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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Gamble nominated for secretary...
 In summary - the 1961 conventi...
 FAA officers acclaimed for second...
 1961 FAA honor awards program
 News and notes
 Flexible A/C system uses piped...
 Product exhibit awards
 Advertisers' index
 Who will supervise the observe...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00090
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: December 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00090
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Gamble nominated for secretary of institute
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    In summary - the 1961 convention
        Page 9
        Page 10
    FAA officers acclaimed for second term
        Page 11
    1961 FAA honor awards program
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    News and notes
        Page 17
    Flexible A/C system uses piped water, heat pumps
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Product exhibit awards
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Advertisers' index
        Page 24
    Who will supervise the observer?
        Back Cover 1
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












On Tampa Bay...


It's St. Petersburg in 1962 and the
Convention's Host will be the Florida Central
Chapter- whose red-coated hospitality in 1957
sparked a memorable meeting and established
an attractive and unique new FAA tradition ..


I- X
*U"Eiii 11111 II' 51!.


ii ...


IjrF114

-111dfiffio


Headquarters of the FAA's 1962 Convention will be the Soreno
Hotel, one of the largest and finest of Florida's west coast. It's
convenient to all downtown St. Petersburg's facilities. It is also
near the yacht harbor and commands a beautiful view of Tampa
Bay. Best of all, it's roomy, comfortable and inexpensive!


IUAL FAA CONVENTION
1962 SORENO HOTEL ST. PETERSBURG


2 m.mmm


.. **
A.^




















































THE SYMBOL OF
EXCELLENCE














Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


4 7i swe ---

The Design of Buildings Architects or Engineers? . .
By Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA
Gamble Nominated for Secretary of the Institute . .


In Summary the 1961 Convention . .. . . 9
FAA Officers Acclaimed for Second Term . . . 11
1961 FAA Honor Awards Program ..... . .. . 12
Science Buildings, University of South Florida,
Mark Hampton, Architect
Christopher C. Larrimore Residence, Miami
Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham, Architects


Ne'


ws ana otes . . . . .
1961 to be Banner Year ... FAA Wins Two Awards Host
Chapter named for AIA's 1963 Convention What kind of Fallout
Protection?


Flexible A/C System Uses Piped Water, Heat Pumps . ... 18
Product Exhibit Awards . . . . .. 22


Advertisers' Index .........
Who Will Supervise The Observer? .
Editorial by Roger W. Sherman, AIA


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, A. Wynn
Howell; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R.
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Jefferson N. Powell, Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER...
This is the final sketch in a series of four cover designs generously developed
by Raymond H. Strowd, of Cornell and Strowd, architects of Ft. Myers. All
have been well received with particularly complimentary comments aimed
at last month's cover. Our thanks should be, and are, hereby given to Mr.
Strowd for his interest, ability and energy.


24
3rd Cover



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
SControlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida Printed by McMurray
Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 1

NUMBER 12 1961
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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DECEMBER, 1961









The Design of Buildings-



Architects or Engineers?


This article by RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA resulted from an
analysis to determine the fundamental differences between architects
and engineers as a basis for defining each profession's field of concern
with the design of buildings. In clear, concise and logical fashion it
clarifies such differences and provides a factual foundation for resolv-
ing existing conflicts between the two professions. The author is
Chairman of the FAA Committee on FAA-FES Liaison .


Among architects there have never
been too many serious differences in
the basic concept of what constitutes
the practice of architecture. The Na-
tional Council of Architectural Regis-
tration Boards agreed in 1961 on the
following:
"The practice of architecture is
defined as the professional activities
of a registered architect. This includes
advice concerning and preparation of
necessary documents for the design
and construction of buildings and their
environment, with the principal pur-
pose of providing space for human use
whether interior or exterior, perma-
nent or temporary, and including,
but not limited to, structures for so-
cial, political and economic service in
fulfilling domestic, religious, educa-
tional, recreational, memorial, finan-
cial, commercial, industrial and gov-
ernmental needs and the like."
The Engineering Profession in the
state of Florida (and in many other
states) is not unanimous in regard to
the right of engineers to practice what
architects consider their sole preroga-
tive. But there are now enough engi-
neers practicing the design of build-
ings to cause concern and resentment
among many in the profession of
architecture.
To analyze the proper field of en-
deavor for each profession, the first
thought is to determine the definition
of Architecture and of Engineering.
Dozens of definitions have been writ-
ten, but none of them seem to tell
the story of the real differences in
education, training and examinations
for qualification to practice. The fol-
lowing very short definitions may
illustrate why the public and the
courts can become confused in
attempting to differentiate by means
of definitions.
4


Architecture Definition: Art or
science of building, especially for the
purposes of civil life. (Webster)

Engineering Definition: The art
and science by which the properties
of matter and the sources of power in
nature are made useful to man in
structures, machines and manufac-
tured products. (Webster)

Further comments on defini-
tions:
Attempts to clarify definitions by
specifically categorizing the fields of
practice are restrictive and cannot
hope to be sufficiently descriptive to
cover all phases of professional
activity. General definitions, without
categories or classifications, have also
proven to be weak in interpretation,
since so many parts are applicable to
either profession, and would so be
construed if tested by legal means.
The difficulty in phrasing of defini-
tions of architecture and engineering
develops because of the use of words
that are common to both professions.
In law they carry a single connotation,
yet design, plan, and structure are
distinctly different in their concept
and execution by the practicing archi-
tect and engineer.

