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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 The pattern of the professions...
 International is the name...
 Human needs come first
 Mizner's fabulous finale is site...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00084
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: June 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00084
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The pattern of the professions is a record of their history
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    International is the name for culture
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Human needs come first
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Mizner's fabulous finale is site of 1961 FAA convention
        Page 18
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Advertisers' index
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.











? DISPLAY
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74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


lr 74e I4sae ---

Letters .


The Pattern of the Professions Is The Record of
By Garry A. Boyle, AIA

International Is The Word For Culture .
By Bruno Zevi


Human Needs Come First .
By Lewis Mumford


. . 4


Their History .


. 8
. 13


. 15


Mizner's Fabulous Finale Is Site of 1961 FAA Convention . .. 18

News and Notes . . . . 20
When Is a Stock School Plan Not A Stock School Plan? Sarasota
Develops New Bidding Practice Code ... Student Awards ... Miami's
ASA Gets New Charter ... AIA Ruling on Suspended Members .
Three New Seminars on Atomic Shelter Structures.

Advertisers' Index . . . . 29


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L.
Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Forrest R. Coxen; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R.
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Jefferson N. Powell, Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
come, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 11

NUMBER 6 1967

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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JUNE, 1961







Letters_


Density Zoning .
Editor, FA:
Very much interested in the article
by MR. VERNER JOHNSON, AIA, in
your May, 1961, issue. Are reprints
of this particular article available-
and if they are, on what basis, as
far as cost?
This article is an excellent analysis
of a difficult problem. What Mr.
Johnson has to say could prove of
considerable value to this Committee.
PAUL FRANK JERNIGAN, AIA
Chairman, Lake Michigan Region
Planning Committee,
Mishawaka, Indiana

EDITOR, FA:
The most interesting and thought-
ful article, "Zoning-Cause or Cure
of Urban Blight?" presented by MR.
VERNER JOHNSON, AIA, in the May
isue, should be studied by all who are
concerned with their community de-
velopment. Mr. Johnson's concept of
a new "kind" of zoning based on
population density can do much to


restore confidence in the value of
zoning as well as to be a practical
solution to the aggravating problem
of rezoning and zoning variance per-
mits.
In the development of this density
concept for zoning there will be
many details added as well as cor-
relation with other aspects of com-
munity planning. One of the most
important of these facets which
should be given early attention is the
designation and preservation of arterial
streets.
Without legitimate arterial streets,
vigorously protected, many of the
benefits which are inherent in Mr.
Johnson's concept of zoning will be
lost.
WM. H. BOURNE, P.E.
Coral Gables, Florida

EDITOR, FA:
Verne Johnson's article in the May
issue of The Florida Architect is a
thoughtful and eloquent plea for more
reasonable standards in urban de-


velopment-standards based upon the
needs of people rather than the greed
of speculators.
Interestingly enough, density con-
trol of urban development has been
used with considerable success in
Europe, notably in Holland and in
England. In Amsterdam, density
controls established by the citizen
government in the 1600's are still
effective. And in Rotterdam, a city
of 725,000, imaginative planning
coupled with logical density control
has served to reduce land coverage
in the central business district from
56 to 31 per cent, and to increase
open space from 44 to 69 per cent.
Many of our American cities have
regulations predicated upon good
principles of urban land control, but
we have failed to establish standards
of urban development that produce
good results. The building bulk-and
hence the population density-per-
mitted under our urban regulations
is little short of criminal. Until a few
years ago, anyone could build as
many 18-story buildings as he wished
in downtown Gainesville. The limit
has since been reduced to 10 stories,
(Continued on Page 4)


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Letters__
(Continued from Page 4)

a standard that is still preposterous!
When land is developed to the
maximum density our laws permit, a
saturation point is reached before
all properties are so developed, and
the value of the vacant or under-built
property is drained off by the over-
built neighbors. Congestion thus in-
jures all alike, for excessive density
is undesirable for the property so
developed and injurious to the prop-
erty that cannot be developed at all.
The author's suggestion that re-
search could give us some of the
answers we need in the field of urban
development is perfectly valid. But,
as a people, we will get neither better
research nor better cities until we
have the will to provide the kind of
urban environment we need and
should have.
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA
University of Florida. Gainesville


EDITOR, FA:
Mr. Johnson's article on zoning
sparked my enthusiasm in his first
paragraphs with his perceptive in-
sight of the wrongs of our present
conceptions of zoning and the dam-
age it does. One can hardly help but
agree that the users, the people,
rather than the use of the land,
should be the prime consideration.
After such an admirable start it
was discouraging to find that he pro-
posed an alternate concept that
ignored almost completely the beau-
tiful idea of "users before use." I
can not doubt but what his plan
would be a definite improvement,
but hardly less arbitrary than the
one he would supplant.
Mr. Johnson asks ". can we not
free ourselves of the rigid, detailed,
burdensome and confusing restric-
tions that zoning regulations have
imposed?" The answer is of course,
YES; but, not by merely substituting
new restrictions for the old. It should
be obvious to all who really care
that zoning itself is the evil and that
we have foisted this evil upon our-
selves in a vain attempt to protect
ourselves from our own immorality.
A neighbor presented a petition
for me to sign declaring my oppo-
sition to the re-zoning of a nearby
piece of land "from residential" to
"business." I asked what was his ob-


section to this particular business. He
answered that it would lower prop-
erty values and if he needed to sell
his home he might suffer a loss.
Pressing further, I asked why must
that necessarily follow? His answer
was that business should not be in
a residential area. The logical ques-
tion, "Why?", produced the first an-
swer: business lowers property values.
One can see the lack of thinking
that promotes zoning. It was fruit-
less to point out that some of the
most beautiful, charming and dy-
namic urban areas of the world in-
corporate compatible mixtures of a
variety of residential and commer-
cial types of construction. It was
equally fruitless to point out that
the character of any business estab-
lishment reflects the character of the
customers, not the owners.
The sign-happy, haphazard, can-
cerous sprawl of business strips along
our busy streets and highways exists
mostly because we patronize them;
and this is surely a reflection of our
own character because it could not
exist without us.
Let us look at it carefully. Sup-
pose an ugly filling station were to
be built in my neighborhood. I de-
pend on my car more and more; its
service is important to my livelihood
and recreation. I don't want the
bleakness, the glare, the noise and
the ugliness that is generated by
most service stations; but I want the
convenience of the service station
enough to patronize. it in spite of
my objections! This simply points up
my weakness, not the station own-
er's. Were I and his other customers
to insist on beauty, noise control,
pleasant lighting and some degree of
conformation to the neighborhood,
to the extent we withheld our trade,
he would surely fold. If he met our
objections we would have no objec-
tions, for we do not object to the
service station per se.
Are we not now getting close
to the answer? Zoning is only a
crutch for our own lack of morality.
We must face the fact that we as a
people are woefully lacking in the
esthetic morality necessary for the
high culture we would like to believe
exists in our society. We must also
face the fact that this high culture
does not exist in our society-simply
because we do lack this sense of
social morality.
(Continued on Page 28)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















































