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HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 Creative sculpture for buildin...
 The bid shopping problem
 Toward a better lien law
 Some work of Starnes and Rents...
 News and notes
 Miami secretaries install...
 Draftsmen's club study courses
 Advertisers' index
 "Poor Casey had struck out...!...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00092
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: February 1962
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00092
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Creative sculpture for buildings
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The bid shopping problem
        Page 9
    Toward a better lien law
        Page 10
    Some work of Starnes and Rentscher
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    News and notes
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Miami secretaries install officers
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Draftsmen's club study courses
        Page 25
    Advertisers' index
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    "Poor Casey had struck out...!"
        Back Cover 1
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.





February, 1962


FLORIDA AR
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS <


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On Tampa Bay...

It's St. Petersburg in 1962 ... and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
Chapter- whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition .



















r h h or n o l v iAe. a I a -F
lBa"y ,,< "eso f roo", c f b "nd inexpensive!









IUAL FAA CONVENTION

1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG
N:. '
P ~i ~~i"pr~4t~, E5~'li:~I










'962 -SORENO HOTEL -ST. PETERSBURG




















































THE GYMOL OP
EXO.MLLUNM








74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


la 74a Isse ---


Letters . . .
Creative Sculpture for Buildings .
By Robert Willson\
The Bid Shopping Problem .
By Daniel Schwartzman, FAIA
Toward a Better Lien Law .
Report on Progress
Some Work of Starnes and Rentscher


Miami Secretaries Install Officers .
Draftsmen's Club Study Courses .
Advertisers' Index ........
"Poor Casey Had Struck Out .! .
An Editorial by Roger W. Sherman, A


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 525 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Robert B. Murphy, First Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Second V.-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
William T. Arnett, Third Vice-President, University of Florida, Gainesville
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville


DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hansen, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: A. Wynn Howell, Richard
E. Jessen, Frank R. Mudano; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
Lester N. May; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA
NORTHWEST: B. W. Hartman, Jr.; FLORIDA SOUTH: C. Robert Abele, H.
Samuel Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr.,
William B. Eaton, John R. Graveley; MID-FLORIDA: John D. DeLeo, Donald
O. Phelps; PALM BEACH: Harold A. Obst., Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Verna M. Sherman, Executive Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER...
This is another of Hank Koch's fine photographs. It's of the house designed
and understandably enjoyed by Janet and Joe Rentscher of the firm of
Starnes and Rentscher some of whose work is shown in the eight-page insert
bound with this issue.


............. 10
. 4



. 9

. 10


. 11-18



S. 19
of


. 23
. 25
. . . 26
. 3rd Cover


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed'by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. .Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida Printed by McMurray
Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 12

NUMBER 2 1 L
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


The Rentschers' House .... Reef Motel, Sanibel Island
.... House for Robert M. Neeley, Coconut Grove
News and Notes . .. . .
BRI Spring Conference CD Building Surveys Actions
FAA Board Meeting 1961 Recap Conference on
Church Architecture Significant Quotes Changes










HOUDAILLE SPAN


IS VERSATILE!


Architects, engineers and contractors
in this area are using HOUDAILLE-SPAN
for roofs, floors and walls of many
types of buildings warehouses,
commercial buildings, gasoline service
stations, multi-story apartment build-
ings and residences.

When you build make certain that you,
too, take advantage of the efficiency
and economy of this versatile concrete
flat slab. These precast, prestressed


units are 40" wide and 6" or 8" deep,
saw cut to your particular needs. They
have hollow cores their entire length to
provide raceways for mechanical instal-
lation of wiring, plumbing or heating.

Let us demonstrate how HOUDAILLE-
SPAN can save time and cut costs on
your next job, by speeding erection
and eliminating costly forming, shor-
ing and cutting on the job. Write or
phone for further information.


?x 'zi_
.4 *-~
s .. L


APARTMENT BUILDING: 2100 Douglas Road,
Coral Gables. Owner and Contractor:
R. E. Couture; Architect: Randolph Ware.
2,756 sq. ft. of HOUDAILLE-SPAN, 6" deep.


;jli~~*~; z~-~ ;;-r~:*?-~~
.1~a'


-J -~~*--,I


STORE BUILDING: Margale. Floridd
Owner, Eng. and Conlr.: Iai k 'Sullivan


F ." .


PARTIAL LIST OF HOUDAILLE-SPAN JOBS


APARTMENT BUILDING
4317 N.E. 21st Ave,
Fort Lauderdale
Owner: Anthony Furci
Furwood Construction Co., Inc., Builder
BOAT STORAGE BUILDING
737 N.E. 7th Street
Pompano Beach
Harrison Jones, Owner
Smoak Brothers, Contractor
APARTMENT BUILDING (Colony House)
541-545 Orton Ave.
Boca Raton
Royal Palm Development Corp., Owner
George Waddey, Architect


BASEBALL CLUB HOUSE
City of Pompano Beach
Pompano Beach
RESIDENCE for Harry Williams
600 S.W. 8th Terrace
Fort Lauderdale
Earl Byars, Contractor


WAREHOUSE: Dm~:. HIiwhldl. n6-1 1 l
Av.eF .r I F-1 1ud. I i., (i n.5 r
4rinur H P,1.1 1r,,nr.-er c, Iur L
Builder-, Company 22 ('110 0 II
vi HOlJDAlLE N 5.. J >, *.i, 1, r II
t) 2 A 2 4 P, I r E i b


ArYKIMtNII UUILUINIi: McCormick Mile,
Ocean Ridge, Florida. Owner: Oyster
Bay Corp.; Architect: George Davis;
Contractor: Al Deen. 8,047 sq. ft.
of 8" HOUDAILLE-SPAN, 8,046 so. ft.
nf 8" HOIIDAILLF-SPAN.


H:OU DAILLE SPA N, IN C.
1776 E. SUNRISE BOULEVARD FORT LAUDERDALE FLORIDA JA 4-0456


Manufactured under SPANCRETE
license by R. H. WRIGHT, INC.,
Fort Lauderdale.


