• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 J. Vance Duncan appointed to state...
 Breuer and Candella slated as 1961...
 The 1961 office practice semin...
 Total coverage for total livin...
 Architects have important part...
 Allstate insurance building
 Coxen to give legislative report...
 News and notes
 Advertiser's index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00087
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00087
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    J. Vance Duncan appointed to state board of architecture
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Breuer and Candella slated as 1961 convention speakers
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The 1961 office practice seminar
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Total coverage for total living
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Architects have important part in new-policy PHA program
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Allstate insurance building
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Coxen to give legislative report as chairman of FAA committee
        Page 22
        Page 23
    News and notes
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertiser's index
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.































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5e Golden Triangle, Norfolk,


)ur Changing Skyline

Located in the heart of downtown Norfolk, the $6.5 million
Iden Triangle building wraps a multitude of functions within
sleek, 14-story frame. A motor hotel, hotel, office building
d convention center, it is the city's first new downtown hotel
more than fifty years. Architecturally, it will remain an
lievement of enduring significance.
The building occupies an entire city block. It houses more
Ln 350 guest rooms, three floors of office space, and a complex
commercial shops. A convention center, comprising fourteen
)andable, inter-communicating banquet and meeting rooms,
ers a seating capacity of 1,000. Also included: A 135,000
lon swimming pool and off-street parking for 400 cars.
[n keeping with its compelling, contemporary design, the
Iden Triangle exemplifies the use of the latest techniques
3 materials in modern, multi-story construction. Basic con-
uction of the towering building is reinforced steel, with Solite
htweight structural concrete used for floor decks. The choice
lightweight concrete for use in this multi-story building is
nificant. Solite's actual weight advantage is 1000 pounds per
)ic yard, or 500 tons dead load saved for every 1000 yards of
uctural concrete laid. In the Golden Triangle, this meant
)stantial savings in structural materials and labor, easier
.nsportation and faster construction while still assuring the
uired in-position strength.
'hese reasons alone, plus others too numerous to mention
re, have made Solite lightweight structural concrete the
?rwhelming choice for the finest structures on our "ever
mnging skyline."


The Golden Triangle stands out as an
impressive element in Norfolk's urban
redevelopment plan. Map above shows
its location in area of Redevelopment
Project No. 1.


GOLDEN TRIANGLE
ARCHITECT:
Anthony F. Musolino, AIA
CONSULTING ARCHITECT:
Morris Lapidus
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER:
Keller-Loewer Associates
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Blake Construction Co., Inc.

Lightweight aggregates used in light-
weight structural concrete produced by
Solite Corporation. Offices in Richmond,
Va.; Charlotte, N. C.; Jacksonville, Fla.
Plants in Bremo Bluff, Va.; Leaksville
Junction, Va.; Aquadale, N. C.; Green
Cove Springs, Fla.


SEPTEMBER, 1961








74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


In 7& Ie44ue ---

J. Vance Duncan Appointed to State Board of Architecture .

Breuer and Candella Slated as 1961 Convention Speakers . .

1961 Office Practice Seminar . . . . . . .
Part III New AIA General Conditions.

Total Coverage for Total Living . . . . . .
Two Dade County Houses by Kenneth Treister

Architects Have Important Part in New-Policy PHA Program .
Francis X. Servaites Speaks to Florida Central Chapter


Allstate Insurance Building . . . . . . . .
One of St. Petersburg's Newest by Weed Johnson Associates

Coxen to Give Legislative Report as Chairman of FAA Committee
News and Notes . . . . . . . . .
Lath and Plaster Seminar . Deadline for School Exhibit . .
Notes on Chapters . Memorandum on Covers . .
Advertiser's Index . . . . . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, A. Wynn
Howell; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R.
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Jefferson N. Powell, Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER . .
It's the first in a long time a cover design submitted by an architect inter-
ested enough to take the time, thought and effort to develop one. Not only
did this designer submit one cover sketch. In the publication office are five
others! All are the work of Raymond H. Strowd, partner in the Fort Myers
firm of Cornwell & Strowd, Architects. Our thanks to him and to others,
our hope that his example may spur them to similar interested efforts.


S. 31


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 11

NUMBER 9 I 719

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 11


. 16


22
. 24









;t29
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SEPTEMBER, 1961


A
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-4


14







J. Vance Duncan Appointed to



State Board of Architecture


In his first appointment to the
Florida State Board of Architecture,
Governor FARRIS BRYANT named J.
VANCE DUNCAN, AIA, of Ocala, to
fill the vacancy created by expiration
of the short-term appointment of
FRANCIS R. WALTON, AIA, of Day-
tona Beach. Walton had been named
by former Governor Leroy Collins to
complete the term of RICHARD BOONE
ROGERS, AIA, who resigned from the
Board early last year because of his
wife's illness. Re-appointments of
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, FAIA, of Jack-
sonville, and of MORTON T. IRON-
MONGER, AIA, Ft. Lauderdale, to
additional four-year terms, were also
announced by the Governor's office.
A native and life-long resident of
Ocala, Duncan was graduated in
architecture from the University of
Florida and later studied at the Grad-


uate School of Design at Harvard
University. He was registered to prac-
tice in 1939 and his Institute mem-
bership dates from 1946. He has
conducted practice in Ocala under
his own name since 1945.
Although he has not been promi-
nently identified with regional pro-
fessional organization, Duncan has
been an active participant in public
service groups. He is presently Gov-
ernor for the State's Community
Growth Committee, a member of the
Marion County Zoning and Building
Committee and a member of the
Ocala Building Code Committee. He
is also serving as one of the Com-
mittee of 100 for Marion County and
is a member of the Ocala Kiwanis
Club. He saw five years of active
duty with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers during World War II and


J. VANCE DUNCAN, AIA


currently holds a commission as Colo-
nel in the reserve force of that service
branch.
The office address of the new State
Board member is 314 Robertson
Building, Ocala, Florida telephone,
MArion 9-1781. He is married to the
former PATRICIA BALL and is the
father of a son, GEOFFREY M. DUN-
CAN, 19, and a daughter, MARCIA,
V. DUNCAN, 10.