Professions of architecture and
engineering overlap but are not
the same:
It is obvious to members of both
professions that the fields of architec-
ture and engineering do overlap. It
seems equally obvious that there is a
difference between architecture and
engineering. That there is a difference
is demonstrated legally by the fact
that states have laws regulating each
profession by different standards, and
usually by different examining and


regulatory boards. The difference is
also clearly demonstrated by the quali-
fications required to obtain a degree
in each profession by colleges and
universities.

Determination of the differ-

ence between an architect and
an engineer on the basis of edu-
cation:
The following table of semester
hours required for degrees in Architec-
ture, Civil Engineering and Mechani-
cal Engineering at the University of
Florida has been arbitrarily grouped
and simplified in order to make an
easily understood comparison.


Arci
tee-
Military Science .-----
English Compostion .-
Mathematics -- --
Physics -----
Chemistry ----- -
Geology ---
General Education --- 2.
(American Institutions,
Humanities, Biological
Sci., Physical Sci., Logic)
Drawing, Descr.
Geometry --- 1
Structural Theory
and Design -------- 1
Construction --- 2
Mat'ls & Methods,
Work. Dwgs., Specif.,
Prof. Admin, Sur-
veying & Site
Building Equipment _


History of
Architecture -------
Theory of Archi-
tecture, City Plan __
Architectural Design
Hydraulics, Water
Supply, Sewerage --
Highways ----
Heat, Power,
Electricity -
Machine Design -----
Thermodynamics --
Metallurgy --
Manufacturing -
Fluid Mechanics ------
Technical Electives ---
Non-Technical
Electives -- -
Professional Seminar _


Civil
d- Eng,.
* Genl. Mech
SOption Eng
4 4 4
8 8 8
8 19 19
5 11 11
8 8
3 -
2 25 25




2 6 6


30 10
10 -




- 4
Cond.)


8-
38 -

- 10 -
- 6-


6 5
S 2 1


Total Semester Hours_ 173 161 159
From the above it is apparent there
(Continued on Page 20)
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DECEMBER, 1961








Gamble Nominated for



Secretary of Institute


All ten chapters of the AIA's Flor-
ida Region have filed petitions
naming CLINTON GAMBLE of Ft.
Lauderdale as a candidate for the
office of AIA Secretary. Gamble's
nomination has been acknowledged
by the Institute and his name will
appear on the ballot of next year's
national convention at Dallas, Texas.
The nomination comes as a logical
outgrowth of the extensive service the
AIA candidate has already rendered to
his professional organization. His AIA
membership dates from 1941 and
during subsequent years he has been
increasingly active in Institute affairs
at local chapter, state, regional and
national levels.
He was a founder and first presi-
dent of the Broward County Chapter,
and has been an FAA director since
1950, serving also for two terms as


both FAA secretary and president. In
1958 he was appointed a director for
the South Atlantic Region, AIA, to
fill the vacancy created by the death
of SANFORD W. GOING, FAIA, and was
subsequently elected as the first di-
rector of the new Florida Region, AIA.
Currently he is serving on the im-
portant AIA Committee on the Pro-
fession and as chairman of three com-
mittees of the FAA.
Clinton Gamble sees the office for
which he has been nominated as one
of the most vital elements in the
entire structure of the Institute. The
following comment made some time
ago in connection with his AIA com-
mittee work, reflects his attitude to-
ward the responsibilities of that office.
"As the AIA grows there must be
constant effort to improve commu-
nications both within the AIA and


CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA


outside. A direct responsibility of the
Secretary's office should be this mat-
ter of communication.
"Of all the communications prob-
lems in AIA one of the most im-
portant is to translate the work,
recommendations, and conclusions of
the national committees and the Na-
tional Board into action programs that
(Continued on Page 20)


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In Summary-The 1961 Convention


No formal papers were presented
at the FAA's 47th Annual
Convention at Baca Raton. Tape
recordings were made of each
seminar session. But the
conversational type of discussion
that characterized each session
made any sort of a coherent
transcription of the recordings
impractical. Consequently this
report is based on notes and
has been developed largely from
the excellent summary of the
Seminar programs delivered by
Thomas H. Creighton, FAIA,
at the Convention's closing
luncheon. For the sketches
of the panelists who made
this one of the most interesting
Conventions, readers are
indebted to George Merritt
Polk, Jr., of the Broward County
Chapter, AIA. .