FEBRUARY, 1962 3








Letters


"Supervise" or "Observe"?
EDITOR, F/A:
Your editorial "Who Will Super-
vise the Observer ?" was one
that certainly expresses my thinking.
The few other architects with whom
I have discussed this new wording
have generally accepted it with a
shrug of the shoulder in much the
same way all other Washington, D.C.,
edicts are accepted.
Our highly paid legal and insurance
consultants have certainly cleared a
primrose path down which the "pussy-
footed" may skip. Possibly had our
consultants stayed longer at the work
table, a better legal definition of the
term "supervision" would have been
written into our General Conditions
(or third person liability) and a pro-
gram of insuring qualified architectural
firms would have evolved. Certainly
we will have a large number of com-
petent observers until another court
decision comes along!
Would it be possible to devote a
portion of our legal and insurance fees
toward obtaining a legal rendering of
architectural supervision, rather than
a lessening of our area of work?
Your question of how we can run
away from responsibility and, at the
same time, ask for more and larger
responsibilities was extremely well put.
Certainly we as architects will not
continue to practice wtihout ever mak-
ing a mistake. But becoming an "ob-
server" raises our profession in the
eyes of-who .?
FORREST R. COXEN, AIA
Tallahassee, Florida



EDITOR, F/A:
I read your editorial "Who Will
Supervise the Observer ?" in the
December issue of The Florida Archi-
tect and I wish to congratulate you
on your thinking. Your question, "Can
one who seeks to weasel out of one
responsibility be expected to discharge
heavier ones under conditions of vastly
widened scope and complexity?" is
well recognized by the public which
seems to be down-grading the achi-
tectural profession every day.
On one side the architects are say-
ing that they are willing to assume
greater responsibilities for ". .. newer
and larger and more complex tasks"-
4


as you stated. And, on the other hand,
they are allowing the legal profession
to take them out of their historical
position.
I thought as a matter of interest
you would like to see a copy of Great
Lakes Architecture which is the of-
ficial publication of the Ohio Council
of the Society of American Registered
Architects which gives the ARA view
of the Owner-Architect contract form.
Also, I thought you would like to see
a copy of this new form which I am
enclosing herewith.
I would like to get your reactions
to the new Owner-Architect form as
developed by ARA-whether they be
favorable or unfavorable.
ROBERT W. STICKLE,
Registered Architect,
President,
The Ohio Council, ARA
Cleveland, Ohio

Lacking both training and expe-
rience in contract law, we can offer
no comment on the ARA's Owner-
Architect "Articles of Agreement and
Contract." Relative to the matter of
Supervision this document says-in
Article I, Phase C, Section c, Super-
vision:-
"The Architect shall supervise the
layout and construction of the work.
This supervision is limited to:
"A ... The personal services of the
Architect or his qualified representa-
tives as necessary in reporting and
making recommendations relative to
the progress of the work. The Archi-
tect shall endeavor to guard the Owner
against defects, deficiencies, unaccept-
able 'workmanship and unnecessary
delays in the work of the Contractor.
The Architect is not liable for any
defects, deficiencies or delays, on the
part of the Contractor, however.
"B ... Job site approval of materials
and equipment furnished by the Con-
tractor.
"C ... It is understood that super-
vision of the work differs from super-
intendance of the work. Should the
Owner desire full-time superintend-
ence by a representative of the Owner,
a Clerk-of-the-Works, acceptable to
both the Owner and the Architect,
shall be engaged by the Architect at
the Owner's expense."
The ARA document is similar in
its basic content to the Owner-Archi-
tect agreement form issued by the


I


Institute. However, as the foregoing
quotation may suggest, it is much
longer than the Institute's form since
it sets forth in much greater detail-
and in six parts-what the Owner is
paying for in the way of professional
service.-ED.

Correction, Please ...
EDITOR, F/A:
During my visit to the FAA meet-
ing (the November, 1961, FAA con-
vention) I intended to discuss with
you the publication of Part IV of
"Omissions and Errors" in the Oc-
tober, 1961, issue of The Florida
Architect.
Experience has proven that, as re-
spects this complicated subject, it is
desirable to use a previously prepared
document for publication. Since I
present the prepared document in its
entirety, it is not subject to the varied
interpretation which occur when pre-
sentations are made from notes with
ad lib comments.
As an indication of this point, and
referring specifically to the question-
and-answer portion of the program,
there is an inaccuracy which has been
printed and which I suppose should
be corrected.
I refer specifically to the question
on page 27: "If we carry professional
liability insurance what should the
limits of liability be?" The answer
which I gave to that question was
that the limit would vary with each
individual insured based on his ex-
posures, financial worth and many
other factors which could only be de-
termined after consultation with his
insurance consultant.
The answer incorrectly used in your
report of the meeting was the answer
to a question as to what limits of
liability should the architect require
of the contractor, sub-contractors and
others. In answer to that question, I
said that the architect should not
specify limits of liability under any
circumstances. This is the responsi-
bility of the owner and his insurance
consultant.
Since both of these questions are
asked regularly, some useful purpose
might be served by a short article on
the subject in the near future.
VICTOR O. SCHINNERER,
Insurance Analyst,
Washington, D. C.
Thanks to a careful reader- and
apologies for the editorial omission
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































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Merry eight-inch JUMBO Bricks are de- Merry JUMBO Brick buildings command
signed to permit use of waterproof in- higher resale prices than those of other
sulation in the voids, resulting in walls building materials.


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Light colors reflect heat, reduce air-
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The comfort of a solid clay masonry
building means happier, more pro:
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Telephone or write for more information, or ask the Merry repre-
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Merry's ability to control color range sets its
JUMBO Brick apart in the industry. Available in
three pastel shades and mild texture as well as
the usual red ranges, Merry JUMBO Brick is
manufactured with minimum tolerances, second
to none in the industry. Units are made in these
sizes:


E.ghtinch Jumbo ..3~ x 7/2
Six-Inch Jumbo 32 x 51
Four-Inch Jumbo 3'/2 x 31/2
Closure Unit ......... 31/2 x 3%


x 11%
x 111/
x 111/
x 7%


15L:


FEBRUARY, 1962





Letters
(Continued from Page 4)
and error. We agree that the subject
noted here is important and deserves
further clarification.

Extra Copy, Extra Value ...
EDITOR, F/A:
I am presently receiving two copies
of The Florida Architect each month
since I have been accepted as a Cor-
porate Member of the AIA. I know
you will want to correct this-though
I have been putting the extra copy
to good use as a gift to our City
Manager.
Please let me congratulate you on
the fine job you are doing and say,
with all the others I'm sure, that I
eagerly look forward to my copy each
month.
JOE WILLIAMS, AIA
Eau Gallie, Florida

Thanks for your thoughtfulness and
congratulations; both are appreciated.
If your City Manager would like to
continue his file, we'll be glad to add
his name to our stencil list.-Ed.


Creative Sculpture for Buildings...


This article, by ROBERT WILLSON, a member of the art staff
of the University of Miami, suggests the use of a relatively
new and inexpensive technique to make the use of sculpture
economically feasible in contemporary architectural design ...