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with a minimum of cost is a plus factor for
any new home.
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Breuer and Candella Slated

as 1961 Convention Speakers


Two of the most outstanding de-
signers in the field of contemporary
architecture will be among the fea-
tured panelists at the important
design seminars scheduled for the
FAA's 47th Ainual Convention to
be held November 9, 10 and 11 at
the Boca Raton Hotel. They are
MARCEL BREUER and FELIX CAN-
DELLA, both of whom have won
world-wide recognition for the bril-
liance of their varied work.
MARCEL BREUER was born in
Hungary and trained under WALTER
GROPIUS at the famed Bauhaus at
Weimar, Germany. After an inten-
sive and increasingly important prac-
tice in both Germany and England,
he came to the United States in
1937 to accept a teaching assignment
at Harvard University. His influence
in the fields of architectural philo-
sophy and creative design was almost
immediate; and since establishing his
own professional office in New York,
his work has been instrumental in
shaping a new approach to design in
both architecture and industry. In
architecture he has produced a wide
range of building types both in this
country and abroad.
He is regarded by all designing
groups as an influential "form-giver".
During the Convention program he
will be primarily concerned with
philosophy of design and the part
that his own creative philosophy, can
play in evaluating the Convention's
theme, "Structural Arts and Archi-
tecture".
FELIX CANDELLA'S position in the
field of architectural engineering de-
sign can, perhaps, best be clarified in
terms of the citation given him by
the International Union of Architects
at its London Congress in July of
this year with reference to the award
of the AUGUSTE FERRET PRIZE. He
was described as "An engineer with
a bold and inventive mind who, by
his imaginative structural conceptions
in reinforced concrete, has contri-
buted to the enrichment of contem-
porary architectural form and the
exploitations of space."
Born in Madrid, he has lived in
Mexico since 1939 and for the past


FELIX CANDELLA


20 years has been a citizen of Mexico.
But the creativity of his work in
reinforced concrete has brought him
an international reputation. He is a
master in the design of thin-shelled
structures; and proof of that fact lives
in buildings all over Central America,
in the United States, and on the
Continent. In addition, FELIX CAN-
DELLA is a teacher, author and lecturer,
- a professor of building at the Uni-
versity of Mexico, contributor to
architectural and engineering publica-
tions throughout the world, and guest
speaker at many universities in South
(Continued on Page 29)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












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Architect:
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General Contractor:
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The 1961




Office Practice




Seminar


The third session of the 1961 FAA
Office Practice Seminar started at
2:00 PM, June 10, 1961, at the Hills-
boro Hotel, Tampa. Subject was
"New A IA General Conditions."
Chairman of his meeting was HILLI-
ARD T. SMITH, JR., AIA, a former
president of the Palm Beach Chapter.


Mr. Smith--I'm sure you'll find
this session equally as informative as
those that have preceded it. It con-
cerns a subject about which few of
us seem know a great deal; and we
are fortunate to have here someone
who has thought enough about the
AIA General Conditions to have
made a very careful and detailed an-
alysis of this facet of our professional
work. The results of this analysis have
been published in mimeographed
form by the Atlanta Chapter of the
Construction Specifications Institute.
MR. BERNARD B. ROTHSCHILD is
now president of that CSI Chapter.
He is a principal of the Atlanta archi-
tectural firm of Finch, Alexander,
Bornes, Rothschild and Pascal and
is a past president of the Georgia
Chapter, AIA. His study of the AIA
General Conditions and their impor-
tant influence on the practice of
architecture has qualified him as an
expert on this subject. Mr. Roths-
child.
SEPTEMBER, 1961


This was not a panel session; but
following the speaker the program
included a general discussion of the
subject in the form of a question and
answer period. Speaker was BERNARD
B. ROTHSCHILD, AIA, Atlanta archi-
tect, who has made a special study
of AIA documents.


Mr. Rothschild- Really I am not
an expert. But a new definition--
in which the "X" is an unknown
quantity and the "SPURT" is a drip
under pressure probably comes
closer than anything else to defining
what I am.
This subject the AIA General
Conditions- is probably as dull and
as dry a one as any architect ever
encounters- and it is probably one
of the most important. But there are
many in our profession who don't
know what the General Conditions
are. And that's the reason for a lot
of court cases.
Now, the 1961 edition of the Gen-
eral Conditions has been changed in
some important respects. Article 5,
Shop Drawings, has this addition:
". . The Architect shall check and
approve, with reasonable promptness,
such schedules and drawings only for
conformance with the design concept
of the Project and compliance with
the information given in the Contract


Documents." Under Article 8, Sam-
ples, the same type of sentence has
been added. A new sentence has been
added to the first paragraph of Article
14. It says, ". . The Architect shall
not be responsible for the acts or
omissions of the superintendent or
his assistants."
In Article 20, Correction of Work
After Final Payment, the second
sentence has been deleted. This had
been the subject of much controversy
since it seemed to imply that the
Contractor could be held to a main-
tenance guarantee for the life of the
building. Toward the end of the sec-
ond paragraph of Article 25, Certifi-
cates for Payments, this clause has
been added ". . or from failure to
comply with drawings and specifica-
tions and the terms of any special
guarantees specified in the Con-
tract . ."
Additions to Article 27, Contrac-
tor's Liability Insurance, I think,
have changed the entire concept of
that liability statement. The new
words are italicized in this quotation
from this article. ". . from claims
for damages because of bodily injury,
including death, to his employees and
all others; and from claims for dam-
ages to property--any and all of
which may arise out of or result from
the Contractor's operations under this
Contract . ."
Changes in Article 38, Architect's
Status, have also been the subject of
some controversy. This is particularly
true about the first sentence which
now reads, "The Architect shall be
(Continued on Page 10)


Part III- New AIA General Conditions


~i~i~i~






General Conditions...
(Continued from Page 9)
the Owner's representative during the
construction process and he shall ob-
serve the work in process on behalf
of the Owner."
(EDITOR'S NOTE-Change from
the old phrasing, "The Architect shall
have general supervision and direc-
tion of the work . ." to the new
expression, ". . he shall observe the
work in process . ." was the subject
of a membership letter from AIA Ex-
ecutive Director William H. Scheick,
dated July 14, 1961. The change was
made, according to this communica-
tion, because certain phrases in earlier
editions of the General Conditions
have caused the profession trouble in
liability suits and revisions have been


made to describe more accurately and
specifically what the architect's serv-
ices do and do not include. In two
recent court cases claims have been
made that the phrase "supervise and
direct" involves the architect in re-
sponsibilities for detailed inspection
which he cannot possibly assume.)
The final change in the 1961 docu-
ment is the deletion of the last sent-
ence in Article 42, Use of Premises.
Now, no architect worth his salt
would start a job with a stock plan.
But in using the General Conditions
just as they are architects are doing
just that. Just because these are
printed doesn't necessarily mean they
are either complete or even applicable
without change to every job. Specifi-
cations change with jobs; and the
General Conditions are as much a