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JUNE, 1961


Q







The Pattern of The Professions


Is A Record of Their History

By GARRY A. BOYLE, AIA


By tradition, landscape architecture
has always been considered a part of
the architect's work. It was so ac-
cepted during the great periods of
architecture in the civilizations from
which we sprung. Who can imagine,
for example, the work of ANDRE LE
NOTRE, the Landscape Architect of
the Palace of Versailles, without first
having had the architect to build
the palace and to design where the
streets and views would converge, pro-
viding meaning to his arrangements.
Would le Notre's gardens have been
there without the architecture?
The Hanging Gardens of Rome
were only a part of The Orsini Palace,
since destroyed, while here in our
own South we find the most beautiful
gardens in the world in the Santee
River Valley, where formerly were
magnificent plantation homes, burned


in "The War." Here, again, it was
the architecture which provided the
reason for the landscaping. The great-
est landscape architect of our times,
M. GROMORT, who executed designs
and layouts all over the world, never
found any reason to be in conflict
with architecture. In fact, he was a
trained architect and a teacher of
architecture and he always made his
work enhance or complement the
architecture it surrounded.
At no time in history has it ever
been denied to the architect the priv-
ilege of designing the surroundings
of his buildings-in fact, many build-
ings spring out of their surroundings,
whether they may be natural or
artificial. This is a prime prerogative
of the architect, i.e. to suit his build-
ings to their site, their era and their
function. The Natchez (Mississippi)


house is beautiful only in its setting
of lovely trees and gardens. Imagine
a Mississippi colonial on a white sand
beach!
How ridiculous can one be? It has
never been denied the architect to
select the most desirable locations for
his buildings on the site (site plan-
ning). Kings, business men and just
folks have gone to architects to decide
for them the most feasible use of
their land or to help arrive at a
feasible location for their building.
The work of the architect is not
specifically law, engineering, art, land-
scaping, interior decoration, nor func-
tional arrangement to gain beauty,
convenience, livability and usefulness.
It is all of these including knowl-
edge of science to determine future
maintenance and repair. It includes
all considerations affecting the sur-
roundings of man. Furthermore, the
architect is not a superman to defy
the vast complex of modern society
with its almost total dependence on
the products of the "machine age".
He therefore calls on specialists in
each category to assist him in working
out his concept of what the owner or
(Continued on Page 24)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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International Is The Name for Culture


By BRUNO ZEVI


My gratitude to the President and
friends of the AIA for the invitation
to participate in this panel is so much
greater because I have very few posi-
tive things to say and many questions
to raise.
Such questions, I fear, will have
to deal with the fundamental of a
contemporary culture of cities. They
concern the dimension of the modern
city, the architects' role in the process
which goes from city-planning to city-
making, and the philosophy of urban
renewal. Unless we reach some com-
mon views on these issues, it will be
difficult even to understand one
another.
Consider, for example, Brasilia. We
have read the most unconditional
praise of this capital city, and also
the most violent criticism. This hap-
pened because we started from dif-
ferent perspectives on what a city is
or should be today. Again, take the
case of the satellite communities on
the periphery of the metropolis: Is
this the right way to cope with city
expansion and, if not, do we have
a better way? As for urban renewal,
it is needed in Los Angeles and
Detroit just as much as in Rome and
Venice, but its meaning is totally
different here and there. Sure, it is
easy to agree on platitudes such as:
"In cities of historical value, the
respect for the past should be bal-
anced by the needs of contemporary
society." But when we come down
to how to reach such equilibrium, the
divergence of opinions is very strong
in Venice and in Rome, and perhaps
also in Philadelphia.
This is why I consider this panel
and the discussions of this convention
extremely pertinent also for the future
of European cities. The American
contribution is needed in Europe and
in the world now more than ever
before. During the present period of
western prosperity, it is no longer a
matter of money or material help,
JUNE, 1961


One of the outstanding seminars of the AIA's Philadel-
phia Convention was the discussion between Bruno Zevi
and Lewis Mumford on "The Culture of Cities." Unfor-
tunately the impromptu and extemporaneous portions of
this discussion cannot be reported here. But the essential
messages of both distinguished speakers have been made
available. Bruno Zevi is a professor, architect,
author, researcher and historian from Rome.... Lewis
Mumford, New York, also a kind of historian, is a
brilliant and biting critic of our contemporary civiliza-
tion and has been called "... the vocal conscience of
American architecture."


but of ideas and methods. Perhaps
another Peace Corps is needed, made
up of architects and city designers.
Well, where can we start from to
understand what a modern city is?
Oddly enough, I started way back
from 1492, just the year of the dis-
covery of America. This is what hap-
pened. A few years ago, I was reading
the famous historian, JACOB BURCK-
HARDT, and all of a sudden, I was
struck by a sentence. After visiting
Ferrara, a town between Bologna and
Venice, in 1860, Burckhardt wrote:
"Ferrara is the first modern city in
Europe." He did not give any expla-
nation for this amazing interpreta-
tion. I looked into town-planning
literature, but found very little about
Ferrara. Many authors were repeating
Burckhardt's sentence, but none
would explain the reasons for it.
Finally, I decided to devote a few
years to the study of this town. Last
year, on the centennial of Burck-
hardt's statement, I published a book
about it. In a few words, these were
my three conclusions:
1. Ferarra could be defined as the
first modem city in Europe because
there was a man who in 1492 de-
signed a master plan for its expansion.
He made the city three times as
large as it was during the Middle
Ages and the early Renaissance. It


was, in a way, an open plan, because
the territory urbanized in 1492 has
never been completely developed even
today. This approach was certainly
new, and in basic contrast with the
pragmatic attitude of the Middle Ages,
when planning and building were
almost synchronous activities, and
with the Renaissance habit of invent-
ing abstract, ideal, and static cities.
2. Such an extensive .plan could
not be implemented throughout by
a predetermined third dimension. The
planner of Ferrara could not build
the whole town; he had to have some
confidence in its natural growth and
leave something for future architects
to do. But he was an architect and
knew that a plan is meaningful only
when it gets a third dimension-that
is, only if architects make it true.
And here was his genius. He was
able to identify the few key structures
of the new town that would guarantee
for four centuries and a half the
urban pattern. Mind you-these focal
points were not monumental plazas
or princely roads, but sometimes very
small buildings at the covers of
secondary streets which, even when
isolated, would suggest the image of
the city. A flexible image, so that it
worked, yet a precise one, so that
it could not be betrayed.
(Continued on Page 14)






International Is The Word ...

(Continued from Page 18)

3. Lastly, this man, BIAGIO Ros-
SETTI, spent about ten years devel-
oping the new section of Ferrara,
but then he spent about twenty years
in renewing the old city. At the end
of his life, in 1516, he had integrated
the old city with its addition, thus
creating a new modern organism.
There it is again. Ferrara was a
modern city because it grew coher-
ently in relation to the same basic
problems of any organic culture of
cities-the measure of the city, the
passage from its plan to its archi-
tecture, the approach to urban re-
newal. The answers are naturally
different; but the main questions
remain perhaps .the same, in 1492
as in 1961.
Let's then tackle the first of these
three questions: the measure, or di-
mension, of the city. I may be wrong,
but I have the impression that our
urban culture went to pieces because
architects were unable to see that a
city could have a form even without
having a dimension. They are not to
blame; the notion of form has some-
how been dependent on the notion
of measure throughout history; and
therefore, town planners tried to im-
pose qn the modern city a dimension
which, however big, was always too
small and deceiving. All of the nine-
teenth century culture, which con-
tinued deep into the first half of
our century, suffers from the psy-
chosis about the size of the city. It
is indeed surprising; just at the time
when modern technology was destroy-
ing the mechanical justification and
the social function of an urban meas-
ure, its determination became the
ideal and purpose of town planners.
You will remember that "The Art
of Building Cities" by CAMILLO
SITTE was published in 1889. The
garden city idea, by EBENEZER HOW-
ARD, became the official doctrine of
town-planning a few years later. Thus,
the utopia of an industrial autono-
mous community found its historical
mirror in the idealistic interpretation
of the agricultural autonomous com-
munity of the Middle Ages.
A similar approach was applied to
the metropolis. Looking at the suc-
cessive town plans designed for Lon-
don, Paris, Rome in the last one
hundred years,, one has the impression