It was probably the most stream-
lined convention in all FAA history.
Organization-wise there were no issues
at stake, no controversies to spend the
time and energies of delegates. Recom-
mendations of the FAA Board of
Directors which, again this year be-
came the agenda for the business
meetings were passed with hardly a
murmur and with such regularity of
acceptance that the process would
have been monotonous had it not
been so quick.
FAA officers were granted a second
term by acclaimation (see page 11).
And the new-business session-on
Saturday morning--was largely con-
fined to a series of five resolutions
embodying: 1) Appreciation to host
chapter and convention staff; 2) Rec-
ognition of speakers and panelists; 3)
Appreciation of exhibitors; 4) Recog-
nition of GuY C. FULTON'S service,
and, 5) In memorium to five deceased
members. As offered by C. ELLIS DUN-
CAN, chairman of the Resolutions
Committee, all passed without dissent.
The formal business of the FAA's
47th Annual Convention was dis-
patched in less than the five hours
allowed for it in the two business
sessions scheduled for Thursday and
Saturday mornings. One result of this
admirably organized procedure was


DECEMBER, 1961


that convention events marched along
almost exactly in step with the pro-
grammed time-table. Another was the
fact that everyone seemed to like the
smoothness of the whole affair; and
no one appeared the least nostalgic for
the hassling and confusion that have
marked some past FAA meetings.
Most importantly, however, this
streamlining of convention business
provided an expanded opportunity for
convention speakers. The program
committee had made the most of it;
and the Boca Raton gathering was
the speakingest in FAA history. In all
there were eleven speakersnot count-
ing FAA officers and Convention
Committee members who presided at
business and dinner meetings. From
AIA headquarters there were AIA
President PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA,
and AIA Executive Director WILLIAM
H. SCHIECK, AIA. Two more were
special speakers THOMAS H. CREIGH-
TON, FAIA, and his wife, GWEN Lux.
And acting as panelists on the three
Workshop Seminars were six more-
ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, FRED N.
SEVERUD, PE., FELIX CANDELA, JOHN
BRUCE GRAHAM, AIA, ALONZO J.
HARRIMAN, FAIA, PE, and GEORGE
MATSUMOTO, AIA.
(Continued on Page 10)
9







1961 Convention...
(Continued from Page 9)
The eleventh speaker was unsche-
duled on the program. He was DOUG-
LAS HASKELL who joined the panelists
of the Friday afternoon seminar with
the avowed intention of "stirring up
a little something." He made a valiant
attempt to develop controversy. But
he failed to do so even by assuming,
chameleon-like, the role of an archi-
tectural devil's advocate.
Indeed, it was this very lack of
disagreement that chiefly impressed
Thomas Creighton as he highlighted
the substance of the three seminars
at the Convention's closing luncheon
on Saturday. The program committee
had apparently hoped to generate
sparks of controversy from the flint
and steel of opposing attitudes and
specialties. Among the panelists were
represented viewpoints of the large
office, the medium office, and the one-
man shop. There were architects, engi-
neers and an educator. Seminar sub-
jects-"Architecture and Technology."
"Concrete vs. Steel in Architectural
Form," and "Esthetic Possibilities in
New Structural Forms" had been
selected, in Program Chairman KES-
SLER'S words, ". to bring out argu-
ments, pro and con, and promote real
'hot' discussions."
But, as Creighton noted, the three
subjects were not really divided. The
panel discussions ranged out from the
technical limitations of their titles and
covered many different aspects of


architecture. Thus the seminars be-
came a series of more or less general
discussions rather than individual
workshops dealing with specific tech-
nological subjects. And, though Has-
kell tried to stimulate it, little dis-
agreement between the speakers devel-
oped. Chief exception to this state-
ment -and one that drew a ripple
of laughter from the audience which
packed each seminar session-was the
contention of Engineer Severud that
"architecture is sculpture." It was a
contention quickly opposed by Archi-
tect Graham who said, "architecture
is articulation of space; sculpture is the
articulation of mass."
Creighton recognized six areas of
agreement that developed during the
the three seminars. The first was on
Technologies. The "concrete vs. steel"
billing was no contest at all. All pan-
elists agreed that many technological
factors influence the structural aspects
of building design; and that use of
any material is dictated by the ex-
igencies of the overall design problem
-including such influential factors as
structural system, form, controls, costs.
The important thing brought out
by Matsumoto-is ". a basic under-
standing of structures" and a familiar-
ity with materials to produce them."
The second area of agreement in-
volved Chaos vs. Order. Order, de-
cided the panelists, grew partly out of
technical honesty- the expression of
structure, though not necessarily its
exposure; the correct flow of stresses;
the use of shapes which work well





E.11



This picture accurately
reflects the comfortable,
informal character of the
"Workshop Seminars."
Taken during the first of
the three sessions, it
shows Fred N. Severud
discussing some points of
his many excellent slides;
and in the foreground,
John Bruce Graham and
George Matsumoto, two
of the other six panelists,
look and listen with in-
terest as keen as any of
the 476 people who were
registered as convention
attendants.