In ancient centuries man had the
time and the money to build struc-
tures which were rich in the arts and
their human meanings. Then it was
possible to make a marble Parthenon
with great sculpture on pediment,
metope, and frieze and crowding the
interior; and a Roman Forum full
of reliefs and bronze and marble
statues; and a Gothic cathedral at
Chartres with exciting stained glass
and sculptural areas.
Today our public and private build-
ings are largely barren of major art,
substituting instead textural walls,
raw materials themselves, and struc-
tural features. Obviously the average
architect no longer can sell his client
on the necessity for money to buy
art for his building. Before long the
architect may find that he has for-


gotten how to think in terms of
art for his structural shape.
However, there seems to be a means
available to the architect now for
securing important creative works.
The price is practical in terms of
budget and cilents. This method is'
the use of sand -cast cement monu-
ments, reliefs, and free-standing sculp-
ture. The possibilities in this field
are unlimited; it barely has been
touched. Experimental approaches
are begging for research.
Sand-cast cement sculpture is cer-
tainly a proper contemporary fabric.
It is cheap in cost of its primary
materials: sand and cement. The time
required for execution is suitable to
the rate of modern building construc-
tion. And the fee of the sculptor is
(Continued on Page 26)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




... --L JI .- ., .. ..* ... .- .-



;TERRAZZO.,. 0 *--1"<


S.. Ho uchd DQ Know Abut


,s -D .






e T o I e
.. ~. .

R$-t TeclhniicW_ rmik.?ivn



I tCa -r a .A I ~temance







Any of the FTA officers listed here will be glad to
answer your questions on the use or technical aspects
of terrazzo. In addition he will arrange for inspection
of whatever terrazzo installations you may have
planned for. Feel free to write him .
Throughout the state member firms of
the Florida Terrazzo Association are Seal W. Adams, Jr.
700 N. W. Seventh Ave., Ft. Lauderale, Fla.
ready to give you any information you William E. Owens
may need regarding the use of TERRAZZO Box 508, New Smyrna Beach, Fla.
in any type of building. Their knowledge, Avery Arent
Box 1879, Clearwater, Fla.
gained from many years of practical Louis Francescon
experience, is yours for the asking 2500 S. W. 28th Lane, Miami, Fla.
Cal un it. Ue it f y. Fr in ts Carl V. Cesery
Call un it. Use it f y. Fr i ts 316 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, Fla.
serving you the Florida Terrazzo Associa- Roland D. Samuels
181 Atlantic Drive, Maitland, Fla.
tion membership can be of real help
Henry C. Giglio
in the development of higher quality and 3719 West Carmen, Tampa, Fla.
more economical construction W. K. Weinhold
1050 Webster Rd., Sarasota, Fla.




iAVERY ARENT, Acting Executive Secretary
P. 0. BOX 1879, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA TELEPHONE 446-8373
8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
lnwryorqesin o h seo urncl set
8f THEazo FLOID ARiinh ilarag o p CHITEC






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(;I-,. r.jI l .:,O,-l ,.:t .r If 6 ,. ,, n ,.. ., Ir,: .
hA j .l. < ... U.. C ( r.,,,.. P,... .,-1', r, I ,,. r
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N 1 -
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,^
Op.





PORTLAND CEMENT


TRINITY
St ,, WHITE
IS A PRODUCT
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COMPANY
Offices: Chicago, Illinois Fort Worth, Texas
Chattanooga, Tennessee Dallas, Texas Houston,
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Jackson, Michigan Tampa, Florida Miami, Florida
* Los Angeles, Calif.
FEBRUARY, 1962


AS USUAL THERE IS SOMETHING EXCITINGLY NEW in the use of con-
crete in architecture precast white concrete structural members.
Here, for example, are giant precast concrete crosses made with
Trinity White portland cement and white quartz aggregate. More
than 250 of these crosses form the exterior structural frame on all
four sides of this seven-story building. They are decorative in ap-
pearance and functional both as sun shades and structural support.
The crosses are temporarily braced in position and become inte-
grated into the structure as the concrete floors are poured, which
operation fills a groove in the spandrel beam of the cross.







The Bid Shopping Problem


This article, on a subject of importance to every member of
the building industry, was originally presented in the form of
an address before the 1961 Convention of the National
Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers at New
York. The author is the Chairman of the AIA Committee
on Office Practice.


By DANIEL SCHWARTZMAN, FAIA


A clear understanding of an archi-
tect's attitude toward all essential
phases of building construction prac-
tice, must of necessity, start with the
architect's ethical responsibility to his
client from whom all commissions
flow. His first responsibility is to dedi-
cate himself to the purpose of pro-
ducing a well designed building which
will meet the client's requirements
within the limitation of cost that eco-
nomic feasibility of the project has
imposed.
The architect has a secondary
responsibility to see that, in the
client's interest, the attitude and the
actions of the contractors and sup-
pliers involved in the building project
are such as to produce the proper
building for which the owner has
contracted. This is often not com-
pletely understood by both owners
and contractors.
The "Obligations of Good Prac-
tice" of the American Institute of
Architects, the ethical code to which
architects subscribe, states:
"An Architect should guard equally
the interests of the Contractor as well
as those of the Client. The Architect
will condemn workmanship and mate-
rials which are not in conformity with
the Contract Documents, but it is
also his duty to give every responsible
aid toward a compete understanding
of these documents so that mistakes
can be avoided."
This does not mean that the archi-
tect is to be the negotiator for the
contractor. Nor, on the other hand,
does it mean that the architect is
committed to drive unrealistic bar-
gains with the contractors for the
owner's dubious benefit.
In order to arrive logically at a
discussion of bid shopping, let us
examine for a few moments the back-
ground of the usual building project
FEBRUARY, 1962


from its inception.
1-A building project is born out of
its economic feasibility. This is
true whether private capital or
public funds are involved. This
feasibility is based upon the poten-
tial income or the operating funds
available to the project (as the
case may be), the cost of land,
land development and utility con-
nections, building contsruction,
furnishings and equipment, main-
tenance and applicable taxes.
Sometimes the architect is
engaged to provide a special con-
sultation service on the economic
feasibility of the project. But even
when the feasibility is determined
without his assistance, the back-
ground of cost control is a factor
for him from the inception of the
project.
2-Since the architect's primary aim
is a building of the highest pos-
sible architectural merit within the
limitations of the site and the
budget, he must start by request-
ing a fee sufficient to cover his
own man-hours of professional
service, as well as that of his staff
and his consultants required by
the project, in the client's interest.
It is consistent, therefore, that the
architect take a similar attitude
toward adequate compensation for
the building contractors whose
work he must also direct, in the
interest of the client.
3-Designs must be made and plans
and specifications necessary to
carry them out must be prepared.
This is the point at which the
architect requires the fullest coop-
eration the type of cooperation
that will, in itself, be the best
defense for suppliers against indis-
criminate Big Shopping. When
the architect selects a product, he