that the chief concern of the planners
was to impose a dimension on the
city. The old walls were destroyed;
they tried to build new ones-never
mind if they consisted of greenbelts
instead of brick and stone.
The theoretical ideal became the
self-sufficient settlement in a self-
contained city form. Now this kind
of vision may continue to work for
small towns, but it looks anachron-
istic not only for the super-metropolis,
but also for the metropolis between
one and two million inhabitants. We
see in Europe that people resent the
artificiality of this kind of overgrown
villages added to cities, because they
cannot offer the benefits of the old
town and deprive them of the ad-
vantages of the metropolis. Moreover,
a city with its high buildings at the
center, lowering down to the peri-
phery until it merges with the coun-
try, is a sort of pyramidal structure
typical of an oligarchic society. It
cannot embody a democratic society
with our contemporary technological
instruments.
I think that we should recognize
that, sad as it may seem, our modern
city has no more a dimension. Or,
at least, we do not know how to
measure it.
Once we have recognized this fun-
damental character of the modern
city, we can interpret it in two
opposite ways. We can repeat that
the city is doomed and disappearing,
because the suburban sprawl nullifies
the difference between town and
country and amalgamates the whole
territory. There is, however, another
hypothesis: The city is still there,
strong and alive, maintaining its
social and cultural functions. But it
is looking for a new urban form
which has nothing to do with the
old one, because the new urban form
is dynamic, sizeless and continuous.
It may be hard to discover and
express the connotations of this new
urban form which is so different from
the ones of the past. Perhaps we
could apply to it a designation used
in contemporary painting, a-formal.
However, we should not be afraid
or impatient. A painting by JACKSON
POLLOCK has a logical and severe
composition, even if it has nothing
to do with the laws of academic
composition. SCHOENBERG'S music is
firmly organized, even if, when com-
pared to the musical tradition, it
sounds chaotic and arbitrary. The


same is probably true of the modern
city: it has a structure, a new and
powerful form which we have up to
now sacrificed to a nineteenth-cen-
tury ideal which is dying, once and
for all, with Brasilia. It is the chal-
lenge of contemporary city designers
to uncover this kincP of a-formal
structure and let it free to grow.
So my first question is: How can
we identify this new sizeless urban
form, so essentially different from
the traditional, static city that we all
know by now obsolete and bleak?
This question brings us into the
area of the second problem: the re-
lationship between city planning and
city making. The architects are, in
this phase, the real protagonists of
the city. But this does not make
the situation much easier. In fact,
modern architecture, in spite of its
great achievements, seems to have
fallen into a state of confusion and
eclecticism. Without some agreement
on architectural language, is it pos-
sible to redesign a coherent urban
scene?
When we look at the history of
Western civilization, we see that
architecture either preceded or was
simultaneous with town-design. That
is to say, all space- conceptions in
towns reflected and translated in
bigger scale space-conceptions which
had been embodied in some building.
I do not assume this to be a devine
law, but it is a datum worth con-
sidering. Mediaeval town space is
identical with mediaeval architectural
space; the pattern of Ferrara is the
same as the pattern of its buildings.
This is true for FONTANA'S scheme
for Rome and for HAUSSMANN'S Paris.
A perfect convergence of planning
and architectural thinking is to be
found in WRIGHT, or LE CORBUSIER,
or GROPIUS, or MIES that is, in
the urban theories formulated be-
tween the two world wars. Does this
convergence of research and criteria
still exist today? And, if it does,
which are the buildings that express
a space-conception capable of being
magnified in city scale? Is it the
Seagram Building or the Guggenheim
Museum Idlewild or Ronchamp?
So far as we can see, the Inter-
national Style ideal of isolated, pure,
transparent prisms in space has been,
if not denied, at least complemented
by a tendency towards expressionistic
plasticity and by a sort of Neo-
Baroque inclination for visual con-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






tinuity through undulating serpen-
tines. I do not think such plurality
of expression is necessarily negative.
In the process of disclosing a new
city form, richness of architectural
language may be interpreted as a
happy event. I have a liking for the
architects who, when planning or
redesigning a city, leave some prob-
lems unanswered, trust the natural
growth, refuse to be dictators up to
the window-curtains and the flower
pots.


This liberal attitude seems con-
genial with a democratic approach,
but to what extent can it work? One
can visualize a sizeless and formless
city of the future, just as beautiful
as a POLLOCK or a SCHOENBERG com-
position, made true and vital by a
various, audacious, personal architec-
ture that-again taking from painting
-we could denominate action-archi-
tecture. But, in order to achieve such
a challenging purpose, architects must
be able to seize the present great


opportunity to remould our cities.
They should think in bigger terms,
they should reorganize the profession
so that it becomes the driving and
promoting power of the entire build-
ing industry. And here I am afraid
that too many of our colleagues, at
the very moment when we can win
and become the leaders of the build-
ing industry, retreat, give up, are
tired, for I don't know what neurotic
reasons. They seem to be content to
(Continued on Page 16)


Human Needs Come First


By LEWIS MUMFORD


There has never been a moment
since the Chicago World's Fair of
1893 when there have been so much
discussion of the state of the city as
today. The reason is plain: the city
has been disappearing before our
eyes, sinking under a tidal wave of
motor cars and parking lots. There
is no sense discussing the culture of
the city if the city itself is about to
vanish, either by being thinned out
into a suburban conglomeration, by
being completely destroyed by nu-
clear bombardment, or by our digging
vast underground cities bargain
basements for those who prefer col-
lective entombment.
In the present discussions, there
are two main camps; those who wish
to preserve at least the central core
of the city; and those who are eager
to assist in bringing about its disso-
lution. But too often their efforts
are indistinguishable. The people who
are trying to save the city are seeking
to save the very things that cause
their neighbors to move out--mere
bigness, speculation, confusion, con-
gestion, or empty ostentation, on the
scale of New York's Lincoln Center.
Nothing has done more harm to the
genuine culture of the city than the
large mass of urban renewal and
public housing projects from New
York to San Francisco.
With a few exceptions, notably in
Philadelphia and Baltimore, these
sterile "improvements" have too often


removed the living organs of the city
and replaced them with an expensive
but profitable mechanical substitute.
Too often, under the illusion that
they have assisted in an urban birth,
the planners and architects have
actually performed a hysterectomy.
If we are to speak with any hope-
fulness about the culture of the city,
we must first remove all the sterile
bureaucratic images of the city of the
future, which many of the greatest
architects of our time have put for-
ward. The city is a human artifact
and must give form to human needs
and human purposes in the order of
their importance, beginning with
man's need for fellowship and love,
for biological reproduction and psy-
chological development. Technolog-
ical improvements exist only to serve
more essential aspects of man's life,
not to dominate them.
The city is an esthetic experience,
an educational experience, and a dra-
matic experience; and no part of a
city is properly planned if it does
not contribute its quota of visual
joy, of vivid human contacts, and of
purposeful and meaningful activities
that sustain the human spirit. These
aspects of culture cannot be effective-
lv pursued where differentiation, in-
dividuality, and choice are absent.
The larger the scale of planning, the
more important it is to avoid mass
solutions based on standardization
and mechanical repetition. The whole


must be organized into parts that
respect the human measure and that
invite a warm human response. The
great boulevards of Paris needed the
cafe to translate the large-scale order
of movement into the intimate order
of response, conversation, human stim-
ulation. The off-Broadway theaters
and the espresso bars have done more
for the culture of the city of New
York than acres of pretentious esthe-
ticism.
The culture requirements of the
city can be met only by multiplying
the places where lovers can meet;
where friends can walk and talk;
where colleagues and associates can
hold long discussions without
benefit of the tape recorder; where
parents and children can occasionally
come together on common ground,
in an environment that contrasts with
and complements that of the home;
where individual persons can quit
the lonely crowd and in solitude find
the companionship and the stimulus
they need. Our present dehumanized
improvements produce only blankness
and boredom. Culture needs an en-
vironment that reflects human pur-
pose and human imagination: open
spaces, with gardens, for meeting;
natural beauty preserved, and if pos-
sible, enhanced and carried by archi-
tectural beauty, the whole immune
to the pressures of technology and
finance. We must stop spending
astronomical sums on technological
absurdities that are destroying the city
and creating an empty and boring
life; and we must invest generously
and widely in the essential small-
scale activities that will restore initi-
ative and power and confidence to
the individual person and the group.


