• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00093
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00093
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text










































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On Tampa Bay...

It's St. Petersburg in 1962 . and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
Chapter whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition















fir

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convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!


UAL FAA CONVENTION
1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG







-'


THE SYMBOL OF
EXCELLENCE







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


nT 7a e -Iue-


Toward A Better Lien Law . . . . .
We Need Better Procedures to Cover More Points
By Bernard W. Hartman, AIA

Letters . . . . . . .. .


.. 4


1961 FAA Honor Awards Program . . ... .. .. . 9-13
Merit Award A. Wynn Howell, Architect
University Lutheran Church, Gainesville

Merit Award J. Don Alford, Architect
Residence for Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Gresham, Gainesville


Roster and Personnel of FAA Committees, 1962 . .


. 14-15


News and Notes .


Advertisers' Index . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1962
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville


DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
O. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER...
This is the University Avenue facade of the new University Lutheran Church
at Gainesville. The building won for its architect, A. Wynn Howell, AIA, of
Lakeland, a Merit Award at the FAA's 1961 Convention at Boca Raton. More
data and illustrations of this prize-winning design appear on pages 9-11.


. . . . 16


. 22


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida . Printed by McMurray
Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Dana B. Johannes, William T. Arnett,
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Hugh J. Leitch

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12

NUMBER 3 1962
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































CITY AUDITORIUM, CITY OF JACKSONVILLE, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
KEMP, BUNCH & JACKSON, AIA, Architects
THE AUCHTER COMPANY, Contractors


Two-way slab and beam framing system designed by
ultimate strength method. 8,000 cubic yards of Solite light-
weight structural concrete was used in the reinforced concrete
frame, beams, floors and roof deck. Solite lightweight masonry
units were used in exterior and interior walls.


RESULTS:
4,000 tons of dead weight saved. Over-all economy
through savings in time, labor, materials. Smaller sections.
Better fireproofing characteristics.








CORPORATION
OFICS







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Construction contracts are inher-
ently infinitely more complex than
are conventional sales contracts for
services or manufactured goods. Too,
the construction contract is peculiarly
more subject to frequent minor-and
sometimes major-modification dur-
ing the period of its performance.
Because of the many different inter-
ests which should be protected and
the varying conditions of, and con-
ditions under, which construction
contracts are performed, it is likely
that brevity and simplicity, in word-
ing at least, will be virtually impos-
ible to achieve in a truly adequate
and equitable law.
Because of the complexity of the
entire situation, it is logical to expect
that less verbiage will be involved and
a better integrated and more easily
functioning law will result if this
statute is designed to embody and
precisely define all of the interests
of all of the parties concerned. At-
tempting to write two or more indi-
vidual,pieces of legislation (each of
which would be designed to accom-
plish a given segment of the whole)
would be even more complex and
would necessitate extensive cross-ref-
erencing and needless repetition. In
the typical statute the laborer's rights
are usually well covered in most situ-
ations. However, the interests, if any,
of the following .people among
others are rarely clearly defined:
materialmen dealing directly with the
general contractor, materialmen deal-


ing with the subcontractor, material-
men dealing with other materialmen,
subcontractors dealing with the gen-
eral contractor, subcontractors deal-
ing with other subcontractors, and
those who frequently (but not nearly
always) deal directly with the owner,
such as architects, engineers, attor-
neys, certified public accountants, sur-
veyors, feasibility and market report
analysts, interior decorators, etc.
In pursuing this highly complex
task, we should strive to create a
procedure which is free of unneces-
sary red tape. Much of the construc-
tion contract work is now, and will
continue to be, undertaken without
benefit of any professional services,
such as those of an architect, engi-
neer, or attorney. Therefore, this
statute should be designed to func-
tion properly and easily without the
necessity of such professional services,
except where prosecution of a lien
or some similar action is involved.
The court dockets are already seri-
ously overloaded and, insofar as prac-
ticable, this statute should be written
so as to obviate the need for civil
action. Insofar as practicable, every
contingency should be anticipated
except where res adjudicata determ-
inations exist and are both just and
incontrovertible.
In order to legitimately limit the
owner's liability and to facilitate the
contract performance and payment,
this law should, if possible, function
so that (at least under certain cir-


cumstances-as, for example, in a
bonded contract) professional serv-
ices should not be required in order
to check a contractor's books, paid
bills, and payroll in order to ascertain
what payments have been, or can be,
properly made. Likewise, if possible,
it should not be necessary for some-
one to check a schedule of values,
or some other such contract-break-
down in order to search out and
identify all unknown potential lien-
ors.
Insofar as practicable, the neces-
sary paper work should be brief, clear,
concise and simple. These essential
qualities should also be applicable to
the methods of, and procedures for,
establishing, maintaining and prose-
cuting a lienor's rights. It is axiomatic
that such paper work, methods and
procedures should be uniform for all
parties at interest. There should be
absolutely no doubt in the mind of
the reader as to whether or not any
specific action is mandatory; any
action which is necessary to the
proper or easy functioning of the
statute should, of course, be obliga-
tory.
Forms for notice of completion,
notice of cessation (of work), labor
and material payment bond, and all
other forms indicated in the law
should be statutory and designed to
dovetail with one another. It is de-
sirable-but undoubtedly impractical
-that it be mandatory that the pre-
(Continued on Page 18)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


