25,
1962, at the Biltmore Hotel in At-
lanta. Theme for the meeting is "CSI
and the Challenge of the Construc-
tion Industry"; and the "challenges"
will be presented by an architect, an
engineer, a contractor and a producer.
Working sessions will present various
attempts to meet such challenges;
and the various sessions of the Con-
vention will be sumamrized and eval-
uated by Judge BERNARD THOMSON,
expert on architectural and engineer-
ing law.
Convention programs and registra-
tion forms can be obtained by writing
the CSI, 632 Dupont Circle Building,
Washington 6, D. C.

Design for The Handicapped
At long last the American Stand-
ards Association has issued a Specifi-
cation for making buildings and facil-
ities accessible to, and usable by, the
physically handicapped. LEON CHA-
TELAIN, JR., FAIA, was chairman of
(Continued on Page 24)
APRIL, 1962


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 23)
the ASA Sectional Committee which
developed the new document. The
committee worked under the spon-
sorship of the National Society for
Crippled Children and Aduts and
The President's Committee on Em-
ployment of the Physically Handi-
capped.
Even a casual reading the the new
ASA document points up the fact
that most buildings are "architectural
barriers" to many persons who are
active in spite of physical disabilities.
The new standard provides a whole
series of practical guides to eliminate
such architectural -barriers and thus
widen the scope of any building's use.
Incidentally, it includes in the handi-
capped category persons whose age
has lessened their capacities for com-
plete mobility, flexibility, coordina-
tion and perceptiveness- as well as
those who suffer from more or less
severe and chronic heart conditions.
Thus the problem of eliminating
architectural barriers to building usage
is of vital concern to many millions
of our population. The matter is of
special moment in Florida with its
relatively large population of "senior
citizens"; and provisions of the new
document should find wide and prac-
tical application here. Free copies can
be obtained from The President's
Committee on Employment of the
Physically Handicapped, Washington
25, D.C.; or from the National So-
ciety for Crippled Children and
Adults, 2023 West Ogden Street,
Chicago, Ill.



Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 19)
healthier construction industry by en-
couraging more realistic business prac-
tices while affording equitable protec-
tion to all concerned.
Hand-in-hand with a more work-
able Lien Law we should also provide
for practical control of technical and
financial competence of those engaged
in the construction industry. This
means: enforced building codes, tech-
nical qualification of builders, and
some system of bonding (possibly on
an annual basis) that would assure
reasonable financial responsibility on
the part of all those offering contrac-
tural services to the public. Such
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






bonding need not necessarily be de-
signed to eliminate losses, but could
provide partial protection. More im-
portantly, it should be designed to
discourage over-extension of credit and
unrealistic capitalization.
Admittedly, these proposals point
up-stream. But I believe they are more
likely to accomplish the results we
all seek for our construction industry
than alternatives that I have thus fai
encountered. At least they contain
food for legislative thought and, I
venture to hope, legislative action.



Incinerators...
(Continued from Page 6)
Each of these units has certain ad-
vantages and disadvantages; but, based
upon safety factors and good design
practices, the multiple chamber unit
with the charging chute and stack
both entering the incinerator is the
preferred installation. A sketch of this
unit is shown below:

floor a
hydraulically
chrgign operatedor



The hydraulically operated sliding
baffles in the charging chute alternate
on a time cycle providing safe charg-
ing of the incinerator. This type of
installation seems to be the most prac-
tical at the present time and has the
least number of undesirable features.
The use of scrubbers is encouraged
for all installations. Scrubbers not only
provide more efficient incinerator op-
eration, but almost entirely eliminate
flyash emissions from the incinerator
stack.
Personnel from the Bureau of Sani-
tary Engineering of the Florida State
Board of Health will be glad to dis-
cuss incinerator installation problems
with architects at any time.
As time goes on, we expect that a
greater number of incinerator installa-
tions will be made in Florida, but we
believe that the minimum standards
we have established will place manu-
facturers on a more competitive basis
and provide better and safer incin-
erator installations for the public.
Through these steps this-Agency hopes
to reduce air pollution problems and
protect our air, which is our most
valuable natural resource.
APRIL, 1962


A new, exciting industrial Florida becomes manifest as hundreds
of new industries discover the advantages of Florida locations for
manufacturing plants, distribution centers, executive offices.
Already built into the framework of the new Florida is more than
a million tons of Florida Steel structural steel, reinforcing steel,
special fabrications.
Florida Steel is the only reinforcing steel manufactured and fab-
ricated in Florida to give Florida a limitless source of quality-
controlled steel right at her finger-tips.

Specify Florida Steel. When
FLORIDA STEEL you build with Florida prod-
ucts, you build a sounder
CORPORATION economy for Florida.

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SJACKSONVILLE FT. MYERS
Steel wuhe yjo wa 4 d" WEST PALM BEACH







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Telephone HI 3-4643
GEORGE MELCHIORRE, Rep.