JUNE, 1961 15


~;;lq~g~&~gBb~;s~h~B~ ~8~9~d~






International Is The Word ...
(Continued from Page 15)
continue to be a minority report.
They stop at MONDRIAN and ARP,
or are bemused with stylistic details,
vernacular evasions, neo-Art Nouveau,
neohistoricism, filligree and other
architectural delights.
You know that I have hailed archi-
tecture's emancipation from the doc-
trinate of the thirties. But such
freedom was won to meet new and
bigger tasks, to extend architectural
research in city scale, and not to
indulge introversions and individual
idiosyncrasies. Urban design is not an
architectural cosmetic. Within the
different sectors of the new a-formal
city we should have a coherent,
sound, and eloquent architecture to
produce a vital third dimension. Let's
remember that the degree of resis-
tance of the third dimension is the
barometer of the validity of an urban
pattern. SIXTUS' scheme for Rome is
three dimensionally so strong that
not even MUssoLINI could destroy it,
although he tried. But the small
streets of the Borghi leading to St.
Peter's were not so strong; and the
crime was committed.
My second question, therefore, is:
What kind of interaction of different
architectural tendencies exists in to-
day's city-making? -
The' third and last question, urban
renewal, is perhaps only a conse-
quence of the first two. But it has
difficulties of its own. I hesitate to
offer any conclusions based on a


quick look at present-day American
cities. But since my arrival in Cali-
fornia, I have toured the major large
scale renewal projects in Los Angeles,
San Francisco, Chicago, Pittsburg,
Detroit and Washington. Perhaps a
subjective impression from a friendly
outsider may be of some use.
I was certainly impressed by the
brave effort made to deal with hous-
ing, urban expressways, industrial,
and commercial developments. How-
ever, it was not always clear to me
whether these projects, taken together
in their aggregate, will make the
future city, will establish the frame-
work of a new urban society. If cities
are to survive as cultural instruments,
they must be more than a collection
of public works projects. Houses or
expressways may be produced on as-
sembly line methods perhaps. Cities
are not. And where is the coordina-
tion between residential communities
and motorways, business districts and
recreational centers-in other words,
where does urban design come into
the picture?
The architectural profession is evi-
dently conscious of the new role it
is called upon to fulfill in the national
task of redesigning urban America.
Indeed, the very significance of the
architectural profession is at stake. In
the process of city-making, there is
no second, or third, or fourth place
that architects can occupy. Either
they come in first, or they are going
to be the last. Either they promote,
or they become the passive reflection
of a disintegrated city life. Organic










Florida's AIA policy and
program were by no
means neglected at the
AIA Convention. Here,
caught in an informal
discussion period, are
Regional Director Rob-
ert M. Little, FAIA, AIA
President Philip Will, Jr.,
FAIA, and FAA President
Robert H. Levison. Sub-
ject of this discussion
was not reported, but
from the character of the
picture, it's evident that
FAA President Levison is
making a forceful point
for the information of
the two AIA officers.


relationship between public works
projects, organic relationship between
these projects and the building in-
dustry at large this is what urban
design amounts to, this is where
urban design becomes public policy.
Either architects can show a way
toward an integrated urban policy,
or architecture is lost.
Never before was architectural de-
sign so dependent on urban design.
The scope of urban renewel cannot
be limited to housing, office triangles,
shopping centers. When it is, archi-
tecture itself is not going to be very
good. For instance, in many American
cities, urban renewal, so far as I
could see, means demolishing, with
bulldozer technique, an urban section
in order to rebuild it according to
contemporary criteria. Often, at the
end of a carpet of old houses, we
see a series of new tall buildings, in
the shape of towers of elongated
prisms. Such contrast of dimension,
structure and character is sometimes
successful, as it attains a surrealistic
beauty. But can isolated towers or
slabs constitute the entire semantics
of urban renewal and offer a con-
sistent method for redesigning urban
America? Don't they sometimes lac-
erate the structure and the texture
of the city, depriving it, together with
the slums, of some of its historical
and social assets? A city atmosphere
means interchange, movement, con-
tinuity-and the architecture for it
cannot always be so violently discon-
tinuous.
This is true especially of city sec-
tions reserved for pedestrians. There
we should have a type of architecture
consonant not only in scale but also
in quality to the pedestrian's tempo.
In fact, too many pedestrians' centers
in Europe look artificial and uncon-
vincing because they do not have an
architectural form of their own.
But urban renewal becomes a much
more difficult operation when it is
applied to monumental towns. In
Italy, we are almost paralysed by this
problem. Opinions strongly diverge.
I happen to be secretary general of
the Italian Institute of Planners, vice
president of the Italian Institute of
Architecture, and University professor
of architectural history. It is more
than enough to give me a case of
split personality about urban renewal.
Historians would not change a stone
of the past; some architects would
(Continued on Page 2S)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






























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Prestressed concrete offers many advan-
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3132 N. E. 9th Street / Fort Lauderdale / Florida


JUNE, 1961







Mizner's Fabulous Finale Is


Site of 1961 FAA Convention


Probably the one word that most
aptly describes the site of the FAA's
47th Annual Convention-to be held
November 9, 10 and 11-is "fabu-
lous." The Convention's 1961 home
will be the BocA RATON HOTEL AND
CLUB; and the dictionary definitions
of that one-word description support
its choice. The Boca Raton is both
"legendary" and "astounding" -
legendary as to its development and
background and astounding as to its
current aspect and facilities.
Originally the Boca Raton was the
Cloister Inn-a fantastic, dreamworld
hideaway for domestic millionaires,
wealthy internationals and European
royalty. It was less of an Inn than a
club of such an exclusive character
that admission entailed a tacit disre-
gard of costs and a proven ability to
spend. Both institution and setting


were the dream children of ADDISON
MIZNER. The Cloister Inn was the
summit of his career-a career which
was as fabulous as the architecture
that it created.
Addison Mizner was the brother
of WILSON MIZNER whose caustic wit
was a by-word among the million-
aire set during the early decades of
the twentieth century. The brothers
might have been more alike than
most people imagine. No one has
completely disproved what many sus-
pect-that the Mizner brand of ro-
mantic architecture, which always
bore the trade mark of a uniquely
moving, old-world nostalgia, was a
tongue-in-cheek gesture that poked
fun at a rapidly changing society while
catering to the manor-house foibles
of its status-seeking spendthrifts.
The Cloister Inn was a three-di-
mensional stage-set and in designing


it Mizner used every trick of an
active imagination and an oblique,
but catholic, sense of humor. For
example, when the Cloister Inn was
first opened to its exclusive public, it
appeared as a gem of age-old roman-
ticism. Mizner had brought the art
of the scene-designer ( a perfect
pinnacle. Some of the stucco of the
new masterpiece seemed stained with
age and crumbling from antiquity.
In the bedrooms the theme of the
antique was no less evident, even
though the backs of the old-world
beds-artfully damaged on the fronts
even to realistic wormholes-showed
the unpainted, raw wood of their
construction.
Mizner was a step ahead of the
AIA's "expanded service" idea. He
supplied the furnishings of the Cloi-
ster Inn as well as many of the
materials that went into the building.
He started an industry new to south
Florida-the antique factory. Several
thriving businesses of today-now
happily making contemporary ma-
terials and furnishings-are the out-
growth of his cast stone plants, his
tile factories and his extensive furni-


