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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 Are convention expenses deductible...
 Architectural research today
 Nominations for 1962 FAA offic...
 Program, 47th annual FAA conve...
 Program, 1961 building products...
 Robert Law Weed, FAIA 1896-196...
 Toward a new lien law...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00089
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00089
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Letters
        Page 5
    Are convention expenses deductible for taxes?
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Architectural research today
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Nominations for 1962 FAA officers
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Program, 47th annual FAA convention
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Program, 1961 building products exhibit
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Robert Law Weed, FAIA 1896-1961
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Toward a new lien law...
        Page 37
    News and notes
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Advertisers' index
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




The November, 19

FLO RIDA ARCHITECT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.
Jc&


17th


ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION ISSUE








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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


Ia 7&hi Isce ---


Letters . . . . .
An Answer to An Attitude By P. M. Torraca, AIA


Are Convention Expenses Deductible for Taxes?

Architectural Research Today . .
By Dr. Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA

Nominations for 1962 FAA Officers . .

Program, 47th Annual FAA Convention .


Directory, 1961 Building Products Exhibit

Robert Law Weed, FAIA 1896-1961 .

Toward A New Lien Law . .


News and Notes .........

Advertisers' Index ........


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, A. Wynn
Howell; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R.
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Jefferson N. Powell, Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER .
This is the third cover designed by Raymond H. Strowd, of Cornwell and Strowd,
architects of Ft. Myers. We don't really believe he had in mind a delineation
of a reflected design of a dome for execution in the structural art of rein-
forced concrete. On the other hand, he might have had. In any event the
tracery forms a suggestive background for the FAA gavel, symbolic of all
convention deliberations.


. 30


. 37


. 38

. 51

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. .Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S. Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida Printed by McMurray
Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 11 Q I

NUMBER 11 1 1
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 6


. 25-29






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Letters




The 1961 OIP Seminar...


An Answer to An Attitude


By P. M. TORRACA, AIA


EDITOR, F/A:
Due to the fact that I was in Ver-
mont and Connecticut during the
summer months, I did not return to
Gainesville until the middle of Sep-
tember and therefore did not see The
Florida Architect of July until then.
I read with interest the Part I-The
Student and The Architect account
of the 1961 Office Practice Seminar.
I confess that I was a little perturbed,
especially in view of the fact that
some of the statements made by mem-
bers of the panel would not stand the
test of a real impartial investigation of
our curriculum at Florida. As far as
Mr. Ginn is concerned he must have
directed his snide remarks to our set
up here. I say this because he has not
studied anywhere else.
I was acting head of the depart-
ment of architecture when the Florida
curriculum was revised. I with 28
members of the faculty sat in sessions





The July 1961 issue of The Florida
Architect carried a part of the discus-
sion of the 1961 FAA Office Practice
Seminar held in June 1961 in Tampa.
In his address to the forum Mr. Trip
Russell made this statement:
". .The most alarming reason I
have heard for the lack of student-
architect contact is that the student
has no time. lie is apparently bogged
down in a tight curriculum that is
exhausting to the point that he can
spore no time to listen to a practicing
architect who might take the trouble
to come to talk to him. If that is true,
I feel there is something wrong with
the curriculum .. I do not believe
any curriculum should be so tight that
it removes from the student any pos-
NOVEMBER, 1961


for months under the leadership of
Dean Bannister and came up with the
present curriculum. This was not the
result of the work of two or three
individuals, but rather the result of
the work of the entire faculty who,
by the way, are graduates of Yale,
Pennsylvania, Columbia, Illinois, Uni-
versity of Texas and perhaps one or
two other schools. I must not omit
Harvard, because one of our faculty
was from there as well as from the
Rhode Island School of Design.
I am therefore submitting some re-
marks in answer to that panel discus-
sion which I hope you will find
appropriate to publish in The Florida
Architect.
I am speaking for myself and not
necessarily for any one else on our
staff.
P. M. TORRACA, A.I.A.
Professor of Architecture
U/F College of Architecture
and Fine Arts, Gainesville.





sibility of contact with the outside
world."
To that last statement I would
shout from the hill top "AMEN."
However, it would be a tragic indict-
ment of architectural education if the
student of architecture in the pursuit
of his professional education really
had no time available to attend lec-
tures by visiting personnel either
from the ranks of our own profession
or from other areas of professional
activity. It is true, of course, that the
achitcctural curriculum of five years
duration must be packed with cul-
tural, technical and professional sub-
ject matter that is demanded by the
very nature of the profession itself.
But to say this is not to admit that


the student of architecture has no
time left for any ouside activity, diver-
sion or experiences.
Those of us who have had the
privilege of being associated with the
problems of architectural education
as critics or teachers over a period of
many years arc indeed disconcertingly
aware of the heavy schedules that stu-
dents must carry. But we are not un-
mindful of the fact that, sympathetic
as we are with their burdens, students
do not always make the best use of
their time. The serious student who
disciplines himself in the proper study
habits does find time to hear concerts,
to listen to lectures by eminent and
distinguished authorities, to attend
drama productions and last, but not
least, to listen to practitioners of
architecture who come to the campus
to talk to them. After all, these do
not take place every day, either.
However, as teachers, practitioners
and educators let us face the facts of
life. The path to professional educa-
tion today any professional field -
is not strewn with roses. And also,
academic education is just the begin-
ning of one's mental and spiritual and
professional development. It is a con-
tinuing process throughout one's life.
It does not end at the portals of
academic institutions.
I was also somewhat alarmed, if
not chagrined, to read the following
statement by Mr. Ronnie Ginn, a
recent graduate of architecture, on
architectural education:
". .The basic problem seems to
lie in the fact that a clear and un-
clouded system of discipline is lacking
S. .it seems to me necessary that the
process of architectural education be
geared to the students' creative abili-
ties and organization of thought
progress. These creative abilities can
not best be served through depend-
ence on an unprincipled and hap-
hazard educational system."
Here then we must ask ourselves:
What does architectural education
envisage? Does it neglect to provide
for the creative development of the
individual? Is the course content of
the various professional and cultural
subject matter so selected as to have
no meaning whatever? These and
many other questions can be asked.
The answers to them can be found in
that monumental work "'The Archi-
tect in Mid-Century" authored by the
(Continued on Page 50)
5








Are Convention Expenses



Deductible for Taxes?


Here's information that may help you deal with
Uncle Sam and be sure of your tax deduction
background in dealing with his tax-collecting agents.


Can you deduct, for income tax
purposes, the expenses you incur by
attending conventions? In the words
of former President FDR, that's an
"Iffy" question. Sometimes you can.
Sometimes you can't. Here, distilled
from a number of reliable sources,
is a guide to your income tax thinking
relative to the costs of your conven-
tion attendance.
First, however, a general caution.
No one-including the Internal Reve-
nue Service tax experts-knows the an-
swer to all tax questions. But enough
precedent has been established on this
matter of convention expense to form
a number of rules-of-thumb which you
can be reasonably safe in following.
That phrase-"reasonably safe"-is


used advisedly. New tax rulings are
being made with astonishing regular-
ity; and for that reason your claims
for deductions must be firmly based
on the general premises accepted by
the IRS. If they are so based, your
chances are vastly better toward re-
futing an IRS move to disallow a
claimed deduction in the future.
Two of these IRS general premises
should guide your thinking relative to
convention expenses. The first con-
cerns the purpose of the expense. The
second involves the records of that
expense. Keep these two cardinal
points in mind. Oddly enough, the
IRS is not as much concerned with
the amount of the money you deduct
for your expenses. The record shows


that IRS seldom questions the total
tab-whether your hotel suite costs
$100 or whether your food-and-drink
bill tots up to $100 per convention
day. But it is keenly interested in why
you spent the money and how you
have accounted for it.
The IRS attitude on the reason for
deductions is fairly easy to understand
-however mystifying may be some of
the interpretations of that attitude.
Simply stated it's this: if the claimed
deductions bear some clear relation to
the business in which you're engaged,
they are allowable. In the case of con-
ventions the IRS has recognized the
business or professional relation-
ship, provided the convention you
attend is related to your own field of
business or profesisonal interest.
An example or two might be of
help here. In the case of an architect
the expense of attending almost any
formal gathering of an organized
building industry group would, with
hardly a question, be construed as a
valid part of the costs inherent in
conducting an architectural practice-
and hence allowable as a deduction.
But a trip to a World's Fair-or,
possibly, a two-day attendance at even
(Continued on Page 34)


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By DR. TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA
Dean, College of Architecture and Fine Arts,
University of Florida




The author, as chairman of the FAA's Committee
on Research, first submitted this article in the
form of a letter to FAA President Robert H.
Levison as "...a report on the conditions of archi-
tectural research in the United States and in
Florida during 1961 as it has come to the atten-
tion of the writer." Long interested in the subject
of his report, Dr. Bannister was a leading initiator,
in 1957, of the Florida Foundation for the
Advancement of Building, visioned as a pioneering
effort toward industry-wide cooperation in the
building field.


ARCHITECTURAL


RESEARCH TODAY


Research is a term widely, but in-
correctly, used today to describe any
study, systematic or haphazard, pur-
poseful or casual, general or private.
This loose employment of the term,
stemming from a general recognition
of recent expansions of knowledge, in
fact obscures the real aims, methods,
and conditions which produced the
meritorious results. If the ends are
truly desirable and to be encouraged
systematically, we must fix a reason-
able definition of the term.
Research is a process which seeks
to discover and establish facts, prin-
ciples, and relationships so that the
result of their subsequent use under
identical conditions will be certain
and predictable. The cumulative result
of research is thus a growing body of
verified knowledge fortifying man's
continuing effort to understand and
control the conditions of his existence.
The research process encompasses
four well-defined stages. First is the
formulation and statement of the spe-
cific problem to be undertaken. Sec-
ond is the setting up and investiga-
tion of plausible hypotheses. Third is
the establishment of the conclusion.
And fourth is the reporting of the
whole process for public use. The
omission of any of these stages renders
a project incomplete and thus pre-
NOVEMBER, 1961


vents its acceptance as research.
The gradual emergence of the re-
search process over the past four cen-
turies has transformed both the under-
standing and use of the physical envi-
ronment in western civilization; and
the powerful appeal of the results of
western research is in large part the
driving force behind the present revo-
lution among so-called underprivileged
peoples.
The acceleration of the process and
effects of research has been particu-
larly evident during the present cen-
tury in agriculture, engineering, and
medicine, which have benefitted espe-
cially from public subsidies for the
support of research programs and cen-
ters.
When we turn to architecture, how-
ever, we find a very different and a
very disappointing picture. On the one
hand, in the area of materials, con-
struction assemblies, and various types
of building equipment, much indus-
trial development work has been ac-
complished. Since most of this activity
has been directed toward, and motiv-
ated by, the exploitation of markets
and the amassing of profits, the ex-
perience derived from investigations
has been fragmentary and, in any case,
has remained zealously guarded as
trade secrets.