is in a sense designing with (1)
appearance (2) durability and (3)
cost, the three factors he must
consider in that order. If there are
several products that he can be
assured are of near equal charac-
teristics, his task is relatively
simple because he can get the
design results he seeks and still
retain the assurances of proper
value that are inherent in the
competitive bidding system. We
all recognize that it is not a per-
fect system, but there is a prevail-
ing American attitude that there
is a moral aspect to it which we
cannot ignore, and a legal aspect
as well, as the latest publicized
court cases seem to indicate.
When there is only one product
known to him that will fill the full
requirements, then the architect has
no choice but to use the "Or Equal"
basis in order to fulfill his obligations
to the client. It is reasonable to
expect, however, that the general con-
tractors all bid on the same product
specified, and indicate as an alternate
in their proposal on which of the "Or
Equal" products their bid is based,
with the savings to the owner, if any,
clearly stated for consideration.
This, too, is not perfect and is not
permissible on certain public work;
but it could be helpful to the con-
tractor, the sub-contractors, the owner
as well as the architect. I refer to the
situation in which the general con-
tractor notifies the architect after the
fact (usually when there is not suffi-
cient time to do the proper research)
that the "Or Equal" product he pro-
poses was originally reflected in his
bid and to have it disallowed would
be a heavy financial hardship on him.
This is an unfair tactic, which may
or may not have started with question-
able Big Shopping, and puts an intol-
erable burden on the architect. The
burden of proof that the product is
"Equal" is morally and legally on the
supplier and contractor, and the
proper time to establish the facts
backed up with testing laboratory
reports and convincing references is
before, not after, the contract is
signed. The American Institute of
Architects has made a great step in
that direction in publishing its
"Building Products Register."
This also means that intelligent,
technically competent literature with
the fullest possible cost, durability
(Continued on Page 27)-







7Tward a e z4ien elac


Report on Progress


Public hearings on the need for
changing Florida's existing mechanics'
lien law will continue for probably
two more meetings, according to
Representative GEORGE L. HOLLAHAN,
JR., chairman of the Florida Legis-
lative Council's Committee on Ju-
diciary and Law Reform. This is the
body which has already held three
public hearings on the existing lien
statute. The first was held in Miami
and reported in The Florida Architect
for November, 1961, and the second,
in Jacksonville, was attended by RoY
E. POOLEY, JR., FAA treasurer, and
JOHN R. GRAVELEY, both of the Jack-
sonville Chapter.
Most recent meeting was held in
Tampa January 12 and was attended
by FAA President ROBERT H. LEVI-
SON and RICHARD E. JESSEN who acted
before the Committee as spokesman
for the architects. A composite of the
reports and reactions of FAA mem-
bers attending and taking active part
in these hearings and an interview
with Chairman Hollahan relative to
the progress of his committee to date
provides, in summary, these points:
1... Hearings have well established
the fact that the current statute needs
drastic revision. Committee members
are not entirely convinced, however,
that all provisions of the present law
should be scrapped and an completely
new statute drafted. This, as pointed
out by Hollahan, is largely within the
province of whatever agency may
finally draft the new statute. The
valid assumption at present is that
Sthe draft of the new legislation would
be made by an appropriate section of
the Attorney General's office -and
the active participation at all hearings
of Assistant Attorney General TOM
HENDERSON as well as DAVID V.
KERNS, director of the Legislative Ref-
erence Bureau, would bear this out.
2...The Committee hopes that
the two remaining hearings now sche-
duled to take place in Orlando and
possibly Pensacola or Miami will
develop less repetitive criticism of the
present law and more constructive


Lien protection for all parties to
a real improvement has been espe-
cially stressed. Currently, material
suppliers appear almost as "forgotten
men" so far as a clear definition of
their lien rights is concerned. And
under the present statute professional
men -architects, engineers, consul-
tants, lawyers-have no lien coverage
whatever and must seek other legal
channels to insure compensation for
their services. Some legislators, it is
known, are not convinced of the desir-
ability of providing a lien protection
for professional people in a "mechan-
ics' lien law." They recognize the
validity of protecting the rights of
these professionals, but see the pre-
ferred possibility of introducing a
completely new statute for this pur-
pose.
Similarly, the methods finally de-
termined for establishing lien rights
should also include all parties. Va-
rious suggestions have already been
made that mandatory registrations
of interests be filed with the clerk of
the circuit court; that notices of
having supplied materials, labor or
service for any real improvement
should go automatically to the Own-
er; that time for filing liens after
"substantial completion" should be
reduced to force unpaid claims of all
parties to the notice of an Owner
prior to final close-out of a job.
Chairman Hollahan is anxious to
complete his schedule of preliminary
hearings and set law makers to work-
ing out the first draft of a new law.
(Continued on Page 23)


suggestions for the drafting of a new
one. Testimony thus far has mainly
stressed the bad points of the present
law. Some suggestions have certainly
been made relative to certain safe-
guards any new law should contain.
But specifics have so far been con-
spicuously lacking at least so far
as any attempt toward developing
definite methods of safeguarding the
various interests concerned in terms
of legally phrased provisions.
3 ... However, out of the welter
of speeches, questions and answers,
and side comments that characterize
all legislative hearings have come
some clear objectives for law-writers
to reach for.
Simplicity is probably of first im-
portance. With hardly an exception
hearing witnesses have pointed out
the wordy and ambiguous complexity
of the current statute.
Clarification of definitions ap-
pears to be hardly less important. In
particular and as a prominent ex-
ample much comment has been
offered on the definition of "com-
mencement" of a real improvement
as an element in determining time
limits for filing of notices or claims.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


DO YOU LIKE THIS EXPERIMENT...?

In past years the FAA's Official Journal has published
work done by architects in most sections of the state.
However, the majority of buildings shown were the subjects
of citations in various Honor Awards Programs at both
national and state levels. And all such presentations have
been in run-of-the-magazine black and white On the
opposite page is the first of what we hope may be an
interesting and useful new series of work-presentations.
The printing process is offset to -permit greater flexibility
of layout. Screening of the photographic reproductions is
finer to provide sharper detail, better tonal quality. And
both paper and ink will be toned in various shades to pro-
vide contrasts with other parts of the magazine. Work
will be varied and we hope to show a cross-section of
high architectural quality as it exists throughout the state.
WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE IDEA. .. ? Write us
pro or con!






Some
Work
of
Starnes
and
Rentscher


Pholos by Hank Koch


FEBRUARY, 1962


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Location of the house on
the one-acre, pine-studded
site was dictated by lot
orientation south and
east and the desire to
open pool and living areas
to prevailing breezes.
Solid walls are stacked
concrete block. All wood
construction has been ex-
posed and either left in its
natural color or stained a
deep brown. In sleeping
and service areas ceilings
have been kept low to ac-
cent the contrast between
heighth and openness of
the peaked roof and
clerestories in living and
dining areas.