The four-session, all-day Office Practice Seminar, held
June 10, 1961, at the Hillsboro Hotel in Tampa, was the
third such gathering to be sponsored by the FAA's Office
Practice Committee. Seminar Chairman Earl M. Starnes,
working with FAA President Robert H. Levison, organized
the meeting into four sessions as follows:
10:00 AM....THE STUDENT AND THE ARCHITECT"
Chairman....J. Vance Duncan, AIA
Speakers.....T. Trip Russell, AIA
Ronnie Ginn
Dale Freelove
Walter Raymond, AIA
11:15 AM...."ARCHITECT-ENGINEER COORDINATION"
Chairman....Robert H. Maybin, AIA
Speakers..... Newton Ebaugh, PE
W. E. Bishop, PE
C. M. Spooner, Jr., PE
2:00 PM...."NEW AIA GENERAL CONDITIONS"
Chairman....Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., AIA
Speakers.....Bernard B. Rothschild, AIA
3:15 PM...."OMMISSIONS AND ERRORS"
Chairman....Earl M. Starnes, AIA
Speakers.....Victor A. Schinnerer,
Insurance Counselor
William E. Sherman
Attorney
This year, for the first time, proceedings of the seminar
were tape-recorded. A resolution was adopted by the FAA
Board of Directors at its June 9th meeting that "the per-
tinent portions" of these proceedings be published
The first two sessions were reported in July and August.
Material on others will follow....Most of the talks were
delivered on an extemporaneous basis, thus a substantial
re-writing from the transcript of the recording has been
necessary to avoid the repetitions and fragmented sen-
tences that invariably occur in the recording of such
deliveries. However, all tape-transcripts have been edited
with the care necessary to assure inclusion of all "the
pertinent portions" of each session.


part of a job specification as any
other part. They should be reviewed
for their detailed application to each
job and changed as the conditions of
the job may make necessary.
The whole point is that this 1961
AIA document furnishes merely the
basis, or foundation, for revisions that
will be appropriate. You should get
to know the various articles of the
General Conditions then adapt
them as needed. Here's an example.
In Article 1- G there is statement
that is beautifully phrased but isn't
understood by 95 per cent of archi-
tects. It says "The law of the place
of building shall govern the construc-
tion of this Contract." Most archi-
tects take that to mean that the
building thust conform to a building
code or zoning ordinance. It means
nothing of the kind. The word "con-
struction" is used in its legal sense.
It means "interpretation"- interpre-
tation of the Contract in the event
it lands in court.
So, if you're not entirely familiar
with the laws of the place where your
building is to be constructed, I urge
strongly that you make friends with a
local attorney and a good insurance
counsellor. Many articles in the Gen-
eral Conditions have legal implica-
tions; and, depending on the job type,
size and conditions, the matter of in-
surance can become both involved
and highly technical.
(EDITOR'S NOTE The re-
mainder of this session was devoted
to a descriptive commentary by the
speaker of the document referred to
near the beginning of this report.
Full title of this is "Guide for Sup-
plementary General Conditions,
Special Conditions, Instructions to
Bidders and Bid Form." Bound with
this was a "Check List for Supple-
mentary General Conditions" com-
piled by the Houston, Chapter CSI
S. The full document comprises
47 pages devoted to notes and sug-
gested possible revisions or alternates
covering all 44 articles of the AIA
General Conditions. This wide range
of subject matter made it impractical
to report Mr. Rothschild's extempo-
raneous comments in any more sub-
stantial detail than has been reported
here . Copies of the document
may be obtained without charge on
application to the Administrative Sec-
retary of the FAA, 414F Dupont
Plaza Center, Miami 32, Florida.)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































TOTAL COVERAGE FOR TOTAL LIVING...


TWO DADE COUNTY HOUSES DESIGNED BY KENNETH TREISTER
reflect an unusual, but intensely practical, approach to the
problem of residential design. This assumes that the lot,
whatever its size or orientation, is quite as much a part of a
living area as the house itself. Thus, landscaping becomes an
integral part of the design process and house and grounds are
so ingeniously related as to provide a breadth of living facil-
ity that is not commonly evidenced in the great majority of
suburban neighborhoods....Particularly noteworthy is the fact
that this design approach utilizes the building site from lot
line to lot line. Planning is open; but the plot development
has been arranged to achieve almost complete privacy while
affording vistas of gardens from almost any interior space.
SEPTEMBER, 1961 11












The 100 by 110-foot lot faces
north and was devoid of natu-
ral features or vistas. A gar-
den fence surrounds the lot
providing complete privacy and
defining the space. The entire
lot is divided into a complex of
outdoor gardens, arbors, cover-
ed areas, screened patios, and
enclosed spaces, each of which
is considered a room for living
-thereby making the sur-
rounding fence the actual lim-
iting element of the home.
Thus developed the lot provides
more than 10,000 square feet of
living area, though the enclosed
spaces-including the three in-
terior garden courts-total only
2,200 square feet . The
plan is zoned in two ways, one
to achieve separation between
"living" and "sleeping" areas,
the other to establish segrega-
tion of adults' spaces from those
designed for children. Rooms
are grouped about a large
brick-paved patio, part of
which is sheltered and the re-
mainder screened. Sliding glass
doors separate the patio from
living and dining areas; and
wood-jalousie doors form the
partition between sleeping areas
and patio. During summer the
doors are usually open and the
house becomes a sort of pav-
ilion shelter with a minimum
degree of separation between
indoors and out.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























































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:j ;!jjl;~Lijjliili:I..i:ri. ::::::O
'`'
:
~; ...,,XIX:"''' :- ::;:::::
"; "'"'",'
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..... .ii;:.; t;e: ~:'i;:,~i~~if~~~lriil!::' `!:::
,.