RES


I D E N T IAL


I N T E R I


ORS


Working closely

with architect

and client for

residential decorations

and furnishings

of distinction





PETER JEFFERSON, Architect R? 14JD PLEr 1ER
A. NILES WHYTE, Contractor --
THE RICHARD PLUMER COMPANY,
Interior Design and Furnishings
155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA PLaza 1-9775

18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


M

























ture shops. Each -production unit bore
the stamp of this preoccupation with
the romance of antiquity-and when
the finished structure seemed too
brash and new, Mizner was wont to
borrow a mason's hammer and whack
the stone and stucco and wood until
sufficiently mellowed by damage. Un-
less some unromantic maintenance
man has since repaired it, the great
stone mantel in the present Cloister
Lounge still carries the gouge marks


of the Mizner ministrations.
That's the legendary background
of what has grown and broadened
and developed into the thoroughly
up-to-date Boca Raton Hotel and
Club of today. The honest erosion
of thirty-eight Florida years has
brought some measure of reality to
the whimsy of the antique. But
skillful modernization, modem equip-
ment, and careful development of a
very extensive landscape program have


combined to bring the present mod-
em comfort, convenience and beauty
so justifiably claimed by the hotel's
management.
To those who have visited the
Boca Raton recently, the coming
FAA Convention will provide a wel-
come opportunity to return. Those
who will stay there for the first time
can hardly term it less than "astound-
ing." Convention facilities-on the
American plan-are as complete as
might well be expected. But the vaca-
tion recreational facilities are now
nearly perfect. There is an 18-hole
golf course-with Slammin' Sammy
Snead as pro-tennis courts, two
olympic-size swimming pools, ca-
banas, and a fleet of fishing cruisers
always waiting and ready.
There it is-the home site for
the FAA's 1961 Convention. Could
you ask for better surroundings in
which to conduct professional busi-
ness? And can you think of a better
place to combine that business with
the fun, good food and recreation
that goes with a luxurious-but in-
expensive!-three day vacation? No-
we can't either!


BUSINESS

INTERIORS


Fulfilling the original

concept of architect and client

for outstanding business

interior designs


RICHARD PLUMER
BUSINESS INTERIORSAINC.


Client: Ryder System, Inc.
Architect: Weed-Johnson Associates
Contractor: Fred Howland, Inc.
Interiors: Richard Plumer Business Interiors


155 NORTHEAST FORTIETH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Telephone PLaza 1-9775
JUNE, 1961 19


Here's the Mizner masterpiece---now the Boca Raton Hotel and Club-from
the lake. Once the exclusive hideway for European royalty and American
millionaires, the picturesque Cloister Inn of the mid-twenties boom has been
developed into one of the finest hotels on Florida's Gold Coast. Now operated
on the American plan, it will be the headquarters site of the FAA'S November
Convention







News & Notes

When Is A Stock School Plan
Not A Stock School Plan ?


The communication on this page
refers to a review commentary that
appeared on page 18 of the April,
1961, issue of The Florida Architect.
In fairness to all concerned we feel
some comment on it is in order.
First, Mr. Auerbach should know
that this publication and the AIA
State Organization which owns it
and which it represents have for years
carried on a constant and vigorous


battle against the stock school plan
idea. As lately as the May, 1961,
issue an article, on page 22, again
exposed the stock plan fallacy with
particular reference to a bill calling
for stock school plans that had been
introduced at the 1961 session of the
Florida State Legislature.
Second, it was precisely because of
our vital interest in this subject that
we paid particular and searching at-


tention to the NLMA brochure that
carried Mr. Auerbach's work. Con-
trary to his expressed supposition, ma-
terial in this brochure was examined
most carefully. We found:
1 ... In Mr. Auerbach's own words
"... After analyzing both.current and
anticipated requirements for teaching
and learning facilities we found we
were involved in basic school plan-
ning ." and that ". The basic
school planning resolved itself into
the design of three types of schools."
2 Publicity material accom-
panying the brochure characterized
it as part of ". a newly available,
complete school program." Further,


. I I ... I. k :. .. .! ..- -. ,- .. I I


EDITOR, FA:
An editorial in the April issue of
your periodical has just been brought
to our attention. It is entitled "Blue-
print of a Fallacy" and concerns a bro-
chure, "Blueprint for Better Schools,"
put out by the National Lumber
Manufacturer's Association based on
several school designs we did for
them.
Seemingly without having com-
pletely read the introductory para-
graphs and without having done any
investigation of the facts prior to
writing,this editorial, the author has
proceeded to condemn this program
"as a high-powered promotion for
stock school plans."
As the architects for this project,
we wish to make the following clear:
1 ... Both the architect's remarks
and those of the NLMA which
are contained on the inside of the
front cover of the brochure, had
they been read, would indicate to
the reader that the purpose and
intent of this brocrure is to "stim-
ulate the interest of architects and
school planners."
2 ... There is no statement or
inference in the book that working
drawings, specifications or any of
the like are available, as indeed
they are not, but rather that the
NLMA would, upon request, pro-
vide technical assistance and in-
formation regarding the use of
wood in school construction.
3 ... Had the editorial writer
been in contact with either the
NLMA or our office asking for


"stock plans," he would have been
told categorcially that none are
available. In fact, none exist.
4 ... Had the writer of the edi-
torial properly checked with the
National AIA, he would have
found Mr. Clarke T. Cooper, Jr.
to be a Corporate Member in good
standing of the Washington-Metro-
politan Chapter of the AIA; his
date of membership being too
recent to have had his name in-
cluded in the 1960 Membership
List (which was compiled as of
September, 1959.)
We believe the implications of this
editorial to be baseless and somewhat
harmful to a good, healthy intercourse
of school design ideas through the
activities and publications of inter-
ested parties.
If the exposure of design ideas,
whether or not they encompass the
exclusive use of a particular building
material, is to be construed as the
presentation of stock plans, then, in
that regard, we have presented stock
plans.
We have heard, whether true or
not, that some architectural firms are
interested in our designs and were
incorporating some aspects of them
in work they were doing. For our
part, we are glad that this is being
done and welcome it as a compliment
on our work. If it is this effect of
the brochure that the editorialist
wishes to guard against, then publi-
cation of any and all school ideas,
whether by professional journals or


interested parties, should be stopped.
Now, let me say a word about the
way these designs were undertaken.
Our original charge from our clients
was to provide a typical school plan
on which we should then hang as
many different types of wood struc-
tural systems as could be thought up.
However, our philosophy of design
does not allow this, but rather calls
for specific structure for specific rea-
son. We also maintain that there are
certain environmental considerations
that should shape a school and its
structure and the selection of its
materials. To the end that these ideas
could be presented, we offered to do
designs for three reasonably different
programs, all of which could be prop-
erly done in a timber system of some
sort. After establishing the programs
the design of the building was ap-
proached much the same as any other
job in our office, with the exception
that we stopped before executing
working drawings and that we dem-
onstrated some possible variations of
our basic schemes.
We wholeheartedly support the
thesis that stock plans hold no solu-
tion to the school problem facing our
communities, but we feel that edi-
torial energy could better be spent
in telling the public why rather than
by condemning out of defense, by
implication and without factual foun-
dation.
SEYMOUR AUERBACH, AIA
Cooper & Auerbach, Architects
Washington, D. C.