FEERUAR'I 1962


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The Reef Motel


Sanibel Island, Florida





Facing south toward the Gulf
and almost 600 feet of sandy
shelling beach, this two-story
Smotel contains ten "efficien-
cy" units per floor. Each has
its own seaside balcony; and
interiors are finished in soft
shades of green, yellow and
brown.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













































































FEBRUARY, 1962









House for Robert M. Neely


Coconut Grove, Florida


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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The problem here was to design a house embodying
both privacy and comfort for a long, but very narrow
lot facing north to the street. Requirements involved living
quarters for a single man and additional quarters for
guests. The solution is really two houses in one separated
by an entrance court and screened from the street and
along the west side by walls of stacked concrete block.


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FEBRUARY 1962

FEBRUARY, 1962


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Narrow as the lot is, an il-
lusion of space has been
developed by setting the
house as close as possible
to the west lot line and
providing as open as pos-
sible a feeling along the
entire east side. Above is a
view from the living room
looking southeast toward
the guest wing and across
the entrance court.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


BRI Spring Conference .
At least two subjects to be dis-
cussed at the Spring Conference of
the Building Research Institute hold
special interest for Florida Architects.
They are, one, the problem of satis-
factory performance of sealants to
produce adequate joints between
building components; and, two, solar
effects in relation to building open-
ings.
The first topic will be the subject
of a two-day meeting that will be
divided into three sessions to deal
with Joint Criteria, Sealant Criteria,
and Recent Developments in Joint
Sealants. The second subject-similar
in character to the theme of FAA's
1961 Convention-will span a three-
day period. Included will be such
topics as solar effects on buildings,
occupants, costs, appearance, and de-
sign. A full day will be devoted to
design problems of such building ele-
ments as windows, skylights, shading
devices and supplementary lighting.
The BRI Conference will be held
at the Shoreham Hotel, Washington,
D.C., April 24-26, 1962. Program
and registration information should
be obtained by addressing MILTON
C. COON, JR., Executive Director,
Building Research Institute, 2101
Constitution Avenue, Washington
25, D.C.

CD Building Surveys
Starts in 51 Counties
Action toward widening both the
scope and effectiveness of Florida's
Civil Defense program was taken late
last month by the U. S. Army Corp
of Engineers in Jacksonville. Action
was initiated in two phases. First an
engineering survey was conducted
designed to locate buildings large
enough to accommodate 50 people
which might prove suitable as public
fallout shelters. The second phase was
the selection of a number of archi-
tectural firms throughout the state to
determine what type of fallout pro-
tection would be offered by each
building located.
This second phase is now under
way. The third step in the planned
program is analysis of what altera-
tions might be needed to make the
buildings safe as public fallout shel-
FEBRUARY, 1962


ters, and whether they could be made
habitable as shelters by a larger num-
ber of people.
Currently some 51 Florida counties
are being surveyed, with similar cov-
erage for the remaining 16 planned
within the next few weeks. Among
the architectural firms that have re-
ceived contracts for the survey pro-
gram are:
Kemp, Bunch and Jackson and Rey-
nolds, Smith and Hills in Jackson-
ville; W. R. Gomon and Associates,
Daytona Beach; Barrett, Daffin and
Bishop, Tallahassee; Look and Mor-
rison, Pensacola; Rogers, Lovelock
and Fritz, Winter Park; Bail, Horton
& Associates, Fort Myers; Gamble,
Pownall and Gilroy, Ft. Lauderdale;
Watson, Deutschman and Kruse,
Miami.
When finally selected and ap-
proved, buildings will be suitably
marked designating them as public
fallout shelters and will be stockpiled
with survival kits by county Civil
Defense organizations.

Board Adopts New
Committee Structure
At its January meeting in Jackson-
ville the FAA Board adopted, in large
part, recommendations on a new struc-
ture for FAA committees submitted
by ROBERT B. MURPHY, Mid-Florida
Chapter, the FAA's first vice presi-
dent. Six of seven recommendations
were carried. The seventh--providing
that committee chairmen for a follow-
ing year be appointed by the FAA
president at the Board meeting prior
to an FAA Convention-was referred
to the By-Laws committee for study
and report.
Recommendations adopted by the
Board were:
1...Where feasible, that each
Committee consist of two sections,
namely an action section and a cor-
responding section. The action sec-
tion consists of a chairman and one
or two vice chairmen. The corres-
ponding section consists of the Chap-
ter committee chairman of this com-
mittee.
"2 ... That at least one of the
members of the action section be a
director of the FAA Board of Direc-
tors.


"3 .. That all of the members of
the action section reside within a
close proximity of each other, thereby
permitting committee meetings with-
out too much effort. That a meeting
be held at least a month prior to
each FAA Board meeting. That each
corresponding member be invited to
attend the committee meeting.
"4 ... That the three Vice Presi-
dents of the FAA be charged with
the following responsibilities: A) Sup-
ervision of the activities of committees
assigned to him. B) Report to the
FAA Board on committee progress
(at each FAA meeting).
"5 ... To develop a standard out-
line form of report for use of com-
mittee chairmen in submitting re-
ports.
"6 ... A folder of instructions to be
provided each committee chairman,
patterned after AIA folder, listing
authority, procedure, budget and
other pertinent information."
Date Set for 1962
Office Practice Seminar
The Board also decided on loca-
tions of the remaining 1962 Board
meetings: in March, Miami; in July,
St. Petersburg; in September, Talla-
hassee, and in November- the pre-
convention meeting at St. Peters-
burg again, the site of the 1962 Con-
vention.
The next meeting will be held
March 23 in conjunction with the
1962 Office Practice Seminar. Subject
of the Seminar will be Expanded Pro-
fessional Service; and present plans
call for authoritative speakers from
out-of-the-state who have had, or are
developing, experience with an ex-
panded service practice.
Complete plans have not yet been
made for the Seminar. All FAA mem-
bers will, however, receive full infor-
mation from the FAA office relative
to time, place and subject agenda for
the meeting.
Title Change Okayed .
Another Board action involved a
change in the designation of the
administrator of the FAA's office in
the Dupont Plaza Center, Miami.
Formerly the FAA's Administrative
Secretary, the Board authorized "...
that the title of VERNA M. SHERMAN
be officially changed to Executive
Secretary in keeping with the duties
she performs." So now it's official -
and the word catches up with the
deed!





News & Notes.
(Continued from Page 19)

It Was a Fine Year
for Plenty of Folks!
If there's any truth in the old adage
that figures don't lie, the year of 1961
brought a whacking lot of construc-
tion contracts to some people. Ac-
cording to the F. W. Dodge Corp.,
"A surging wave of construction con-
tracts in December helped to boost
the total for 1961 to an all-time rec-
ord for the United States."
Dodge economists noted that much
of the year's building strength was
concentrated in the residential build-
ing sector. Apartment buildings con-
tracts soared 32 percent above the
level of 1960. Single family house
construction was ahead of 1961; and
the volume of residential contracts
was up 7 percent from the previous
year. The total number of 1961
dwelling units rose 4 percent.
Non-residential contracts slipped
one percent from the 1961 volume-
largely due to a sharp drop in manu-
facturing buildings. However, com-


mercial construction rose two percent;
and the volume of institutional and
hospital building contracts zoomed
to 18 percent above 1960. Heavy
engineering contracts slipped slightly;
and both public works and utilities
were down compared with 1960.