Futhermore, little if any competent
architectural assistance has been
sought or utilized by the companies
involved, so that, while the final prod-
uct may of itself satisfy some limited
criteria, it could at the same time
prove wholly useless in the program
of a total building. Product develop-
ment will remain, of course, a neces-
sary function and must be performed
by producers, but such work must not
be confused with research.
It should be noted that even when
general product investigation is carried
on by a trade association, the result
can rarely be accepted as research. At
the same time, such studies as those
conducted and published by the Port-
land Cement Association fulfill the
most rigorous definition of research.
In recent years too many architects
have succumbed to the habit of claim-
ing design development studies as re-
search. Although the two processes are
analogus, their different aims and
standards separate them distinctly. On
the one hand, research seeks to distill
general principles from experience; on
the other, design applies all principles
relevant to a specific set of complex
and even contradictory conditions,
judges and resolves the inevitable
clashes, and seeks the optimal prac-
(Continued on Page 16)







Report on Research...
(Continued from Page 15)
ticable specific solution.
Thus research can assist, but can
never usurp, the function of design;
nor can design operate with reason-
ably direct effectiveness if it remains
unguided by principles validated by
research. The ultimate decisions of
the design process must always depend
on intuition; but this fact need not
deny the positive contribution made
by rational considerations drawn from
research. Indeed, it is not an either-or
choice, but a just combination of both
that will fortify the truly skilled de-
signer.

New Type of Research .
What kinds of architectural re-
search, then, does the profession need
to accomplish? In general, this can be
simply stated by saying that the archi-
tect could benefit from concerted, sys-
tematic investigation of every type of
situation that arises in the design of
contemporary buildings. This bald
allegation is true because so little in-
vestigation has been carried out and
so few principles, even the most rudi-
mentary, have been established.
We have operated rather by rules
of thumb, more or less inspired
guesses, and specious sophistry. In
an age of advanced science, we are
forced to practice as if exact knowl-
edge were not worth the bother. To
cite a simple example: What consti-
tutes an optimal stair? Despite insur-
ance companies' voluminous records
of accidents on stairs, we still rely
upon rules of thumb to determine
riser and tread. Continuing accident
rates indicate the need for a much
more subtle approach unless we are
prepared to outlaw all buildings of
more than one story.
At another level lie unanswered
questions about optimal spaces for
various kinds of activities. One may
consult a Graphic Standards, but such
sources are almost invariably based
solely on rules of thumb drawn prag-
matically from the accidents of past
practice. For three or four particular
building types, principles of functional
organization are being studied by na-
tional committees of the A.I.A. It is
to be hoped not only that these
studies will achieve their primary pur-
pose, but also that they will establish
a viable general methodology applica-


ble to other types as well.
With regard to esthetic questions,
the scarcity of verified principles seri-
ously handicaps the design process. If
the purpose of esthetic design in archi-
tecture is the expressive ordering of a
building's inner and outer spaces, de-
sign is thus the language by which the
architect communicates the structure's
perceived emotional content to be-
holders. The effectiveness of spacial
message clearly depends, therefore,
upon the designer's power to appre-
hend its possibilities, develop its most
appropriate and most significant ex-
pression, and present it with optimal
clarity. While the ultimate synthesis
will naturally remain intuitive, the
process could proceed more securely
if the possibilities of vocabulary, the
principles of grammar and composi-
tion, and the nuances of eloquence of
this spacial language were more cer-
tainly understood. In this regard, the
research now under way at Ohio State
University by Hoyt Sherman and his
group offers promise.
Because the practice of architecture
is so exclusively concerned with the
design process, architects themselves
have rarely undertaken systematic re-
search projects. Even when they have
attempted the formulation of a prin-
ciple needed for the design of a par-
ticular commission, the results have
seldom become generally available.
For the same reason, architectural
faculties have devoted their instruc-
tional efforts almost exclusively to de-
sign. The result has been that only
recently, under the influence of bene-
ficial effects observed on other fields,
has the profession begun to manifest
interest in the possibilities of research
truly architectural in character.
Any development plan for architec-
tural research raises the problem of
finance since the concerted effort and
equipment it requires far exceeds the
resources of individuals, however en-
thusiastic and dedicated they may be.
Attempts to secure adequate support
have thus far met with very disap-
pointing results. The usual proposal
in architectural circles is to seek con-
tributions from producers and suppli-
ers of building materials and equip-
ment; but, while some firms and trade
associations have supported research
projects, these have rarely, if ever,
gone beyond questions bearing very
directly upon the contributors' own
problems. Most of these projects
would be more correctly designated


as product development. It has be-
come increasingly clear that such
sources cannot be counted upon for
more than a dribble of grudging token
aid in seeking answers to the multi-
tude of problems of interest primarily
to architects.
To laymen it would no doubt seem
reasonable to expect that, if these
problems are of importance to archi-
tects, the profession itself is the logical
source of support for solving them.
Unfortunately, this solution has not
as yet proved equal to the need. The
American Architectural Foundation,
formed in 1942 and reorganized in
1960 as the American Institute of
Architects Foundation, was intended
to attract and unite the profession's
resources for research. After nineteen
years, its principal has grown to only
$100,000 and yields only a small por-
tion of the funds required for a mini-
mal program. The Foundation de-
serves to prosper, but with all due
appreciation it is probably unrealistic
to expect it to satisfy the profession's
real needs in the foreseeable future.

Possibility at Home .
The Florida Foundation for the
Advancement of Building was a simi-
lar attempt which sought contribu-
tions from all segments of the build-
ing industry of the State. However,
after its inauguration in 1957 an ini-
tial limited appeal met with surpris-
ingly small response insufficient
even to carry out a general state-wide
canvas. Nevertheless, the principle of
FFAB remains basically sound and it
seems possible that, were the Florida
Association of Architects to assume
active leadership, FFAB could become
a very useful agency for the State's
profession.
Appeals to private foundations have,
in general, met with very little success.
Their directors tend to regard archi-
tecture and building as private enter-
prises which should be able to supply
their own needs, at least in the initial
stages of development. This attitude
may derive in part from the fact that
direction of these organizations has
been controlled primarily by physical
and social scientists who favor familiar
areas of academic investigation and
who believe, like some architects
themselves, that architectural research
is essentially a routine engineering
matter. It will continue to be difficult
(Continued on Page 19)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































Weldwood plain sliced 4" Architectural walnut, installed in a carefully mismatched plank style. Office of the president, Southland Life
Insurance Company, Southland Center, Dallas. Arch: Welton Becket, FAIA & Assoc., Los Angeles. Inst: Adleta Show Case & Fixture Mfg. Co., Dallas.


How many faces has walnut paneling?


THREE POPULAR TYPES OF VENEER CUTS
Type of cut Result in the panel





Plain slicing-The log is cut In
half, then sliced with a razor sharp A unique and variegated figure, as
blade moving parallel to a line strikingly illustrated above.
through the log's center.


I I
I MI
Quarter slicing-The log Is I
quartered and sliced so the blade A series of stripes, straight in some
strikes the log at right angles to woods, varied in others.
the growth rings. I

I I) I L t- 0= I)


Half-round -Segments or flitch-
es of the log are mounted off- A bold variegated grain marking
center on a lathe so the blade that differs from plain slicing be-
cuts slightly across the annular causthe blade partially follows
growth rings. the annular rings. I
L g-ow~hr-'n',-


It all depends on how you slice it...

Walnut can be many woods when it is made into paneling by
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ORLANDO, 140 West Miller, 5-9005 TAMPA 3, 5510 North Hesperides, REdwood 7-6091
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NOVEMBER, 1961 17

















sgoOs$Ioses


A Unit of Houdaille Industries. Inc.
18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


VISIT


BnOT







Report on Research...
(Continued from Page 16)
to dispel this misconception until the
real character and significance of arch-
itectural research can be clearly dem-
onstrated. Although some support
may in time be given by private foun-
dations, it seems unlikely that they
will ever become major contributors.

Solid Background .

In surveying possible sources of sup-
port for architectural research, it is
instructive to recall the beginnings of
similar activities in agriculture and
engineering. Like architecture and
building, both were large in scope,
but so dispersed as to be unorganized.
Neither was at first able to support
coordinated programs of research. In
1834 Boussingault in Alsace and in
1837 Lawes in Herefordshire began on
their own farms the first scientific
field research in agriculture. The
establishment of agricultural colleges
during the mid-nineteenth century
promptly encouraged faculty con-
ducted research on a modest scale.
The obvious benefits thus procured
finally stimulated the creation of gov-
ernment supported experiment sta-
tions, beginning in 1875 with that of
Connecticut. In the following eleven
years, eighteen states had followed
suit. In 1887, Congress stimulated ex-
pansion of this trend by providing
funds for the establishment of experi-
ment stations as units within land-
grant state universities. The investiga-
tions conducted over the years by
these organizations have been pri-
marily responsible for the metamor-
phosis of agriculture into a science-
based industry. It is widely held that
for every dollar of tax support agri-
cultural research has benefitted the
economy more than 500 per cent.
The development of engineering
research followed a similar course. But
it was not until 1903, 108 years after
the formation of the first engineering
school, the Ecole Polytechnique at
Paris, that the first Engineering Ex-
periment Station was established at
the University of Illinois. Although
this pattern was widely adopted, a
large proportion of engineering inves-
tigations in the past were primarily
routine tests and development projects
conducted for and financed by private
companies. In recent years, however,
industrial research and development
NOVEMBER, 1961


has expanded so markedly that com-
pany research units have assumed
most of the responsibility for product
development. The most progressive
experiment stations have thus been
able to concentrate their efforts upon
projects selected for their research
potentials.
The extension to architecture of
this experiment station type of opera-
tion within the university system has
been very limited. Purdue University
studied various types of prefabricated
houses. The most successful and sus-
tained program has been that of the
Small Homes Council of the Univer-
sity of Illinois, which has conducted
contract and a few non-contract proj-
ects ranging from the development of
new construction methods, such as
slabs on ground, panelized walls, and
small shop-fabricated roof trusses, to
an investigation of family psychologi-
cal reactions to a sequence of dwelling
plans made possible by a changeable
house. In many ways the example of
the Small Homes Council under-
scored the benefits procurable from a
more extensive and more inclusive
program.
The logical step from such partially
tax-supported programs was to a na-
tional experiment station for archi-
tecture and building. The establish-
ment of the Building Research Station
at Watford, England, in 1920 pio-
neered the way. After four decades of
work, the value of such a program has
been inescapable. Sweden financed a
similar program by a special tax levied
on all building payrolls. Following
World War II, many other European
states formed similar units.