20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






captions in the brochure clearly indi-
cate that the three school designs had
been developed to be applicable to as
wide as possible a range of site con-
ditions and community requirements.
3 Mr. Auerbach's foreword
states that ". All of these designs
were developed and engineered in de-
tail so far as structural systems, in-
terior and exterior finishes are con-
cerned". Presentation included sketch
plans complete even to furniture and
equipment indications and with
graphic scales so that room dimen-
sions could be accurately measured.
With these were wall sections, struc-
tural details, suggestions for interior
treatments, alternate elevation details,
perspectives, and photographs of scale
models. The NLMA publicity release
states that ". detailed structural
data" are available on request.
To us the conclusion seemed in-
escapable that here was a remarkably
well worked out basis for stock school
plans. Based on the material in this
brochure it would appear easy for a
competent draftsman on the payroll
of a local school board to develop the
working drawings necessary for the
construction of any of these schools.
We did not say in our former com-
ment nor did we believe that
Mr. Auerbach or the NLMA had of-
fered, or had even produced, com-
plete construction documents of their
designs. Nor did we decry any effort
to publicize constructive ideas.
Neither did we deprecate the ingenu-
ity and designing skill which was evi-
dent in the material contained in the
NLMA brochure. Our chief concern
was with the implication inherent in
the presentation of this material-that
individual community educational re-
quirements can be easily and ade-
quately met by "adapting" a pre-con-
ceived design concept to local site
conditions. This is the idea behind
the stock school plan advocacy. And
it is the fallacy of this idea that we
feel impelled -through duty and
inclination to expose at every turn.
We did not, nor do we now, have
any wish to deprecate either the abili-
ties of Mr. Auerbach and his associ-
ates nor the justifiable desire of the
NLMA to promote greater accept-
ance of its products. If our comment
in the April issue appeared to do this,
we are as guilty of publishing a mis-
understanding as, in our considered
judgement, is the NLMA. And for
this we are sorry on both counts.
JUNE, 1961


Sarasota Develops New
Bidding Practice Code
Sarasota is the newest Florida com-
munity to follow the lead of Jack-
sonville, Fort Lauderdale and Or-
lando in the development of a new
Construction Bidding Practice Code.
Started some five months ago, the
Code has been put into final form
and a program is now underway to
gain approval of a sufficient number
of subscribers so that it may be short-
ly put into effect as standard proced-
ure in Sarasota County. Once this is
accomplished it is hoped the new
Code will be accepted in other areas,
including Manatee County.
The bidding practice proposal was
initiated by a committee-now desig-
nated as the Code's Board of Control
-that included ROLAND W. SELLEW,
AIA, Chairman, and DONALD ROWE,
Vice Chairman, HERBERT F. AL-
WARD, Secretary treasurer, RUSSELL
A. CURRIN, HOWARD B. HILL, WER-
NER F. KANNENBERG, AIA, and T. T.
WATSON. It undertook, according to
a statement from the chairman,
"... to investigate such codes as have
been in operation heretofore, notably
in Broward and Duval counties. We
took what we deemed to be the better
features of both of these and from
them developed our proposed code.


. The draft of the code was
reviewed by a series of meetings with
architects, general contractors, sub-
contractors and material suppliers.
The final code as printed was changed
in but a very few minor particulars
by these meetings and then essentially
unanimously approved by each
group."
Copies of the code, including a
membership application form, are
available from the Board of Control's
office, Post Office Box 1335, Sara-
sota.
In common with other recently
adopted bidding procedure proposals,
Sarasota County's new Code contains
lists of procedure for compliance on
the part of architects, general con-
tractors and sub-bidders -including
sub-contractors and suppliers. Basic
foundation of the new Code is the
"four-hour bid plan" which has been
increasingly regarded as one of the
greatest deterrrants to the recognized
evil of bid-shopping.

Student Awards .
Recognition for outstanding stu-
dents was the subject of the Annual
Awards Luncheon of the U/F's Col-
lege of Architecture and Fine Arts
held in Gainesville May 11. Top
(Continued on Page 22)


FAA President Robert H. Levison and three past presidents of the FAA,
Clinton Gamble, John Stetson and H. Samuel Kruse, hold a planning conference
between the business meetings at the AIA Convention in Philadelphia. Subject
of this particular conference was not announced. But it might well have had
to do with the FAA's 1961 Office Practice Seminar to be held in Tampa, at
the Hillsboro Hotel on Saturday, June 10, 1961. Two morning discussion
panels will deal with "The Student and the Architect" and "Architect-Engineer
Coordination." Subjects of the two afternoon panels will be "New AIA General
Conditions" and "Omissions and Errors-Liability and Legal Responsibilities
of the Architect." Dean Samuel T. Hurst will summarize the program as guest
speaker.
~~.:.,-.....-..,.






News & Notes-
(Continued from Page 21)
honors, the Silver Medal of the AIA,
went to FORREST F. LISLE of Winter
Haven, with THOMAS F. BRIDGES of
Dania as runner-up. Both students
received the architectural classic by
Henry Adams, Mont Saint Michel
and Chartres. The Silver Medal is
given to the graduating student whose
academic career has been distin-
guished and who shows most promise
as a future architect.
The FAA Medal, awarded for lead-
ership and service, was presented by
JACK MOORE, AIA, to THOMAS F.
BRIDGES. WVILLIAM F. WEDEMEYER,
III, of Coral Gables, received from
Professor JAMES T. LENDRUM, AIA,
the Alpha Rho Chi medal in recogni-
tion of student leadership and pro-
fessional promise.
Tuition scholarships provided by
the Barrett Division of the Allied
Chemical Corp. and the Tile Council
of America were granted to DAVID K.
BOUBELIK, Nashville, Tenn.; GERALD
E. WARRINER, Miami; JOSEPH R.
VISI.AY, Greensburg, Pa.; WILLIAM
D. ASHWORTH, Homestead; and
THOMAS F. BRIDGES.


A number of awards were made for
winners of design competitions held
during the year. For excellence in a
final design project, an airport for
Jacksonville, books were given to
February graduates. FORREST F.
LISLE received first prize; THOMAS N.
WATTS, Fort Lauderdale, second
prize; and JAMES E. COSTOPOULOS,
Fort Pierce, third. First prize for a
design competition sponsored by the
Brick Layers, Masons and Plasterers
Union went to PETER RUMPEL,
Ponte Vedra Beach. LARRY K.
TRAVIS, Winterset, won the second
prize and WILLIAM F. WEDEMYER,
III, the third.
Pearcc-Uible Homes, Inc., of Jack-
sonville, provided prizes for the de-
sign of a middle income residence.
First prize went to ROBERT TROY
HUNTER of Fort Pierce; the second to
RICK RADOS of St. Petersburg. Honor-
able mentions were awarded to JULIO
ARIAS WRIGHT, Panama City, Pan-
ama; JOSEPH VISLAY; and CHARLES
WRIGHT, Lake Worth. Winners of a
competition sponsored by the Tile
Council of America were: first, PAUL
E. ROBINSON, Savannah, Ga.; second,
EUGENE L. HAYES, Booneville, N.Y.;
third, BARTLEY NOTOWITZ, Miami


Beach; and fourth, DAVID L. LEON-
ARD, Stanford.
Winners of the competition in in-
terior design sponsored by the Florida
chapter, AID, were: first, JOHN C.
ODIN, Miami; and second, MARY
BETH GILFILLAN, Mount Vernon,
Ohio. Honorable mentions went to
ROBERTA LANE, Myrtle Grove, and
CAROL SUE BARINGER, Gaincsville.
The Mobile Homes Research
Foundation awarded prizes to stu-
dents in landscape design. ARTHUR
FOSTER, Jacksonville, took first prize;
RONNIE GINN, Gainesville, second;
and THEODORE LITTLER, Boulder
City, Nevada, third.

