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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 State board starts 12 injunctions,...
 Prestressed concrete units get...
 1961 office practice seminar
 1961 homes for better living...
 Parks - a new field for servic...
 News and notes
 Concrete hull for 24-ft sailbo...
 Urban renewal needs central design...
 Products and practice
 Fun poke at planners
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00085
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: July 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00085
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    State board starts 12 injunctions, grants 69 registrations
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Prestressed concrete units get U/L fireproof ratings
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    1961 office practice seminar
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    1961 homes for better living program
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Parks - a new field for service
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    News and notes
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Concrete hull for 24-ft sailboat
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Urban renewal needs central design idea
        Page 33
    Products and practice
        Page 34
    Fun poke at planners
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














* h
















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JULY, 1961


. a,







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


ne 7Ti Isu^e ---

State Board Starts 12 Injunctions, Grants 69 Registrations .

Prestressed Concrete Units Get U/L Fireproof Ratings ....

1961 Office Practice Seminar . . . .

Part I- "The Student and The Architect"
1961 Homes For Better Living Program . . .

Merit Award Merchant-built Category; Gene Leedy, AIA
Parks A New Field For Service . . .
By Kenneth Treister


Concrete Hull for 24-ft. Sailboat . .
By Peter Larkin

Urban Renewal Needs Central Design Idea .
By Edmund N. Bacon, AIA


. 31


. 33


Products and Practice . . .
New Joint Material for Masonry Construction


Advertisers' Index ........

Fun Poke at Planners .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L.
Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R.
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Jefferson N. Powell, Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


. 34

. 35

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 11

NUMBER 7 196I

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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JULY, 1961






State Board Starts 12 Injunctions;




Grants 69 Registrations


Judging from complaints received
by the State Board of Architecture,
violations of the state law governing
the practice of architecture are on
the increase. At its June meeting the
Board considered a particularly leng-
thy legal agenda. It met the situation
squarely by authorizing further in-
vestigation of many of the complaints.
And on the basis of evidence already
collected, the Board approved legal
actions to halt architectural practice
by unregistered individuals in twelve
cases.
Recently the Board's attorneys
completed proceedings against two
unregistered men that resulted in in-
junctions against continuation of
their activities in the architectural
field. One, entered in January of this
year, enjoined N. WARFIELD GRATZ,
who for some years has been doing
business as "N. Warfield Gratz Plan
Service" in Brevard County. The
other similarly enjoined MURRAY C.
GODDARD, of St. Petersburg, the final
decree of injunction being entered
by the Circuit Court of Pinellas
County in March.
In each case the Board was the
plaintiff. To those not familiar with
such matters, the wording of the
court's final decree of injunction
should prove interesting. It says, in
the concluding paragraph,
"Ordered, adjudged and decreed
that the Defendant should be,
and he hereby is, enjoined and re-
strained from offering to engage, or
from engaging in, the designing or
planning for the erection, alteration
or enlargement of buildings for others,
from offering to practice and from
practicing architecture, and from
holding himself out as an architect
without first being registered and
qualified to do so, or using any busi-
ness or professional names or desig-
nations which may lead the public to
believe he is engaged in the profession
of architecture, and such injunction
shall be permanent, perpetually so
restraining and enjoining the De-
fendant "
Once such a decree is entered by


the Circuit Court, the Board's dis-
ciplinary function ceases. Should the
individuals against whom such in-
junctions have been entered continue
the practices from which they have
been enjoined, they are then in con-
tempt of court and disciplinary
action to force their compliance with
the court's order is then up to the
court, not the State Board of Archi-
tecture.
Thus far the Board has never lost
a case against an individual who has
been practicing architecture without
having first been registered to do so.
Legal proceedings are, of course, a
last resort of the Board. In every case
the activities of the individual have
been investigated and evidence of
their illegal character has been as-
sembled. In the vast majority of cases
the individual has been warned that
he has been operating contrary to the
state law; and it is only when such
warnings are disregarded that the
Board feels impelled to take legal
action to force compliance with the
statutes.

68 New Registrations
Granted .
As another result of its week-long
June meeting, the Board issued reg-
istration to 69 individuals. Of these
34 were granted on the basis of pass-
ing the Junior examination; another
34 were granted on the basis of the
registrants having had registration to
practice in other states. One certifi-
cate was issued on the basis of re-
reinstatement of JOSEPH UNGER, of Ft.
Lauderdale. This brings the total of
new registrations granted this year to
130. The following successfully passed
the written examinations:
Coral Gables-CHARLES J. COT-
TERMAN.
Delray Beach-DUANE VAN JOHN-
SON.
Fort Lauderdale OTTO GROVE
JR., JAMES E. GUI, E. N. POWELL.
Fort Myers-FOUNT T. SMOTHERS,
JR.
Gainesville-DONALD C. PECK.


Goldenrod-JEFFE G. HOXIE.
Jacksonville-PETER J. FRITSCH,
JR., ROBERT C. GOODWIN.
Lakeland-J. BRUCE SPENCER.
Lake Worth- JOHN E. DUGGER,
RALPH S. MOE, JR.
Miami DOUGLAS G. JACKSON,
CHARLES K. LONSDALE,. CLAUDE H.
MADDOX, JR.
Miami Beach-J. MARCUS PINSKER,
MARVIN I. SCHWARTZ.
Naples-WALTER L. KELLER.
Orlando-JOHN E. DYE, FRANK
T. SHEEHY.
Palm Beach-GEORGE S. STEELE.
(Continued on Page 27)

." .' j" ,. ..*: ,. /,:


Reeder Appointed

To State Board


EDWIN T. REEDER, FAIA


EDWIN T. REEDER, FAIA, of
Miami, was named by Governor Far-
ris Bryant to the State Board of
Architecture to fill the vacancy cre-
ated by the resignation of ROBERT
LAW WEED, FAIA. The new appointee
received his commission in time to
attend the June meeting of the Board
in Ft. Lauderdale.
The resignation of Mr. Weed, be-
cause of ill health, had been tendered
to the Board at its January meeting,
but Mr. Weed indicated his willing-
ness and desire to continue his Board
activities until a new appointment
could be made to fill the vacancy.
Mr. Reeder's appointment was made
to cover the unexpired portion of Mr.
Weed's term and will expire in June,
1963. Both men are members of the
Florida South Chapter.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













































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But there is more than enduring surface beauty in these panels.
During the same plant process, each panel was given a "sandwich fill-
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White quartz MO-SAI sunshade grilles
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Today the fire resistance of all
building materials is being studied
more closely than ever before in his-
tory. Old and new materials and
construction methods are being sub-
jected to severe fire tests at an ever-
increasing rate. One of the newer
construction methods prestressed
concrete-appears to be under closest
scrutiny by architects, engineers,
building officials and insurance com-
panies.
According to A. H. GUSTAFERRO,
Construction Engineer of the Port-
land Cement Association, Chicago,
there have been more than 40 stan-
dard fire tests conducted in the
United States on prestressed concrete
building components. Gustaferro,
who spoke recently before the South
Florida section of the American Soci-
ety of Civil Engineers in Fort Laud-
erdale, stated that test data now


available shows prestressed concrete
can be designed to provide any degree
of fire resistance.
Fire resistance of prestressed con-
crete, according to Gustaferro, is af-
fected principally by three factors:
(1) concrete cover over the prestress-
ing steel, (2) size of the member,
and (3) degree of restraint. Tests
conducted at the new fire research
laboratories of the Portland Cement
Association in Skokie, Illinois, indi-
cate that fire endurance for pre-
stressed concrete may be improved
by increasing the cover, or by pro-
viding some degree of restraint in the
construction. The amount of re-
straint required appears to be very
small, Gustaferro told the local engi-
neers. He added that fire tests on
duplicate specimens of prestressed
concrete building members have
given almost identical results, indi-


eating that performance is predict-
able.
Underwriters' Laboratories at
Northbrook, Illinois, have conducted
a number of fire tests on prestressed
concrete slabs as well as on joist-type
members. UL provides. 2-hour fire
resistance label service. for most
double tees and channel sections pro-
duced in this country. Since most
double tee units are relatively small,
they represent the most vulnerable
type of member from a fire resistance
standpoint. Higher ratings are avail-
able for larger members. The basis
for label service is a series of tests
conducted by UL on double tee
members which was sponsored by the
Prestressed Concrete Institute.
Thus far, six tests have been suc-
cessfully conducted on flat, hollow-
core sections at Underwriters' Labora-
tories. All of these have qualified for
at least 2-hour label service. None of
them failed structurally when sub-
jected to the severe treatment of
ASTM standard fire test. A task
committee of the Illinois Section of
the American Society of Civil Engi-
neers recommended tentative fire re-
(Continued on Page 38)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




























