structurally. Chaos could also be de-
feated through artistic expression,
based partly on an understanding of
sculptural form and disciplines, partly,
as Candela expressed it, as a result of
using emotion in the creation of a
space enclosure. As the third basic
ingredient of order, the panel agreed
on social purpose. Applied to architec-
ture this meant "understanding the
problem" (Graham); "a good sound
job" (Harriman), and "background
buildings, not all foreground archi-
tecture" (Matsumoto).
Third point of harmony concerned
Methods of Creation. Here, Creigh-
ton noted, the discussion went rather
far afield. Candela observed three
stages in the creative process: science,
art, and technique--which he trans-
lated as meaning investigation (or re-
search), creation (or design) and con-
struction. Graham and Harriman sug-
gested the need for a variety of special-
ists and, above all, the necessity for
teamwork in the office-as well as utili-
zation of all applicable techniques and
disciplines. Matsumoto voiced a plea
for a closer relationship between archi-
tect and engineer- or at least a mu-
tual understanding of the duality in-
volved in design problems. He touch-
ed also on the desirability of "a univer-
sal language" as a common ground for
better understanding between various
types of building professionals.
Even with the engineer members
there was unanimity of opinion rela-
tive to the Role of The Architect. He
should, decided the panelists, be "the
team leader," the man who, though
with help from many sources, "makes
the final decisions." Relative to his
clients he should be "the interpreter
of needs." But in this connection he
should not be merely an "instrument
to do what the client wants" nor "an
entertainer." All panelists ascribed to
the architect "a serious responsibility
to improve environment"; but Haskell
observed that his role could not be
"established by fiat," but only by his
overall competence.
Fifth among the agreements Creigh-
ton noted concerned Education. Pan-
elists agreed generally that improve-
ments were needed in the field of
architectural education. But opinions
differed somewhat on the method that
should be pursued. Candela thought
a curriculum could be "less practical,"
should strive rather to develop "more
imagination in structures." Harriman
expressed a divergent view. Schools
should be "more practical" he said
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







and should develop in the student
"more ability to be useful in an
office." He thought the schools now
put too much emphasis on design and
stressed his conviction of the "need
for research"- but did not define the
type of research needed.
Matsumoto, as an educator himself,
saw need for improvement, but took
the middle course. He called for a
closer liaison between student and
teacher. He noted again the need for
"an understanding of structures" and
stressed the desirability of a broad
educational base composed of many
subjects as a means for "creating a
whole man" rather than any sort of
a specialist. He observed that schools
generally now recognize that "not
every student can be a form-giver";
and in this connection Candela sug-
gested that students might well be
taught "reasons for structure and
form" and the fact that mere "differ-
ence is not a virtue."
Finally, Creighton noticed an area
of agreement as to The Future. Pan-
elists were unanimous in recognizing
a present need for growth as a prere-
quisite to realizing opportunities of
the future. The profession, they de-
cided, should progress, not haphaz-
ardly, but "with direction"; and as
one means for doing so should "de-
velop and use a vocabulary of techno-
logies." It should hold itself open to
the use of "advancing technologies,"
continue to "coordinate many discip-
lines that are developing" and be alert
to "develop new disciplines in situ-
ations where old disciplines are no
longer valid."
From all this discussion of the
varied subjects of the Workshop Sem-
inars Creighton discerned a number
of "lessons" for Florida architects.
The near unanimity of all panelists,
pointed, he thought, to an accelerat-
ing trend toward the "integration of
engineering and architecture." He
touched on what he held to be a
growing emphasis on the "good" de-
sign solution, rather than the "differ-
ent" one- with "good" used in the
technological sense to mean a struc-
ture that "works" relative to its stresses
and materials.
The seminars, he thought, had thus
clarified the pressing need for "hon-
esty" in building design--honesty in
the sense of full use of the sciences
and full expression of techniques. As
opposed to the superficial exposure of
structural systems, this, said Creigh-
DECEMBER, 1961


FAA Officers Acclaimed for Second Term

In a strictly no-contest vote the 1961 FAA Convention acclaimed
the incumbent FAA officers for second terms in 1962. Recom-
mendations of the Nominating Committee were not opposed
from the floor; and thus the 1962 slate will be Robert H. Levison,
Florida Central Chapter, President; Verner Johnson, Florida
South Chapter, Secretary; and Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Jacksonville
Chapter, Treasurer. Robert B. Murphy, Mid-Florida Chapter, be-
comes First Vice President and William F. Bigoney, Jr., Broward
County Chapter, steps into the Second Vice President spot .
The Convention's only election contest was for the office of
Third Vice President. For this office the Nominating Committee
proposed a choice between William T. Arnett, Florida North
Chapter, and William S. Morrison, Florida Northwest Chapter.
Elected was William T. Arnett who will act as the FAA's adminis-
trative representative in the FAA's North Florida area.... Above
are, left to right, Vice Presidents Bigoney and Murphy, President
Levison, Treasurer Pooley and Florida Regional Director Robert
M. Little, FAIA. Secretary Johnson and Vice President Arnett
were not present when this picture was taken Elected for the
Regional Judiciary Committee were Kenneth Jacobson, Palm
Beach Chapter, as a three-year member, and Arthur Lee Camp-
bell, Florida North Chapter, as a one-year alternate.


ton, is honesty in architecture. And
he thought the panelists had devel-
oped the point in a constructive and
fairly adequate fashion. True, this was
a general statement and as such could
be generally applied to many regional
conditions and needs. But to the ex-
tent the statement could be adapted
to the solution of specialized regional
problems, it had, he thought, special
significance to Florida architects.
Creighton thought that one other
"lesson" had been distilled from the
discussions of the seminars. This was
a "demonstration of maturity" relative
to architectural philosophy and prac-
tice. It showed, he thought, a growing
awareness of the need for rounded


knowledge, for a greater use of abil-
ities-and for greater abilities capable
of use, as well. This attitude suggested
that architects were now less desirous
of merely "pleasing" a client, and thus
are becoming less susceptible to the
temptation of catering to the whims
of current design "fashions."
"All this," Creighton concluded,
"highlights the proper role of the
architect. Individual attitudes may,
and should, differ. But I am sure we
are all going in the same direction.
This is toward the fuller creative lead-
ership that can come from continuing
study, keener understanding and the
constant improvement of our profes-
sional product."
11


































