Miami's ASA Obtains
Organization Charter
The letters "ASA" have a special
meaning in Greater Miami architec-
tural circles. They stand for the Arch-
itectural Secretaries' Association, now
in its second year of a vigorous and
dedicated existence. Organized in the
fall of 1959, the group now numbers
some 30 top-flight secretaries of lead-
ing Miami architects-and though
hardly more than eighteen months
old, the organization has already won


Twenty-seven Florida members attended the AIA Convention in Philadelphia, among them this group who were
present for a mid-Convention caucus of FAA representatives. Seated, left to right: A. Wynn Howell, president,
Florida Central; David W. Potter, Florida North Central; Marion I. Manley, FAIA, Florida South; H. Samuel Kruse,
Florida South; Arthur F. Deam, Mid-Florida. Standing: Robert H. Levison, President, FAA; W. Kenneth Miller,
Mid-Florida; John Stetson, president, Florida Joint Cooperative Council; Clinton Gamble, Broward County; Jack
McCandless, Florida Central; Dana B. Johannes, Florida Central; Gene Thompson, Mid-Florida; and Robert M.
Little, FAIA, Director, Florida Region, AIA.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






the Miami News Community Service
Award and national recognition.
The May meeting of the ASA was
a high point of the current year's
program. During a brief ceremony,
EDWARD G. GRAFTON, AIA, presented
the organization's new charter to MRS.
BILLIE THOMPSON, the group's first
president. The ASA thus becomes the
first chartered organization of its kind
in the country. But the widening in-
terest generated by its varied activities
points to the probability that other
ASA chapters will be formed. MRS.
Lucy MUNZNER, 1961 president, is
already working with a group of arch-
itectural secretaries in Chicago toward
this end.
Chief purpose of the group is co-
operative effort to develop better serv-
ice to those by whom members are
employed. Several monthly meetings
have included panel discussions on
secretarial "short cuts" and improved
methods for handling office operations.
The group has conducted a continu-
ous money-raising campaign for char-
ities and as a result has helped
rehabilitate a needy family and has
turned $400 over to the Florence
Crittendon Home. In October last
year "Bosses' Night" was inaugurated
at which Senator CLIFF HERRELL was
guest speaker and WALTER S. KLEM-
ENTS was crowned "Boss of the Year."
In April this year B. ROBERT SWART-
BURG, AIX, entertained the eroup at
a cocktail and buffet party in his
Miami Beach home.


AIA Issues Ruling
On Suspended Members
Strange as it may seem there exists
what appears to be a general mis-
understanding of the rights and privi-
leges of members of the AIA who,
for one reason or another, have been
suspended. To clarify this matter,
JAMES O. KEMP, Secretary of the
Jacksonville Chapter, recently sought
and obtained a ruling from the Sec-
retary of the Institute, J. ROY CAR-
ROLL, JR., FAIA. The Jacksonville
Chapter has made this ruling avail-
able for publication for the helpful
information and guidance of other
Florida Chapters.
The AIA By-laws indicate that only
corporate members in "good stand-
ing" may enjoy the rights and privi-
leges of Institute membership. Good
Standing is defined as follows:
"A corporate member is not in
good standing in The Institute or in
any of its component organizations
if he is under suspension. Immediate-
ly upon the suspension of a corporate
member, his rights in the Institute
and in any of its chapters or state
organizations shall be withdrawn until
he is restored to good standing."
According to the AIA Secretary,
the AIA Board of Directors has adopt-
ed the following rules with respect
to corporate members under suspen-
sion:
"1 They shall not use the initials
'AIA'.


"2 __They shall not hold themselves
out to the public as members of The
Institute.
"3 ..-The Institute shall not classify
them as members.
"4 __They shall be removed from
the mailing list of The Institute for
the period of their suspension.
"5 --They will be required to pay
dues.
"6 _They shall not be allowed to
attend meetings or to participate in
any way in Institute activities."

Changes .
Effective July 1, KEMP BUNCH &
JACKSON, Architects, will move their
offices from 33 South Hogan Street
to 1320 Coast Line Building, Jackson-
ville 2. The firm designed the re-
cently completed Coast Line Build-
ing as a notable addition to Jack-
sonville's new waterfront develop-
ment.
HAROLD C. ROSE, formerly a mem-
ber of the faculty of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts of the
U/F, has accepted the post of Di-
rector of the School of Architecture,
Montana State College at Bozeman,
Montana.
FRANCES R. WALTON, member of
the State Board of Architecture, has
moved his office from 142 Bay Street
-where he had been since 1947-to
Room 217 in the new IBEW Build-
ing at North Ridgewood Avenue,
Daytona Beach. He was the architect
for the new building.


. ~ ..~.........
...,~ ~ .......-. ~ ~......,..,...
..,.
~. ...-...


International Is The Word ...
(Continued from Page 16)
like to clear everything up, planners
change their opinion all too often.
In the meantime, Palermo has be-
come socially degraded to the point
that only the "Report" by DANIEL
DOLCI, perhaps the best living Italian
who recently visited this country,
succeeded in depicting. Venice is
going to pieces; and its new town-
plan, just approved, does not offer
any long-range solution. Milan, yes,
is totally renewed, with the result
that it is perhaps the ugliest city in
Europe, a city where the Duomo and
St. Ambrogio are the only buildings
which look out of place and tune.
In the next five years the historical
center of Rome is going to be re-
newed, and the question is, once
again: how to do it?
JUNE, 1951


I think that this problem too
concerns all of us. In spite of the
differences between American and
European towns, a philosophy flexible
enough to be applied to American
cities quite probably might work also
for Europe.
These are my main questions re-
garding the city's size, its new third
dimension, and urban renewal. They
are questions of an economic, social
and esthetic nature, at the same time,
because the notion of anti social
beauty is just a contradiction in
terms. I could stop with these ques-
tions, but I ask of you two more
minutes to stress a point about which
I feel very strongly and which con-
cerns international cooperation on
planning policy, city-design and urban
renewal.
To be frank, can we expect a


definite answer to these questions,
from this panel of this convention?
It is doubtful: we are no longer
looking for formulas, for theories
valid everywhere and nowhere. We
believe in experiences and mutual col-
laboration; and this is an urgent prob-
lem about which perhaps we can do
something right here and now.
As you know, there are many inter-
national bodies and organizations that
are supposed to take care of exchange
of information. But, for some reason
or another, they do not seem to work.
First of all, many of them collect
facts and figures from official sources,
general facts and apologetic figures.
They never touch the real core of
the matter, the specific city problems.
Secondly, these official organizations
either do not follow any clear phil-
(Continued on Page 24)






International Is The Word ...
(Continued from Page 23)
osophy concerning our urban future,
or they follow two or three different
philosophies at the same time. On one
side, they have an abstract, illum-
nistic approach; they imply that there
are certain universal values in urban
civilization, which should work from
Brazil to China because they are good
for everybody. When you come down
to find out what these universal
values are, you discover that they are
vague common denominators of no
interest to anyone.
Sometimes, they take the opposite
approach. They try to adhere to what
they call the specific cultural pattern
of every nation; they find that every-
thing that exists has some reason
for existing-even the slums if they
are picturesque enough. This is a pa-
ternalistic attitude, almost a colonial
approach, and it works just as badly
as illuministic abstractions. Finally,
the major fault with all these inter-
national organizations is that they are
paralyzed by the principle of non-
intervention.