JOB: Exceptional Child Center, Fort Lauderdale
ARCHITECT: John Evans, A.I.A.,
Fort Lauderdale
ENGINEER:
D. E. Britt & Associates,
Fort Lauderdale
CONTRACTOR: Tooker-Heath Construction Co.,
Fort Lauderdale
OWNER: Broward County Board of
Public Instruction


The Exceptional Child Center, Ft. Lauderdale, offers several interest-
ing examples of HOUDAILLE-SPAN advantages. The architect wanted
a building material with these properties: 1) A finished underside
requiring only painting. 2) Insulation value to keep an outdoor class-
room comfortable. 3) Long span to eliminate columns in class-room
area. 4) Design flexibility to encourage imaginative applications.
HOUDAILLE-SPAN, an extruded, precast, prestressed concrete roof
and floor plank was specified on the basis of these requirements.
Its practical 40" width enabled the architect to develop a pleasing
roof design in which alternate planks are set-back in a staggered
line. This effect could not have been achieved practically or eco-
nomically with the usual narrow width planks or poured-in-place
construction. The 30' long slabs provide a clear, unobstructed out-
door class-room area between the two building wings. And the
smooth, 8" deep, hollow core units will be alternately painted in
different colors to provide a cool, colorful ceiling.
HOUDAILLE-SPAN might very well be the practical solution to your
next building project. One of our representatives will be pleased
to supply you with the details. Call today for his assistance.


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JULY, 1961 7

















































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COPYRIGHT 1961 BY BLUMCI







The 1961 Office Practice Seminar...






Part 1 -The Student ""- W' "


and The Architect

Mr. Duncan The purpose of this
Seminar Session is to present the rela-
tionship between the Student and the
Architect from various points of view
- that of the practicing architect, the
student and the educator with the
idea of bettering a mutual understand-
ing through constructive comment.
First, we have someone to represent
the position of the architect T.
TRIP RUSSELL, a 1934 graduate of
Pennsylvania with a BS in architect-
ure; and an MA in 1935. He has
been practicing his profession in Mi-
ami for 25 years.

Mr. Russell Fellow students! I
am considered as an architect; but I
still resent having my undergraduate
years even at age 51 so abruptly
brought to a close. I am still a student
of architecture.
A little over a month ago in Phila-
delphia, the AIA presented to a frail
old man *the Institute's Medal of
Honor. I have known him for some
time; and in his company I have had
some but all too few of the
most rewarding hours of my adult life.
His name is LE CORBUSIER; and his
short, witty, urbane response in
French was brutally mutilated in
translation. In the English version he
said, "I have a confession to make.
I live in the skin of a student".
Though an awkward phrase, this was
the essence of his meaning. He still
considers himself a student and so
should every practicing architect.
Our interests in architectural schools
is not nostalgic. For me, particularly,
these interests are not now in the
U/P, my alma mater, but in schools
closer to my home here that, in my
opinion, are now part of my profes-
sional responsibility. Therefore I feel
a deep concern toward the students of
architecture.
As it now exists, the relationship
between the students of architecture
and the professional practitioners of
architecture is not satisfactory. Today,
JULY, 1961


The 1961 FAA Office Practice Sem-
inar was held June 10, 1961, at the
Hillsboro Hotel, Tampa. The first of
four seminar sessions two in the
morning and two in the afternoon -
started at 10:00 A.M. The subject


members of the profession do not par-
ticipate much in the process of archi-
tectural training. Some years ago, I
think, it was better particularly in
such active centers as Philadelphia,
Boston and New York. Then the cur-
riculum was better understood by the
architectural profession, largely be-
cause the profession had been a part
of it for so long a time.
Whatever may be said of the Beaux
Arts system and in the past 20
years many things have been said
about it the professional architect
knew what the student was supposed
to learn. Today he has less familiarity
with a curriculum- at least not in
the sense of having participated in it
during his undergraduate days. Yet he
feels a strong urgency to help.
We are all asked questions by stu-
dents. And one I find most baffling
is, "Why isn't there more participa-
tion by architects in a professional
training program?" And, in order to
answer, I must in turn ask a question:
"Who makes the opportunity for such
participation?"
Students say they have been told ar-
chitects are busy men whose time is
so valuable that it cannot be spared
to come to universities and participate
in a training program. I do not believe
that to be true. An architect's time
is valuable and he doesn't want to
waste it idling around a university
campus. He is not justified in spend-
ing it that way. But I know of no ar-
chitect who will not take the time -
and absorb the expense to work
with students, providing he feels he
has something to contribute.
The universities complain of a lack
of funds to pay visiting lecturers.


was, "The Student and The Archi-
tect". Chairman of this first session
was J. VANCE DUNCAN, AIA. Speakers
were, T. TRIP RUSSELL, AIA, RONNIE
GINN, DALE FREELOVE, and WALTER
RAYMOND, AIA.


Funds may not be available to pay
men whose principal income is de-
rived from lectures to students. But
no funds are necessary to pay for tal-
ented advisors, nor for experienced
and understanding comment on the
relationship between student and ar-
chitect and, in significant addition,
the practice of architecture.
The most alarming reason I have
heard for this lack of student-architect
contact is that the student has no
time. He is, apparently, bogged down
in a tight curriculum that is exhaust-
ing to the point that he can spare no
time to listen to a practicing archi-
tect who might take the trouble to
come to talk to him. If that is true, I
feel there is something wrong with
the curriculum. This is like a music
school wherein students .are so in-
volved in musical theory that they
have no time to sing--or akin to a
theological school where dogma is
made so important that students have
no time to learn to preach. I do not
believe any curriculum should be so
tight that it removes from the stu-
dent any possibility of contact with
the outside world.
However, there is a suspicion lurk-
ing in the minds of many practicing
architects that there may be another
reason. They suspect that ideas from
the "outside" are disruptive to the
curriculum that students are con-
fused enough as it is without confus-
ing them more with what might seem
diversities. I think this has hurt all
concerned though I should like to
hear the students' viewpoint on that.
I believe that bad effects in life re-
sult from lack of contact between stu-
(Continued on Page 10)


~i~ga~d~





Office Practice Seminar...
(Continued from Page 9)
dents and practicing architects. Many
architects have much to contribute -
and many are merely waiting to be
asked. But there exists a notable lack
of communication between the uni-
versities and the profession. The only
possible channel of communication is
through the university faculties. The
student does not know enough about
architectural practice to say to an ar-
chitect "Will you give us your views
on such-and-such a thing?" And the
architect, if not bashful, is certainly
not presumptuous. He has to be asked
and there, I think, is the funda-
mental difficulty.
Contact between students and pro-
fessional architects can bring both
material and esthetic advantages to
students. Together, the profession and
the students can develop a heart-
warming and stimulating relationship
that will be extremely valuable to
both.

Mr. Duncan Thank you. For the
student's point of view I present a
young man from Jacksonville Mr.
RONNIE GINN. He is a 1960 BS in
Architecture graduate of the Univer-
sity of Florida and was recently grad-
uated with a Bachelor degree in land-
scape architecture. He has had con-
siderable office experience and is to
extend this experience this summer
with a trip to Europe.