Present Status .

In contrast, in the United States
the absence of any coordinated pres-
sure from the building industry long
delayed any consideration of national
support for building research. The
formation, soon after the war, of the
Building Research Advisory Board as
an industry coordinating agency and,
later, of the correlated Building Re-
search Institute served to stimulate
interest by providing a forum for the
exchange and discussion of ideas and
findings. These groups gained semi-
public status when they became affili-
ated with the National Academy of
Sciences. BRI has continued to per-
form its original function of dissemi-


nation, but BRAB gradually under-
took the performance of research con-
tracts primarily for government agen-
cies which found themselves con-
fronted by technical problems. Cur-
rently, BRAB's annual budget for
such projects is approximately $250,-
000.
As national growth continues to
create expanding building needs, and
as the profession and industry become
more aware of the benefits of research,
the advantages of a coordinated,
large-scale research program are be-
coming increasingly apparent. One
hopeful indication is the proposal now
under consideration to establish with-
in the Bureau of Standards a division
charged with building research. While
it seems likely that such an agency
would initially probably tend to em-
phasize types of constructional prob-
lems amenable to engineering-like in-
vestigation, participation by architec-
tural personnel should in time make
it possible to undertake other kinds
as well.
The development of research in
other fields indicates that the expand-
ing need for it in architecture and
building will require the service of
many agencies both public and private
and on many levels. As the findings of
research become disseminated, archi-
tects will rapidly discover that their
increased knowledge of principles will
clarify old procedures and give them
surer mastery in the practice of their
art.
Finally, it may be of interest to re-
view briefly at the local level a num-
ber of research and research-related
projects completed or under way by
members of the faculty of the De-
partment of Architecture. In connec-
tion with the development of particu-
lar courses, several members have pub-
lished or are preparing texts or syllabi.
Associate Professor Bertram Y. Kin-
zey, is co-author of a new text on
building equipment published by
Prentice-Hall. Associate Professor F.
Blair Reeves has completed a syllabus
on architecture as a profession for use
in the freshman introductory course.
Professor P. M. Torraca has prepared
a syllabus on planning criteria of se-
lected building types for use in his
fourth-year course in architectural the-
ory. Assistant Professor Robert S.
Davis is developing a series of demon-
stration plates for the use of students
in delineation. Associate Professor
(Continued on Page 47)


























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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




































44 wit





?IS-









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NOVEMBER, 1961 21


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11II ILLUMINATED WALL BRACKET spotlight handrails
in corridors and stairways Incandescent recessed lighting
provides added safety and decorative night lighting for:
HOSPITALS HOMES FOR AGED THEATRES HOTELS SHIPS


4i uu77 #


OF P I T T S B U R G H


G E N E R A L C A T A LOG OF CO M P L E T E B L U M C R A F T LINE A V A I LA B L E ON REQUEST
COPYRIGHT 1961 BY BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH 460 MELWOOD STREET, PITTSBURGH 13, PENNSYLVANIA


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Nominations for



1962 FAA Officers


For President .


At its August meeting the FAA
Board appointed a Nominating Com-
mittee composed of JOHN STETSON,
Chairman, Palm Beach Chapter;
WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR., Broward
County Chapter; RICHARD E. JESSEN,
Florida Central Chapter, and FORREST
R. COXEN, Florida North Central
Chapter.
The Committee named the follow-
ing as the 1962 FAA officer nominees:
For President, ROBERT H. LEVISON,
Florida Central Chapter; For Secre-
tary, VERNER JOHNSON, Florida South
Chapter; For Treasurer, ROY M.
POOLEY, JR., Jacksonville Chapter.
In announcing nominations for
Third Vice President, the Committee
reported, "The Committee feels it is
a good idea to nominate two men for
each office, unless an incumbent is to
be re-nominated." Selected for the
post were, WILLIAM T. ARNETT, Flor-
ida North Chapter, and WILLIAM S.
MORRISON, Florida Northwest Chap-
ter. Both men have formerly served
as members of the FAA Board of
Directors. The nominations for Third
Vice President is to fill the vacancy
created by the expiration of ARTHUR
LEE CAMPBELL'S vice-presidential
term as a representative of the FAA's
North Florida Area.


For Third Vice President..
:i~~ .....


Campbell has been serving as First
Vice President during the past year.
This post will be filled during 1962
by ROBERT B. MURPHY, Florida Cen-
tral Chapter, now Second Vice Presi-
den. WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, Broward
County Chapter, will become Second
Vice President for 1962.
Nominations for the important
Regional Judiciary Committee were
also made. Named were: KENNETH
JACOBSON, Palm Beach Chapter, as
a three-year member and ARTHUR LEE
CAMPBELL, Florida North Chapter,
as the one-year alternate.
The Nominating Committee will
present its report to the Convention
at the first business session Thursday
morning, November 9. Nominations
can then be made from the floor for
any or all offices about to become
vacant. Unless election of nominees
takes place by acclaimation, balloting
procedure will follow that established
in 1958. In line with the system of
Chapter representation adopted
through By-Law changes in 1959 and
first effective at last year's Conven-
tion, voting will be done solely by
duly qualified Chapter Delegates. In
order to vote, each Delegate must be
accredited by his Chapter and be
registered as such by the Convention.


ROBERT H. LEVISON

For Secretary .


VERNER JOHNSON


For Treasurer .


WILLIAM T. ARNETT
NOVEMBER, 1961


WILLIAM S. MORRISON
WILLIAM S. MORRISON


ROY M. POOLEY, JR.






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This rugged patio stone is really two units in one. The colorful,
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a versatile, precision-made paving tile that's widely adaptable,
accurately dimensioned, slip-proof-with all the tough durabil-
ity and ease of maintenance for which high-density concrete has
long been noted. Terra-Tyle is the modern outdoor patio stone...







f
* oJ -. ...__


I I












SII







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_______"__J________________ _







St
J











th Annual Convention

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS






The Theme- STRUCTURAL ARTS and ARCHITECTURE


* The theme of this year's Convention has a deeper than obvious
significance. Recent rapid advances in building technology-and par-
ticularly the rising importance of structural design as a controlling
element of architectural esthetics-have exposed a host of introspect-
ive questions to many thoughtful leaders of the architectural profes-
sion. The rising influence of the structural arts on the architecture
or our time-and of our future-suggests that basic changes in pro-
fessional attitude and practice are in the making. An attempt to
examine such changes and to explore some of their more direct
implications is, at the very least, an exercise of professional prudence.
* Such is the core and essence of this Convention's program.
Thoughtful people have arranged this program; other equally thought-
ful people, many of them authoritative specialists, will conduct it.
During its course many questions will be probed; trends will out-
lined; probabilities will be guaged. The range of discussion is broad.
Primarily it will be based on the art of building, traditionally the
justification for the architect's existence. To what extent is this art
of building undergoing change? This may well be the most important
professional question of the hour. For the developing answer to it
will largely, if not completely, control the pattern of professional
practice in our emerging future.


PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA
President, AIA


ROBTRT H. LEVISON, AIA
President, FAA


HAROLD A. OBST, AIA
President, Palm Beach Chapter


NOVEMBER, 1961 25


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What Changes... How Great..


.When?


This year, for the first time, the Convention Theme will be developed in a series of Work-
shop Seminars, subjects of which have been correlated to provide a continuity of discussion.
Object of the new program arrangement is to provide panelists with sufficient opportunity
to probe the Convention theme in depth; to analyze some of its more important implica-
tions; and thus hopefully to arrive at some conclusions representing a consensus of informed
opinion. Audience participation is invited; and each Seminar will be scheduled to provide
for questions from the floor. These may be impromptu, or they may be written for presen-
tation by the panel moderator. Of the six panelists, two are engineers noted for crea-
tive technique and progressive philosophies and four are architects, of which all are distin-
guished for design and one is a professional engineer as well as an architect ....





These Are The Panelists...




9d.






"s,


ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA
AIA Director, Florida Region Past
President, Fla. South Chapter and FAA
S. own practice in Miami since 1933
. versatile designer, particularly in
educational field; buildings in Uni-
versities of Miami, South Florida and
Puerto Rico design lecturer .
widely published in magazines .


FRED N. SEVERUD, PE
Consulting engineer, senior partner in
New York firm of Severud Elstad-
Krueger-Associates structural
specialist University lecturer .
author of many technical articles, two
books recipient of medals from
Arch. League, N. Y., Franklin Insti-
tute, Philadelphia. .


FELIX CANDELA
Professor of building, Univ. of Mexico
. .specialist in design, construction,
of shell structures author and
international lecturer member of
many technical societies professor
of poetry at Harvard recipient of
international honors for structural
design. .


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















These


Are


The


Special


Speakers...


JOHN BRUCE GRAHAM, AIA

Member of AIA since 1951 part-
ner in Chicago firm of Skidmore,
Owings and Merrill talented
member of a unique team of archi-
tectural designers noted for the pro-
gressive character of their work and
the regularity with which this work
receives professional citation. .


THOMAS H. CREIGHTON, FAIA GWEN LUX


Educational background of Harvard,
Beaux Arts architectural designer
from 1926 to 1946 editor of P/A
since 1946 writer, critic, uni-
versity lecturer outspoken pro-
fessional commentator world trav-
eler author of numerous books on
residential design and construction.


ALONZO J. HARRIMAN, FAIA, PE

Degrees in mechanical engineering,
Univ. of Maine, and architecture,
Harvard principal in architectural
practice since 1928 specialist in
industrial government work and
schools author of many technical
articles on schools recipient of
various awards for school design. .


A versatile artist in wood, glass, metal,
stone studied under Ivan Mes-
trovic, Willard White Guggen-
heim Fellow for a three-year European
study tour exhibitor at many
international and one-man shows .
design collaborator with top architects
for building sculpture .


GEORGE MATSUMOTO, AIA

An M.A. from Cranbrook Academy of
Art .top-flight architectural de-
signer a consistent design-award
winner since 1942 city planner
. independent practice since 1948
. teacher of design since 1947 .
widely published in national archi-
tectural journals. .