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433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


State Board...
(Continued from Page 4)

Fort Pierce-RICHARD T. STAGG.
Gainesville-ROBERT H. TUCKER.
Jacksonville-WALTER Q. TAY-
LOR, JR., ROBERT C. WISE.
Lakeland-W. WADE SETLIFF.
Lake Worth-GERHARD A. SELZER.
Leesburg-JAMES R. PAGE, JR.
Miami-EMANUEL ABRABEN, JULES
P. CHANNING, SOLOMON ENGEL, JR.,
ROBERT J. FILER, EUGENE R. FOR-
TUN, JAN HOCHSTIM, JAMES D. LEE,
RONALD W. ROBISON, WAYNE C.
WILLIAMS.
Miami Beach-WARREN C.
WUERTZ.
Naples-HAL T. REID.
No. Miami-JAMES H. NUNN, JR.
Palm Beach-ARNE J. KENTTURI,
DONALD S. MCKERCHAR.
Pensacola-THEODORE J. RUCKS-
TUHL.
Pinellas Park-WILLIAM H.
HAIRE.
Sarasota-BOYD A. BLACKNER,
JAMES C. PADGETT.
St. Petersburg-SANFORD G. GOLD-
MAN.
Tampa-CESAR P. ALFONSO,
CHARLES F. CURRY, JR., WARREN L.
HENDERSON, RUSSELL J. MINARDI,
EARL A. QUENNEVILLE, FRANK W.
WHITE.
Winter Park-DONALD R. HAMP-
TON, JOHN WILLIAM TOTTY
The following were registered to
practice in Florida from other states:
RUDOLPH M. ARSENICOS, Brooklyn,
N.Y.; CHARLES C. BARLOW, Jackson,
Miss.; PAUL KENNETH BARNES, Cleve-
land Heights, 0.; E. B. BAUGH, JR.,
Valdosta, Ga.; WILLIAM L. BEAMAN,
Indianapolis, Ind.; J. T. BRANDT, Dal-
las, Texas; JACK B. BROWN, Atlanta,
Ga.; IRA H. DAVEY, Hackensack, N.J.;
WM. E. DELAHANTY, New York, N.
Y.; GERALD G. DIEHL, Detroit, Mich.;
JOSEPH L. DONOFRO, Dothan, Ala.;
MARK L. FINFER, Chicago, Ill.; FRED
M. FISCHRUPP, Mobile, Ala.; WM. K.
FRIZZELL, New York, N.Y.; CORNEL-
IUS L. T. GABLER, Detroit, Mich.;
DANIEL F. GIROUX, Rochester, N.Y.;
WILLIAM A. HALSEY, Boston, Mass.;
PAUL H. HARBACH, Orchard Park, N.
Y.; ANDREW W. HEPBURN, Boston,
Mass.; ALAN INGRAM, Charlotte, N.
C.; FRANCIS D. JACKLEY, Baltimore,
Md.; EDWARD F. KNOWLES, New
York, N.Y.; WILLIAM C. LAY, Akron,
Ohio; BRITON MARTIN, Philadelphia,
Pa.; JOHN L. MASCARELLA, Tucson,


Ariz.; ROBERT H. MEIER, JR., Phoe-
nixville, Pa.; ARTHUR G. ODELL, JR.,
Charlotte, N.C.; WILLIAM G. PERRY,
Boston, Mass.; DAVID E. POST, Grand
Rapids, Mich.; JOHN STOKES REDDEN,
Oak Park, Ill.; THOMAS M. SHAW,
Boston, Mass.; WM. E. SIVERTSEN,
Jamaica, N.Y.; THOMAS E. TORRI-
CELLI, Hackensack, N.J.; CLIFFORD
HARRY WARRINER, Atlanta, Ga.;
WILLIAM M. WEBER, Raleigh, N.C.;
STANLEY C. WHITE, Cold Spring, N.
Y.; CHARLES F. WISE, Rosemont, Pa.;
W. M. WOHLSCHLAEGER, Huntsville,
Alabama.
For the past several years registra-
tion in Florida has increased by about
200 per year. In 1950 total registra-
tion was 800. Since then the number
of architects registered to practice in
Florida has more than doubled. It
now stands at just under 1800. Also,
in 1950 only 53 applications for reg-
istration were filed. By 1960 a total
of 357 applicants took the exams.



New Downtown...
(Continued from Page 15)
the normal retail uses, this circle
would include a cinema and depart-
ment store. The cinema might begin
at the 3rd level and continue up two
stories. The department store might
also rise higher than the remainder
of the circle. Shops could face into
the mall; they might also face outside.
The most powerful architectural
symbols of this new downtown com-
plex would be the twin towers, each
rising twenty stores or more. The first
floors would be available for a multi-
tude of commercial uses: for example
a financial institution would be most
appropriate with its drive-in facilities
below. One tower would be a new
downtown hotel, designed to attract
conventions. The other tower would
be an office building and it would be
of immense benefit to the project if
it might incorporate all of the muni-
cipal offices.
Beyond the towers to the west,
over what is now the old city hall,
would be a great lifted concourse
overlooking the bay. It would have
fountains, seats, landscaping, and
might well be the setting of daily
band concerts, street dances and fes-
tivals.
Across the pedestrian bridge over
the bay front drive and at the end of
the axis would be located the muni-