Mr. Ronnie Ginn -If the Hon. Mr.
Russell thinks of himself as a student,
then I am very much confused about
my position in this field of endeavor.
There is the story of a boy who, when
very young, was approached by a
Fairy Godmother. "Johnny," she said,
"Something you need will happen to
you in your lifetime-something com-
pletely different from anything that
has ever happened to anyone else."
All through his life Johnny searched
and waited for the something that
was to happen to him. Finally, on his
deathbed, he suddenly discovered
what it was. It was nothing--abso-
lutely nothing!
This parallels a basic architectural
education from the student's stand-
point. When he enters college he has
a seed planted in his mind- an in-
terest in architecture. But he is con-
fused and belittled by his new en-
vironment and by all the "outside"
10


courses, such as history and political
science, that he takes along with his
basic courses during his freshman and
sophomore years.
As one result he develops a mental
scrapbook of cliches. During these
two years he tries to put them on ev-
ery piece of paper and into every proj-
ect. He does this because he is search-
ing for something he doesn't un-
derstand exactly what. Then he ad-
vances to the junior and senior level
and all his courses history, archi-
tectural history, structures, and the
rest are brought together in one
fell swoop. He begins to realize there
is more than just a design purpose in
architecture. So he goes through this
process, he eliminates his scrapbook
of cliches, one by one; and by the
time of graduation he finds he has
nothing but a sheepskin. Like John-
ny, he has found nothing in the
years.
The basic problem seems to lie in
the fact that a clear and unclouded
system of discipline is lacking. The
cliches become a major part of the
student's thinking and they have a
tendency to pull him away from what
he is really searching for. From the
student's level this is quite possible.
As I have said, he is confused anyway.
Then he gets a confused picture of an
architecture that doesn't really exist.
So he lives in a dream world, so to
speak; and he fancies it in a way that
you and I know could not possibly
exist.
Collegiate education requires only
a few years of a total professional ca-
reer. But the basic habits of study
and development are formulated dur-
ing those years. Therefore, it seems to
me necessary that the process of ar-
chitectural education be geared to the
students' creative abilities through
discipline and an organization of
thought progress. These creative abil-
ities cannot best be served through
dependence on an unprincipled and
haphazard educational system.

Mr. Duncan Thank you Ronnie.
Also from the student's point of view
we have a 1960 BS in Architecture
graduate of Cornell. He is from Mi-
ami, has had considerable office ex-
perience and is presently connected
with the office of Starnes and Rent-
scher. I present Mr. DALE FREELOVE.

Mr. Freelove Architectural train-
ing, I think, is complex in nature. It


can be divided into three stages; first,
college education; second, post-grad-
uate work- that is getting practical
office experience after school and
prior to registration; and third, of
course, is registration becoming an
architect.
It's with the second, stage that I
am mainly concerned this morning.
A student getting out of school faces
many, many problems; and I have
faced some of them very recently.
I think the first problem a student
faces and I still feel as if I am a
student after leaving school is get-
ting a job. Toward the end of the
spring semester he naturally starts
thinking about this. And I think this
is pretty much a "do-it-yourself" pro-
gram particularly from the standpoint
of the architectural student.
At other colleges and departments
of universities recruiters from various
companies are sent to the campus to
interview students and offer them
jobs with concrete training programs.
Some of these training programs may
last from six months to two years.
This is not so in architecture. So it's
up to the student to get the job
himself.
During the past year I've visited
many offices. In one of the first,
my reception was hardly very warm.
When I asked to see Mr. So-and-so,
the receptionist looked up from her
work and said "Well, do you have
your stuff with you?" I said I had a
few slides and a brochure and would
like very much to have a few minutes
with the architect. So she called on
the phone back to the inner sanctum.
I was allowed to go in to see him
and she said, "All right, Mr. So-andso-
will see you. Take your stuff into
him."
I've been in some offices two or
three times and haven't been allowed
to see the architect or anybody in the
office though sometimes I've been
sure that someone was there. Con-
trast this with some other offices
I've visited. Last winter I spent a
few days in Porto Rico and visited
three offices there. The reception
was very warm. In one I spent an
afternoon talking and exchanging
ideas with the firm's two partners.
I showed them work I had done;
they showed me what they were do-
ing, took me though their office and
invited me back the following day to
go through two high-rise apartment
buildings after which we looked at
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





some other architects' work.
In visiting offices I have found
that those doing really good work do
take an interest in the student and
are willing to take their time and
talk. In other words they are not
too involved in their own little world.
Coming back from Porto Rico I
was fortunate to get employment in
a small office in Miami an office
that is doing some very good work.
In an office a student realizes the
difference from the scholastic environ-
ment he has been used to. It's not
academic. It's practical and naturally
has to be that way. So he can solve
one of his main problems seeing
how his design is carried through to
its final stage into the reality of the
completed building. The small office
is a fine place to observe how this is
done and the practical experience it
offers is very important.
I feel that the college education
is not the end to professional educa-
tion; rather it is only the beginning.
I feel much can be done for the
relationship between student and ar-
chitect through more meetings like
this this is wonderful for me, the
first one I've attended. And I think
much can be accomplished through
a greater exchange of ideas between
the student and the architect.


Mr. Duncan Thank you Dale.
To round out this program we have
the educator's point of view presented
by a BA graduate of Columbia in
1928. He has had 24 years of prac-
tical experience in his own office and
has been teaching since 1956. Hie is
now Professor of Architecture at the
University of Florida Mr. WALTER
RAYMOND.

Mr. Raymond The purpose of
architectural education as I see it is
two-fold, particularly in an architec-
tural school. One is the fundamental
purpose of education which is to make
a man alert to learn things and to
do thinking. And the second one,
as a professional school, is to be aware
not only of the needs of the profes-
sion, but the direction the profession
itself is taking.
What are characteristic changes:
how can we anticipate them? And
how can we train students so they
will fit in with changing needs and
demands of the profession itself?
\Vhen I started out, architecture
JULY, 1961


was still really a small body of the
community but certainly not as
small as in the 18th and 19th cen-
turies where there existed a very
homogeneous group with similar so-
cial, economic and intellectual pat-
terns. This group has gradually -
but recently with increasing speed -
changed so that architecture today is
serving all segments of society peo-
ple of all kinds, people of all differ-
ent social, economic, and intel-
lectual bases.
So it seems to us that the training
of the student must change to accom-
modate this new society that the pro-
fession of architecture serves. The
architect will always remain involved
with design; but design must now be
integrated with all the needs of the
profession. Its base must be broad-


ened to include not only the techni-
cal changes that we know about. We
must also understand the philosophy
of society itself. In many respects
this transcends just the study of ar-
chitecture unless we consider that
the nature of planning is really an
intelligent anticipation of human
needs. In this case we have to ser-
iously broaden our scope of training
so that the architect will be able to
appreciate some of the wide influ-
ences that bear on his work.
This brings up several points that,
frankly, we don't know anything
about. In this wide concept of plan-
ning there are so many areas that it
is questionable whether any man can
be really informed on all the subjects
that bear on building. We arc con-
(Continued on Page 16)


The four-session, all-day Office Practice Seminar, held
June 10, 1961, at the Hillsboro Hotel in Tampa, was the
third such gathering to be sponsored by the FAA's Office
Practice Committee. Seminar Chairman Earl M. Starnes,
working with FAA President Robert H. Levison, organized
the meeting into four sessions as follows:
10:00 AM....THE STUDENT AND THE ARCHITECT"
Chairman....J. Vance Duncan, AIA
Speakers.....T. Trip Russell, AIA
Ronnie Ginn
Dale Freelove
Walter Raymond, AIA
11:15 AM...."ARCHITECT-ENGINEER COORDINATION"
Chairman....Robert H. Maybin, AIA
Speakers.....Newton Ebaugh, PE
W. E. Bishop, PE
C. M. Spooner, Jr., PE
2:00 PM...."NEW AIA GENERAL CONDITIONS"
Chairman....Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., AIA
Speakers.....Bernard B. Rothschild, AIA
3:15 PM...."OMMISSIONS AND ERRORS"
Chairman....Earl M. Starnes, AIA
Speakers.....Victor A. Schinnerer,
Insurance Counselor
William E. Sherman
Attorney
This year, for the first time, proceedings of the seminar
were tape-recorded. A resolution was adopted by the FAA
Board of Directors at its June 9th meeting that "the per-
tinent portions" of these proceedings be published.
Accordingly, the first session of the Seminar is carried
in this issue. Material on others will follow....Most of the
talks were delivered on an extemporaneous basis, thus a
substantial re-writing from the transcript of the recording
has been necessary to avoid the repetitions and fragmented
sentences that invariably occur in the recording of such
deliveries. However, all tape-transcripts have been edited
with the care necessary to assure inclusion of all "the
pertinent portions" of each session.