Lrr


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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1961 FAA Honor Awards Program


Though not as extensive as in some past years,
the Architectural Exhibit of the FAA's 47th
Annual Convention reaffirmed the fact that Flor-
ida architects are doing work comparable in
imaginative concept and quality of design with
that of any other region. Thus, the significance
of the FAA's Honor Award Program is increasing
year by year.... This year there were two award
categories Houses and Non-Residential. Two
Merit Awards were designated in the first category
- but the Jury did not select an exhibit for an
Honor Award. In the second category, however,
the Jury selected two buildings for an Honor
Award and only one for a Merit Award. The
Jury was Thomas H. Creighton, FAIA, Felix Can-
dela, and George Matsumoto, AIA. Selected by
the Jury for Merit Awards in the Houses Category
was the Larimore residence, for which Pancoast,
Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham were architects,
and the Gresham residence for which J. Don
Alford was architect. ... In the Non-Residential
Category the Jury picked two buildings for which
Mark Hampton was architect for the Honor
Award; and for the Merit Award, a Church for
which A. Wynn Howell was architect .... Shown
here are three of the award winners ....


. to Mark Hampton, AIA


. and Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA
..and Russell T. Pancoast, FAHA


Life Science Building, University of South Florida

Mark Hampton, Architect


Alexander Georges Photos


DECEMBER, 1961




















Laboratory Science Building, University of South Florida
Mark Hampton, Architect


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Christopher C. Larimore Residence...

Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham Architects


DECEMBER, 1961

























The house plan takes advantage
of a difference in ground levels
and is, in effect, two buildings
joined at the house entrance.
The bedroom portion is two feet
lower than the living and car-
port areas. Structure is mostly
wood supported on 24 concrete
piers. Roofs are side nailed,
alternate 2x4s and 2x2s span-
ning 12 feet. Exterior sheathing
is bleached, textured plywood


An. i~n~


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~- ~kB s&P.Y








News & Notes____


1962 To Be Banner Year...
There seems to be general agree-
ment that 1962 will be a year of great
building activity. According to F. W.
Dodge Corp., construction next year
will enjoy its best year in history. F.
E. DUTCHER, vice president of the
Johns Manville Corp., expects con-
struction volume-including modern-
ization, maintenance and repairs--to
soar to over $80-billion, or about 15
percent of 1962's anticipated gross na-
tional product.
The Dodge forecast is the most con-
servative of the two. It predicts that
"total construction contracts" will
reach about $40-billion, up 7 percent
over 1961. Dodge sees a 10 percent
rise in residential dollar volume and
an overall 4 percent rise in contracts
for non-residential buildings.
The Johns-Manville survey forecast
a new construction total for 1962 of
a record $60.6-billion with an addi-
tional $20 -billion going for modern-
ization, remodeling and repair of
existing structures. It estimated an
increase of 3.5 percent in housing and
an increase in the value of industrial,
commercial and utilities construction
of 4.2 percent, The J-M forecast broke
down total construction into private
and public sectors. It set private con-
struction for 1962 at about $41.9-
billions, up 4 percent over this year.
Public work volume is expected to
reach about $18.7-billions, up 6:7 per-
cent.

Chapter Committee
Named for AIA's 1963
Miami Convention
Members of the Florida South
Chapter--which will Host the Insti-
tute's 1963 Convention at the Ameri-
cana Hotel--have been named. And
in a number of instances a substantial
amount of preliminary planning has
been done. Honorary Chairman is
ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, Director
of the Florida Region. General Chair-
man is H. SAMUEL KRUSE. Other
members are:
Guide Book: JAMES L. DEEN, RUS-
SELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA, FREDERIC
SHERMAN, HON., AIA.
Hospitality and Women's Events:
WAHL J. SNYDER, JR., FAIA, and
MRS. SNYDER.
Finance: CHARLES BROWARD, JR.
DECEMBER, 1961


Publicity: EDWARD G. GRAFTON.
Exhibits: JAMES E. FERGUSON, JR.
Tours: ROBERT C. ABELE, JAMES
L. DEEN.
Theme and Programs: ALFRED
BROWNING PARKER, FAIA.
Museums and Concert:s EDWIN T.
REEDER, FAIA.
Architects' Home Parties: VERNER
JOHNSON.
Board-Staff Dinner: JOHN L. SKIN-
NER, FAIA.
Transportation: EARLE STARNES.
Entertainment: FRANK E. WATSON.
Student Program: OGDEN K. HOUS-
TON, JR.
In discussing the policy of Institute-
Chapter cooperation relative to local
conventions of the Institute, Chair-
man Kruse indicated that full respon-
sibility for such cooperation was
assumed by the local chapter rather
than any AIA region or state organi-
zation. He expressed the hope, how-
ever, that all members of the AIA
would plan to attend to a he 1963 Na-
tional Convention. He promised that
details of his Committee's program
and progress would be released for
publication as these developed and
were approved.