NOVEMBER, 1961
































CONVENTION HOSTS
Palm Beach Chapter, AIA, Harold
A. Obst, President; C. Ellis Duncan,
Vice President; Reed B. Fuller,
Secretary; Robert W. Wening, Jr.,
Treasurer.

CONVENTION COMMITTEE
Kenneth Jacobson
General Chairman
Frederick W. Kessler
Samuel Ogren, Jr.
Program
Charles E. Toth
Robert W. Richardson
Registration
John Stetson
Hospitality
Roy M. Simon
Jack S. Willson
Entertainment
James W. Robinson, Jr.
Robert F. Blake
Leslie Wedlock
Architectural Exhibits
Norman Robson
Awards
Harold E. McCall
George J. Votaw
Products Exhibits
John Gesbocker
John T. Shoup
Robert W. Wening, Jr.
James E. Ashley
Publicity
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Donald R. Edge
Arrangements
Paul A. McKinley
John B. Marion
Students
Beverly Stetson
Emily V. Obst
Women's Events


9:00 P.M.


9:00 A.M.
to
10:00 A.M.
10:00 A.M.
to
12:00 noon






12:00 noon
to
12:30 P.M.
12:30 P.M.









2:00 P.M.
to
4:30 P.M.


Opening of Convention Exhibit!
Robert H. Levison, FAA Presider
officiating.,Guests: Hon. Leo J. Fo>
Mayor of Boca Raton and Member
of the Board of County Commission
ers, Palm Beach County. Entrance t
Cloister Loggia.
Visit Products Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.

First FAA Business Session, Presider
Robert H. Levison, presiding. Invc
cation by Rev. Albert G. Shiphors
Pastor, First Presbyterian Church c
Boca Raton. Report of the Nomina
ing Committee to be followed b
nominations from the floor. Consic
eration of Board's Annual Repor
Theatre Auditorium.
Visit Products Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.

Luncheon Cathedral Dining Roon
Welcome to Convention, Robert -
H. Levison, President, FAA.
Introduction by Robert M. Littl(
FAIA, Director, Florida Region, c
the AIA President, Philip Will, Jr
FAIA. Address, "The Future of Th
Architectural Profession."
Presentation of Awards to Produc
Exhibitors.
Workshop Seminar-"Concrete v
Steel in Architectural Forms." Thea
tre Auditorium.
Panelists: Sr. Felix Candela, Joh
Bruce Graham, AIA, Fred N. Severu(


Program -

THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION

BOCA RAT(


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8
12:30 P.M. Registration for Chapter Member
to Guests, Students and Exhibitor Pei
6:30 P.M. sonnel. Cloister Lobby.
3:00 P.M. Installation of Product Exhibits.
to Cloister Lobby and Loggia.
9:00 P.M
3:00 P.M. Installation Architectural Exhibits.
Mizner Room.
4:00 P.M. Meeting, FAA Board of Director
President Robert H. Levison presic
ing. Parlor Three Ninety-one.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9
9:00 A.M. Registration continues.
to Cloister Lobby.
6:00 P.M.










7th Annual


Convention


ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

OTEL BOCA RATON NOVEMBER 9, 10, 11, 1961


P.E., Alonzo J. Harriman, FAIA,
George Matsumoto, AIA, and Robert
M. Little, FAIA.
4:30 P.M. Visit Products Exhibits. Cloister
to Lounge and Loggia.
6:00 P.M.
6:30 P.M. Cocktails, Cloister Gardens.
7:30 P.M. Dinner, followed by night club enter-
tainment and dancing. Patio Royale.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10
8:00 A.M. Breakfast Seminar. Patio Royale.
Speaker-Gwen Lux-"Sculpture and
the Other Arts as Related to the Es-
thetics of Structural and Other Forms."
9:00 A.M. Final registration. Cloister Lobby.


to
12:00 noon
9:00 A.M.
to
9:30 A.M.
9:30 A.M.
to
11:30 A.M.


11:30 A.M.
to
12:30 P.M.
12:30 P.M.











2:00 P.M.
to
4:00 P.M.




4:00 P.M.
to
5:00 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
to
6:30 P.M.


Visit Product Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.

Workshop Seminar "Architecture
and Technology". Theatre Auditor-
ium.
Panelists: Sr. Felix Candela, John
Bruce Graham, AIA, Alonzo J. Har-
riman, FAIA, George Matsumoto,
AIA. and Robert M.. Little, FAIA.
Visit Product Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.

Luncheon-Cathedral Dining Room.
Harold A. Obst, President, Host
Chapter Presiding.
Introduction by Kenneth Jacobson,
Host Chapter Chairman, of the AIA
Executive Director, William H.
Schieck, AIA. Address "New
Aims and Goals of The Institute,
New Developments, Things to Expect
from The Institute".
Presentation of Architectural Exhibit
Awards.
Workshop Seminar "Esthetic Pos-
sibilities in New Structural Forms".
Theatre Auditorium.
Panelists: Sr. Felix Candela, John
Bruce Graham, AIA, Alonzo J. Har-
riman, FAIA, Robert M. Little, FAIA,
and George Matsumoto, AIA.
Balloting. Cloister Lobby.


Visit Product Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.


7:30 P.M.


Annual Banquet. Cathedral Dining
Room.
Introduction of the FAA Officers for
1962.
Presentation by Franklin S. Bunch,
FAIA, President State Board of
Architecture, of registration certifi-
cates of newly-registered architects.
Dancing Patio Lounge Hotel
orchestra and facilities.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11
8:00 A.M. Visit Product Exhibits. Cloister
to Lounge and Loggia.
9:00 A.M.


9:00 A.M.

12:00 Noon
to
1 :00 P.M.
1:00 P.M.


Final FAA Business Session. Theatre
Auditorium.
Visit Product Exhibits. Cloister
Lounge and Loggia.

Luncheon Cathedral Dining Room.
Robert M. Little, FAIA, presiding.
Address by Thomas H. Creighton,
FAIA "Summary of Convention
Seminars." Presentation of Product
Exhibit Attendance Awards.
Adjournment 47th Annual FAA Con-
vention Robert H. Levison, FAA
President.


CONVENTION NOTES:
All FAA members may take part in any Convention discussion,
but voting on all questions calling for Convention action is restricted
to those Chapter Delegates who have been properly accredited and
registered at the Convention.
Admission to Convention meetings and affairs will be accorded
only to those who have previously registered for the Convention.
Evidence of registration is a badge, the color of which designates
various registration classifications as follows: Corporate Members,
white; Associate Members, yellow; Student Members, orange; Exhibi-
tors, pink; Ladies, beige; and Guests, gray.
Only FAA members are eligible for Product Exhibit Attendance
Awards. To be eligible members will sign a registration book at each
booth visited. Members need not be present personally to receive the
award.
Members of FAA Committees should periodically check the
hotel's bulletin board for notices of meetings, particularly at the
beginning of the Convention.
Host Chapter members will be wearing Batik jackets. They will
be available throughout the Convention to provide information and
answer questions.
Ladies of the Convention are cordially invited to attend all sessions
of the Convention. Full information on the Convention Ladies' Pro-
gram may be obtained at the Registration Desk.

HOTEL INFORMATION:
Check out time is 2:00 P. M. If an extension is required, please
check with the Assistant Manager on duty at the front desk.
Breakfast is served daily in the Cathedral Dining Room from
7:30 A. M. to 9:30 A. M. Luncheon is available in the Cabana Area
and Polo Lounge (buffet) from 12:30 to 2:30 P. M. daily, for conven-
tion registrants.
Meal tickets will be available at the registration desk for registered
convention attendants, not staying at the Club, on the following basis:
Breakfast, $2.50; Luncheon, $4.00; Dinners, $7.00. Tickets should
be purchased at time of registration.
Bus service is available without charge to the Cabana Area on a
regular and frequent schedule from the main entrance to the Hotel.
29







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1961's Building Products Exhibit...


I :--- X



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1 2 3 4 5 6

34 33 :32 31 30

;-: 35 36 37 38 39

I 45 |44 43 42 41 1 40


DININ AREA







S 7 8| 9 10 11




29 28 27



J .toncl to Arc ade
dnd Cloister Gardens \


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S 12 i 13 14 15 16 17
18

19 |4E2
26 25 24 23 22 21 i20


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This year more time than ever has been scheduled for studying the
exhibit of building products. So this year there will be greater oppor-
tunity to meet face-to-face the representatives of the materials and
products which architects specify to turn their design dreams into
efficient realities. In addition to giving you information on what's new
and different about the products made by the firms who are exhibiting,
you have the chance to win one of the several exhibit attendance
awards--and on this score, it could be YOU !


1...Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co.
2...Florida Power & Light Co.
3...Florida Power & Light Co.
4...Florida Power & Light Co.
5...The Mabie-Bell Company
6...Schlage Lock Company
7...Bradley Washfountain Co.
8...Interstate Waterproofing
Company, Inc.
9...Harris Standard Paint Co.
10...Superior Window Company
-Superior Solar Shade
Company
11...Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.
12...F. Graham Williams
Company, Inc.
13...Weyerhaeuser Company-
Rilco Wood Products Division
14...American Olean Tile Co.


15...Lotspeich Company
16...Florida Terrazzo Association
17...United States Plywood Corp.
18...Zonolite Company
19...The Mosaic Tile Company
20...Hopkins-Smith, Incorporated
21...Florida Natural Gas
Association
22...Houdaille-Span, Incorporated
23...Boynton Landscape Company
24...Formica Corporation
25...Boiardi Tile Mfg. Co.
2.6...George C. Griffin Company
27...Mutschler Kitchens of Florida
28...Kuppers, Incorporated
19...Metallic Engineering Co., Inc.
30...Rohm & Haas Company
31...Rohm & Haas Company
32...Florida Solite Company


33...Lambert Corporation of Fla.
34...Clearview Corporation
35...Clearview Corporation
36...Holloway Materials Corp.
37...Miami Window Corporation
38...Miami Window Corporation
39...Benjamin Moore & Company
40...Dwyer Products of Florida,
Inc.
41...Independent Nail & Packing
Co.
42...Russell & Erwin Division, The
American Hardware Corp.
43...Renuart, Bailey, Cheely Lum-
ber & Supply Co.
44...Renuart, Bailey, Cheely Lum-
ber & Supply Co.
45...Culligan Water Conditioning
Association of Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























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IIDA NATIONAL BANK Architects: SAXELBYE & POWELL, AIA; Engineer: CHARLES MAYER; Contractor: GEORGE A. FULLER


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THIS HELPFUL LITERATURE


THIS HELPFUL LITERATURE


MANY ARCHITrECTr and others are finding this author-
itative literature on new and better fastening methods
helpful. It tells how STrnONCHOLD'-' Annular Thread and
SCREw-TITrE' Spiral Thread Nails make house frames
stronger, keep floors and underlayment smooth and
squeak-free. virtuallyy eliminate "popping" nail heads
in gypsum board drywall, hold shingles secure in winds
up to three times hurricane force often with fewer
nails, slimmer nails, shorter nails and with important
savings in time, labor and materials. SrROCNGHOLD and
SCREW-TITE Nails ha\e revolutionized fastening meth-
ods. This literature shows \you nIw \\'rite us for it.
Several of the pieces shown have won awards in
PC-AIA and or PC NAHB literature contests.