mE.mmmm EmEEm mm


II
n


Saluting:
Architect: Weed-Johnson Associates
Engineers: H.J. Ross & Associates, Structural
R.L. Duffer & Associates, Mechanical
Weeks Engineering Co., Electrical


The Coppertone Corporation Office & Warehouse U




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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


UI
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UI

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I IN







1961 Homes For Better Living Program


MERIT AWARD-Merchant-built Category


GENE LEEDY, AIA,
Architect


McELROY BUILDERS, INC.
Builders


RAY DANIEL NURSERY,
Landscaping


This Winter Haven house won a
Merit Award in the Merchant-built
Home category Class C, sales price
over $25,000 of the AIA Homes
For Better Living Award Program for
1961. It was one of three houses de-
signed by Florida architects to win
honors in the nation-wide competi-
tion. Here is the architect's own
comment on his prize-winning de-
sign:
"This house makes no attempt to
revolutionize design or construction
methods. It was a joint effort by
the architect and builder to improve


the 'builder's house' by realistic meth-
ods. The collaborative goals were:
"1. ... To provide a house with as
much living space as possible under
realistic economic conditions, cater-
ing to a market of young professional
or business households with several
children.
2. To use simple materials,
simple construction methods and sim-
ple joinery so that the house could be
erected by a normal building crew
with a minimum of supervision.
"3. To utilize the lot as pri-
(Continued on Page 14)


JULY, 1961








vate living space architecturally re-
lated to the house.
"4. To provide a conservative
exterior to avoid consumer resistance
- 'It must look like a house.'
"5. To provide .a profit for
the builder at a sales price under
$35,000 to include land, pool, garden,
walls, and landscaping and air con-
ditioning.
"A two-story scheme was employ-
ed to reduce costs, provide more land
space for outdoor living, separate the
bedrooms from day living space, and
counteract the monotonous flatness
of the Florida landscape.
"The lower story is constructed of
concrete block, the upper is a simple
box frame overhanging the lower
floor. Identical roof trusses are used
for both house and carport roofs.
"This house was a pilot model for
later production. It received universal
public acceptance from both design
and cost standpoints. It was purchas-
ed by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hinds
of Winter Haven."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













































































JULY, 1961 15






Office Practice Seminar...
(Continued from Page 11)
cemed with the needs of the profes-
sion perhaps for specialization.
Perhaps options should be offered for
particular training in the final year
of the curriculum.
We have to consider whether the
profession is entering an era in which
offices will be tremendously expand-
ed with experts in the various
fields which have to be recognized so
architectural planning can be prop-
erly developed. Or, is architecture to
waive its leadership in the building
field and allow other sorts of specially
equipped organizations to provide this
type of expanded service?
These are the things we have to
consider. And, perhaps, we may have
to change our approach to the study
of architecture.
Finally, I bring to your attention
the recognition of the profession. In
some respects we suffer from a lack
of it or at least a lack of under-
standing. Unquestionably the build-
ing industry is one of the largest in
the country. Certainly it is here in
Florida. The possibility that archi-
tecture or architectural education may
be aided by our state legislature is
questionable. We may get schools
that will implement facilities in order
to provide this education. But this is
not so important in view of the ex-
panding scope of architectural edu-
cation or in view of the fact that
the state legislature has not seen fit
to let us implement any sort of a
planning program to provide students
with an idea of the expanding nature
of the architectural profession.

Mr. Duncan -Thank you, Mr.
Raymond. Do we have questions
from the floor?


In the general discussion that fol-
lowed, not all contributions were in
the form of questions nor germane to
the subject of the Seminar session.
Those included here were culled from
a great deal of recorded conversation
and have been briefed in question
form for clarity in publication.-Ed.


Q-Could some system be worked
out whereby the AIA could function
as a recruiting body for the architec-
tural profession?


A (By Mr. Russell)-I'm not cer-
tain this is what we need when our
teaching facilities are already strained
to the utmost. Unfortunately, the ar-
chitectural school planned for Gaines-
ville is not going to be built imme-
diately; and there is little point in
recruiting students when we cannot
handle adequately the ones we already
have. Many very talented boys are
graduating from high schools as I
am aware because of the high quality
products of the Dade County voca-
tional schools. They could be re-
cruited. But first, I think, we have to
find out how we are to handle them.

Q-Is there any way to evaluate
the potential worth of students who
apply for summer jobs any stand-
ard of education or training that can
be used?

A (By Mr. Raymond)-When does
a man learn to think in school? They
come with a lot of miscellaneous
ideas, but without ability to make
valid judgments on what they think
or see. When they come to the point
of trying to discover what architecture
is by the process of thinking for them-
selves, students can become of some
use to you. Some men reach this
point early, others not even when
they graduate. When this will take
place, I cannot tell you. If you were
to ask us, we could, perhaps, give you
our own evaluation of a student's
development.

Q-I've never known a beautiful
environment to produce a good stu-
dent without a good faculty be-
cause a university is no better than
its faculty. What can be done to
solve the problems you have along
these lines?

A (By Mr. Raymond)-We do
have difficulties in Florida because
the architectural school has a lower
budget than almost any other school
on the campus. This is partly what
I meant in speaking of the public's
lack of understanding relative to our
profession.
We do want new men on our
faculty. We have had representatives
from various sections of the country
-but not as many as might be ex-
pected because of our budgetary con-
ditions. It's going to be even more
difficult to get any good men to sup-
plement our faculty when the school


is no longer accredited. We need a
new building to continue our accredi-
tation and it looks now as if we are
not going to get it.

Q- Would not the program sug-
gested by Mr. Russell help this situ-
ation? I believe this program could
be worked out and that architects
would be willing to participate.
Would it not also help improve stu-
dent-architect relationships by letting
students get to know their potential
future employers before they graduate
and face the problems of getting jobs?

A (By Mr. Raymond) I, for one,
would certainly welcome this. I don't
see how any professional school can
exist without the wholehearted coop-
eration and support of the profession.
Don't misunderstand my comment
about getting new men. There's
always change in a faculty. The
younger men are presented opportu-
nities elsewhere to their benefit. So,
in the replacement of this rotating
group lies our opportunity to bring
in new men with various types of
experience from different sections of
the country. It's not a question of
replacement from the standpoint of
the removal of faculty members. This
is a matter of filling vacancies in the
faculty a problem of how best to
obtain the skills and abilities we need
within the limitations of our operating
budget.

Q Insofar as you know, is the
loss of accreditation relative to the
construction of the school's new build-
ing a threat, or a promise, or a
weapon?

A (By Mr. Raymond) -I don't
think it is a weapon; it was a state-
ment made by the last accrediting
committee. To solve educational prob-
lems we do need facilities, such as
libraries, classrooms and the rest. This
means a building, of course; but the
building itself is also to me an im-
portant reflection of the public's atti-
tude toward architecture in this state.
I am worried about the matter of
accreditation insofar as it may influ-
ence faculty vacancies; and I am wor-
ried about the loss of accreditation
because it is the result of a policy at
the state legislative level which di-
rectly reflects a lack of public under-
standing and recognition of the values
of the architectural science.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















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JULY, 1961 21







Parks-A New Field For Service...


The architect's participation in park development is not
entirely new. Seasoned practitioners who can hark back
to their Beaux Arts college days will recall the innum-
erable sketch problems dealing with "park shelters",
"garden houses" and "orangeries". What makes pro-
fessional news of this author's approach to park
development is his concept of a park as a tool for com-
munity improvement. He is not primarily concerned
with any single element of park planning, but with the
total design of an area which, by providing well inte-
- grated recreational facilities, nay act as a social counter-
balance to the tensions and pressures of life in a crowded
city .. As such his thesis sketches a new opportunity
for community service as well as professional activity .