FAA Wins Two Awards...
At the annual meeting of the Flor-
ida Society of Association Executives
in November, the FAA's Administra-
tive Secretary, VERNA M. SHERMAN,
was presented with two Awards of
Merit. One was for the FAA letter-
head, designed by KENNETH STANTON,
a student at the University of Florida.
The other was for The Florida Archi-
tect, official FAA publication. Both
awards were given "In recognition of
outstanding achievement in the field
of communications for Trade and Pro-
fessional Associations." The award
program is a newly-developed activity
of the FSAE and part of that Asso-
ciation's annual meeting program.
Presentation to the FAA was made
by Hon. JAMES P. Low, manager,
Association Service Department of the
Chamber of Commerce of the U. S.


What Kind of Protection
from Atomic Fallout... ?
The subject of shelter from atomic
fallout will soon merit a paraphrase of


the old cliche about the weather-
which, incidentally was first voiced by
CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER, not
MARK TWAIN to which it has been
erroneously ascribed times without
number. The great deal of talk has
produced, thus far, very little action-
the reason being, apparently, that no-
body, but nobody, has really thought
the problem through to a practical,
generally applicable conclusion.
Even the scientists are now suggest-
ing that the danger from atomic fall-
out is not the quick lethal possibility
it was once thought to be. Officialdom
has likewise done an about face re-
garding the necessity of every family
embarking on a do-it-yourself shelter
construction program. We have now
reached the stage of sober second
thinking; and it may be that now the
architectural profession can make a
real contribution toward the end of
developing a well-considered program
of survival protection.
This assumes some such program is
-or will be-needed. About this no
one knows for sure. But along with
the old habit of "keeping the powder
dry" is the prudent American admon-
ition to "take cover." And the what,
where, and how of taking cover from
results of a nuclear war action has
now become a first-class national prob-
lem.
What can you do to help toward
itse solution? First step is to inform
yourself about the current state of the
atomic shelter art. In mid-October the
AIA issued, over the signature of Pres-
ident PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA, a four-
page pamphlet on the subject. It listed
regional offices with primary responsi-
bility for a Civil Defense Survey. In
Florida this office is that of the U. S.
Army Engineer District, P.O. Box
4970, Jacksonville 1, Florida. This
office, apparently, operates under the
jurisdiction of a Civil Defense Reg-
ional Office the address of which is
P.O. Box 108, Thomasville, Georgia.
Write to these addresses for infor-
mation. Ask for addresses of your local
Community Civil Defense organiza-
tion. Make yourself available to this
organization. President Will has said
"... the architects of this nation
should be prepared to participate vig-
orously in a program which may prove
to be vital to our survival." You can
do no less than to offer your talents,
interest and energies in furthering the
local segments of this program.
(Continued on Page 18)
17







News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)

Changes .
CHARLES E. LACKEY has moved his
office to a new address at 9300 S.W.
59th Street, Miami. The new phone
number is MOhawk 7-8336.
H. MARCUS PINSKER has announced
the opening of a new architectural
office in the Shore Building, 1190
N.E. 125th Street, North Miami.
Phone is PLaza 1-5687.
RICHARD S. LEVIN has established
a new office location at 4350 S.W.
108th Avenue, Miami. The phone is
CA 1-9754.
RANDOLPH F. WARE has moved his
office to 7420 Ingraham Terrace,
Coral Gables. The new phone is MO-
hawk 7-4055.
NILS VICTOR JOHNSON has an-
nounced the opening of a new office
at 11601 N.W. 7th Avenue, Miami.
EARL V. WOLFE has moved his
office to 4025 Ponce De Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables. The phone is the same:
HIghland 4-6912.
WILLIAM H. PECK has changed
offices to a new address at 309 S.E.
9th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale. Phone is
the same-JAckson 3-4471.


Flexible A/C System Uses


Piped Water, Heat Pumps


In the recently-completed building
for the Tampa Electric Company, for
which ELIOT C. FLETCHER was archi-
tect, a combination of various air
conditioning elements has been ingen-
iously used to provide the greatest
possible degree of flexibility and space
savings. The building is multi-purpose,
half containing office space, the other
-called Leisure House--housing an
auditorium, lobby, kitchen and dem-
onstration areas.
Total cooling load is 38 tons 20
for offices, 18 for Leisure House. But
study revealed that nine separate con-
trol zones would be required and
finally decisions were made to: 1)
Utilize air-handlers in each zone; 2)
Utilize water as the heating-cooling
medium; 3) Provide one 20-ton heat
pump for each half of the building;
4) Pipe chilled or heated water to
each air-handler, thus minimizing
ductwork in each zone.
The two heat pumps are located


outside the building and operate inde-
pendently- though they may be
cross connected if future needs war-
rant. They supply water to coils in the
air handlers at 45" for cooling and
118* for heating. Zone temperatures
are maintained by electronic controls
which actuate three-way valves on the
water coils. Conditioned air is deliv-
ered to zone areas in various ways
depending on space requirements.
Ceiling diffusers, combination lighting
diffuser troffers, perforated plate dif-
fusers and standard wall registers have
all been used. Aquastats in the heat
pumps provide automatic mainte-
nance of supply water temperatures
by cycling compressors.
Consulting engineers were JOHN A.
BEDINGFIELD and Associates. Using
two Typhoon heat pumps, each with
two 10-hp. compressors, they have
achieved a custom-designed air-to-
water system that is proving efficient,
flexible and economical.