Practically all of the au-
thorilalive data available
on the holding power of
threaded nails is the re-
sult of the continuing pro-
gram of research spon-
sored by us, and reported
in these VPI Bulletins.
Ask us for a bound copy.


Sample board at right is
12 x 18 inches, has ac-
tual samples of nearly
50 "Stronghold Line" im-
proved fastenings that
hold better, tighter, long-
er enable you to use
new cost-saving tech-
niques and materials.


"DanAe Like m. No A... F-o a L-A., a Scnei,'


alrtr

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Independent Nail & Packing Company '" tI

BRIDGEWATER. MASSACHUSETTS ... ... ,.' s


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


See us in Booth 41
FLORIDA ARCHITECTS
CONVENTION
Boca Raton, Nov. 9 11


i,~(*n
















Robert Law Weed,



FAIA



1896-1961


With the death of Bob Weed on Sunday,
October 8, the architectural profession lost one
of its staunchest and most able citizens. For
forty active years he served his profession and
community in the bright light of the highest
interest of each. Each will miss him. But both
profession and community are the better for his
unremitting devotion to their improvement; and
in this fact lies his most practical and enduring
accolade.
It could almost be said of Bob Weed that
he was a pioneer in the state which since 1919
had been his home. Though born in Pennsylvania
and graduated from Carnegie Tech, he established
his own office in Miami in 1922. As a state
Florida was then young in its development; and
Miami, particularly, was just starting to experience
the pains of growth. Architecture, as a firmly
established profession, was almost as youthful.
To the growth of both his profession and
community Bob Weed brought competence,
vitality and an abiding loyalty. And he brought,
too, courage and the spark of vision without
which no future can be built. Bob Weed's con-
tributions to the growth of Miami were both
tangible and intangible. The results of his con-
tinuing work for the University of Miami have
been characterized by Life magazine's comment
as producing ". the first completely modern
U. S. campus-and also one of the handsomest."
And throughout Dade County and the State his
work stands out for the fresh, clean character of its
design and the quality of its site planning and
construction.


His intangible community service was no less
noteworthy. He was a member of the Dade
County Development Commission, the Miami-
Dade and the Florida State Chambers of Com-
merce and the Miami Board of Appeals-as well
as a number of clubs. He was active in the
Plymouth Congregational Church of Coconut
Grove.
His membership in the AIA dates from 1929;
and his design accomplishments were recognized
by two AIA awards, seven FAA citations, culmi-
nating in his election as a Fellow of the AIA. He
was a member of the Florida South Chapter,
serving in various capacities, and was a past presi-
dent of the FAA. His most recent professional
service was as a member of the Florida State Board
of Architecture, from which ill health forced his
resignation this year. Unlike most practicing
architects he was also a member of the Florida
Engineering Society.
He will be missed not only for his ability,
his seasoned judgement and the generosity of his
service. His friends-and they were many-will
miss him for the qualities that made him friends.
Among these were his self-effacing modesty, his
humor and love of fun, his sincerity in thought
and action, his steadfast devotion to his family,
to his country, state and church, and to the
profession he loved so well.
His life was a full and productive one. Bob
Weed earned the respect in which he was held.
He earned the recognition he was accorded.
And, finally; he earned, in full measure, the right
to rest he has now been given.


NOVEMBER, 1961


Il I L Il I -I







Convention Expenses...
(Continued from Page 6)
a professional gathering as part of a
two-month's European tour-would
probably be disallowed unless the IRS
could be convinced of their direct
relationship to the conduct of an arch-
itectural practice.
Often they are, of course. New and
novel buildings at a World's Fair
could completely justify a trip neces-
sary to study the technique of their
design and construction. And in the
case of attendance at a conference of
foreign architects, the IRS record
shows that deductions have been al-
lowed for the expense of such attend-
ance itself-excluding, however, the
costs of bringing the wife and young-
sters along, or the costs of your own
traveling other than those required to
attend the conference.
So the costs of attending conven-
tions in which an architect would
normally be interested are deductible.
And that means all the costs. Unless
the IRS suddenly changes its mind,
this includes amounts you may spend
on the recreational side of a conven-
tion-as the outings, parties, sight-


seeing trips that the IRS recognizes
to be social activities incidental to the
main, or business, purpose of the con-
vention. Your registration fees and
admission charges to special events
are valid convention expenses; and you
can claim deduction for living costs
during your attendance and the ex-
pense of traveling to and from the
meeting.
But there may be a catch in the
allowance of your claim for deducting
these expenses. Whether or not the
IRS approves it may well depend on
the extent to which you can prove
that all the convention expenses you
claim were actually incurred. And this
points up the second of the IRS gen-
eral premises-the matter of recording
what your convention trip has cost
and what you have spent the money
for.
It is on this point of record that
many differences arise between busi-
nessmen and the IRS agent who may
be examining tax returns with special
scrutiny on items of deduction relative
to such categorical items as "conven-
tions" and "travel and entertainment."
The days are gone-probably forever
-when you could set down a lump-


sum deduction for these expense items
and assume that the IRS would accept
it at face value. This is not to say that
the IRS will not accept your de-
duction claim. But if your income tax
return is pulled for detailed audit and
your deductions questioned, you then
face the necessity of proving that all
you have claimed were not only actu-
ally incurred and paid for, but also
were incurred within the overall
framework of your business activity.
The chances of your return being
subject to a detailed audit become
greater every year. Right now the IRS
is perfecting a plan for identifying
taxpayers by account numbers. Pri-
marily this is to make certain that
all income is reported-since account
numbers will eventually be required
on all disbursements made to indi-
viduals. But it is also part and parcel
of an IRS long-range program to make
every taxpayer-individual, partner-
ship, corporation or whatnot-avail-
able for review of his income tax
return. This new numbering system
is slated to go into effect for most
individual taxpayers next year. And
most professional men particularly
in Florida where professional status


RESIDENTIAL


INTERIOR


Richard B. Plumer, A.I.D.
Pefia
Helen Carr, A.I.D.
Margaret Webb DeHass, A.I.D.
Steve Steffen, A.I.D.
Vern Currie, A.I.D., I.D.I.
Dix Mason, A.I.D.
Jane E. Ward, A.I.D.
Huber Harrison Griffin, A.I.D.
William F. Maler, A.I.D.
Helen Macris, Affiliate A.I.D.
Arleen Bradford


RICHARD PLUM ER

ttlu~imii


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






must be maintained on an individual
basis-will be among the first to be
gathered into the net of the new regu-
lations.
This increased chance of a tax re-
turn audit or the need for proving
your convention expenditures are not
necessarily things to be feared. But
they are matters to be regarded seri-
ously. Assuming you're honest-and
the IRS can pounce fast if you're not
-you need have no fear of justifying
deductions if you will seriously keep
a record of what you spend to claim
them.
One of the best plans for doing
this is to keep an expense diary. Keep
it for every occasion that involves any
sort of travel or entertainment ex-
pense; and keep it particularly for your
convention attendances. In it note
first the purpose of the occasion or
trip or meeting; and then jot down
expenditures as they occur. In addi-
tion, hoard such proof-items as travel
ticket stubs, receipted hotel bills,
credit card vouchers. Bothersome as
this may be to many, it can pay off
-in some cases handsomely. Regu-
lations of the Treasury accept notes
or diary records that show the nature


and amount of business travel and
entertainment expenses. But support-
ing evidence is also usually required,
particularly relative to exceptionally
large expenditures.
Two classic examples reveal the
wisdom behind this practical admon-
ition. One involved the man-inci-
dentally an architect -whose de-
duction for parking expense was
disallowed because he couldn't tell
the IRS agent just when and for what
occasions he had paid the parking
fees-and couldn't show receipted
parking tickets to prove he paid them.
The other extreme is the case of the
meticulous traveling salesman. He
habitually kept a detailed expense
diary; and as a result was able to
deduct more than $7,000 spent from
a gross income of $9,000 on account
of travel and other business costs.
One other point is important to
those attending conventions. Can you
take someone with- you, pick up all
the tabs and deduct the expenses of
your companion in addition to your
own?
The IRS says yes-and no. Here
again it looks at the purpose behind
the situation. If your wife is more


interested in visiting friends, or in
shopping or sight-seeing than in con-
vention activities, the rules say her
expenses aren't deductible. But if she
can help you in the business end of
the convention or normally works
with you in your profesisonal activity,
her trip, as well as yours, is a business
expense and therefore a valid tax
deduction. The same yardstick holds
for associates or business friends.
Admittedly there are gray areas in
this whole matter of tax deductions.
Many taxpayers-especially, it would
appear, those in professional fields-
regard claims for deductions in the
light of specialized, often highly indi-
vidualized, business backgrounds. The
IRS agent may see them in a different
light. And in such cases, the conflict
is not so much a matter of the rule
book as it is a question of interpreting
an intent and then deciding on the
validity of a claim based on that
intent. The IRS viewpoint has not
always been upheld; and should your
claims for such deductions as conven-
tion expenses be seriously questioned,
you have recourse to a pattern of
procedure about which any IRS office
can inform you.


Fulfilling the original concept

of architect and client

for outstanding business interior

designs


BU


RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORS


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Telephone PLaza 1-9775
NOVEMBER, 1961 35























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6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Quality...


PRECAST CONCRETE


r


Jb







Toward A New Lien Law...

The first public hearing of the Legislative Council Committee
on the lien law revision was a good start in the right direction.