By KENNETH TREISTER
(Sketches by the author)


.,,d#'79".'** ____ -.' '***l*****"'.~


1 A NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
Man has a continuing inborn desire for a natural
environment and to fulfill that desire, properly
designed gardens and parks should become an inte-
gral part of his individual as well as his social
environment. This green landscape should be the
nucleus of our community lives, the oasis within
our modern society that permits us to enjoy the
serenity and beauty of nature. Unfortunately,,
gardens and parks are few, and well designed recre-
ational facilities all too scarce.


2 MAN'S INBORN NEED

Though modern society has made us into busy
machines, there is still an intrinsic magnetic pull to
man's first love, nature, for man's roots are in the
earth. Though we live in concrete, walk on asphalt,
and ride in steel, we all long for the untouched
natural landscape of the earth. In our urban jungle
we call the city, this need for a natural environment
can only be met in large spacious green areas inter-
woven within the fibers of our communities.


22 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






_- L LJ---L L

F 3 PARKS A PRACTICAL
NECESSITY


-sr
.'1.. ...









. .t '


~I Ir


JULY, 1961 23


Unfortunately, a city laid out on a gridiron of
asphalt streets, crowded houses with neatly mani-
cured lawns and an occasional captive planting
circle, does not afford children the facilities in
which to dream, explore, create, run, sing, and be
happy. It wasn't too long ago when the young
of our country played in the woods, wandered along
the stream, fished in the river, and enjoyed the
natural beauty of the countryside.






4 MILES OF WHITE TILE ROOFS
Since our society has chosen to turn our landscape
into miles of white tile roofs, and with long rows
of houses naked to the street, and all toeing the
set back line, it is that same society's responsibility
to provide well planned recreational facilities on the
limited land left for that purpose.







5 WELL DESIGNED PARKS -
A NEGLECTED ART
Proper planning and good design of recreational
facilities is a badly neglected art and offers a chal-
lenging opportunity to all professional designers.
Though most communities have some significant
parks, there is always a total lack of competent
design. The parks lack the aesthetically pleasing
and imaginatively exciting areas that should be
the soul of a park. Many of our municipalities
boast of such things as landscaped mauls, parkways,
and grandiose entrance gates, but provide only
meager recreational facilities for their citizens. An
open lot covered with grass, sand, and containing
some swings, is called a park.




(Continued on Page 24)












6 AN OPPORTUNITY FOR

IMAGINATIVE DESIGN

SDesign for leisure time activities can afford the
architect complete freedom in his playful use of
his creative talents. He may not be hampered by
the many functional and structural necessities that
are found in normal construction. He should be free
to design with light and carefree exuberance. The
park is a place to have fun; fun for the designer
as well as the small boys on Sunday sailing their
toy sailboats on a miniature lake.









S7 CREATIVE LEADERSHIP

0 a0 NEEDED

The architect has a wonderful opportunity to march
headlong into this area of recreation which for so
long has needed creative leadership. Every munici-
pality has areas designated for park use, but they
lay barren with neglect. The need is to turn these
barren lots into busy, exciting, fun-loving parks,
giving the children as well as the adults the space
and imaginative tools that they so badly need.
Play is an important factor in the development of
a mature man, both exercising the body and the
mind. Unfortunately, the children of a community
do not represent a large pressure group demand-
ing their rights. The architects should recognize
this need and step forward to fill this void.


An examination of three parks I've
recently designed will serve as ex-
amples of the varying types of design
possibilities, each solving different
community and neighborhood prob-
lems. Due to their limited size, these
parks only fill the most practical needs
of the community. Ideally, large areas
of land should be dedicated to natural
green landscape in the style of Cen-
tral Park, with small sections allo-
cated for practical uses.


Park No. 1


: Medium Size
Children's Park


The first park, located in Coral
Gables, was nothing but a developer's
legacy to the city, covered in grass
and pine needles and completely un-
used. It was only a name on the city's
map.
It was felt that this was a small
neighborhood park and did not have
sufficient space for anything more


than the consideration of the neigh-
borhood youth. The park was divided
into three primary areas; (1) the top-
most for the infant play, (farthest re-
moved from a busy road); (2) a cen-
ter section for older children's playing
field; and (3) the front section dedi-
cated to adults' supervision as well as
the general beautification of the park.
A continuous perforated brick wall
along the heavy traffic street was
used to protect the children and also
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to define the area of the park. This
wall was moulded and bent to form a
children's playhouse on one side and
on the other an enclosed sunken thea-
ter (for story telling or neighborhood
meetings). Entering through two of
the sculptured brick walls, one comes
into the main axis of the park, a
broad, paved, landscaped walkway
lined with benches allowing the
adults to enjoy the shade of the trees
and also providing a good view of
their children at play.
The playfield, designed for their
more active running games, is de-
fined by a continuous concrete ring,
sloping and turning to form a skat-
ing and bicycle path. By bringing
some walks through the center of this
area, a constant variety of directional
paths is afforded.

Park No. 2: A Total
Community Park
The second park was designed for
a crowded slum area and represents a
different scope and problem than that
of the first design discussed.
The entire community of this sub-
standard housing district had practi-
cally no recreational facilities. The
park, therefore, had to be designed not
only for children, but the teenagers,
adult population, and the elder citi-
zens. To them these recreational fa-
cilities are not a luxury but a neces-
sity, for their homes and their com-
munity are void of such facilities.
This park was divided into five pri-
mary areas: (1) The small children's
area located in the upper right hand
corer away from the main traffic
street. (2) The elder citizens' park ad-
joining the children area. This prox-
imity was due to the tradition that
the elder citizens have of watching
the little children while their parents
are at work and their natural affinity
towards small children. The older cti-
izens, therefore, act as a buffer be-
tween the children and the rest of
the park. (3) The "Community
House", the focal point of the park,
is a large court in the tradition of all
community plazas, defined by a con-
tinuous "L" shaped pavilion. (This
pavilion contains the central main
recreation building and on either side
the teenage and the elder citizens'
buildings.) (4) The teenagers' section
is isolated by itself in the lower left
hand corner of the park so as to give
the teenagers the privacy and identity
JULY, 1961


that they seek. It contains a dance
area for after-school dances as well
as a hobby and game pavilion. (5)
A large playfield on the upper portion
of land is delegated for older children's
use where the need is for large run-
ning room and fields for football, soc-
cer, hockey, etc.
So this becomes a second type of
park, a community park, where in one
section the shouts of young children
playing games will mingle with the
laughter of elder citizens playing shuf-
fleboard, horseshoes or checkers. The
music of the teenage jukebox at an


"after-school dance" will blend with
the shouts of a soccer game on the
athletic field. Simultaneously a
meeting or class in art may be under
way in the main adult community
house. This total park for family activ-
ities includes picnic areas and land-
scaped walks for just enjoying the
beauty of subtropical Florida. This
type of community park in an area
where only substandard buildings and
slums usually fill the lives of its citi-
zens is not only an architectural but a
moral necessity of our society.
(Continued on Page 27)













2


.--


31I TI


Park No. 1 ..


X Ttl C "...
Ir, --T---. ..---

Park No. 2 ..
Park No. 2.





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Parks...
(Continued from Page 25)
Park No. 3
A third type of park is a small
park designed for another below par
slum area. This was unique in that
it was a tiny 35 foot by 100 foot
lot and again where there was abso-
lutely no recreational community
facilities. The City had recently in-
stalled three pieces of catalog equip-
ment which line one side of this park
and are now vibrating continuously
by the use of hundreds of children.
This design, by necessity, had to be
simple. Protection for the children
from the adjoining street was given
by the use of a continuous wall run-
ning down the 100 foot street side
and returning into a graceful curve
across the lower 35 foot side, ending
in a circular pad and drinking foun-
tain.
The base circle would have a con-
crete bench forming a story telling
area. The space where the equipment
is would be covered in sawdust and
the remaining in green asphalt. The
asphalt would be painted bright colors
in the various lines of games such as
hop-scotch, marbles, shuffleboard, etc.
This not only designates-the gamearea,


but creates an aesthetically pleasing
abstract pattern on the asphalt. This
is an example of a small park that
could provide a local neighborhood
much needed children recreation.