4;


.,

:: 4,"

5?.


More and more
homebuyers
are asking for

CONCEALED
TELEPHONE
WIRING

Whatever else the latest building boom may
have done, one thing is certain prospective
home buyers no longer have to be sold on
modern conveniences, like telephone planning.
They ask for them.
The advantages of adding or moving telephones
with a minimum of cost is a plus factor for
any new home.
Won't you let us show you how easy it is to have
modern, saleable concealed telephone wiring in
the home or subdivision you are designing?
Just call your Telephone Business Office.



Southern Bell
...Gwu~iy I ft" 14 & J


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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HOW TO KEEP WARM


IN A CHILLY HOUSE


A,~


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DECEMBER, 1961


i


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For executive convenience and customer
hospitality-here's everything you need,
hidden away in a handsome furniture
piece. Contains refrigerator with Ireezer
(plenly of ice cubes). two-burner electric
rangetop, deep sink (optional), plus con-
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wyer
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room and rnltal piopertie.
For full information, write
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Custom-Cast

Plaques


t-forms
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Glowing geometric shapes
combine the beauty of soft
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all-aluminum construction
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light-forms may be used on
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Architects or Engineers...
(Continued from Page 4)
is a striking difference in the educa-
tional preparation for Architecture,
Structural Engineering, and Mechan-
ical Engineering. The major emphasis
in the engineering curricula is in
mathematics and sciences, leading in
Civil Engineering a strong sequence
in structural theory (not necessarily
applied to buildings), and leading in
Mechanical Engineering to study of
heat, power, electricity, machine de-
sign and associated specialties.
In the architectural curricula the
emphasis is on the design, equipment
and construction of buildings. Sixty-
four semester hours are devoted to
History of Architecture, Theory, City
Planning, and Architectural Design
compared to zero semester hours in
these subjects under Civil Engineer-
ing and four covering air conditioning
under Mechanical Engineering. The
subjects of materials and methods,
working drawings, specifications, pro-
fessional administration, survey and
site call for twenty-two hours under
Architecture as compared with ten
hours under Civil Engineering and
zero hours under Mechanical Engi-
neering.
These comparisons are not made to
furnish an unfavorable comparison,
but to point up the difference in the
educational preparation for each pro-
fession. There is an absolute absence
in the engineering curricula of the art
and science of designing building as
such.

Determination of the differ-
ence between an architect'and
an engineer on the basis of Flor-
ida State Examinations for Regis-
trations to Practice:

Engineering Examination by State
Board (Florida) in Civil Engineering:
A review of a recent two-day examina-
tion by the Examining Board revealed
the following: The first day there
were nineteen questions from which
the examine was to answer ten. The
second day there were about thirty-
eight from which the examinee was
to answer enough to total 60 points.
A good portion of these questions
had to do with structure, water, sew-
ers, grading, and basic theory which
could be applied either directly or in-
directly to some components of build-
ings. There was not one question in
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






regard to planning or designing of
buildings, no site planning, no archi-
tectural history, no theory of design,
and no comprehensive structural or
mechanical systems for buildings.
Architectural Examination by
State Board (Florida): By contrast the
architectural examinations consist of
thirty-six hours covering History and
Theory of Architecture (3 hrs.), Site
Planning (5 hrs.), Architectural De-
sign (12 hrs.), Building Construction
(3 hrs.), Structural Design (5 hrs.),
Professional Administration (3 hrs.),
and Building Equipment (5 hrs.)
Conclusion: The State of Florida
by its examinations qualifies architects
to design building sites, to design the
architecture of buildings including
structure and equipment, and to sup-
ervise and administer building pro-
jects.
The Florida engineering examina-
tion qualifies the engineer to design
(among other things) certain limited
component parts of buildings. It cov-
ers many questions not directly con-
cerned with the design and construc-
tion of building and requires generally
more preparation in mathematics,
physics, chemistry, and, in the case
of the mechanical engineering ques-
tions, machine design, thermodynam-
ics, metallurgy and fluid mechanics.

What about the client:
The purpose of registering the mem-
bers of a profession is to protect the
public. The only state registration
based on education, experience and
a state examination pertaining to the
design of buildings, is the registration
of architects.
Architects are commonly engaged
to project and supervise the erection
of costly residences, schools, hospitals,
factories, office and industrial build-
ings and to plan and contain urban
and suburban development. Health,
safety, utility, efficiency, stabilization
of property values, sociology, and psy-
chology are only some of the inte-
grants involved intimately. Banking
quarters, commercial office sites,
building lobbies, store merchandising
salons and display atmospheres, mo-
tels, restaurants and hotels eloquently
and universally attest the decisive im-
portance in competitive business of
architectural science, skill and taste.
A synthesis of the utilitarian, the ef-
(Continued on Page 23)
DECEMBER, 1961


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DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?

If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect . We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address"....


At the exhibit opening ceremony, left to right: Howard McCall, AIA; FAA
President Robert H. Levison, AIA; AIA President Philip Will, Jr., FAIA; Com-
missioner Sundy; Boca Raton Mayor Fox; Commissioners Lytal and Van Kessell,
and Kenneth Jacobson, AIA.