We Need


Better Procedures


To Cover


More Points



By BERNARD W. HARTMAN, AIA,
Past-president, Florida Northwest Chapter
















A. G. Odell, Jr. and Associates of Charlotte are consulting architects on the exterior and the lobby.
SDesign, Engineering and Construction by Engineering Department of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.




I I/ PRECAST CONCRETE CURTAIN WALL PICKS UP
THE PATTERN OF CAMEL CIGARETTES Designers of the new Reynolds Tobacco Company
cigarette factory in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, presented an unusual challenge: they wanted the
curtain wall material to match in color and proportion the famous Camel Cigarettes that are made in
this plant. The alternate stripes of the facade were scaled to the right proportions, and then actual
Color Photography by Charles E. Talton. samples of the cigarette
SO paper and tobacco filler
.:,, r,- ,-. were color-matched in
S ,. y, ... quartz-aggregate Mo-Sai
.. : another example of
the design versatility
. .. ... ... .'.. .: . .* . . .of this uniq ue curtain w all
S. and facing material. The
Mo-Sai precast concrete
curtain wall panels,
which averaged 4'x28' in
size, were anchored
directly to the steel
framework of the building.


THE

-Zwfl
COMPANY

0 HOME OFFICE: High Point Rd.
P. O. Box 1558, Greensboro, N. C.
FLORIDA PLANT: 3601 N. W. 74th St.
P. 0. Box 47546, Miami, Florida
GEORGIA PLANT: Peachtree, Georgia







Letters


Farsightedness . .

EDITOR, F/A:
In the article (February issue) en-
titled "Creative Sculpture for Build-
ings," the author urges the use of
sand-cast cement sculpture as a versa-
tile and economic means of bringing
art into public structures.
The author says, . Somewhere
there should be architects and artists
who can work together toward this
end." Florida architects may be inter-
ested to note that a Miami sculptor
and a Miami architect have realized
this relationship for a particular struc-
ture now under construction. A.
HERBERT MATCHES, AIA, designed the
new Miami Beach Public Library
which features a cylindrical auditor-
ium, the exterior of which has been
designed entirely of sand-cast cement
relief panels by ALBERT VRANA, Coco-
nut Grove sculptor.
We congratulate Sculptor Vrana
and Architect Mathes, as well as the
Miami Beach City Council, for their


farsightedness. Perhaps Florida can be
a leader in the Renaissance approach
to architecture as spelled out by ROB-
ERT WILLSON in the F/A article.
JOAN (Mrs. John D.) GILL
Key Biscayne, Florida

Mid-year Graduates...

EDITOR, F/A:
Throughout our academic training
The Florida Architect has served as
an invaluable link to the profession.
I would like to thank you on behalf
of the Student Chapter here at Flor-
ida for your contribution to our
knowledge of the profession of archi-
tecture.
Below is an alphabetical list of the
February graduates:
LuIS CARLOS AVILAN (MA), Bogota
Columbia, S. A.; HERBERT L. BANKS,
Winter Park, Fla.; WALTER G. BER-
TOSSI, Huntington, N. Y.; JOHN F.
GROVES, Mt. Dora, Fla.; JAMES G.
HUGHES, Winter Haven, Fla.; THOMAS
R. HURLEY, Maitland, Fla.; JOHNNIE


wyer compact
kitchens

Shown is the
p DWYER SERIES
S .. 51. only 54'in
Slengtr. Other
__ g. models 39' to 69',
I gasorelectric.


ENGINEERED FOR APARTMENTS. r[-, Di \:r
'-,',.tl 1 K i I,--n I, lJe: .1.- . n 0 a i'fr !,' t .I

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,R, O,,- .i i C.' .
WRITE OR CALL TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG


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DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC., Phone FRanklin 1-4344
SUITE 621, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, 300 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD WAY, MIAMI 32