Conclusion
In summary, the essential fact is
that we need a strong effort on the
part of our enlightened citizenry to
provide a comprehensive system of
parks for all our communal needs. Not
just sand lots, but well designed parks
where art and nature are married,
where sculpture is as important as
swings, where color, shape, and space
are esesntial ingredients, and where
man's intrinsic needs for a natural
environment are met.
A park should be a garden; a garden
that can, if well designed, be the nu-
cleus of the community, the focal
point of its cultural, spiritual, and
social needs. It could provide a rest-
ful green expanse within our com-
munities that provides the meeting
and recreational facilities that our
facilities, both individually and col-
lectively, can thrive on. Our neigh-
borhood would again have a town
square,a "market place," a heart. The
challenge is there.


State Board...
(Continued from Page4)
Pensacola-WILLIAM R. BEAN.
Pompano Beach JOSEPH C.
BORIS, ARTHUR N. HOSING III,
CHARLES E. KEILER, JR.
Sarasota-JAMES C. ABBOTT, JR.
Tampa HERBERT L. LAWTON,
THOMAS C. MARTINO, DONALD E.
MCINTOSH, H. DEAN ROWE, H.
LESLIE SIMMONS, JAMES B. SULLIVAN.
West Hollywood--JAMES M.
MERRIFIELD.
The following were registered to
practice in Florida from other states:
ALBERT E. ALEXANDER, San Fran-
cisco, Calif., FRED E. BETZ, Cincin-
nati, Ohio, MARTIN F. BLUMBERG,
Pleasantville, N.J., RICHARD M. BRAY-
TON, New York, N.Y., MAURICE J.
CARROLL, St. Louis, Mo., IRVING W.
COLBURN, Chicago, Ill., JOSEPH T.
DAVERMAN, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
ROBERT C. DEAN, Boston, Mass.,
GEORGE F. DIEHL, Detroit, Mich.,
ROBERT B. GREENBAUM, Chicago,
JULY, 1961


Ill., ALBERT J. GRAESSER, Hunting-
ton, N. Y., WILLIAM C. GROBE, Bell-
aire, Texas, WILLIAM D. GUMERSON,
Oklahoma City, Okla., G. HAROLD
W. HAAG, Ivyland, Pa., ROBERT J.
JINRIGHT, Thomasville, Ga., W. FON-
TAINE JONES, New York, N. Y.,
HENRY KLUMB, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, JOHN H. MACFADYEN, New
York, N. Y., ANDREW J. MANGIONE,
Atlanta, Ga., SAMUEL Z. MOSKOWITZ,
Wilkes Barre, Pa., WILBUR A. MUL-
LIN, Lombard, Ill., GEORGE W.
NEFF, Philadelphia, Pa., SHERMAN R.
PATTERSON, Sewickley, Pa., CHARLES
J. PEPINE, Pittsburg, Pa., OTTO F.
SEELER, South Bend, Ind., JAMES B.
SHANE, Big Rapids, Mich., L. MILES
SHEFFER, Atlanta, Ga., EDWARD K.
SHEPPARD, Charlotte, N. C., PAT
YATES SPILLMAN, Dallas, Texas,
MICHAEL F. SOFRANKO, Hobart, Ind.,
JACK A. THALHEIMER, Philadelphia,
Pa., GEORGE A. THOMASON, Mem-
phis, Tenn., MAX O. URBAHN, New
York, N. Y., ROBERT C. WAKELY,
St. Clair Shores, Mich.


In January of this year 49 appli-
cants were registered after successfully
passing the written examination, as
against 34 in the past month. How-

ever, the number of registrations
granted either by exemption or on the
basis of an NCARB certificate rose
sharply in June as against January. In
January only 13 registrations in these
classifications were granted. In 1960
a total of 93 such registrations were
granted and 79 on the basis of the
written examination.

Board Moves Its Offices ...
The official office of the Board
is that of its Secretary-Treasurer. Ef-
fective early this month the Board
will have a new office at 106 Oakland
Building at 2631 Oakland Park Beach
Boulevard, in the Oakland Park sec-
tion of Fort Lauderdale. All corres-
pondence should be addressed to
MORTON T. IRONMONGERA AIA, Sec-
retary-Treasurer, at this new address.
The office was formerly at 235 S.E.
13th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale.


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ANY







News & Notes


Convention Committee
Announces Speakers
Program Chairman FREDERICK W.
KESSLER has announced that three
speakers have already accepted pro-
gram assignments for the 1961 FAA
Convention to be held at Boca Raton
November 9, 10 and 11. He is now
negotiating with two more and ex-
pects to make another definite
announcement relative to them in the
very near future.
Those who have already become
part of the program that will de-
velop the Convention's theme-
"Structural Arts and Architecture" -
are ALONZO J. HARRIMAN, FAIA, of
Auburn, Maine, THOMAS H. CREIGH-
TON, FAIA, New York, and MRS.
THOMAS H. CREIGHTON. No specific
subjects for their individual contri-
butions have yet been released. The
Committee is developing the Conven-
tion program in coordination with
other phases of Convention activity
and expects to release time schedules
and subject matter of seminars and
panel discussions soon.
Alonzo J. Harriman took his first
degree in engineering from the Uni-
versity of Maine with the intention
of becoming a ship builder. But work
in the architectural office of his uncle
turned his interest to architecture;
and he graduated from the Harvard
School of Architecture with a master's
degree. For ten years he was a partner
in the firm of Coombs and Harriman
and now heads the firm of Alonzo J.
Harriman Associates, Inc. He has
been a director of the Institute from
the New England Region and a fre-
quent speaker before many regional
groups and Institute chapters.
Thomas H. Creighton is a familiar
figure to many Florida architects. A
graduate of both Harvard and the
Beaux Arts Institute of Design, he
has been editor of Progressive Archi-
tecture since 1946. He is an accom-
plished speaker and the author of
several books on residential architec-
ture.
Mrs. Creighton, before her marriage
in 1959, was GWEN Lux. Born in
Chicago and trained in various art
schools both here and abroad, she
is a talented and versatile artist who
has worked in collaboration with
many architects and has been the
JULY, 1961


The distaff side of architectural affairs figured prominently in last month's
meeting of the Florida South Chapter, when two charming ladies received
documents of their individual achievements. Left, Ruth E. Blower receives,
from Chapter President Herbert R. Savage, left, and Past-President Robert C.
Abele, a scroll of appreciation for her effective public relations activities on the
Chapter's behalf during the past two years. Right, President Savage welcomes
Claire D. Giller as a new AIA Corporate Member after her membership certi-
ficate had been presented to her in a brief but imprsseive ceremony by her
AIA-architect husband, Charles Giller.


recipient of many professional awards
and honors for the creative vitality of
her work.
Her studies included a term with
the Polish sculptor Ivan Mestrovic
and a three year term as a Guggen-
heim fellow. She has been accorded
several one-man shows of her varied
works.



LEGISLATIVE REPORT
POSTPONED
Plans had been made to include
the full and final report of the
FAA's Government Relations Com-
mittee in this issue of The Florida
Architect. Unfortunately, however,
this has proved impossible. Anthony
L Pullara, chairman of the com-
mittee, and driving force behind
FAA activities in Talahassee during
the legislative session, was taken
suddenly ill and at this writing is
still in a Tampa hospital The
planned Report will be published as
soon after his recovery as possible.