A long step was taken late last
month toward what may eventually
be a new and vastly better lien law
for Florida. It took place in the new
State Office Building in Miami in the
form of a hearing of a Florida Legis-
lative Council Committee authorized
by the 1961 Legislature to "study the
Mechanics' Lien Law (Chapter 84,
Florida Statutes as amended) with a
view to improving and simplifying
said law."
Chairman of the Committee is
Dade County Representative GEORGE
L. HOLLAHAN, JR. Senator B. C.
PEARCE, 26th District, is vice-chair-
man, and the eight-man committee
includes three Senators and three
Representatives. Senators are, SCOTT
KELLY, 7th District, S. D. CLARKE,
22nd District, and THOMAS E. DAVID,
30th District. Representatives are,
OSSEE R. FAGAN, Alachua County,


WILBUR H. BOYD, Manatee County,
and WILLIAM G. O'NEILL, Marion
County.
Present at the hearing were some
fifty persons representing virtually
every phase of the construction in-
dustry. Not all were vocal. But of
those who did address the Committee
an overwhelming majority expressed
ideas relative to revision of the present
lein law that indicated a gratifying
and surprising unanimity of opinion
on a number of important points.
These were:
1 ... The present lien law should
be scrapped and an entirely new sta-
tute enacted in its place.
2 ... The new law should be vastly
simplified as compared to the present
statute.
3 ... It should, clearly and simply,,
define the rights of all parties; set
positive commencement and termina-


tion rights; provide for notification of
the owner relative to these lien rights;
and provide penalties for fraudulent
or inaccurate liens.
As might be expected, some of the
speakers confined their remarks to the
narrow band of the special interests
they represented. But the most widely
constructive views were voiced by
HARRY TOUBY, representing the South
Florida Chapter of the AGC, VERNER
JOHNSON, AIA, speaking as a repre-
sentative of the FAA, and JOHN STET-
SON, AIA, who presented the recom-
mendations of the Joint Cooperative
Council. Statements of these indi-
viduals were made during the early
part of the hearing. And with the
exception of the statement by the
representative of the National Asso-
coiation of Credit Men, most of the
following speakers echoed or endorsed
the principles outlined by these build-
ing professionals.
Sitting with the Committee as
active participants in the hearing were
DAVID V. KERNS, Director of the Leg-
islative Reference Bureau, Tallahassee,
and Assistant Attorney General
THOMAS HENDERSON. Both men will
(Continued on Page 45)


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NOVEMBER, 1961







News & Notes_


All Out in Orlando .
Architects in Orlando have chalked
up a record for United Appeal efforts
that will be difficult to beat. Chair-
manned by ROBERT B. MURPHY, the
architects increased their pledges over
last year by 33 percent-and 100 per-
cent of the Mid -Florida Chapter
members in the Orlando area signed
up.
Not only that. Murphy's report
of the architects' contributions was
completed on October 4-the kick-off
date for the Orlando U/A drive. Due
largely to the capable efforts of the
Mid-Florida Womens' Auxiliary, the
pledge canvass of the architects was
completed almost three weeks before
the first report luncheon of the drive
was scheduled.


Air Conditioning Seminar...
The Greater Miami Chapter of the
Producers' Council will conduct an
Air Conditioning Seminar Saturday,
November 18, 1961, at the Everglades
Hotel, Miami. The session will start
at 10:00 a.m., will carry through


luncheon and is scheduled for com-
pletion by 4:00 p.m. The only charge
will be the cost of the luncheon,
$3.00.
Purpose of the seminar, which has
been prepared by specialists especially
for an architectural audience, is to
review types of systems now available,
to discuss criteria for system design
and to outline some of the technical
standards of system operation which
relate to architectural practice. The
seminar is open to all architects who
wish to attend.

Reynolds Award .
Nominations for the R. S. Reynolds
Memorial Award for 1962 are now
being received by the AIA which for
the past five years has administered
the annual award program. The pro-
gram carries an honorarium of $25,000
and an original piece of sculpture for
the architect who has designed a work
of architecture involving use of alum-
inum which is judged significant by
a reviewing jury. Size or type of struc-
ture and the amount of aluminum
employed are not as important as the


imaginative quality of the design.
Nominations for the award should
be forwarded to Institute headquarters
prior to December 1, 1961.

Home Awards Program ...
Registration deadline is January 12,
1962, for participation in the seventh
annual Homes for Better Living
Awards program sponsored jointly by
the AIA and Life and House and
Home magazines. Custom-built
houses, houses designed for a mer-
chant-builder and garden apartments
completed since 1959 are all eligible
for submission. Awards will be an
announced at the AIA's 1962 Con-
vention at Dallas, Texas. Information
and registration forms can be obtained
from MRS. FAYNETTA W. NEALIS at
the AIA's Washington office.

More Recognition... !
House and Garden magazine has
recently undertaken a series of articles
designed to give its readers a better
understanding of what an architect
can do for them. The articles have
been reprinted in the form of neat
attractively design pamphlets. Infor-
(Continued on Page 42)


one of the
requirements
for the home of
O today is...

CONCEALED TELEPHONE WIRING

Homebuyers want the home they buy today to
remain "up-to-date" for many years to come.
That's why they're asking for plenty of
telephone outlets with concealed wiring.
Homebuyers can be sure that the architect
who includes Telephone Planning in his designs
has their comfort and convenience in mind.
Southern Bell would like to show you how
easy it is to let modern concealed telephone
wiring help sell your homes. Just call your
Telephone Business Office.



Southern Bell

...G 0041g "1 ey F, f


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











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We acclaim the theme of FAA's 47th commercial buildings of many types ...
Annual Convention "Structural Arts Now we offer even greater selectivity.
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cial conditions of our climate it has wide tional, synthetic, vinyl and epoxy fin-
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SPECIFICATION HELP Rapid advances in paint technology particularly in The
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range of "Paints and Colors For Our Climate" To help solve this problem Harris
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Harris Branch Warehouses-Florida: Eau Gallie, Orlando, W. Palm Beach,
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NOVEMBER, 1961 39















1:


A Warm


Welcome


to the


Florida Association of Architects

make your reservations now

for the 1961 convention

November 9, 10, & 11


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Boca Raton, Florida
L. Bert Stephens, General Manager
R. B. Leggett, Executive Manager


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 38)
mation about the reprints can be
obtained from the publication's office,
420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17.
And a recent Sunday edition of the
Miami News carried a two-column
box entitled "Trust Your Architect!"
The first paragraph said, "Drawing
plans is only a small part of what
an architect can do for you. His main
job is to save you money, time and
anguish as you travel that rocky road
from dream to actual home."

Changes .
The Jacksonville firm of REYNOLDS,
SMITH AND HILLS, Architects and
Engineers, has moved into larger
quarters in its own new building
at 4019 Boulevard Center Drive, Jack-
sonville. The move was made on the
occasion of the firm's twentieth anni-
versary.
JOE WILLIAMS has announced the
opening of his office for the general
practice of architecture at 792 High-
land Avenue, Eau Gallie. The tele-
phone is ALpine 4-5492.
CURTIS E. HALEY has moved his
office to 214 Alhambra Circle, Coral
Gables. His telephone Highland
8-0371-remains the same.
CHARLES E. LACKEY & ASSOCIATES
announce the opening of a new office
at 7380 Red Road, South Miami. The
telephone is 661-0912.
JOHN A. TRIPP has established a
new office at 175 Majorca Avenue,
Coral Gables. The telephone is HIgh-
land 4-6171.
BAYARD C. LUKENS has re-located
his office at 511 S. 21st Avenue,
Hollywood. His telephone-WA
2-6221-remains the same.
ROY L. RICKS has announced the
addition of C. J. KENDRICK, III, as a
partner in the new architectural firm
of RICKS AND KENDRICK. Offices are
at 12 West Main Street, Fort Walton
Beach.
CRAIG B. THORN and FREDERICK
N. REED have announced formation
of a partnership for the practice of
architecture. The new firm will be
known as Thorn and Reed, Archi-
tects. Offices have been established
in Suite 4, Lightner Museum Build-
ing, St. Augustine.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT'






MR. ARCHITECT: 4


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reminding your clients that oil home heating is safer,
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For even, controlled warmth all through the house,
install central oil home heating. New compact
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utility room, or in a wall.
For quick, dependable emergency heat, get inex-
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before the last minute rush...
SEE YOUR HOME HEATING DEALER
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REMEMBER: U.S. Weather Bureau records
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O f@<^^ NOVEMBER, 1961

Good NEW S about Natural Gas...


PROOF that Natural Gas can cut water heating costs is now available in cost
study made at Parkland Apartments, Tampa. In November, 1959, Parkland replaced
SIX 120-GALLON ELECTRIC WATER HEATERS with ONE Natural Gas heater of only
75-GALLONS capacity. Cost of operating the Natural Gas water heater for months
of December, 1959 through April, 1960 was $276. 88 on Rate #32 of Peoples Gas Sys-
tem. Parkland records show cost of operating the six electric water heaters during
corresponding months of previous years was $626. 04. Indicated saving over just five
months was $349. 16.

If you'd like copy of this cost study, write Mr. John A. Davis, Manager, Park-
land Apartments, 3211 Swann Avenue, Tampa. Mr. Davis said: "In our search to
hold down the ever-climbing operating costs of our business, we replaced six 120
gallon electric water heaters with one gas heater of 75-gallons capacity. The far
greater speed in the recovery of gas heaters over electric heaters made this almost
unbelievable saving possible."

CONSTRUCTION has started on gas industry's $6, 000, 000 pavilion for 1964-65
New York World's Fair. American Gas Association and subsidiary corporation will
build and operate pavilion. The 40, 000 square foot, two story structure will be com-
pletely enclosed by invisible glass and largest air curtains ever installed. Natural
Gas air conditioning system will supply both cool and warm air.

Natural Gas will also supply a major part of estimated 25, 000 tons of cooling
required by other buildings in World's Fair and majority of exhibitors will use gas
for heating, cooking and water heating.

Exhibits in 1962 Seattle World's Fair will also use Natural Gas for cooling,
heating, cooking and water heating.

Despite intensive promotion by other energy suppliers, SEVEN OUT OF TEN
homes built in 1962 Parade of Homes at Gainesville, Florida, were equipped with
Natural Gas heating systems and automatic water heaters.

Orange City, Florida, has granted new 30-year Natural Gas franchise to Florida
Home Gas Company, DeLand.

WHAT'S NEW? Gas fueled portable outdoor barbecue grill. No struggle to make
fire, no shifting coals to control heat, no dousing too-hot fire with water, no ashes
to clean out and dump. Char-broils steaks to crisp perfection.

Also new and due on market soon is TWO TON gas-fired absorption air condit-
ioning unit by one of leading manufacturers in the field in U.S.