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


E. JARVIS, JR., Miami, Fla.; DONALD
G. KLUGE, Gainesville, Fla.; DEWITT
B. MCLEAN, Jacksonville, Fla.; HUM-
BERTO E. MALAVASI, Costa Rica, C.
A.; ANGEL OLIVA, Tampa, Fla.; ROB-
ERT H. SWILLEY, Lake Worth, Fla.
RICHARD E. COLE,
President, Student Chapter,
FAA, AIA
U/F, Gainesville
Cuban Architects ..
EDITOR, F/A
I would like to inform you of the
recent elections held by our Associa-
tion for the year 1962. I am includ-
ing the roster of the executive com-
mittee for your files.
CARLOS MENDOZA
President, Asociacion De
Arquiteitos Cubanos En El Exilio
The new mailing address of the
Association of Cuban Architects in
Exile is P. O. Box 35-186, Miami 35,
Florida. Newly elected officers are:
President, CARLOS MENDOZA; First
Vice President, EDGARDO MENESES;
Second Vice President, ALFONSO CAS-
TANON; Secretary, JAIME SALES;
Treasurer, ROBERTO GUEDES. The As-
sociation is an active component of
the Association of Cuban Profes-
sionals in Exile; and the two dele-
gates to that body are CARLOS MEN-
DOZA and GUSTAVO MORENO.-Ed.

Attention Golfers . .
EDITOR, F/A:
We plan to have our 39th Annual
Golf Tournament and Dinner for
architects and architectural draftsmen
at East Lake Country Club on Friday,
June 8th this year, and we are looking
forward to a large attendance and a
good time.
It will be appreciated if you will
make mention of this in your maga-
zine in ample time for the Florida
architects to make their plans to be
with us. You have given us this pub-
licity in the past and it has been very
helpful. Of course, formal invitations
and programs will be mailed individu-
ally at the proper time but this
advance notice will be appreciated.
F. GRAHAM WILLIAM,
Chairman,
F. Graham Williams Co.,
Atlanta, Georgia
Herewith the "advance notice" of
a yearly event that has become almost
a tradition among building profes-
sionals of the southeast. Better mark
your calendar now. And a follow-up
reminder will appear in a later issue.
-Ed.


I I
















HOUDAILLE-SPAN USED ON WALLS AND ROOF RESULTS IN AN
ATTRACTIVE, STRUCTURAL "SKIN; MIETS BUDGET REQUIREMENTS






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Quality... MODERN CONCRETE

From the deepest piling, 135' below ground, stretching
10 stories into Tampa's new skyline, The Marine Bank
building lends a clean refreshing look to one of the nation's
fastest growing cities.
In all, 8,000 cubic yards of concrete went into the reinforced
concrete frame, floor, wall and roof system. The owners
selected this type of construction for economy, speed of
construction, fire safety and overall solidarity.





GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COA PANY
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA 0 TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
PENINSULAR DIVISION, JACKSON, MICHIGAN 0 VICTOR DIVISION, FREDONIA, KANSAS
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







1961 FAA Honor Awards Program


University

Lutheran

Church

A. WYNN HOWELL
Architect


This church, first unit in a planned complex to serve a small parish
and student group, is located in Gainesville on University Avenue across
from the U/F campus. Various stages of the building Frr-r.ll.! have
been planned to appear whole and complete at any period of development.
To achieve this continuing unity the total plan was based on a strict
module. A one-directional structural system was established; and widths
will be varied to suit three or more functions. Roof heights will vary to
reflect space relationships. . Laminated fir beams used in the church
will be used throughout the total complex- as will the type of cedar
decking that roofs the church. But roofs of other buildings will be flat,
thus marking the church as the dominating element in the completed
complex. . Colums of the church are reinforced concrete; and the
semi-enclosing walls are light-weight aggregate and regular gray concrete
blocks laid in alternating courses. Floors are natural concrete, carpeted
in the narthex, aisles and chancel. . .


MARCH, 1962


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THE FLORIDA ARCI-ITECT


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between columns are fill-
ed with clear fixed glass
separated by wood mul-
lions and flanked by red-
wood jalousies for natural
ventilation. The church is
completely air-condition- : S
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MARCH, 1962


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Residence for Mr. & Mrs. W. M. Gresham ..


J. DON ALFORD
Architect


The design of this house in Gaines-
ville for a family of four grew from
the client's wishes for informality,
economy and adaptability of plan,
large entertainment areas and seg-
regation of children's living areas.
It was also directly influenced by
the character of the site heavily
wooded and sloping sharply toward
a creek at the northeast corner ..
This was an "experiment in the
use of simple, standard materials
to achieve economically a great
variation of related space". Exter-
ior load-bearing walls and piers are
exposed concrete block. Beams are
double 2"x12"s, spaced apart with
a 3/s" plywood strip, supported by
truncated double 2"x8" columns
springing from masonry piers. The
result is a simple, efficient and
dramatic structural system.