Where Are The Covers...?
First item in the News and Notes
section of the December, 1960, issue
of The Florida Architect reported the
proposal of the Publications Commit-
tee that Chapters hold informal design
competitions to make available a


series of member-designed covers for
the FAA's Official Journal. Informa-
tion relative to mechanical and pro-
cessing requirements were sent, in late
November, to all chapter presidents
by Clinton Gamble, chairman of the
Committee.
To date, only one unfortunately
unusable sketch has been received
by the editor. Several sketches were
received from U/F students. But
with the exceptions that have already
appeared in early 1961 issues, these
proved impractical within the frame-
work of the magazine's mechanical
requirements.
The program of specially designed
covers was started through the initia-
tive of the Jacksonville Chapter.
Without question, a rebirth of this
interest and initiative and its exten-
sion to all FAA chapters would be
welcomed not only by the magazine's
readership, but by all those concerned
in the publication's development and
production. All questions relating to
mechanical requirements and to tech-
nical limitations involved in the pro-
duction processes of the publication
will be fully answered if addressed to
the magazine's editor.
Few other regional AIA publica-
tions have developed the cover design
program that has characterized this
publication for the past two years.
Members' interest can assure its
continuation.
(Continued on Page S0)





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 29)
In The News...
B. ROBERT SWARTBURG, AIA, Mi-
ami Beach, has been named head of
a management team for the develop-
ment of a 3,800-acre community in
mid-Florida. He has assumed the
presidency of both the North Orlando
Company and the North Orlando
Utilities Company. The community
was established to provide homes for
employees of electronic plants that
are suppliers to the rocket and sat-
ellite center at Cape Canaveral. FHA
has given site approval for 3000 home-
sites and is now processing plot plans
for 3000 more.
IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, FAIA, has
been elected vice-president of Pre-
Engineered Homes, Inc., a new cor-
poration with offices in Deerfield
Beach. The firm will pre-fabricate a
shell house as well as completely
equipped residential units. These have
been designed for industrialized con-
struction in a plant at Pompano
Beach. The new Florida industry is
planning to manufacture 3000 units
during this year.


Early last month a group of some 45 leading South Florida home builders
heard six of the area's leading architects discuss "The New Look in Residential
Housing and Home Financing" at a conference-luncheon sponsored by E. Albert
Pallot, president of the Biscayne Federal Savings and Loan Association. Pictured
above are, left to right, Mr. Pallot, and five of the speakers, Russell T. Pan-
coast, FAIA, Verner Johnson, AIA, Robert Fitch Smith, FAIA, Robert Law
Weed, FAIA a director of the lending institution and Robert M. Little,
FAIA. The sixth speaker was Edward G. Grafton, AIA. The conference was
called primarily to consider how talents of architects could be more widely
utilized by both builders and financial institutions "to produce a finer home
for the lower-priced buyer." Pallot said his institution hoped to establish a
group of consulting architects who would be available to work with builders in
improving the design of popular priced homes the cost of such service to be
borne by Biscayne Federal. Guests were unanimous in praise of his attitude;
and agreement was general that architect-builder cooperation could improve
home design.


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Concrete Hull for
24-foot Sailboat

By PETER LARKIN

Concrete ships were not unusual
during World War I when their con-
struction was undertaken to speed
output with a limited work force. We
know of two such ships, one in the
Bahamas off the shores of Bimini,
another at Cape May, New Jersey.
Both are watery memorials to an era
in shipbuilding that might have been.
New methods and new materials in
shipbuilding have relegated concrete
ships to a fond memory.
So it was with some surprise and
interest that we investigated a report
that three Broward Countains-two
architects and an engineer--were
hard at work designing and construct-
ing a concrete sail boat at a "do-it-
yourself" boat yard some seven miles
west of the ocean. GEORGE POLK,
AIA, LARRY BROWNING, architect, and
WALTER HARRY, a registered en-
gineer, all of Fort Lauderdale, are the
trio engaged in this fascinating proj-
ect. DAVE PEEBLES, also of Fort Laud-
erdale, is serving as Naval architect
and supervisor on the job.
According to Polk, spokesman for
the group, PIER LUIGI NERVI, out-
standing Italian engineer, discovered
"ferro-centento," a concrete in which
reinforcing steel comprises up to 30
per cent of the cross-sectional area
of the member. He designed a 38
foot yawl to be built of three-eighths
inch "ferro-cemento" concrete. This
sail boat, completed in 1946, is still
in use in the Mediterranean Sea. In
fact, there is a large fleet of smaller
sailboats, all constructed of "ferro-
cemento" that are active there.
With this knowledge to guide
them, Polk, Browning, Harry and
Peebles went to work. They designed
and constructed a wood form for a
yawl the measurements of which are:
24 feet overall; seven foot six inch
beam and with a draft of three feet
ten inches, with a combination keel-
centerboard.
Two layers of one-half inch square
heavyweight galvanized Clinton Cloth
were laid over the outside of this
formwork, and an additional two lay-
ers were placed on the inside to reach
a desired thickness averaging one-half
inch. Multiple thicknesses were ap-
(Continued on Page S2)
JULY, 1961






Concrete Boat...
(Continued from Page 31)
plied at stress points.
After the craft's shape was obtained
with the wire cloth, the "ferro-ce-
mento" was applied. The mix con-
sisted of, roughly, one bag of cement
to one and one-quarter cu.-ft. of sand
No aggregate was used and the water
content was less than five gallons
to each bag of cement. The mix was
designed to produce 5,000 psi in 28
days. Concrete technicians at R. H.
Wright, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, de-
signed the mix and furnished the
concrete. Two men plastered the
entire hull with the mix, inside and
outside in six working hours, to build
up a thin shell of concrete ranging
from three eighths inch to three-
quarter inch in thickness. The outside
hull surface will be treated with a
waterprooofing compound.
The boat will also feature a precast
concrete centerboard trunk, a con-
crete keel and a precast concrete rud-
der. The decks will be of sandwich
type construction consisting of a two
inch styrofoam core with two layers


of wire mesh and "ferro-cemento"
concrete on each side of the core.
Interior bulkheads partitioning the
cabin will be cast in place.
According to Polk, a concrete boat
has many advantages over usual wood
construction. Obviously there will be
no rot. The boat will be resistant
to toredo worm attacks; and due to
the elimination of seams and to the
waterproof finish, should be dry at all
times. Basically, Polk adds, the boat
has every advantage inherent in fiber-
glass construction plus i n c r e a s e d


strength and lower cost.
While cost records have not been
kept on this particular boat, the
builders estimate that this type of
construction should reduce costs by
as much as 50 per cent over conven-
tional construction. They further state
that the technique lends itself easily
to mass production. Weight-wise the
boat is comparable to a medium dis-
placement type boat of the same size
constructed of wood. This 24-foot
craft has a displacement of just under
5,000 pounds.


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Left, wood frame outlining boat's shape was covered with galvanized wire
cloth; and after being sprayed with concrete, the shell was placed in a cradle,
right, so inside work and finishing could be completed.






Urban Renewal Needs
Central Design Idea
The summary comment of
Edmund N. Bacon, AIA, in
conjunction with his presen-
tation of "Redesigning
Downtown Philadelphia"
that was the high point of
the 1961 AIA Convention.
I have said that the challenge to
the architectural profession today is
to prove that it is capable of design-
ing an urban environment worth the
price it costs. I have said that, in
order to do this, its individual prac-
titioners will have to take a new
view of their separate efforts; the
profession as a whole will have to
take a new view of itself; and its
educational institutions must train
men who can think in terms of
broad design structure and who see
their role as dealing with total design
problems at the level of government.
Like it or not, due to circumstances
beyond its control, the architectural
profession has been propelled into a
central position in the formation of
our current society. If we fail our
profession now we will have failed
the society of which we are a part.
Without a central design idea as
an organizing force, the individual
efforts under urban renewal will lead
to chaos.
With s central design idea, the
creative energies of the individual
architects will be stimulated to new
heights, and the result will be truly
architecture.
Without great designers in a cen-
tral role, we cannot create great cities.


Prestressed Concrete...
(Continued from Page 6)
distance for prestressed concrete from
one to four hours. Their recommen-
dations are dependent upon concrete
cover over the prestressing steel, and
the size and shape of the member.
Fire tests conducted in this coun-
try have verified and extended data
obtained previously in Europe, wlicre
prestressed concrete has been used
since the 1930's said Gustaferro. Data
now available will allow building offi-
cials to grant conservative ratings to
most types of prestressed concicte
construction. Additional tests are
now being planned by the Prestressed
Concrete Institute to provide data
for more realistic ratings.
JULY, 1961


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everyday punishment with ease.