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







cipal concert hall, also elevated. This
concert hall would be designed to
accommodate a multitude of uses: from
a symphony orchestra to a Shakes-
pearian festival from the modern
dance to the classical ballet.
The marine park integrates the re-
sources of Sarasota Bay with this new
urban center. With direct pedestrian
access across the concourse and
bridge, and by automobile directly
across what is now city pier, this
landscaped island not only provides
a park for walkers and sitters to
enjoy close communion with the bay.
It also provides much needed facilities
for the yachtsman and the boater. A
"non-commercial" marina would pro-
vide safe mooring for the sea tourist
and a "Boatel" would allow him to
live near his craft. A restaurant over-
looking the water would take advan-
tage of this stimulating atmosphere
and allow its patrons to come either
by land of by water.
A covered walk (and a moving
walk if practicable) would encircle the
entire raised platform. Evening enter-
tainment, dining and dancing would
flourish. This new center would be-
come a symbol of a new Sarasota
which is moving ahead toward an
exciting and significant future.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Better Fuel Council of
Dade County . . 19
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 10
Brumos Porsche Car Corp. 9
A. R. Cogswell ..... 26
Coral Gables Glass
& Mirror, Inc ..... 26
Featherock, Inc. . . 24
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 24
Florida Gas Transmission Co. 16-17
Florida Home Heating
Institute . . 28
Florida Natural Gas
Association . . 8
Florida Power & Light Co. . 22
Florida Prestressed Concrete
Association . . 21
Florida Steel Corp. . . 25
Florida Terrazzo Association 3
General Portland Cement Co. 7
Houdaille-Span, Inc. 13
Merry Brothers
Brick & Tile Co... . 5
Miami Window Corp . 1
Portland Cement Association 18
Prescolite . . . 24
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 23
Superior Window Co .4th Cover
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 20
Tempera Corp. . . 6
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27


APRIL, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secrefray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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MR. ARCHITECT!

Our current ads have reached
hundreds of thousands of Florida
homes again and again.

One ad said that people can keep
warm in a chilly house by bundling-
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with safer, more dependable OIL
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home heating bills in HALF. The
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CENTRAL OIL HEATING- by far the best permanent solution to your family's
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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






F/A Panorama...

U/F BUILDING FOR ARCHITECTURE... A REALITY NEXT YEAR ... ?
In Governor Bryant's bold proposal for financing vitally-needed new buildings
for Florida's educational institutions the new building for the U/F's College of
Architecture and Fine Arts has apparently been given the Number One Priority.
Funds for preparing the necessary documents for its construction have already
been released; and the architects, Kemp, Bunch and Jackson, of Jacksonville,
are now busy on working drawings and specifications. Recent announcements
indicate that progress on the financing program has been satisfactory in spite
of opposition on "technical" grounds from some Cabinet members. If this most
recent move doesn't bog down, the U F architectural faculty might well be teach-
ing in a new environment by 1964.

HOW MANY ARCHITECTS ARE ENOUGH... ?
The AIA's monumental study of the architectural profession's status and future
opportunities "The Architect at Mid-Century" called for a steady growth
in the ranks of the profession and a progressive expansion of the country's facil-
ities for both fine arts and technical education. Nationally last year there was
one registered architect for about every 5,000 people. In Florida the concentra-
tion is higher about one for every 3,000 people. What does this mean? It
could indicate that the building business is booming here at a much higher rate
than throughout the nation. But it could also mean that the profession in Flor-
ida has been growing somewhat out of step with population growth as com-
pared with the national picture. If registration were to continue at its present
rate in Florida about 200 per year and population estimates ran true, by
1970, the concentration would be even higher about one architect for every
2,500 people in a population of 8,000,000.

SEATTLE, 1962 "COME, COME, COME TO THE FAIR .. "
Aside from the usual architectural fantasies that make every world's fair a mag-
net for architects, the one opening this month in Seattle may prove to be one of
the most important of all time. One of its top-flight exhibits is a transportation
system, a real, live-and-running monorail the first of its kind to become
operative in the U.S. This is fast, quiet, economical mass transportation that has
proved its many-sided worth in several European cities for many years. An
attempt was first made to introduce the monorail idea to US cities in the thwarted
thirties. It was, perhaps, a poor time from the economic viewpoint. But since
then every other proposal and there have been many has apparently run
afoul of Vested Interests and Long-Term Franchises. Maybe the demonstration
at Seattle will finally open the way to development of monorail suburban sys-
tems. Florida could use some. With Homestead and Hollywood rapidly becom-
ing residential suburbs of Miami, and with our west coast hinterlands growing
into a sort of strip city from Naples to Crystal River, the highspeed economy of
a monorail looms as a near-essential.

INTERAMA WILL A RECURRING DREAM PROVE REAL...?
There's no fanfare yet. But Dr. Irving Muskat has announced with quiet cau-
tion that funds to start the basic development of a north-of-Miami site for
Interama have become available. A policy and program for this long-dream-
ed-of intercontinental cultural and trade center have jelled. An overall plan and
a guiding design scheme have been proposed. Interama seems to be finally tak-
ing tangible shape and will be the subject of a near-future report here.































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