SEPTEMBER, 1961





























Photos by Rudi Rada


THREE BUILDINGS COMPRISE ONE HOUSE for a maximum of
privacy and comfortable living on a 75 by 125-foot urban lot.
Here, too, the lot is fenced, the landscaping is designed as an
integral part of the total living area and the enclosed areas
are characterized by a feeling of open and informal spacious-
ness....The three buildings are; a two-story home with patio
and pool; a guest and cabana building; and a carport all
served by a central cement-paved walk.



B-;"?" s in - 7* 3--------------------





IS-7ll ["rb


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


q


_















Construction is wood throughout.
Framing members are joined and
anchored with heavy-duty metal
connectors, galvanized to resist
corrosion and exposed on the ex-
terior. All interiors are wood pan-
eled, mostly in cypress boards, with
flush panel, jalousied and fixed
louvre wood doors being used for
openings . Except in the living
and dining areas, furniture, de-
signed by the architect, is largely
built-in to provide an integration
of interior design with that of the
building itself. Floors in dining and
living areas are random-pattern
green Vermont slate. In the den
the floor is brick in a herringbone
pattern; and the covered walk and
pool areas are finished in cement
bordered with strips of small, neu-
trally colored cobblestones . In
the landscape development, most
of the usual lawn areas have been
eliminated. In their place are large
areas of river gravel in various
color ranges that surround reflect-
ing pools and fountains. Planting
has been largely confined to low
maintenance elements, including
small base plants, dwarf palms and
cacti.


SEPTEMBER, 1961








Architects Have Important Part



in New-Policy PHA Program


The nation's 100,000-home public
housing program requires the "very
best thinking and creative work" of
architects to carry the plans of PHA
Commissioner MARIE McGUIRE to a
successful conclusion. Further, the
Commissioner believes that "archi-
tects must be less hampered in their
creative efforts, that they must be
rewarded and their prestige increased."
These statements reflect a new policy
on the part of the PHA- a change
of "ground rules" and were made
by FRANCIS X. SERVAITES, PHA
Deputy Commissioner, before an
audience of Florida Central Chapter
architects on August 12th.
The PHA official's talk was pri-
marily an outline of the Federal
bureau's new attitude toward the
overall problem of providing "better
designed and better looking public
housing projects." In commenting on


the recent past history of low-rent
housing programs the speaker said,
"In recent years the AIA and the
PHA have not exactly been seeing eye
to eye. Some harsh words have
been said on both sides. Luckily
this is behind us. We have turned
the proverbial corner and things are
different.
"I strongly suspect both of us can
take blame for the past. There have
been let us face it mistakes
made. The criticisms of the low-rent
program, however, about which all of
us have heard too much, are un-
doubtedly exaggerated in the public
eye. Regardless, things like institu-
tionalization, lack of creativity, rubber
stamp projects, failure to impart
charm, unimaginative design....that
can be eliminated if we work to-
gether."
He touched on the admitted "rigid-


ity of thought" and the time-consum-
ing routines that had characterized
former PHA policies and procedures
"to the detriment of creativity." But
he warned his audience not to expect
complete elimination of all "bureau-
cratic accumulations."
"Controls there must be," he said,
"and controls there always will be
when it comes to the expenditure of
public funds. This responsibility can
never be laid aside; and in this respect
the goals of the AIA before the public
should be one with those of the PHA.
These are times that call most urgently
not for argument, but for agreement
amongst those that have a mutually
common goal.
"The PHA message for better staff
work has gone out to the field. Our
Regional Offices, who must process
the work of your imaginations, have
been alerted to our new expectations.
This places squarely on the member-
ship of the AIA the task of producing
new designs commensurate with eco-
nomy and the people's interests we
both serve."
Servaites sketched the progress of
the public housing program from the
passage of the Housing Act of 1937


RESIDENTIAL

INTERIORS

Richard B. Plumer, A.I.D.
Pefia
Helen Carr, A.I.D.
Margaret Webb DeHass, A.I.D.
Steve Steffen, A.I.D.
Vern Currie, A.I.D., I.D.I.
,I .Dix Mason, A.I.D.
Jane E. Ward, A.I.D.
Huber Harrison Griffin, A.I.D.
William F. Maler, A.I.D.
Helen Macris, Affiliate A.I.D.
Arleen Bradford


S. RICHARD PL/ ER






155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775
16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


J






to the present -and then projected
the program in terms of the imme-
diate future. In barely 25 years the
program has progressed from little
more than an idealistic concept to
a total of 487,399 public housing
homes--with 41,344 more now be-
ing built. Further, 88,503 additional
units are now largely completed in
architects' offices and awaiting bid
action; and awaiting action by local
housing authorities are the 100,000
new units authorized by the Congress.
"You Floridians" said the Wash-
ington official, "hampered by an
overall lack of urban renewal legisla-
tion, can well use a generous portion
of this 100,000 authorization of
homes to do some of the slum clear-
ance work that is so badly needed
in most communities."
Commenting specifically on the
PHA administration's new attitude
toward the part architects should take
in the achievement of its immediate
program the speaker had this to say.
"In the success of the program we
are reserving a special niche for the
architect and his design. To his busi-
ness profession he has added a degree
of moral and social obligation and


a lasting contribution has been made.
You have done more than present
the program to the public. You have
explained it.
"A case in point is the Victoria
Plaza Court in San Antonio, Texas,
where our p r e s ent Commissioner
Marie McGuire, working with her
architect, making innumerable studies,
has pioneered in constructing housing
for the aged. The light that they
let into the subject has spread far
beyond the bounds of San Antonio
and has affected to a lasting degree
the design of such housing elsewhere
and the public housing program in
general.
"Frankly, I can tell you that Com-
missioner McGuire feels that our
ground rules must be changed. She
thinks that architects must be less
hampered in their creative efforts,
that they must be rewarded and their
prestige increased. She believes that
it is vital to the program and pro-
poses to give it immediately more
emphasis.
"Presently our ideas run to award
programs, national competitions, pilot
projects, research grants, educational
materials, and like matters. Their


production may take a little time,
but a start has been made as anyone
who has in the last two weeks read
our circular of July 26, 1961, knows.
This was an informal briefing on
housing for the elderly. This was
expansive, rather than limiting, help-
ful rather than hindering, and full
of ideas rather than restrictions. It
is the kind of thing you can expect
from us in the future.
"Today, we have assembled under
DR. WEAVER, housing experts in
every field of housing operation, who
are not only recognized authorities
in their own specialized fields, but
enthusiastic supporters of the entire
housing program as it was stated in
the President's housing message. As
was not quite the case under the
previous administration, they are
united in support of the entire pro-
gram, they are working together.
"To do for your communities what
needs to be done, their united efforts
need your cooperation and support,
and, very important, your best think-
ing and creative work. Particularly,
does Commissioner McGuire of PHA
- and I will add myself think that
(Continued on Page 31)


. NELG IA/N N AIR




h J^^~i^^^b^^^^.^^


Fulfilling the original concept

of architect and client

for outstanding business interior

designs


, I N I : I^^


RICHARD PLUMER
Business Interiors, Inc.