Tuflex is available in a variety of
handsome color patterns, all acous-
tically quiet and exceptionally dur-
able. This tough %" thick rubber tile
is available in 9" and 27" square
tiles. Easily installed over wood,
concrete or other dry sub-flooring,
Tuflex will remain new-looking
throughout many years of safe, com-
fortable service with minimum care.


For complete information contact your local distributor or write:
RUBBER PRODUCTS, INC. 4521 W. Crest Ave. Tampa 3, Florida


Prompt appraisals and
WASHINGTON .e --s,
W SHINGTON commitments without cost
or obligation.
Our MORTGAGE LOAN
F EDER L DEPARTMENT will be glad
S" SAVS 1 LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI I1ECH to arrange an appointment
1244 Washington Avenue to suit your convenience.
1701 Meridian Avenue 1133 Normandy Drive I jax D coMN ASThU H. COUXSHON
All Office: JEfferson 8-8452 ",.." o'.,-.u'...


Re-tcaffz










A. R.COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"




THE BEST

in

Architects' Supplies




Complete Reproduction
Service




433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.





ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Better Fuel Council of.
[Dde County .. 12
Bird & Son, Inc.. 1
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh .. 8
Chrysler Airtemp .26
A. R. Cogswell . 35
Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc. .. .. 3rd Cover
Florida Home Heating
Institute . 36
Florida Portland Cement Div. 21
Florida Power & Light Co. 28
Hamilton Plywood .. .. 6
Houdaille-Span, Inc. 7
Koolshade Sun Screen 17-20
Lambert Corp. ... .30
The Mabie-Bell Company 5
Meekins, Inc. 2nd Cover
Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co. .. 3
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 31
Rubber Products, Inc. .. 33
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 32
Superior Window
Company .. 4th Cover
Washington Federal Savings
& Loan Assn. . .33
F. Graham Williams Co. 35


Products and Practice




New Joint Material


for Masonry Construction


Throughout the long history of
masonry construction, the joint be-
tween units has been the weakest
link in its chain of progressive devel-
opment. Recently a new bonding
material has become available for
specification by Florida architects
which, if generally adopted, might
well cause a minor revolution in the
technique of masonry construction.
Called "Threadline" by its manu-
facturer, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc.,
it is a product of modern chemistry
- an adhesive that is as unique as
it appears to be efficient.
A series of exhaustive tests have
shown the new bonding agent to
reach full strength nine times as fast
as ordinary mortar, to develop a joint
strength many times that of ordinary
mortar and to be so resistant to
effects of both weather and flames
as to be, for all practical purposes,
both water and fire proof. Further-
more, its use thus far indicates that
it may make possible a substantial
reduction in the cost of masonry con-
struction that employs concrete,
cinder and lightweight blocks or con-
crete, cinder, lightweight and red
clay bricks. In a number of com-
petitive demonstrations, use of the
new joint material- which is a mix-
ture of organic and inorganic ingredi-
ents resulted in reducing the labor
cost factor by about 50 percent.
One complication does exist rela-
tive to its use. Masonry units -
whether of concrete or clay must
be absolutely square and smooth on
all bedding surfaces. Otherwise the
degree of adhesion may be reduced
and the wall may not be exactly
plumb and level. Reason for this re-
quirement is that the new mortar is
spread, not with a trowel, but with
a caulking gun or extruder and
the average finished joint is approxi-
mately 1/16th of an inch thick.
This means that ordinary concrete
or clay blocks or bricks must be
ground before laying the cost of
which has been estimated as about


This suggests the unique adaptabil-
ity of the new chemical adhesive
to production of unusual forms in
masonry construction. This is an
experimental spiral stair made with
smooth-ground concrete block
bonded with a 1/16 joint. It is un-
supported and spirals more than
1800 a construction that would
be impossible to produce with or-
dinary mortar. It was one of a
series of tests to document the
performance and versatility of the
new bonding material.


20 percent of the material. However,
even with this higher material cost,
the saving in labor per unit of con-
struction indicates that an overall
saving of about 30 percent should be
realized.
With materials that are commonly
manufactured to precision tolerances
and smooth surfaces like a wide
range of decorative units such as
grille blocks--the cost advantage
would be even more evident. This
would be particularly true when the
item of cleaning is considered. With
the use of ordinary mortar, the final
cleaning of any fair-sized masonry
construction becomes a considerable
expense- especially so in the case
of variously pierced and moulded
grille units.
Aside from the economy factor,
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






the new joint material would appear
to contribute much greater structural
strength to the finished construction.
Tests have shown its bond strength
to be five times that of ordinary
mortar and its compressive strength
20 times that of the traditional
"mud". In a variety of demonstra-
tions, wall panels as large as 20 by 7
feet have been lifted with a crane
without damage; and a three-block
span joined with the new material
sustained, without damage, a dead
load of 1500 lbs. while in a similar
test repeated with ordinary bonding
mortar the span failed at a dead load-
ing of 150 lbs.
Thus far the new mortar-adhesive
is being handled by the Tampa Sand
and Material organization in Tampa
and by Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., in
the Miami area.


Fun Poke at Planners .
AND ON THE EIGHTH DAY .By
Richard Hedman and Fred Bair, Jr.
Published by The Falcon Press,
Philadelphia. 10%" by 13%". Off-
set and illustrated. 46 pages: $3.00.
In days of tension people are wont
to take themselves more seriously than
sometimes might seem justified. Plan-
ners are no exception; and with the
tangled knots of urban problems now
an almost, nationwide preoccupation,
these technical gentlemen are pulling
long faces and wagging long fingers
in admonition of dire possibilities to
come.
But not quite all of them. The
authors of this book are agin gloom.
And between the covers of their "last
word on city planning and planners,"
Messrs. Hedman and Bair have pack-
ed the greatest collection of delight-
ful spoofs that this reviewer has come
across. Fred Bair an able planning
technician and Executive Secretary of
the Florida Planning and Zoning
Association did the text, complete
with gobbledy-gook, cliches, nonsense
charts and daffynitions. Hedman did
the drawings. Between them they have
produced a picture-and-caption ray of
technical sunshine that's good for a
chuckle-a-day from now until then.
Better get it and enjoy it now.
Fred Bair will do the purchasing
honors for you. He and Hedman have
developed a delightful order form
headed by Bair's address P. O. Box
818, Auburndale, Florida. He'll prob-
ably answer a letter sent to that box.
JULY, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK .D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 MONROE DRIVE. N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" AND ALUMINUM

PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS

We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154










M


The guy with the halo? He's the builder

who offers economical OIL heat!
Of course most house-hunters now recognize the need in
Florida for dependable, permanently-installed home heating. A i IfT
And they know it won't cost them much if it's oil heat. M ARCH
The builder who spends a little more to give his homebuyers Ads like this one are reminding everybody
the big savings assured by oil heating deserves his halo. i F ( y c t
in Florida (including your clients) that oil
Just how much more economical is oil heat? It averages home heating is the safest, most depend-
about HALF the cost of heat from other fuels! It's much safer able and by far the most economical for
and more dependable, too-by far the best for Florida homes. able and b far the most economicl fo
this state. Your specification of oil home
If you're buying or building, insist on oil home heating. If heating will be readily accepted in most
your present home needs better heat at much lower cost--
install clean, efficient, far-more-economical oil heating! It's the cases.
one right solution to Florida's home heating problem!
FLORIDA HOME AU HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET, MIAMI
BEST AND CHEAPEST COMBINATION FOR YEAR 'ROUND HOME COMFORT:
OIL HOUSE HEATING AND ELECTRIC AIR CONDITIONING!
36 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Tengee

Versatility

Comes from

Concrete,

Imagination

and

Know-How...


S. and these
are some of
the units
nominal 12"x12"x4"


BRICK


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SYSTEM OF
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CONSTRUCTION


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