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LErA



LONEP. FLOOR PLAN .*L'' Cf--


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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MARCH, 1962








Roster and Personnel of FAA Committees for 1962

1 AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS BROWARD ,iAYTONA FLORIDA FLORIDA FLA. NORTH FLA. NORTH FLORIDA JACKSON- MID-
COUNTY BEACH CENTRAL NORTH CENTRAL WEST SOUTH VILLE FLORIDA
Chairman, M. H. Johnson,
Chain, Johnson George M. David A. Mark M. H. Pearce L. W. Stewart Edward George R. Donald O.
1617 N.W. 12th Road, G ir; .ill' Polk, Jr. Leete Hampton Johnson Barrett Morrison E. Crain Fisher Phelps
Vice President, William T. Arnett

2... BY LAWS
Chairman, H. Samuel Kruse,
811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg .Miami FrankR. Roy M.
Vice-President, William T. Arnett

3 .. CHAPTER AFFAIRS
Chairman, Francis R. Walton,
Chairman, Francis Ridgewood Ave., Da Bch Thor Amlie David A. Edgar John L. R. Chester Ula L. John O. James E. Gordon
211 No. Ridgewood Ae., DaLeete Hanebuth Grand L. Craft Manning Grimshaw Clements T. Orr
Vice President, William T. Arnett Francis
Walton

4... COLLABORATION WITH DESIGN PROFESSIONS
Chairman, A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
Chairman,5557 A rlington Road, Jacksonville David Joel W James Frank G. Pearce L. R. Daniel Irvin Norman H. John B.
5557 Arlington Road, e W. Kerr Sayers Jannewein George Barrett Hart Korach Freedman Langley
Vice President, William T. Arnett

5 ... COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Chairman, William T. Arnett, William David A. Henry L. Wm. T. Robert W. Stewart Donald H. Warren C. James E.
University of Florida, Gainesville P. Peck Leete Roberts Arnett H. Brown Morrison Forfar Hendry, Jr. Windham
Vice President, Robert B. Murphy

6 ... EDUCATION
Chairman, T. Trip Russell, ler a me E. t E. obe B.
1020 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami Donald Ralph F. Archie G. M. H. Albert P. James James E. Robert E. Robert B.
M. Moeller Spicer Parish Johnson Woodard Kendrick Branch Boardman Murphy
Vice President, Robert B. Murphy

7 ... FAA CONVENTION COMMITTEE
Chairman, Verner Johnson, Dana B.
250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami Johannes
Vice President, William F. Bigoney

8 ... FAA FES LIAISON
Chairman, Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA, Clinton Melvin
2575 South Bayshore Drive, Miami Gambles Grossman
Vice President, William F. Bigoney Irvin
Korach
Edwin T.
9... FAA AIA FELLOWSHIP Reeder
Chairman, Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA Russell T.
University of Florida, Gainesville Pancoast
Vice President, not assigned Igor B.
Polevitzky
Wahl J.
10... GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Snyder
Chairman, Forrest R. Coxen, James M. Harry M. Richard Myrl J. Forrest B. W. Herbert R. John R. Wythe D.


PALM
BEACH
Belford
Shoumate











George J.
Votaw




Emily V.
Obst




Norman N.
Robson





Edgar S.
Wortman




Kenneth
Jacobson




John
Stetson










Harold A.
"kI..,



























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NEH

POLICY FOF

COMMITTEE


For the first timi
this year FAA Com
mittees will consis
of two sections. One
- listed here b'
chapters will bi
the "corresponding'
section. The othe
section will be re
guarded as tho
"action" section

The idea behind thi
new organization
set-up is to stream
line committee act
ivities, permit more
frequent meetings o
active committee
personnel, and per
mit presentation o
progress reports a
FAA Board meetings


Supervision of com
mittee activities b
FAA Vice President
is another element ii
the new committee,
organization. EacI
V-P has been assign
ed an ex-officii
function on a grou
of committees; an,
it will be his respon
sibility to work witl
chairman a n
"action groups" ii
advancing segment
of professional con
cern for which com
mitees have beei
appointed.

The roster of cor
mittee personnel
shown here include
only the names o
the committee chair
men, the vice-presi
dent to whom th,
commtitee has bee;
assigned, and th
"corresponding'
members of FAi
committee who ar
chairmen of the sam
committee at chap
ter level. At pres
time members o
"action" sections o
FAA committees ha,
not been finally
named. A roster o
these members wil
be published in ai
early future issue.







News & Notes


Office Practice
Seminar Set For
Miami, Mar. 24th
Co-Chairman EARL STARNES of the
FAA Office Practice Committee has
announced that the 1962 Seminar
will be held March 24, from 10 AM
to 4 PM at the Buildorama Mezza-
nine in Miami's Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter. The general subject of the
meeting will be "Expanded Service
for Architects". It will be handled
in three phases; and opportunity will
be given for audience participation
during a question and answer period.
Discussing the subject from the
standpoint of the small office will be
GEORGE T. HEERY, AIA, of the
Athens, Ga., firm of Heery and Heery.
Impacts of expanded professional ser-
vice on large office operation will be
explored by ROBERT F. HASTINGS,
FAIA, partner in the Detroit firm of
Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Assoc.,
Inc.
Importantly involved in any pro-
gram for expanded architectural ser-


vice is the question of the AIA's man-
datory standards of professional prac-
tice. Much committee work has been
done on this subject at the national
level; and the Seminar program will
include a discusison of the proposed
new AIA Standards by CLINTON
GAMBLE, former Regional Director
for Florida.
The Seminar will follow the meet-
ing of the FAA Board scheduled for
March 23rd. Invitations to attend
will be sent to FAA membership from
the office of the FAA's Executive Sec-
retary.