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Telephone PLaza 1-9775
SEPTEMBER, 1961 17



















































THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


- v






ALLSTATE

INSURANCE

BUILDING

WEED JOHNSON ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS . Located near
St. Petersburg on Highway 19, this is the state headquar-
ters for the Allstate Insurance Company. Containing 72,000
sq. ft. and of reinforced concrete construction, the building
was designed for an eventual second floor, with low initial
cost and minimum maintenance expenditures as controlling
requirements. The site is 11 acres in the center of a 70-acre
tract planned for development as an office-building park. .
Exterior walls are surfaced with glazed tile, openings fitted
with heat-resisting glass set in molded rubber gaskets. Inside,
floors are of vinyl asbestos; ceilings are sound-absorbing -
spray-type in the cafeteria, access tile elsewhere. Movable
partitions are used for all office areas...


SEPTEMBER, 1961







ALLSTATE

INSURANCE

BUILDING































On this page are two
views of the lobby and,
opposite, the cafeteria-
both of which have ac-
oustically-sprayed folded
plate ceilings. On both
east and west sides of
the building openings are
screened on the exterior
w i t h precast concrete
grille blocks. These are
shown from the inside in
the view of the cafeteria
serving line on page 18;
and from the outside in
the general view of
southeast corner of the
building on page 19
taken from the parking
lot to include a view of
the cafeteria exterior with
its outdoor, covered ter-
race. The relatively iso-
lated location of the cafe-
teria resulted through
grouping of all service
and mechanical areas to-
ward the rear of the
building. But the cafe-
teria was also placed here
so the room may be used
for dinner meetings by
outside organizations
without interference to
normal operations in oth-
er parts of the building.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















































































SEPTEMBER, 1961 21






Coxen to Give Legistative Report as


New Chairman of FAA Committee


FORREST R. COXEN, of Tallahassee,
past president of the Florida North
Central Chapter, has been named by
FAA President ROBERT H. LEVISON
as the Chairman of the FAA's Gov-
ernmental Relations Committee to
succeed the late ANTHONY L.
PULLARA. He is currently compiling
recommendations from each member
of his committee which will be incor-
porated in a full and final report of
the committee's 1961 activities for
presentation to the FAA Board of
Directors at its next meeting.
In the meantime, Coxen has pro-
vided The Florida Architect with
highlights of the Committee's work
during the 1961 legislation session
for the information of FAA members.
His statement noted first the direc-
tives given his Committee by the FAA
Board. It then outlined the activities
of the Committee and closed with
a commentary on overall accomplish-
ments.


The Committee's program was
designated by the FAA Board to
encompass the following:
1...Each week during the 1961
legislative session the FAA would be
represented in Tallahassee by a mem-
ber of the Governmental Relations
Committee.
2...In addition, a legislative repre-
sentative would be employed for the
duration of the 1961 session and a
Tallahassee member of the Commit-
tee would act to coordinate the work
of the professional representative
with activities of visiting Committee
members. The FAA Board retained
Tallahassee attorney J. LEWIS HALL,
SR., as legislative representative and
designated Coxen as the Committee's
Tallahassee "coordinator".
3...Guidance for both legislative
representative and Committee mem-
bers was embodied in a resolution
approved by FAA membership at the
Association's 1960 Convention and


FORREST R. COXEN, AIA


published on pages 25, 26 and 27
of The Florida Architect for Decem-
ber, 1960.
During the session the Committee
reviewed some 4,487 bills proposed
by the House and Senate 3,015 of
which became laws. It gave close in-
spection to all those which might
have some bearing of various aspects
of professional activity. Of these, the
(Continued on Page 29)


E FROM LAMBERT


TAL CLEAR SEAL
o CONCRETE FLOOR TREATMENT


BIG


SLAMBCO
"".:iL .. ...


DELIVERS






CURES
HARDENS
S SEALS
DUSTPROOFS


FK I ,nr1NIAL VAIAN
AND INFORMATION
FOLDER WRITE:


LAMBERT
OF FLORIDA
P.O. BOX 2226, ORLANDO, FLORIDA Phone GArden 5-8682
P.O. BOX 151, HOUSTON, TEXAS Phone CApitol 4-0616
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


22


pan I ir~ ll








































Modern school uses precast concrete...

reduces costs to less than $1100 per square foot!


- How to get the best school at the lowest cost. This is a common
; problem in growing communities. The Linton-Stockton Elementary
School in Linton, Indiana, solved it with precast concrete.
The school building has received wide acclaim in educational
circles... and the cost was only $10.87 per square foot.
There are 36 classrooms in all, each averaging 1200 square feet in
Size. Total accommodations: 1200 pupils. Total cost for this 80,000
square foot school: $870,000.
SConstruction was relatively simple. The frame was formed by
precast concrete members supporting precast roof slabs. All pre-
casting was done at the site.
Careful planning, standardization of members and re-use of forms
helped hold down costs and building time. Other advantages in-
clude low maintenance, long life, low annual cost and high fire safety.
If your community is considering a new school, it should definitely
Precast concrete "bent" being swung into place at new consider precast concrete. Free information will be sent on request.
Linton-Stockton Elementary School. Designers: T. C. Dorate
and S. 0. Pantazi, Indianapolis. Structural engineer: F. E.
Burroughs, Indianapolis.

the mark of a
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION modern school...
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida C O N
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete

SEPTEMBER, 1961 2:










A. R COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"




THE BEST

in

Architects' Supplies




Complete Reproduction
Service

*BMMI B

433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.





DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?

If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect .... We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address"....