1962 Conference
on Church Architecture
All registered architects are eligible
to submit examples of their church
work as part of an architectural ex-
hibit to be held in Cleveland, Ohio,
at the Sheraton-Cleveland Hotel,
March 20 to 22, 1962. The exhibit
will be held in conjunction with the
1962 Conference on Church Archi-
tecture and is being developed under
the joint sponsorship of the Church
Architectural Guild of America and
the Department of Church Building
and Architecture of the National
Council of The Churches of Christ
in the USA.
Information relative to the exhibit
and its requirements can be obtained
from MRS. HAZEL ANDERSON, Execu-
tive Secretary, 13466 Connecticut


Avenue, N.W., Suite 1123, Washing-
ton 6, D.C. Prompt action is neces-
sary. Entry blanks must be in her
office by February 26th.
Significant Quotes .
"In the centers of most American
cities it is the older buildings which
usually hold our city landscape to-
gether. Our newer commercial streets,
with their inevitable competition of
signs and shapes of buildings, are
hardly better than a Miami Beach.
Experimentation is vital and neces-
sary to all our fields of endeavor, but
experimentation which is not con-
trolled by the cohesive force of an
underlying philosophy can only pro-
duce anarchy. Today we have a kind
of anarchy in architecture.
"The only way to eliminate this
anarchy is to examine the essential
reasons for the kind of architecture
we must have, beyond basic character-
istics of structural stability, utility and
compatability to the economic frame-
work of society. Without the disci-
pline and the inspiration which can
be provided by a clear understanding
of purpose, we will not be able to
(Continued on Page 22)


V.,





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let

CONCEALED

r telephone wiring
put more sales

appeal in your homes
More and more today it's the quality
"extras" that sell homebuyers. And
concealed telephone wiring is just such a
prestige feature.
S Lifetime concealed wiring provides plenty of
built-in outlets throughout the house ...
offers maximum flexibility in phone
placement or rearrangement as family needs
grow or change. And there's never any need to
mar walls or woodwork with additional wiring.
Find out soon how easy it is to
give your homes added sales appeal with
concealed telephone wiring.
Just call your Telephone Business Office.


Southern Bell


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










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w thank you...

Florida Architects!


Thanks to your planning, new homes in
every price range are being up-graded
to Medallion Home standards of electric
living. There's increasing recognition
that the home with anything less will be
out of date in the near future. In the
FP&L service area, twice as many
Medallions were awarded in 1960 as
in 1959.
You and every segment of the home con-
struction industry will be benefited by the
50 million dollars being spent nationally
during 1961 alone on the "Live Better
Electrically" and "Medallion Home"
promotion to sell more homes faster.


A Medallion Home award certifies to these comforts and
conveniences:
1. ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN with clean, cool, flameless electric
range and at least three other major electric appliances,
including a safe, flameless electric water heater for
precious peace of mind.
2. FULL HOUSEPOWER 100-200 amp service entrance-
enough wiring to give work-saving appliances all the
electricity they need ... plus extra power for those added
later. Plenty of switches and outlets the key to Better
Living, Electrically.
3. LIGHT FOR LIVING-ample light planned for comfort,
safety and beauty.
For full details of the Medallion Home program and valuable
promotional aids, call any FP&L office.


N Rarn-TAe dm /y ljtameless c67&i Zix

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA


FEBRUARY, 1962 21


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 20)
accomplish the gigantic task of fram-
ing modern man in his proper envir-
onment. That such a philosophy must
exist today is obvious when we look
in retrospect at past ages of archi-
tecture .
"The conception of an architecture
for all the people instead of a select
few is only possible through adher-
ence to a humanist philosophy one
which is consistent with the nobler
ideas we seek. To achieve this high
purpose in architecture the goals to
realize are:
"1 ... To enhance the enjoyment
of life through beauty and delight.
"2... To be uplifting, so that we
can reflect the nobility to which man
aspires.
"3... To give order, and through
order, a background of serenity for
the complex activity of modern life.
"4 ... To be truthful. It must have
an intrinsic clarity of structure which
is natural and inevitable for the pur-
pose it fulfills.
"5 .. To have full understanding
of, and fidelity to our technological


processes, so that we may conserve
our effort in the task of rebuilding
our environment, and so that our
architecture will be based on and thus
be symbolic of the great advances in
society made possible through indus-
trialism.
"6 ... Perhaps the most important
of all to be in scale with man so
that he is at all times secure and happy
in his environment and intimately
related to it." -By MINORU YAMA-
SAKI, during a lecture given before a
meeting of the Royal Institute of
British Architects.
Changes...
The Miami firm of FRANK H. SHu-
FLIN, Architect, and Associates, has
announced the relocation of its offi-
ces from the Dupont Plaza Center to
9200 N. E. 6th Avenue, Miami
Shores. The new phone is 759-4481.
A new firm has been formed for
the general practice of architecture
and engineering by ROBERT W. CIT-
RON, AIA, PE. It will be known as
Robert W. Citron Associates, Archi-
tects and Engineers with offices in
the Paramount Building, Palm Beach.
The phone is 832-6212.


SIDNEY L. KOTKIN has relocated
his architectural office at 9211 Bird
Road, Miami. The new phone is
221-4551.
RAYMOND O. PECK, AIA, has
opened a new office at 522 S. Fed-
eral Highway, Pompano Beach. He
was formerly located at 1808 W.
Terra Mar Drive. Phone of the new
office is 941-4159.
JOHN B. MARION, AIA, has relo-
cated his office in Palm Beach. His
new address is Rooms 311 and 312,
Seminole Building. 230 Royal Palm
Way, Palm Beach. Phone has not
been changed- TE 2-1500.
The architectural firm of GUY C.
FULTON & Associates has opened a
new office at 2003 S. W. 13th St.,
Gainesville. The new phone is FR
2-9814.
H. R. LICHTMAN, AIA, has an-
nounced the relocation of his office
at 211 S. Miami Avenue, Miami. The
new phone is FR 4-2113.
The new architectural office of
GILBERT FEIN & Associates is now
Suite 211, 1674 Meridian Avenue,
Miami Beach. The new phone is JE
8-7477.


RES


I D E N T I


A L


I N T E R I


ORS


'" -r Flexible... practical... yet formal
enough for entertaining were
Sy the requirements for this dining area
S .. lin a Miami residence. Working
.," |. with specific problems, the interior
; .. .. designer and architect achieved
S this superior solution.