Peace Corps
Wants Volunteers
At least ten architects and city
planners are wanted by the Peace
Corps as volunteers in Tunisia. The
immediate project is Tunisia's high-
priority housing program, which, over
the next ten years will absorb a quar-
ter of that country's public invest-
ment. Similar projects are being de-
veloped for Gabon, Liberia, Somali,


Honor Awards for Students Work...


Johnn D. Shelton, third year student in architecture at the University of
Miami, was a $200 winner of the 1962 Reynolds Aluminum Prize for archi-
tectural students, administered by the AIA for the "best original design of a
building component in aluminum." Pictured above during presentation of
his award are, left to right, James E. Branch, AIA,chairman of U/M's depart-
ment of architecture; Harry E. Jennings, manager of Reynolds Florida division;
Shelton; John 0. Grimshaw, AIA, president of the Florida South Chapter; and
John E. Sweet, U/M professor of architectural engineering . Shelton also
won a Merit Award for his design of a real estate office at the Student Exhibit
of the 1961 FAA Convention. Other Convention award winners were: Dewitt
Maclean, U/F, an Honor Award for a weekend retreat; Dick Cole, U/F, a
Merit Award for his design of Studio D'Or; and Frank Leach, U/F, a Merit
Award for a Commercial Plaza design. These student awards are scheduled
for publication in an early future issue.


Lester Pancoast, Florida South Chap-
ter, has been elected president of the
1,000-member Coconut Grove Club,
one of the most active civic groups
in south Florida. He has been instru-
mental in recent efforts to maintain
the traditionally residential character
of Coconut Grove that opposed a re-
zoning for high-rise apartments.

Malaya and several Latin American
countries.
For further information, potential
Peace Corps volunteers should write
to Peace Corps, Jules Pagano, Chief,
Professional and Technical Division,
Office of Public Affairs, Washington
25, D. C.

Personals . .

JAMES T. LENDRUM, head of the
U/F Department of Architecture, has
been appointed by Administrator
ROBERT C. WEAVER to an eight-man
advisory committee for the Housing
and Home Finance Agency. He will
help advise the agency in carrying out
the low-income program of the 1961
Housing Act.
JOHN P. DELOE, Mid-Florida Chap-
ter, was recently the recipient of the
Silver Beaver Award, given by the
Boy Scouts of America to volunteer
Scouters as its highest recognition of
service at the Council level. He has
had a long-time interest in Scouting
and has served as Commissioner of
the Brevard District.
FRANK MCLANE, JR., and JOHN
RANON, both members of the Florida
Central Chapter, have announced
the addition of two new associates,
DONALD E. MCINTOSH and JACOB L.
GOTTFRIED. The new firm name will
be MCLANE, RANON & ASSOCIATES.
(Continued on Page 18)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







"A g 41, .
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.;~cri~;*.~t~rfuI~un~~rrrrxr


Merry JUMBO Brick, now available in dis-
tinctive light colors, is a money-saver that
keeps on saving year after year. Merry
JUMBO Brick goes up faster, cuts labor
cost for contractors. And check these sav-


Merry eight-inch JUMBO Bricks are de.
signed to permit use of waterproof in-
sulation in the voids, resulting in walls
with low U-loctor. The four-inch unit
can be used where cavity wall construc-
tion and insulation are desired.


Light colors reflect heat, reduce air-
conditioning costs.

Low maintenance cost! Merry JUMBO
Brick walls don't require continual
waterproofing and painting,


Merry JUMBO Brick buildings command
higher resale prices than those of other
building materials.

Built-in fire safety results in favorable
insurance rates. Merry JUMBO Brick,
already fired at 2,100 degrees, won't
disintegrate like other materials. Jumbo
units (except the largest) qualify for
insurance purposes as "solid clay ma-
sonry wall."

The comfort of a solid clay masonry
building means happier, more pro-
ductive employees.


. -.