News & Notes_


Lath and Plaster Seminar...
A full day of information on the
latest techniques in use of lath and
plaster is available to all Florida
architects at the Seminar to be held
Saturday, September 16, 1961, at the
Town House, West Palm Beach. The
session is being offered by the Gyp-
sum Association and the Metal Lath
Manufacturers Association with spon-
sorship by the Florida Lathing and
Plastering Contractors Association,
Inc. There is no charge for the
session--which is open to all FAA
members-and luncheon and cock-
tails will be tendered by the sponsor
of the meeting.
Registration, however, is necessary.
Application should be made promptly
to JOE M. BAKER, Exec. Secy., P.O.
Box 464, New Smyrna Beach, Florida
- or he may be contacted via phone
at GArden 8-5153.

Deadline for School Exhibit
September 15, 1961, is the dead-
line for receipt of entry blanks for
the 1962 School Building Architec-
tural Exhibit of the National Conven-
tion of the American Association of
School Administrators. The Conven-
tion is to be held in Atlantic City,
N.J., February 17-21, 1962. Notices
of intention to exhibit should be
addressed to American Association of
School Administrators, Attention:
DR. SHIRLEY COOPER, 1201 Sixteenth
Street, N.W., Washington 6, D.C.

Notes on Chapters . .
Florida South-President HERBERT
R. SAVAGE has set up a Past President's
Council. Purpose is to sit twice a
year January and June to review
past Chapter accomplishments, to
help clarify present Chapter aims and
policies and to advise on future Chap-
ter objectives.
ALFRED B. PARKER, FAIA, has ac-
cepted an appointment by H. SAMUEL
KRUSE, the Chapter's 1963 AIA Con-
vention Chairman, as chairman of the
Convention Seminars Committee.
Florida Central-HARRY MERRITT
has been named as chairman of a
new committee to study the feasibility
of establishing a new scholarship fund
or of participating in an already es-
tablished fund. His report will be the


basis of the Chapter's future course
of action in this field of interest.
President A. WYNN HOWELL has
appointed ELLIOTT HADLEY as chair-
man of a new Historical Committtee.
As the second largest Chapter in
the state, the membership is concern-
ed about the wide extent of chapter
jurisdiction. Discussion has occurred
about the possibilities of, 1) estab-
lishing new chapters in the Florida
Central's area, or, 2) establishing a
series of local sub-chapters under ex-
ecutive control of Florida Central.
A new Committee on Chapter Reor-
ganization has been appointed to
study the matter. Chairman is DANA
JOHANNES; and members are JACK
WEST, ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA
and H. LESLIE WALKER, JR.
Florida North Central Secretary-
Treasurer PRENTISS HUDDLESTON has
reported discussion about the possi-
bility of the Chapter acting as Host
to the 1963 FAA Convention. How-
ever, latest information is the oppor-
tunity has been declined and the FAA
Convention Committee is now sur-
veying other location possibilities.
EDWARD M. FEARNEY, lately a mem-
ber of the staff of the Architect for
the Board of Control, Tallahassee,
has returned to a teaching assignment
in the U/F at Gainesville.

Memorandum on Covers...
Here is an excerpt from a letter
signed by A. ROBERT BROADFOOT,
AIA, of the Jacksonville Chapter,
dated June 19, 1961:
"For the past several months I have
noticed with alarm the fact that the
covers for The Florida Architect have
deteriorated in design appeal and that
there is absolutely no attempt at de-
sign or the least bit of creativeness
expressed in the cover of The Florida
Architect . Would it not be pos-
sible for The Florida Architect to em-
ploy an artist rather than a type-setter
to design the covers of our future
issues of The Florida Architect?"
Following is a communication from
CLINTON GAMBLE, Chairman, FAA
Publication Committee, dated Novem-
ber 21, 1960 almost exactly seven
months prior to the letter quoted
above:
"To: Presidents of Chapters, FAA
"I...Enclosed are 10 copies of the
(Continued on Page 27)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










the clean
look of...


PRESTRESSED
CONCRETE


/


F,\061W
P;Z_.


Architect, George Storrs, Jr
Photographs courtesy of R. H Wnght. Inc


New applications, wider acceptance,
increased demand for its use...have: 4
marked prestressed concrete progress,
making this an era of unprecedented i S
product expansion. Chartered in 1954... i .
its inception in Florida... the Prestressed NWt
Concrete Institute will hold its conven- .l ' .
tion this year in Denver, Colorado.hee D, W :
The roster now totals 720 with
members in 43 states in the U. S. A. and *v i a
in 33 other countries. For their contri- .
bution in making this era noteworthy, : : o
acknowledgment is made to the
following Florida manufacturers of
prestressed concrete units.


BRANNEN, INC., Sarasota U FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC., Tampa
CAPITOL PRESTRESS COMPANY, Jacksonville U JUNO PRESTRESSORS, INC., West Palm Beach
CAST-CRETE CORPORATION, Tampa U LEWIS MANUFACTURING CO., INC., Miami
CONCRETE STRUCTURES, INC., North Miami U MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC., Miami
DURA-STRESS, INC., Leesburg U MEEKINS-BAMMAN PRE-CAST CORP., Hallandale
DUVAL ENGINEERING & CONTRACTING CO., Jacksonville N PERMA-STRESS, INC., Holly Hill
WELL ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING CO., Lakeland U PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC., Lakeland
FINFROCK INDUSTRIES, INC., Orlando U SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC., Pensacola
FLORIDA LITH-I-BAR, INC., Miami U WEST COAST SHELL CORPORATION, Sarasota
R. H. WRIGHT, INC., Ft. Lauderdale