S4 Architect: Peter Jefferson
S.Contractor: Niles A. Whyte




i RICHARD PH/MER


155 NOiRTIEAST`7 FORIEH SREE MIAMI, IOrDesignerA Rcaza 1r

155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 10)
He has accepted the principle of
setting up a "lay committee' to work
with legislators in developing a new
law. His present thinking is that this
committee should represent all inter-
ested segments of the construction
industry; but that as small a com-
mittee as possible will prove to be
most efficient as an advisory body to
cooperate with legislators in the draft-
ing of a new law. The architectural
profession will be represented on it.
An enormous amount of discussion,
writing, re-discussion and re-writing
lies ahead before any bill for a new
lien can be made ready for submission
to the legislature. With the 1963
opening but a little more than a
year away, it seems doubtful-at least
at this writing-whether all the
knotty questions can be resolved and
a bill introduced in Tallahassee a year
from this April.
It may well be that Floridians may
have to wait until 1965 to get the kind
of lien law they are now groping for.
But this much is sure. They are on
the highroad to it.


Miami Secretaries
Install Officers
Miami's Architectural Secretaries
Association held its first meeting of
1962 late last month at Betty's Res-
taurant on Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami. Chief purpose of the meeting
was installation of this year's officers.
The organization, now beginning its
third year, is made up of secretaries
who help run the offices of South
Florida architects and has grown from
a charter group of 15 to a member-
ship of nearly 40.
Out-going president, Lucy MUNZ-
NER (Whal Snyder & Associates) pre-
sided briefly, then turned the meeting
over to VERNA M. SHERMAN, Execu-
tive Secretary of the FAA, who con-
ducted the colorful and symbolic
inaugural ceremony. New officers are:
President, FLORENCE ELLISON (Don
Reiff Associates); First Vice Presi-
dent, IDA NEWMAN (Robert M. Lit-
tle); Second Vice President, MILLIE
SARGENT (Watson, Deutschman &
Kruse); Recording Secretary, JEAN-
NETTE TRACY (Robert Fitch Smith);
Corresponding Secretary, MARJORIE


SVALDI (Lewis H. Hitt); Treasurer,
MAGDA KULHANJIAN (Daverman &
Associates). Installed as Directors
were LucY MUNZNER and VIOLA M.
LEWIS (Polevitzky, Johnson & Asso-
ciates).
The installation ceremony involved
a seven-spoked wheel with multi-col-
ored ribbons attached to each spoke
and to the hub. The wheel symbo-
lized the unity of the organization
with each spoke representing one of
the club's officers and the hub its
president. As each new officer's name
was called she grasped the ribbon at-
tached to her spoke, listened to a
reading of her charge of office and
received the congratulations of the
membership.
The new president, FLORENCE
ELLISON, spoke briefly on the aims,
progress and future plans of the orga-
nization. One of its major activities
is a continuing campaign to aid two
important South Florida charities -
the Variety Childrens' Hospital and
the Florence Crittendon Home.
The new president introduced MRS.
ALICE WAINWRIGHT, newly elected
(Continued on Page 25)


Colorful and inviting.., this employees'
dining room is in the First National
Bank of Clearwater, recently completed.
Working closely with architect and client,
the Plumer firm consistently produces
outstanding designs for business and
professional interiors.

Architect: Harry MacEwen, A. I.A.
Contractor: Frank J. Rooney, Inc.
Interior Design: Richard Plumer
Business Interiors, Inc.


RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORS


I
BUSNS


* 1: 1. A 0 ; W T .*



ft 4 voV
AA WAW
_4w


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Telephone PLaza 1-9775
FEBRUARY, 1962 23






MR. ARCHITECT:

Many of your clients would prefer
cheaper, safer, better oil home
heating. They know that oil heat
costs less than half the cost of
heating a house with other fuels.
We've been telling them about it
for two years. A current ad ad-
dressed to present home owners
also says:


If you're tired of makeshift, inefficient heating
methods, we suggest you install permanent
CENTRAL oil heating, proved best by far
for Florida homes. Costs less than you think
-low monthly payments. Adds to the resale
value of your home. Keeps your family hap-
pier and healthier .. year after year.
WALL

UTILITY FIREPLACE
ROOM FLOOR

In recommending oil home heat-
ing to your clients the chances
are you're giving them something
they already know about and want.






FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Miami Secys...
(Continued from Page 23)
Miami City Commissioner, who
spoke to the group about women's
role in politics. She touched on the
need for wider and more specific in-
terest in all phases of city government
and stressed particularly the necessity
for wise planning relative to the city's
future development. This, said the
speaker, was of special importance to
architects and their associates. She
noted with approval contributions
already made by many of South
Florida's professional group.



Draftmen's Club
Study Courses
The 1962 schedule of advancement
classes for members of the Drafts-
men's Club of Miami was slated to
start February 5 at the University of
Miami Koubek Center, 2705 S.W.
3rd Street. This year's program as
planned by the club's educational
committee has been expanded to in-
clude instruction in the fields of engi-
neering and contracting as well as
in architecture. Instructors who have
volunteered their services come from
outstanding offices throughout the
Miami area.
Courses in site planning and design
will be handled by REYNOLDS CLARK;
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA; IGOR
B. POLEVITZKY, FAIA; CHARLES S.
SYMONDS, AIA; FRANCIS B. TELESCA,
AIA; FRANK E. WATSON, AIA. A
course in history of architecture as
a background for architectural design
will be conducted by O. K. HOUSTON,
JR., AIA. A course on office practice
-the business side of architecture-
will be given by H. SAMUEL KRUSE,
AIA.
To complement these architectural
subjects, the Greater Miami Chapter
of the Construction Specifications In-
stitute will supply capable instructors
for a course in specification writing.
Members of the South Florida Chap-
ter, AGC, will handle various instruc-
tional phases of a course in building
construction.
The engineering side of a drafts-
man's progressive education will be
covered by a series of courses in the
fields of both structural and mechan-
(Continued on Page 26)
FEBRUARY, 1962


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Draftsmen Club...
(Continued from Page 25)
ical engineering. In structures there
will be two courses, basic and ad-
vanced. The former will be taught
by structural engineer WILLIAM C.
GORMAN, and the advanced course
will be handled by JOHN NYTRI.
The class in electrical engineering
will be taught by RALPH SELLS. A
plumbing contractor, ALLEN GIL-
LETTE, will conduct a course in his
field; and instruction in heating and
air conditioning will be given by engi-
neer FRED BARLOW.
The yearly program of advance-
ment courses has grown to be one
of the most valuable, significant and
popular of the Draftsmen's Club
activities. In expanded form this year,
it should prove to be even more help-
ful as an aid to those craftsmen seek-
ing near future registration via State
Board examinations. At the very least
it has already proved its worth as a
means of advancing the technical abil-
ities and skills of its member drafts-
men.