CONFUSION sometimes arises in minds of public over use by some liquefied
petroleum gas dealers of term "natural gas" in their names. Pipeline natural gas
is delivered to consumers by means of underground piping in virtually the same
state as it comes out of wells in the gas fields of Texas and Louisana. It is gas, or
vapor, from production to consumption.

Liquefied petroleum gas, although a manufactured product, is refined from
crude petroleum, also a product of nature. Therefore, LPG dealers can use term
"natural gas" in their names if they choose. Liquefied petroleum gas can be propane
or butane. It is shipped from refineries to dealers in railroad tank cars, stored by
dealers in liquid form in tanks at bulk plants, distributed to consumers in tank trucks,
placed in steel cylinders on consumers' premises. When ambient temperature is high
enough to cause the liquid to vaporize, it becomes gas.

Reproduction of any or all items on this page prohibited without written permission
from Florida Natural Gas Association, 206 E. New York Ave., DeL'and, Florida.

44 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 37)
undoubtedly be intimately involved
with the drafting of a new lien law;
and Henderson, particularly, will prob-
ably be given the job of coordinating
various recommendations and opin-
ions into the form of a practical
statute that will ultimately win ap-
proval of all interested groups.
From one point of view this is
truly a monumental task. The history
of active efforts to effect drastic re-
vision of Florida's present "cumber-
some, ambiguous and unworkable"
lien law spans some four years and
is marked by almost innumerable con-
ferences attended by representatives
of business groups whose interests
would be affected by any change in
the lien law. These efforts have been
largely abortive-first because they
could not be coordinated by an au-
thoritative agency; and second because
means were not available to provide
the research, legal talents and hearing
procedures necessary.
Representative Hollahan's Commit-
tee has been constituted to cut
through the tangles of this situation.
The hearing in Miami is the first
of several planned for the remainder
of this year and next. Another meet-
ing is scheduled in Orlando this
month; and later other hearings will
be held in Tampa, Jacksonville and
Pensacola.
At future meetings the Legislative
Committee may be working with a
Lay Committee, composed of repre-
sentatives of various groups within the
building industry. This was proposed
by Verner Johnson; and was appar-
ently received with favor by Repre-
sentative Hollahan and his Commit-
tee members.


I :.f 01

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Report on Research...
(Continued from Page 24)
Don A. Halperin, of the Department
of Building Construction, is the auth-
or of a new text Building with Steel,
published by the American Technical
Society.
In connection with a university
contract with the Office of Civil De-
fense Mobilization, Professor M. H.
Johnson, Assistant Professor William
A. Stewart, and D. King Royer, In-
structor in Building Construction,
have attended OCDM courses on the
design and evaluation of shelters
against atomic hazards, have con-
ducted short courses for architects and
engineers, and are preparing to incor-
porate this material in our curricula.
Several members of the faculty have
engaged in projects of architectural
history. Professor Reeves and Assistant
Professor Henry C. Edwards served
again, as in several previous summers,
on appointment by the National Park
Service, as directors of student meas-
uring teams for the Historic American
Buildings Survey. Reeves' group was
stationed in Lexington, Massachusetts,
and Edwards' team worked at St.
Augustine.
Professor Walter Raymond has re-
cently completed a translation of Abbe
Laugier's Essai sur l'architecture, pub-
lished in Paris in 1754, which, as the
first organized statement of rationalist
theory, became one of most significant
landmarks of architectural criticism.
While Raymond's principal purpose
in preparing this translation was to
make it available to students in his
fifth-year course in the Literature of
Architectural Theory, it is expected
that its publication will be welcomed
by all contemporary architects inter-
ested in the sources of present-day
points of view. The author of this
research report has recently published
a paper on Oglethorpe's Sources for
the Savannah Plan, and is preparing
a reconstruction and metrological
study of the fourth-century Basilica
of St. Peter built in Rome by Con-
stantine.
No doubt the most exciting project
is that for which Professor James T.
Lendrum has served as technical con-
sultant for the past two years. It is the
development by one of the country's
largest industrial companies of a com-
pletely prefabricated house using the
utmost advanced design and construc-
tion techniques.
NOVEMBER, 1961


Can Archtect






Spfeci4






If you offer Quality to give the Service architects
demand they want to know about it. And the best
place to tell them is in THEIR VERY OWN MAGAZINE.

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers and general contractors.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building"-for through draw-
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create .

Architects' specifications control your sales. To help
them specify the product or service you offer, tell them
about it where they'll see it regularly HERE .



Florida's ONLY OFFICIAL 9a,
FAA Journal ... Owned, read '
and used by architects







Florida Architect


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7th Annual Roll Call--- 1960-1961




Listed here are firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA

grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they

make or sell are of a quality to merit specification. They seek your approval.


AMERICAN CELCURE WOOD
PRESERVING CORP.
1073 E. 8th St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Wood preservative process
Agency-Bacon, Hartman &
Vollbrecht, Inc., 1st Federal Savings
Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

ARKLA AIR CONDITIONING CORP.
812 Main Street, Little Rock, Arkansas
Arkla-Servel gas-fired air conditioners
Agency-Robert K. Butcher & Associ-
atest, Inc., Slattery Bldg., Shreveport,
Louisiana

BB CHEMICAL COMPANY
784 Memorial Dr., Cambridge, Mass.
Bostik-Textured Coatings
Agency-Sutherland-Abbott,
581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass.

BELCHER OIL COMPANY
1217 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
Arkla-Servel oil-fired air conditioners
Agency-Bishopric/Green/ Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

BETTER FUEL COUNCIL OF DADE
COUNTY
Oil heating
Agency-Woody Kepner & Associates,
Inc., 3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

BIRD & SON, INC.
East Walpole, Mass.
Termite Prevention System
Agency-Reach, McClinton & Hum-
phrey, Inc., 1235 Statler Bldg., Boston,
Massachusetts

JULIUS BLUM & CO., INC.
Carlstadt, New Jersey
Decorative iron and aluminum units
Agency-Seery & Ward, Common-
wealth Bldg., Louisville, Kentucky

BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts, aluminum
grilles

BOCA RATON HOTEL & CLUB
Boca Raton, Fla.
Convention Hotel
Agency-Adams & Keyes, Inc.,
Advertising, 2103 N. Federal Hwy.,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

BOIARDI TILE MANUFACTURING
CORP.
General offices-Cleveland, Ohio


1800 N. 4th Ave., Lake Worth, Fla.
Agency-Tobias Advertising, 230
Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach, Fla.

A. R. COGSWELL
433 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Archests' supplies and reproduction
service

CHRYSLER AIRTEMP-CHRYSLER CORP.
Miami Branch-3171 E. 11th Ave.,
Hialeah, Fla.
Airconditioning
Agency-Bevis & Associates
Ingraham Bldg., Miami, Fla.

DARYL PRODUCTS CORP.
7240 N. E. 4th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Sliding glass doors
Agency-Gold, Hancock & Berg, Inc.
Advertising 211 N. E. 97th St.
Suite 208, Miami, Fla.

DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th St., Hialeah, Fla.
Decorative masonry materials

DWOSKIN, INC.
Main Office-Atlanta, Ga.
4029 N. Miami Ave., Miami, Fla.
Wallcovering and Wallpaper
Agency-Bearden-Thompson-Frankel,
Inc. & Eastman-Scott Advertising,
22 8th St. N. E., Atlanta, Ga.

DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
621 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Manufacturer kitchens for motels
resorts and hotels
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency,
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Ind.

ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
4550 37th St. N., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Electric heating units

FASERIT OF MIAMI
920 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla.
Textured finishing material

FEATHEROCK, INC.
6331 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal.
Lightweiht garden and landscape rock
Agency-Sierra Advertisers, 6331
Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal.

FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami, Fla.
Custom-cast plaques


FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th St., Miami, Fla.
Oil and gas heating
Agency-Bevis Associates, Advertising
Ingraham Bldg., Miami, Fla.

FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSN.
Deland, Florida
Gas-cooking and heating
Agency-Palmer Tyler & Co. Biscayne
Plaza Bldg. at 79th St., Miami, Fla.

FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa, Fla.
Portland cement
Agency-Gray Advertising, Inc.
Daughterty Bldg., Tampa, Fla.

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Miami, Fla.
Electric utility
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE
ASSN.
P. 0. Box 217, Hallandale, Fla.
Precast, prestressed concrete
Agency-Peter Larkin, P. O. Box 4006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
215 So. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.
Reinforcing steel and accessories
Agency-R. E. McCarty & Assoc., Inc.
206 S. Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.

FLORIDA TILE INDUSTRIES, INC.
608 Prospect St., Lakeland, Fla.
Manufacturers of glazed wall tile and
trimmers
Agency-Gray Advertising, Inc.
Arcade Bldg., 442 W. Lafayette,
Tampa, Fla.

GENERAL PANEL CORPORATION
1702 Gleason Ave., Sarasota, Fla.
Insulated curtain wall panels
Agency-B & B Promotion Service
4263 Ellen Ave., Fort Myers, Fla.

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
111 West Monroe St., Chicago, III.
Trinity White cements
Agency-Harris & Wilson, Inc.
221 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, III.

GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville, Fla.
"B & G" windows and window walls
"Griffco" aluminum products


4a THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










HAMILTON PLYWOOD
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Fort Lauderdale
Cabinet and paneling plywoods
Agency-Travis-Messer, Advertising
P. O. !Box 7368, Orlando, Fla.

HARRIS STANDARD PAINT COMPANY
1022-26 No. 19th St., Tampa
Paints and paint products

HOLLOWAY MATERIALS CORP.
P. O. Drawer 1237, Winter Park, Fla.
Precast concrete panels

HOUDAILLE-SPAN INC.
1776 E. Sunrise Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Prestressed concrete units
Agency-Peter Larkin, P. O. Box 4006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

THE HOUSTON CORPORATION
St. Petersburg, Miami, Jacksonville,
Orlando, Lakeland, Daytona Beach, Eustis
Natural gas installations
Agency-Grant Advertising, Inc.
201 S. E. 13th St., Miami, Fla.

INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Bridgewater, Mass.
Special nails and fastening devices
Agency-Warner Alden Morse
P. 0. Box 720, Brockton, Mass.

JO ITALIAN CERAMICS
Pan American Bank Bldg., Miami, Fla.
Italian ceramic tile
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami

LAMBERT CORPORATION
2125 W. Central Ave., Orlando, Fla.
Waterproofing materials, concrete

LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS CO.
811 Madison Ave., LOF Bldg., Toledo, O.
Sheet glass
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
55 Public Square, Cleveland, Ohio

THE MABIE-BELL COMPANY
Greensboro, North Carolina
Precast, lightweight concrete panels
Agency-David W. Evans & Associates
Evans Bldg., 110 Social Hall Ave.
Salt Lake City, Utah

MEEKINS, INC.
P. O. Box 3657, Hollywood, Fla.
Concrete products
Agency-Patrick Duffy Advertising
1785 Broad Causeway, Miami, Fla.