Merry's ability to control color range sets its
JUMBO Brick apart in the industry. Available in
three pastel shades and mild texture as well as
the usual red ranges, Merry JUMBO Brick is
manufactured with minimum tolerances, second
to none in the industry. Units are made in these
sizes:
Eight-Inch Jumbo ....3/2 x 7%' x 111/2
Six-Inch Jumbo ....... 3% x 5%2 x 11
Four-Inch Jumbo .... 31/2 x 3 x 11/2
Closure Unit ........... 3/2 x 3/2 x 7/2


Telephone or write for more information, or ask the Merry repre-
sentative who calls on you;


ALltMhq BEnfnIhsjLd

3hic L/ 4A TUiZ I 6a yuM4iM

/lllqllA+n ,Z 1oh4in


MARCH, 1962






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 16)
The firm's new address is Riverside
Professional Building, 205 W. Bro-
rein Street, Tampa 6. The new phone
number is 253-9659.
RICHARD BOONE ROGERS has moved
into a new office at 511 North Mills
Street, Orlando. His phone is GArden
2-2104. His office was formerly at 516
East Central Avenue in Orlando.

New Anchorage
for Stair Railings

Difficulties of providing adequate
and adjustable anchorage for railings
used in connection with contempo-
rary thin, pre-cast concrete stairs can
apparently be overcome through use
of a new anchoring system recently
developed by Blumcraft of Pittsburgh.
Formerly railing anchorage involved
either drilling the concrete and using
expansion shields, or building steel
anchors into the concrete and then
tapping and drilling them on the job.
Both methods require expensive field
labor, which, if not highly skilled, can
result in improper alignment of rail-
ing posts.


ANCHOR WELDED TO
* '. REINFORCING RODS


:. . ..

ADJUSTABLE
MALLEABLE IRON ANCHOR
e ...Al-/ "


The new system involves use of
pre-drilled malleable iron anchors that
are welded to the reinforced steel in
the concrete treads. As indicated in
the sketch, elements of the anchor
are adjustable to permit perfect align-
ment of posts. Use of the new system
is said to provide extreme rigidity


tn


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let

CONCEALED

telephone wiring

put more sales

| appeal in your homes
More and more today it's the quality
"extras" that sell homebuyers. And
( concealed telephone wiring is just such a
prestige feature.
h. Lifetime concealed wiring provides plenty of
S built-in outlets throughout the house...
offers maximum flexibility in phone
placement or rearrangement as family needs
grow or change. And there's never any need to
mar walls or woodwork with additional wiring.
Find out soon how easy it is to
give your homes added sales appeal with
concealed telephone wiring.
Just call your Telephone Business Office.


Southern Bell
Ckw, q adwf *ls FAiOu


\4


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


even when posts are mounted at the
extreme edge of stair treads. Also, the
new system is said to allow a wide
choice of railing and post design while
maintaining the safety factor of sound
structural support.
The new anchorage device was de-
veloped in recognition that a railing
is only as strong as the method by
which it is attached to the stair. Also
it reflects an effort to reduce the costs
of labor in field instalaltions.





Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 4)
cise, exact wording of each form be
followed by each party concerned
whether or not the official form is
used (i.e. on a labor and material
payment bond form, for example,
there should be no "fine print" at-
tempting to modify the intent-or
evade the letter-of the law). Per-
haps the statute could require that
only the statutory forms (printed by
the state) be used.
(Continued on Page 21)








































The MEDALLION helps sell homes faster


Fifty million dollars are being spent
nationally this year to promote the
MEDALLION HOME program. The
MEDALLION displayed on the outside
of a home is assurance that the inside
provides the modern electrical benefits
that buyers are looking for-including
Full Housepower wiring and plenty of
switches and outlets. Successful archi-
tects in increasing numbers are satisfy-
ing the home-buyers' preference for
Better Living, Electrically, which the
MEDALLION signifies.


In addition to Full Housepower, every
home certified for the MEDALLION
has ample Light-for-Living and is
equipped with at least four major elec-
tric appliances, including flameless elec-
tric range and flameless electric water
heater. You can gain by recommending
the MEDALLION standards of electri-
cal excellence for homes in every price
range. Call any FP&L office for full
details.


-?71W /fAa2' flameless c Z^
../T'S CHEAPER, TOO!


FLORIDA


POWER & LIGHT
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


COMPANY


MARCH, 1962 19





NIN


HOW TO KEEP WARM IN A CHILLY HOUSE


JUMP UP
AND DOWN


But... wouldn't it make better sense To end your winter heating problem perma-
to warm up the house? Especially when you nently, install CENTRAL oil home heating-
can do it so easily and inexpensively with oil streamlined, space-saving, money-saving, auto-
home heating, the safe, dependable kind that matic equipment that flows controlled warmth
cuts home heating bills in half. to every room.


??p^9 660r46^g^^ ^^^^^^^^oi
4 -~


FLORIDA HOME W HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


More and more Florida home OWNERS believe our adver-
tising slogan: "When the best costs less, it's smart to buy
I it!" How do we know? They bought considerably more
M R. ARCHIT.I OIL home heating equipment in 1961 than in 1960. Florida
home BUYERS also know by now that oil heat will save them money year after year. Neither you
nor they will ever regret your recommendation of cheaper, safer, better OIL home heating!






Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 18)
If a statutory bond form is to be
both equitable and workable, how-
ever, the law should insure the sure-
ties' interests to a reasonable extent.
For example, the law should require
proper notification of the surety in
the event of contract changes; other-
wise, it would be obviously unfair to
demand that the bond contain no
recision clauses or other attempts to
limit the surety's liability.
It goes without saying that the law
should be paragraphed and organized
for simplicity and logical sequence.
Complete and precise individual def-
initions should appear only once, and
they all should occur only in the
same section of the text. No "inter-
pretations" should be left up to the
reader and no ambiguities should be
present. Any elaboration or clarifica-
tion of a definition should be confined
to the paragraph where the definition
originally is made. Once a definition
has been clearly stated (in the "defi-
nitions" section), it should be not
further elaborated upon nor repeated
(in whole or in part) anywhere in
the text. Once any given word or
particular grouping of words has been
specifically defined throughout the
text, that word or grouping should
be used precisely as originally stated
and without any further modification
or modifying adjectives. For example,
a "good and sufficient surety" is a
common expression which is quite
frequently-and unnecessarily-addi-
tionally "modified or repeated in
part" in the text. Use of synonyms
should be avoided as they serve only
to confuse both issue and reader.
In fairness to all concerned, this
statute should be of the "condition-
ally limited claims type." The "un-
limited claims type" can be most
unfair to the owner and the "claims
limited to unpaid-contract-sum type"
generally gives inadequate protection
to the potential lienors.
A definite and precise priority-
chain of interests (and/or "class"
divisions) should be clearly estab-
lished and 100 per cent complete.
If any specific classes) of liens are
to be guaranteed 100 per cent settle-
ment of their claims (as opposed to
pro rata distribution throughout),
then this should be specifically and
completely clarified. Mechanic's liens
should not, I believe, have preference
(Continued on Page 22)
MARCH, 1962


For the Finest Nianes


in the Induistry--



MASONITE
Wall Paneling, Sidings, Hardboard of I100 Uses

SIMPSON
Plywood, Doors, Insulation, Redwood Lumber

MARLITE
Prefinished Wall and Ceiling Panels

IPIK
Hardwood Solid Core Flush Doors

WOODLIFE
Preservatives and Wood Finishes

DARLINGTON
Better Hardwood Plywood and Wall Panels

BUFFELEN
Fir Doors and Plywood

WESTAG
Imported European and African Plywoods

THOMPSON
Hardwood Flush Doors

COLONIAL
Stairs and Woodwork of Ageless Beaiuty

BESSLER
The Creator of Disappearing Stairs

ELLIOTT BAY
Philippine Mahogany

RAI SEY
Quality Stock Woodwork of Our Own
ManL facture

Serving Sonlth Florida for Over 50 Years


;


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:: : :::









NEW ADDRESS...?
SEND IT TO US

Incorrect addressing is to
blame for almost every
magazine returned to us
by the Post Office Depart-
ment. And you will be to
blame for not receiving
The Florida Architect reg-
ularly if you change your
address and don't tell us
about it promptly. Even
if you lease a post office
box and keep your present
office address, your mag-
azines will be returned if
you indicate that your
new box number is to be
your mailing address . .
So keep us informed
about any change at all in
your mailing address.
Otherwise we will be
forced to drop your name
from our files. And that
will make a sorry situation
for us both ..


Lien Law...
(Continued on Page 21)
over liens of record prior to the exe-
cution of the construction contract
involved.
When a contract is performed sub-
sequent to the issuance and main-
tenance of a valid, proper surety
bond, the time limit for filing a
claim of lien should be shortened
for each class of lien; and final pay-
ment should be permitted sooner
than in the case of an unbonded
contract. Possibly the bond should
be written to act also as a "com-
panion" to a performance bond which
is functioning as a "maintenance
bond" during the guarantee-warrantee
period. Ordinarily, we usually think
of all lien rights as being terminated
upon final payment of the contract-
assuming all prior claims have been
settled as of that date. However,
it is easy to visualize a situation dur-
ing the guarantee warrantee period
where this might not be so-unless
the statute is carefully worded. This
brings to mind the fact that the Flor-
ida Statutes at present are somewhat
vague as to whether or not there is
a "statutory" guarantee period for
construction contracts and, if so, how
long it is. A question worthy of con-
siderable thought is whether or not
there should be a longer statutory
guarantee period for a bonded than
an unbonded construction contract.
The law should make quite clear
whether or not demolition, recondi-
tioning, alterations, repairs and land-
scaping-among others-are included
as "construction work" under its defi-
nition. If demolition, for example, is
not included in the definition of
"construction work" and any material
(such as lumber) is subsequently de-
livered to the job, who sits in judge-
ment as to whether or not any part
of that lumber is destined for "con-
struction" as opposed to "demoli-
tion?" Delivery of material "to be
used in construction," of course, typ-
ically symbolizes and establishes the
"visible commencement of construc-
tion operations." This (and other un-
related) situations) could easily be
further complicated in any case where
the plans and specifications were so
incomplete or inaccurate that they
hindered, rather than aided, in clari-
fying the issue. Likewise, the distinc-
tion between installed items and re-
movable items should be most pre-