Creative Sculpture...
(Continued from Page 6)
less because less time and detail is
required. The type of work imposes
a simplicity of style and artistic ap-
proach which is understood today on
all levels. In my work, I find cement
as flexible as a pencil sketch, full of
color, and plastically pleasing.
It is entirely feasible to plan the
costs of a building to include the
concrete sculptural panels and the fee
of the,artist as legitimate structural
costs as some alert architects have
discovered. It has been said that a
wall which might demand a million-
dollar fee for marble carving, could
be done for $25,000 in sand-cast
cement reliefs. It is an art which can
be done at costs a city council will
approve.
Major sculpture will not return to
our buildings except through some
method of sand-cast cement creations.
The proper and imaginative use of
this material could produce a Renais-
sance of the use of sculpture in archi-
tecture. This we seek, and need, if
life is to be improved. Somewhere,
there should be architects and artists
who can work together to this end.
It takes both.


COULD THIS

MAN BE YOU?

A National Corporation is
looking for a manufactur-
er's representative or es-
tablished company to sell
and promote architectur-
ally accepted product in
the state of Florida. Must
have excellent reputation
and following among ar-
chitects and be financially
stable. Sales already es-
tablished on a limited
basis. Please furnish all
pertinent information and
list products now handling.

For further details and
confidential interview
write Box No. 262.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Florida Foundry & Pattern
Works 26

Florida Home Heating Institute 26
Florida Power & Light Co. 21

Florida Terrazzo Association 8

General Portland Cement Co.. 7

Houdaille-Span 3

Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co. ... 5

Miami Window Corp. 1

Richard Plumer . 23-24

Portland Cement Association 28

Prescolite . 26

A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 25
Southern Bell Tel. and Tel. Co. 20

Superior Window Co. 4th Cover

Tempera Corporation 6
F. Graham Wililams Co. 27


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Bid Shopping...
(Continued from Page 9)
and installation information should be
made available to the architect during
the design selection period. Fortunes
are being wasted on senseless glossy,
pretty picture-type mailings to the
architect which are of no value to
him. This is especially true of cost
information. It is not unreasonable to
expect a product manufacturer to do
the research required to determine on
a rule of thumb basis how much his
product will cost in place in the
building. The feeling that cost
information is sacred to the protection
of the general contractor's interest is
probably the open sesame to Bid
Shopping and questionable substitu-
tions.
The owner is paying in his con-
tract for a reasonable overhead and
profit-over-costs to the contractor. He


WHAT ...
NO MAGAZINE?
If you're not receiving
this magazine, it's ten to
one you haven't told us
about an address change.
Better look to it The
P. 0. returns improperly
addressed mail. That's ex-
pensive. So, if your mag-
azine is returned, we'll
have to drop your name
unless you tell us where
you are.


is also paying an unspecified sum as
an insurance premium for the guaran-
tees of maximum cost and the quality
of workmanship and materials that is
inherent in the general contracting
system. The owner, through his archi-
tect, is entitled to all of the cost and
quality information on any product in
his building.
I am a great believer in the theory
that when a project is successful the
"star-dust" settles on the shoulders
of everyone involved. Architects are
romantic enough to feel that their
role is that of the "Master Builder"
and all of the contractors, suppliers
and workmen are his teammates dedi-
cated to the best interests of the
client. The great reputations in the
building industry have been based on
that type of reliability and are the
best answer to Bid Shopping.
FEBRUARY, 1962


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secreiray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















"Poor




Casey




Had




Struck




Out...!"
i UC S


This story is true. Events in it happened recently. All the facts involved
have been documented, and here they are.
A small, but prosperous and growing Florida Village was presented with
an opportunity to purchase a Country Club as the basis for a fairly ambitious
community recreational complex. The Village Council discussed possibilities
of its future development with a Young Architect; and at the same time
retained an out-of-state Consulting Organization to prepare a feasibility report
covering the entire project.
When preliminary development plans had been completed and economic
studies made and coordinated with these, it became evident that the project
could become not only an asset to the Florida Village, but also a source of
community revenue that would tend to reduce current tax millages. In a word,
the Village Council was presented with a program for a radical community
improvement that, from every viewpoint, seemed ideal.
Total cost to the Village amounted to just under $1.5-mililon-comprising
just over $1-million for the Country Club property and just under $.5-million
for the contemplated improvements. Operating profits were conservatively
estimated at a bit over $111,000- more than adequate from every viewpoint.
Approval of the project was given by the community; and accordingly the
Village Council proceeded to start the program moving.
The Council, realizing the scope of the opportunity at hand and wishing
to make certain that all its elements were properly coordinated, decided that
it would write a single contract for the entire development. Thus, the Council
believed, the Village's master plan for recreation could be carried through
under the direction of one administrator who would be able most efficiently
to plan for and dovetail each segment of the program.
In this unusual glow of enlightened civic interest and understanding the
Council called for the Young Architect.
"We wish to sign a single contract with you," the Council told him. "You
are the architect for this project. But we are confident that your work would
be more effective as to overall results if you were able to administer the con-
struction as well as the design phases of this program. This would then permit
us to deal with one individual whom we could regard as coordinator of the
entire project. We wish to do this."
Here almost made to order and presented on a silver platter was what
the architectural profession has been clamoring for. It was a "package without
the deal." It was an opportunity for an architect to regain his original role of
master builder without necessity for relinquishing even a tiny part of his
professional attributes and prerogatives.
The Young Architect said NO. Architectural design that he would do.
But his office was small and not staffed for the type of administrative and
coordinating activities called for here.
So the Council naturally signed a single contract with the out-of-state
Consulting Organization for which the local Young Architect will now work
as a hired and captive hand.
What would YOU have done ... .
The moral of this story is too pitifully obvious. This is not the first such
opportunity given architects to raise their professional sights and broaden the
scope of their professional service. Nor, hopefully, will it be the last. But they
will be fewer and fewer as time goes on if architects fail to grasp and make
the most of them as they occur.
The Young Architect could have done this. He could easily have enlarged
his staff. Or he could have called on an older, more seasoned colleague for
whatever special knowledge and experience he thought he lacked.
But he did neither. And his passive refusal has done something less than
nothing to help the profession of which he is a member along the road to
the wider service, the new responsibilities and the broader accomplishments
which our time and future demand.-RoGER W. SHERMAN, AIA







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INSPIRING!
Condomini Ponce e Leon, Saniurce, Puerto Rrco
H I. Hettinger arid Co General Contraitor
Reinaldo Per:., Architect


Tecemanora RealI


and Financi'g C(:rp ^u. nei&
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MONUMENTAL!
Dade Oounv. Jail and Public Safety Building
Coda & Associates
Architects
Williani Burbessee & Co.
General Contractor


WI


SYSTEM OF
CURTAIN WALL
AND
WINDOW WALL
CONSTRUCTION


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DYNAMIC!
The Deauville Hotel
Miami Beach Florlrd
Melvin Grosinfan
A 1 A Architeit,
'I