Product Exhibit Awards...


The now-traditional Honor Awards
to products exhibitors were presented
by FAA President ROBERT H. LEVI-
SON at the Convention's opening
luncheon meeting Thursday, Novem-
ber 9, 1961. That for Excellence of
Display was won by the Boiradi Tile
Manufacturing Company and was ac-
cepted by MR. MARIO BOIARDI. The
other went to the Harris Standard


S. for educational value of display


Paint Company for Educational Value
of Display and was received by MR.
DOUGLAS McCoY, general sales man-
ager for Harris.
The Awards were announced by
HAROLD E. MCCALL, chairman of the
Convention's Product Exhibit Com-
mittee. As last year the award plaques
were of walnut mounted with engraved
name plates and a relief AIA seal.


S. for excellence of display


Above are the prize-win-
ing exhibit booths; and,
left, President Levison
presents the Honor Award
Plaques to exhibitors.
Left to right, President
Levison, Douglas McCoy,
of the Harris Standard
Paint Co., and Mario Boi-
ardi, president of the
Boiardi Tile Manufactur-
ing Company, Cleveland
and Lake Worth. Harris
Standard headquarters are
at Tampa.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Architects or Engineers...?
(Continued from Page 21)
ficient, the economical, the healthful,
the alluring and the blandished is
often the difference between employ-
ment and unemployment, thriving
commerce and a low standard of ex-
istence. Basic engineering no longer
suffices to satisfy many demands of
American health, wealth and pros-
perity.
The only logical explanation for
the inclusion, in the statute govern-
ing the practice of engineering, of
the word "buildings" as a permissive
item of design for engineers, is that
certain structures are of necessity a
result of the special requirements of
housing mechanical equipment, such
as electrical power plants, and are not
primarily concerned with problems of
human occupancy such as circulation,
site development, form, interior space,
exterior mass, and other aesthetic con-
siderations.
The statute controlling the practice
of Architecture acknowledges this
right of engineers to design buildings
"which are purely incidental to their
engineering practice." The wording
of this statute is permissive but at the
same time definitely limiting.



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Florida Power and Light Co. 7
Florida Portland Cement Div. 8
Merry Brothers Brick
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Miami Window Corp. 1
Prescolite ... . 20
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 21
Southern Bell Tel. and Tel. Co. 18
Superior Window Co. 4th Cover
Tempera Corporation 6
F. Graham Williams Co. .23


DECEMBER, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Who Will Supervise the Observer...?



This is merely an individual query. It has been raised because of the confusion that
has been created by recent official excursions into legalistic semantics -a confusion,
almost amounitng to consternation, that is shared by many Florida architects with wide,
long, and varied professional experience. This is not to speak for them. But some points
of the matter may strike some notes in harmony with their own thinking.
What we are speaking about is, of course, the change in Article 38 of the 1961
Edition of the General Conditions, the change which eliminates the word "supervise"
and uses the word "observe" in its place. As pointed out by MR. JOHN F. CLARK,
attorney, in a publication recently issued by the Institute, this change not only lessens
the authority of the architect, but also lessens his responsibility. And the change was
apparently made as a legal means for accomplishing just this result.
But a good question could be made as to whether this result is professionally desir-
able. From a broad view the profession seems to be working itself into a predicament.
On one hand, leaders are forcefully persuading it to expand its services, to reach for and
assume greater responsibilities for new, larger and more complex tasks. On the other,
there seems to be a fearful and increasing concern with the possible results of continuing
to accept the responsibilities with which it has traditionally been charged.
These attitudes are antipathetic. Can one who seeks to weasel out of one responsi-
bility be expected to discharge heavier ones under conditions of vastly widened scope
and complexity?
We appreciate efforts of the legal profession to protect the building professional
against the possibly disastrous effects of his own acts. But we wish lawyers would be
equally as eager to clear away some of the legalistic fog that covers the whole doctrine
of third-party liability. For it is this doctrine that has thrown professional men into a
profound tizzy; and it is an attempt to anticipate future interpretations that may lie
under the fog that has produced the recent exercise in semantics relative to Article 38.
Any architect worthy of mature status does not need whatever vague protection may
reside in sly wordings. He is knowledgeable enough to provide the skill, experience and
technical capacities his client has a right to demand. He is conscientious in his desire
to carry his client's project through to a turn-key status. And he is strong enough in
character and confident enough of his varied abilities to accept the responsibility for
his performance at any stage of the work.
In a word, he is thoroughly competent to undertake the professional activities for
which he was trained and for the conduct of which he has been legally certified and
registered. And here, it seem probable, lies the crux of this whole matter.
Without competence -and on a constantly ascending scale -architecture, as even
the professional activity most of us have known it, is surely doomed. Legal foxholes and
weasel phrases can never take its place. Indeed, these only serve to lessen its importance
and to dangle a sort of tinsel protection before those who show themselves to be not
quite competent enough.
MR. PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA, has put it clearly. "It is logical," he said, "for the
architect to be in charge of the thinking about the future of urban civilization. But the
leader will be he who provides drive and competence whether he's an architect or not."
And who but the leader will be the one to supervise the observer?
-ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA



























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