cise. Title to removable items (or
materials or manufactured items
stored on site but as yet unincorpor-
ated into the work) should remain
in, or revert to, the hands of their
last legal owner in the event of a
forced sale.
Some difficult situations and ran-
dom thoughts follow. Although com-
pletely unorganized, they may serve
to stimulate constructive thinking-
but, if not, they will surely help to
picture the intricate, complex nature
of the problem at hand. For example,
should the priority of a claim of lien
be determined by the date the claim
was filed-or the date the work was
performed? Should the time limit for
filing claims of lien run from the date
of notice of completion or from
the date the individual last worked
on the job? And would such work
have to have been performed "on the
site?" Whichever way these questions
are answered, many interesting and
complicated situations can be readily
brought to mind.
Assume a pro-rata settlement is
made and a given lienor decides he
isn't satisfied with his share. Can he
institute (and collect on) a personal
action against the owner (or a surety)
to recover the unsatisfied balance of
his claim? This situation logically
would most likely occur where the
owner is endeavoring to act as his
own contractor.
Assume two (or more) owners
(other than husband and wife) in
joint tenancy of a piece of real estate.
Suppose that one of them, without
the knowledge of the otherss, exe-
cutes a construction contract and that
a forced sale results in order to pay
off lienor's claims. Are the unknowing
owner's rights prejudiced-or is his
original partial interest intact?
Assume a tenant enters into a con-
struction contract without the own-
er's knowledge. How is the owner's
liability for liens to be equitably de-
fined and limited? What differences
would result in the event that owner
had prior knowledge of the contract?
How would the situation (and the
relative liabilities) change if the con-
tract were signed by lessee rather than
a tenant? The answers should, prefer-
ably, not be contingent upon the spe-
cific wording of the individual lease.
In the case of segregated contracts,
would each such contract be recorded
as a separate instrument? If so, it
logically follows that all paper work,
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Dwyer Products of Florida 6

Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Florida Home Heating
Institute .20

Florida Portland Cement Div. 8
Florida Power & Light Co. 19

Florida Prestressed Concrete
Institute . 24

Houdialle-Span, Inc. . 7

The Mabie-Bell Company . 5

Merry Brothers Brick
& Tile Co. .. 17

Miami Window Corp. . .1

A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 21
Solite .. 3

Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 18

Superior Window Co. 4th Cover
F. Graham Williams Co. . 23






notices, etc., would be multiplied by
the number of such contracts. In the
case of a group of unconnected build-
ings to be built on the same property
for one owner, would it be necessary
to handle each building with a sep-
arate contract? If not, would indi-
vidual notices of completion, etc., be
required? This situation frequently
occurs in the relationship between a
speculative volume builder and his
subcontractors in the course of build-
ing large numbers of homes where
times of both commencement and
completion of operations vary dras-
tically from unit to unit.
Assume that an unbonded con-
tract (but where either the contract
or a notice of commencement of
work is filed for record) is being per-
formed and that a subsequent con-
tract change is made which materially
increases. the scope of the work. If
the lien law requires that the change
be recorded, and it is not, how are
the rights of potential lienors affect-
ed? How about the owner's liabilities?
How would the time for filing liens
be affected? Fortunately, it is prob-
able that this situation is unlikely to
occur in a bonded contract.
All payments by and between all
of the individuals involved should
stipulate specifically what the pay-
ment is for and what job it is on.
This is frequently not done today,
particularly by smaller contractors
when dealing with materialmen. Na-
turally, too, to keep an accurate ac-
counting of each job it is necessary
to specify on each purchase order
and invoice exactly what items and
quantities are for which job. Other-
wise it would be impossible to ascer-
tain the unpaid balance due on a job
when a release of lien is requested
or when the period for filing a lien
is about to terminate.
Unless careful planning is used to
prevent confusion, it is possible that
claims of lien could "compound"
themselves and present an untrue
picture. Such a case could occur
where a materialman was dealing
with a subcontractor and they-and
possibly each of their laborers-each
filed separate liens on the identical
piece of work. In the event that a
subcontractor receives payment for
his work, should he be obligated by
law to use such of those funds as
necessary to pay the materialman who
supplied him with the material used
in the subject job?
MARCH, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





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The Structural Strength

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IIPI9I~WEIIIL


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MEMBERS


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Perma-Stress, Inc., Holly Hill


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Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Lakeland
Southern Prestress Concrete, Inc.,
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- S~c

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rj~;2~~-


Here's the anodized aluminum interlocking
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Please u rite for complete details. brochures, and samples.



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625 E. 10th Avenue Hialeah, Florida
Phone TU 5-1521


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