SEPTEMBER, 1961












BREAKTHROUGH

IN COOLING&HEATING










ARKLA'S NEW 25-TON
GAS CHILLER-HEATER
Here it is-the revolutionary new Arkla absorption unit
that heats and cools without a steam producing boiler
or converter. Gas-fired burners in the generator sec-
tion energize the system for absorption cooling, or for
heating. It's the perfect system for modern year 'round
gas air conditioning.
INSTANTLY HEATS AND COOLS AUTOMATICALLY U HEATS WATER WITHOUT A BOILER U COOLS WATER
WITHOUT A COMPRESSOR E REQUIRES NO LUBRICATION U SEALED FOR LIFE, REQUIRING MINIMUM
MAINTENANCE U MAINTAINS SAME CAPACITY FOR THE LIFE OF THE UNIT E HAS NO MOVING PARTS
IN THE HEATING AND COOLING CYCLE U FIRST MEDIUM OR LARGE TONNAGE AIR CONDITIONER THAT
HEATS. Truly revolutionary ... investigate for your next building project the new Arkla DF-3000
Gas-fired All Year* Chiller-Heater.
FOR DETAILS CONTACT YOUR LOCAL GAS COMPANY
OR WRITE ARKLA AIR CONDITIONING CORPORATION
812 MAIN STREET LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS
26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 24)
program for the cover design compe-
tition you will have in your chapter.
If you need more copies please let
me know.
"2...We have set the date for sub-
mission of the cover designs for
January 10, 1961. You may wish to
submit before that time which will be
appropriate. The point, of course, is
to have the designs by the time of the
January Board meeting of the FAA.
"3...If you wish to appoint some-
one other than yourself to follow up
on this matter, would you please let
Roger Sherman know who it is.
"4...You recognize that this cover
competition is not only for the prac-
tical purpose of getting some really
worthwhile imaginative covers, but
also to give all of us the knowledge
that The Florida Architect is really
our publication.
"5...Any further questions may be
addressed to either Roger Sherman or
to me and we will see our answers are
coordinated and prompt in reply.
"6...I sincerely hope you will make
this an important part of your chapter
activity for these next two months
and see to it we get some inspired
cover designs."
The point is that the Publications
Committee pf the FAA and the edi-
tor-publisher of the magazine both
have long recognized the economic
impracticality of Mr. Broadfoot's sug-
gestion that The Florida Architect
"employ an artist" to design covers.
The interest in cover design showed
by the Jacksonville Chapter-of which
Mr. Broadfoot is a member-in 1959
was welcome and resulted in an im-
mediate improvement in the maga-
zine's appearance. This interest was
continued by the U/F Student Chap-
ter in 1960; and most covers during
that year were adapted from student
designs-with credit given to the in-
dividuals concerned.
However, since that time only a few
of the 1961 covers have been new and
original designs. These also came from
students. They were not the only ones
submitted for 1961 covers. But the
others could not be adapted for use
either because such adaptation would
have proved inordinately expensive or
because the designer had neglected
to conform to some of the basically
necessary mechanical requirements of
publication processing.


5 WASHINGTON


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* Takes 2/3 the time to erect
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Distributed in Florida by:
Kissam Builders, Supply, Orlando
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., Hialeah
Doby Brick & Supply, Boca Raton
S Steward-Mellon Co., Tampa
Steward-Mellon Co., Jacksonville
jIL F. Graham Williams Co., Atlanta.


faDept. FAS, 6331 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.,
AW fetU L erlcfljl, INC. LOS ANGELES 28, CALIFORNIA







MR. ARCHITECT:
Your clients have learned about the ad-
vantages of oil home heating from adver-
tising like this in newspapers and on TV
and radio during the past two years.


B. -A




u p I A T I N 6 1


By now, just about everybody knows
that Florida homes need heat during
/our short but chilly winter cold
snaps... That efficient, dependable
home heating doesn't have to cost
much in Florida.. That OIL heat
averages about HALF the cost of
heat from other fuels... And that you
don't have to pay a premium price
for fuel oil when you use it for home
heating only! If you'll insist on
clean, safe, economical OIL heat-
you'll never "take a beating" on the
cost of home heating!


Architects who specify oil for home
heating are assuring their clients
of substantial savings in the years
to come . savings they've been
told about time after time. They
will not question your recommen-
dation of better, cheaper, safer oil
heat in the houses you build for
them!



FLORIDA HOIIE. HEATINO INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th St., Miami Florida


BEST AND CHEAPEST COMBINATION FOR YEAR 'ROUND HOME COMFORT:
OIL HOUSE HEATING AND ELECTRIC AIR CONDITIONING!






Legislative Report...
(Continued from Page 22)
following appeared to have special
importance, though the list does not
include all that were investigated.
HB 1039 Stockplans for Schools.
This was killed in committee with
the cooperation of officials of the
State Department of Education and
DR. C. W. MCGUFFEY, School Plant
Administrator.
HB 1294, Mechanics Lien Law
Study. Long advocated by the FAA,
this was passed. Result will be to
set up a study committee toward the
end of writing a completely new lien
law for introduction at the 1963
session of the Legislature.
HB 1358, Contractors' License Act.
This bill, which had the support of
the FAA, was not reported out of
committee in time for passage; and
HIB 1528, Setting up a State Board
for Landscape Architects cleared com-
mittees, but died on the legislative
calendar. Similarly, HB 1683, Revi-
sions to Architect's Law died on the
calendar. This would have raised
Florida registration requirements in
closer conformity with standards of
the NCARB than now exists.
The sum needed to construct the
building proposed for the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts for the
U/F (see The Florida Architect for
May, 1960) was retained in the final
version of the joint Appropriations
Bill. However, funds have not yet
been released by the Administration,
though indications are that priority
for this project may make possible its
construction during 1962.



Convention Speakers...
(Continued from Page 6)
America, United States and Europe.
To cap this climax, he was recently
appointed as Charles Elliot Norton
Professor of Poetry at Harvard Uni-
versity for the coming academic year.
In November these men with
others to be announced later--will
bring to those attending the 1961
FAA Convention the inspiration of
their knowledge and past accomplish-
ments and their stimulating approach
to the attainment of new achievement
peaks in the future. The experience
of meeting and hearing them should
be unforgettable.
SEPTEMBER, 1961


. ... Measure It


Against Any Standard


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NOW . a new design tool the Simpson 7-11
flush panel, ceiling-height door . For spacious,
Florida-living scale . For economy in partition
framing . For custom-made quality at mass-pro-
duced savings . Available from factory in rotary
Lauan, rotary Natural Birch or Masonite (for painting)
with matching or fir edges from 1'-6" to 3'0" in
1 /8" and 13/4" thicknesses or interior use ... Made
of kiln-dried lumber with full-width lock rail and top
rail oversize for precision fitting . Tenoned con-
struction, pressure bonded facing guaranteed as
to materials and workmanship-Specify SIMPSON ...
* * Stocked in Miami: Rotary Lauan with matching edges
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the medallion that has
a gn.eti.c pull!