MAROLF HYGIENIC EQUIPMENT, INC.
1627 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd., Clearwater, Fla.
Sewage disposal systems
Agency-Wesco Advertising
811 Court St., Clearwater, Fla.

MERRY BROTHERS BRICK & TILE CO.
Augusta, Georgia
Structural clay products
Agency-Withers & Carson PR &
Advertising, 700 Security Federal
Bldg., Columbia, S. C.

MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
5761 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Aluminum awning windows


Agency-E. J. Scheaffer & Associates
Advertising Agency, Inc.
1101 N. E. 79th St., Miami, Fla.

MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Kitchen design and construction
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd at Harirson, Elkhart, Ind.

RICHARD PLUMER
155 N. E. 40th St., Miami, Fla.
Business, residential interiors

PONTIAC MILLWORK COMPANY
2005 Pontiac Rd., Pontiac, Mich.
Plastic laminated flush doors

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Dr., Orlando, Fla.
Portland cement and products
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.
410 N. Michagan Ave., Chicago, III.

PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
2229 4th St., Berkeley, Calif.
Lighting fixtures
Agency-L. C. Cole Co., Inc.
406 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif.

RAYBESTOS DIVISION
RAYBESTOS-MANHATTAN, INC.
P.O. Box 1021, Bridgeport 2, Conn.
Masonry mortar
Agency-Gray & Rogers,
12 So. 12th St., Philadelphia, Pa.

A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th Terrace, Miami, Fla.
Architectural woodwork and supplies
Agency-Robert S. Hurwitz Advertis-
ing, 1775 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

REFLECTAL CORPORATION
200 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.
Metal solar screens

RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS, INC.
155 Washington St., Newark, N. J.
Glue laminated wood products
Agency-E. T. Holmgren, Inc., E717
First Nat'l 'Bank IBldg., St. Paul Minn.

RUBBER PRODUCTS, INC.
4521 West Crest, Tampa, Fla.
Rubber tile floor covering
Agency-Taliaferro & Associates
330 W. Platt, Tampa, Fla.

SOLITE CORP.
Richmond, Virginia
Lightweight aggregates for
structural concrete and masonry units
Agency-Cabell Eanes, Inc.
509 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va.

SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND
TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Atlanta, Georgia
Communications
Agency-Tucker Wayne & Company
1 175 Peachtree St., N. E., Atlanta, Ga.

SOUTHERN WATER CONDITIONING,
INC.
301 15th St., S., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Water softener and conditioning


Agency-International Public Relations
and Advertising, 1422 4th St., S.,
St. Petersburg, Fla.

STA-BRITE FLUORESCENCE MFG. CO.
3550 N. W. 49th St., Miami, Fla.
Fluorescent lighting fixtures
Agency-Harris & Company Advertis-
ing, Inc., Dupont Plaza Center,
Miami, Fla.

THE STRONG ELECTRIC CORP.
City Park Ave., Toledo, Ohio
Lighting fixtures
Agency-Wendt Advertising
Spitzer Bldg., Toledo 4, Ohio

SUPERIOR WINDOW COMPANY
625 E. 1Oth Ave., Hialeah, Fla.
Curtain wall and window wall
Agency-Robert S. Hurwitz Advertis-
ing, 1775 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.

TEMPERA CORPORATION
4035 N. Interstate Ave.
Portland 17, Oregon
Anti-scald valves
Agency-Harry Watson Advertising
924 E. Burnside St., Portland, Ore.

TERRA-TYLE, BOIARDI TILE MFG.
CORP.
1800 4th Ave. No., Lake Worth, Fla.
Outdoor patio stone

THOMPSON DOOR CO. INC.
5663 N. W. 36th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Hollow and solid core doors

TITUS MANUFACTURING CORP
Waterloo, Iowa
Aluminum air difussion products
Agency-Colle, McVay, Weston,
Barnett, Inc., 217 W. 5th St.
Waterloo, Iowa

UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th St., New York, N. Y.
Plywood and plywood products
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Ave., New York, N: Y.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY
300 W. Adams St., Chicago, Ill.
Concrete roof decks
Agency-Fulton, Morrissey Co.
612 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.

WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS
& LOAN ASSOCIATION
Miami IBeach, Fla.
Financing-Residential & commercial
buildings
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc., 1201 Ainsley Bldg.
Miami, Florida

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS COMPANY
1690 Monroe Dr., Atlanta, Ga.
Masonry building materials, products

ZONOLITE COMPANY
125 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill.
Lightweight insulating fill
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
105 W. Adams St., Chicago, III.


NOVEMBER, 1961 49


11111111111111111111IIIIIIIIIILIIIIIIIII










A. COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"




THE BEST

in

Architects' Supplies




Complete Reproduction
Service




433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.





DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?

If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect ... .We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address"....


Answer to Attitudes...
(Continued from Page 5)
distinguished educator-Dean Turpin
Bannister.
It is only with deep humility that
I offer the following remarks. We all
know what Vitruvius wrote on the
subject of architectural education. It
is still valid to-day.
If we keep in mind what an archi-
tect must do and how he must per-
form in a world of hard realities, it
is obvious that he must have as broad
a training as time, circumstances, na-
tive ability and talent will permit.
The training of a student of archi-
tecture must embrace many areas of
culture, defined in its most compre-
hensive sense: science, technology,
economics, finance, politics, design
and many other subjects. But in a five
year period the selection of subject
matter to which a student must be
exposed has to be selected with care
and wisdom. This is being done-
and in stating this I do not mean to
imply that the final word has been
said.
Take one facet of architectural edu-
cation, namely, design-in its varied
variations and manifestations. In its
total connotation it embraces investi-
gation and research, analysis and syn-
thesis, and a comprehensive knowl-
edge of the techniques of construc-
tion, structures, mechanical equip-
ment, acoustics and electrical work.
It embraces also a philosophical un-
derstanding of esthetics, of the social,
economic, and political problems of
our society, and an intelligent aware-
ness of the psychological motivation
of human beings. Let there be no mis-
take about this.
Indeed the process of architectural
education does not operate in a vac-
uum; it involves students, the practi-
tioner, the educator and the public in
general. And the subject matter of
all courses is geared to the end that
the students will develop a maturity
of thinking in the various academic
and professional offerings that will
permit them to assume their proper
role, after the necessary apprentice-
ship period, as practicing architects.
The late Theodore Irving Coe
wrote "The education of an archi-
tect can not be confined between the
covers of books. ."
Kenneth K. Stowell wrote-"Archi-
tectural education can, however, only


begin in the schools it is a life
time pursuit. The school can in-
culcate logical methods of thought,
research and can impart a basic work-
ing knowledge of the arts and sci-
ences the architect must employ, the
means to his ends It can develop
a thirst for knowledge, an enthusiasm
for experiment and a critical discrim-
ination and judgment. It can encour-
age-if not impart-a creative imag-
ination tempered only by analytical
logic. It can train the young archi-
tect in clear graphic expression of
ideas, purposes and aims. It should
also train him in the art of convincing
verbal presentation. It is a process he
is destined to follow from the college
to the grave."-Architectural Record
-July 1, 1949, page 89.
Indeed, it is the duty, responsibil-
ity, and obligation of architectural
education to provide the climate, the
skills, the tools, the knowledge, the
motivations and disciplines that are
so necessary for the practice of a
highly rigorous, disciplined and exact-
ing profession.
To meet the requirements of a cult-
ural, technical and professional edu-
cation, especially within the frame-
work of a five year period, is a hercu-
lean task. It would, of course, be ad-
vantageous for all concerned to place
architectural education on a graduate
level. Yale, Pennsylvania, Harvard,
Columbia and others have done this.
Yet in spite of the fact that a five
year curriculum is a crowded one, it
just is not true that it deprives the
student of the opportunity to engage
in extra-curricular activities or to
listen to outside speakers or practicing
architects.
Also, Mr. Ginn's statement quoted
at the beginning of this comment un-
justly indicts a body of men who have
given their life's efforts to the prob-
lem of architectural education. The
system of architectural education is
neither "unprincipled" nor "haphaz-
ard." It is based upon a serious study
and comprehension of the facts of life
as they pertain to architectural prac-
tice and registration as they exist to-
day and will undoubtedly prevail for
some years to come.
What the more distant future will
hold for architectural practice and
for architectural education is another
question which will have to be faced,
discussed, analyzed and finally re-
solved.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh ___ 22
Boiardi Tile Mfg.
Company _____ 41
Boca Raton Hotel and Club 40
A. R. Cogswell ____ ___ 50
Daryl Products Corp._____ 52
Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc. _________ 3rd Cover
Dwoskin, Inc. ____________ 4
Dwyer Products of Florida,
Inc. _________ 2nd Cover
Featherrock, Inc. _______ 46
Florida Natural Gas
Association _________ 44
Florida Home Heating
Institute ______ ___ 43
Florida Portland Cement
Div. ______________ 36
Florida Power and Light Co. 13
Hamilton Plywood-Insert 9-12
Harris Standard Paint Co.__ 39
Houdaille-Span, Inc. ____ 18
Independent Nail and
Packing Co. _______ 32
Lambert Corporation of
Florida _______________ 6
Libby-Owens-Ford Glass Co._ 42
The Mabie-Bell Company __ 14
Marolf Hygienic Equipment
Co. _________________ 7
Meekins, Inc. __________ 8
Merry Brothers Brick and
Tile Co. ______________ 3
Miami Window Corporation_ 1
Richard Plumer _____ 34-35
Portland Cement Association 21
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc._ 45
Weyerhauser Company,
Rilco Division .._____.__ 20
Rubber Products, Inc. ___ 42
Solite ______________ 31
Southern Bell Tel. and
Tel Co. ____________ 38
Superior Window Co. 4th Cover
Terra-Tyle ____________ 24
F. Graham Williams Co. 51
United States Plywood Co.__ 17
Zonolite Company ______ 37


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secrefray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





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NOVEMBER, 1961






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'Door. it
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Fl.wea; send :pe.--ii.: 31.:,n r.ei and lufll nclOsbit td .%t or quaU Y lntn n Prducs % s i ,
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Tengee


Versatility

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Imagination
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