The MEDALLION HOME program helps sell more
homes faster!
In the FP&L service area, twice as many Medallion
Homes and Apartment Units were certified in 1960
as in 1959.
Architects will be benefitted by the 50 million dol-
lars being spent nationally during 1961 alone on the
Medallion Home promotion.
The campaign pre-sells builders and home-buyers
and offers architects an incentive for up-grading resi-
dential standards for Better Living, Electrically.
Here's what makes a MEDALLION HOME:
1. ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN with clean, cool, flameless
electric range and at least three other major electric
appliances, including a safe, flameless electric water
heater for precious peace of mind.
2. FULL HOUSEPOWER 100-200 amp wiring
for the convenience of modern electric living.
3. LIGHT FOR LIVING ample light planned
for comfort, safety and beauty.






Find out how you can profit by par-
ticipating in the MEDALLION HOME
program which offers valuable promo-
tional aids. Just call any FP&L office
for complete details.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
HELPING BUILD FLORIDA






mlsTHE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Architect's Part in PHA...
(Continued from Page 17)
we need it in the field of public
housing. Where we have had it in
the past, we count our many suc-
cesses. Where we have not had it,
there are our failures."
A brief period of questions and
answers followed the PHA official's
address. In answer to one relative
to availability of financing for hous-
ing for the elderly, Servaites clarified
the PHA's position compared to that
of other agencies. He stated that 100
percent financing for a non-profit
organization for housing the elderly
could be obtained from the Commun-
ity Facilities Administration, a com-
ponent of the HHFA at sub-market
interest rates. The money is obtained
from FANNIE MAE, must be paid back,
and since it involves no subsidy, as
does a PHA project, will necessitate
higher rents than those contemplated
by PHA.
One question that provoked general
laughter was "Who is, or what is,
Fannie Mae?" Servaites replied that
it used to be a girl's name, but now
stood for FNMA--the FEDERAL
NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION.


ADVERTISERS INDEX
Arkla Ai( Conditioning
Corp. .. . . 26
Bird & Son, Inc. . . 3
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 8
A. R. Cogswell .. .. 24
Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc. .. .. 3rd Cover
Featherock, Inc. . . 27
Florida Home Heating
Institute . . 28
Florida Natural Gas Assn . 32
Florida Portland Cement Div.. 25
Florida Power & Light Co. 30
Florida Steel Corp. . 6
Lambert Corp. . . 22
The Mabie-Bell Company 7
Meekins, Inc. . 2nd Cover
Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co . . 5
Richard Plumer .. 16-17
Portland Cement Assn. .. 23
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 29
Solite . . . 1
Southern Bell Tel. &
Tel. Co . . ... 4
Superior Window Company
4th Cover
Washington Federal Savings
& Loan Assn. .... 27
F. Graham Williams Co. . 31


SEPTEMBER, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretray
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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O MM SEPTEMBER, 1961
Good NEWS about Natural Gas..

NEW LOW RATE for natural gas for air conditioning and heating approved
by FPC for Florida gas utilities. Ask your local utility for owning and operating
cost study on gas vs. electric air conditioning before you buy. Units available
from 3-tons up. Recent big gas air conditioning installations in Florida: Univer-
sity of South Florida, Tampa; Robert Meyer hotel, Jacksonville; Univis factory,
Ft. Lauderdale; Spyraflo factory, Miami; Golden Beach City Hall.

Scare advertising by electric utilities proved UNFAIR and FALSE by latest
report of National Fire Protection Association. Most recent 12-months figures
show 122, 900 fires attributed to electricity with property losses of $193, 220, 000,
only 31, 600 attributed to gas with property losses of $28, 520, 000. Gas safety
record also far better than oil which caused 47, 800 fires and property losses of
$31, 870, 000. Frequency of fires per installation: Electric 1 in 480, Gas 1 in 2, 212.

Nation's educators, architects, engineers, builders watching test in Pinellas
County where cost and operating features of a NATURAL GAS AIR CONDITIONED
junior high school being compared with non-air conditioned junior high of same
size. One fact already proved: Air conditioned school costs no more to build than
non-air conditioned.

WHAT'S NEW ? Gas water heater that combines THREE CAPACITIES in one,
30-gallons, 40-gallons and 50-gallons. You dial for the production wanted. Small
family, set dial for 30-gallons; big family with clothes washer and dish washer,
set for 50-gallons. Heater automatically adjusts for peak efficiency at each setting.

Two new high schools opening at DeLand this month will use natural gas for
heating, water heating and cooking, also in laboratories of science departments.

The Florida Natural Gas Association took leading role in efforts that defeated
scheme to have 1961 Legislature double state utilities tax, from 1-1/2% to 3% of
customers bills. Increase would have been passed on directly to customer. Asso-
ciation argued that taxes on all utility consumers already too high, ranging from
11-1/2% to 21-1/2%. State wanted to build roads with increase it would have got.
Polk County legislators shoved local bill through closing hours of session author-
izing special tax on utility consumers to build hospital, but subject to referendum.
Big question FNGA couldn't get anybody to answer: "Why should gas consumers
pay for roads and hospitals that everybody, including non-gas utility consumers,
would use ?"

Meat packers bemoan fact they can't make something useful out of pig's squeal.
Gas industry has solved problem equally as challenging. Exhaust heat from gas
powered turbine and conventional engines now being used to make steam for heating,
water heating and absorption air cooling. Get the story and facts on this exciting
new development from your gas utility. Ask for brochure on Park Plaza Shopping
Center, Little Rock, Ark.

Florida hotels, motels, restaurants and office buildings installing natural gas
powered generating units to supply electricity when thunderstorms or hurricanes
knock out power lines. Cost is surprisingly low. Your gas utility will supply techni-
cal data.
Reproduction of any or all items on this page prohibited without written permission
from Florida Natural Gas Association, 206 E. New York Ave., DeLand, Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























Ornamental


Barandas


These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay we
import from Venezuela
They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama.
But they have the same
sort of slight color
variations and occasional
kiln markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished wall.


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DUNAN BRICK YARDS,

INCORPORATED

MIAMI, FLORIDA TU 7-1525


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Here's the anodized aluminum interlocking
architectural grille that represents a new
dimension in function and decorative beauty.
Neatness and patterns that will evoke the
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Window Ornamental Grilles Security Door
Entrance Ornamental Grilles Room Dividers
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Please write for complete details, brochures, and samples. C

SUPERIOR SOLAR SHADE CO. M.~"Ah.


--


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Phone TU 5-1521




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