I submit to you that a totally dif-
ferent type of international coopera-
tion on city design should be
organized. Something coming directly
from the profession, anti-bureacratic,
quick to intervene in every part of
the world, around a drawing board,
with pencils in hand. Towns are to
be redesigned, and in this task every
country needs the support of others,
and can contribute. A timely, friendly,
and competent intervention from out-
side can remove many difficulties that
arise within a single nation.
However, whether you will con-
sider this suggestion or not, I want
you to know that whatever you do
in redesigning urban America has a
great impact on Europe. When the
plan for Fort Worth was published,
there was in Italy a sincere enthu-
siasm; we felt that something had
been done for Texas which was
instrumental and meaningful also for
us. The same can be said of the
Golden Gateway Redevelopment in
San Francisco, of your experience in
Detroit, in Pittsburgh, and in many
other cities, of the admirable cam-
paign on urban renewal that some


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of your architectural magazines are
conducting. The same is true espe-
cially of Philadelphia, a city which,
for the work being done in the Uni-
versity, in the planning commission
and in the redevelopment authority,
might be considered one of the
world's major centers for city design
today.
Fifteen years ago, I had the honor
to speak at the Convention of the
American Institute of Planners which
was held in Cleveland. This was in
1946. The title of my address was:
"Town Planning as an Instrument of
an American Foreign Policy." I meant
what it implied. Unfortunately, dur-
ing the last fifteen years, this instru-
ment was little used, and American
foreign policy was not always bril-
liant and successful. Something, how-
ever, is changing now, here as in the
whole world. Expectation is in the
air; and I feel once again that the
architects' contribution can be de-
termining. Town-making will perhaps
be the final battleground between the
East and the West. In an affluent
society, the quantitative competition
is going to become less and less
important. The final battle will be
fought on quality. And their city de-
signers and architects will bear the
greatest responsibility.



Pattern of Professions...
(Continued from Page 8)
the public want and -need; what they
are able to afford and then, how best
they can sacrifice to get those things
which are most essential.
Professions, as we know them, are
divided for purposes of training and
legality; each profession, in its turn, is
divided into the practical (or active)
and the spiritual (or philosophical).
Let us be more definite. In the prac-
tical profession, dedicated persons
strive to cure or lessen those ills and
evils which were not intended in the
Creation, but which man has brought
about by his own fault or neglect. In
the spiritual aspect, we find the en-
lightenment which will instill a right
conscience into the minds of, and a
serenity of soul within, those who are
dedicated to practice or, an under-
standing as to what to cure and how!
Despite the amoebic nature of pro-
fessional lines in ancient and modern
(Continued on Page 27)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






















Note to taxpayers:


Up to 75% of the materials are free when

streets are paved with


soil-cement

It's stronger inch for inch than any
other paying material except concrete.
CROSS SECTION
Tax saving, low-cost streets can be attractive long-life streets. The
answer is modern soil-cement.
Soil, usually right on the site, portland cement and water are all that's
needed. Mix together, roll solid, add a bituminous topping-the job's
done! Even worn out gravel and blacktop street material can be broken
up and mixed in. Modern machines and skilled street crews can lay
several blocks a day. No mess and inconvenience for you, either. Soil-
cement can take local traffic the first day.
Initial cost is low. And there's little or no maintenance. Sound rea-
nons why more and more communities throughout our nation are using
soil-cement pavement to get good streets with few tax dollars. Write for
free information.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete
JUNE, 1961


s MODERN
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THE LADY SAID NO to high-cost home heating
and shell say YES only to low-cost OIL heat!
Of course Mrs. Wilson wants permanent heating
in her home in cold snap weather. And she
knows home heating needn't cost much in Florida. MR. ARCHITECI:
That's why she won't even consider-a home
that's not equipped with economical oil heat. We are again reminding your clients (in 11 Florida
She checked up on home heating costs and learned newspapers with 690,000 circulation) that "lux-
that oil heat averages about HALF the cost of curious oil heat cuts home heating bills in half."
heat from other fuels. So she's doing her house-
hunting in the new communities featuring We believe you'll find quick and grateful accept-
cheaper, safer, all-round-better oil home heating ance when you specify economical, efficient, cen
Moral: Insist on luxurious oil heat and trial oil heating.
"live economically ever after"!

FLORIDA HOME %e HEATING INSTITUTE
2022 N. W. 7th STREET, MIAMI
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26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Pattern of Professions...
(Cont:nued from Page 24)
times, history which has a way of
forgetting the transient and putting
the pieces into place-clearly records
that the dedicated professional think-
ers of all ages have dwelt within the
disciplines of the three historically
gifted planning professions which are
Philosophy, Sociology and Architect-
ure.
Here, let us define "planning." To
begin with, no one would waste time
assembling the facts about, or dis-
covering the ills and evils confront-
ing humanity without the intention
of evolving the cure. But, since we
have realized that there is a basic
spiritual or philosophical background
common to all professions, we now
arrive at a more fulsome definition.
Planning must therefore comprise all
of the work of those who dedicate
their lives to the alleviation of human
misery.
Let us enlarge briefly. Philosophy
covers all of the relationships of man
with his Creator, fellow man, and to-
ward himself, the group and the com-
munity. It must be correlated to his-
tory. Sociology deals with the health
and welfare, both physical and men-
tal, of man, the family, group and
community. It is best tempered by
humanitarianism. Architecture con-
cerns itself with all of the physical
surroundings of man, the family
group and community. It must
enoble and inspire. By now, it should
be plain that all three planning pro-
fessions have as their aim (besides
alleviating human misery), increasing
the values and pleasantness of life for
man and his community, of civiliza-
tion and ultimately of the world -
this, to elevate us all.
Let us be careful to avoid a play on
wrods which may offend dedicated
professional men because of our
general lack of understanding of the
roots of our language since we began
(about 136 years ago) to choke off
our thought and literature from the
life blood of the parent civilizations
of Europe by belittling everything
European as "old fashioned" and
"unnecessary." "Learn to make a liv-
ing" was the only accepted social
standard. As related above, law and
politics are Philosophical; medicine is
a part of Sociology; landscape archi-
tecture and graphic statics are in-
cluded in Architecture.


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JUNE, 1961


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HAVE YOU CHANGED YOUR ADDRESS?
If so, be sure to send in your new address PROMPTLY.
We try hard to keep our mailing files up to date. But
if we don't receive change of address notices in time
to revise the files, the magazine is mailed to the old
address, then returned for non-delivery... So, keep us
informed. This way you can keep your issue files intact.


Letters
(Continued from Page 6)

At this point it is time to shed
a tear. The very persons who could
lead us from this cultural desert are
the most guilty. Our own organiza-
tion, the AIA, has promoted the
"professional" aspect of the archi-
tect so much that the public no
longer looks to us for esthetic guid-
ance. It's almost a crime to be an
artist. We have become so obsessed
with buildings that we have lost sight
of what buildings really are, what
they do to, and for, the users and
the public. We construct monuments
to ourselves with little care of their
effect on the adjoining property, the
neighborhood, or the community.
Some of us are so hot to obtain
work we charge a fee too small to
produce anything worth while. Others
of us have been so charmed by the
AIA code of ethics we refrain from
publicly criticizing the architect,
even when the work is horribly bad.
Still others of us politic so hard for
a job that in essence we become the
captive of the owner whom we must
not offend since he was so gracious
to give us the job in the first place.
Still others accept work which we
know in advance cannot, because of
the attitude of the client, become
a worthwhile project. This we ration-
alize by saying to ourselves, "we'll
make money on this one, and do
well on the next one."
Look around you! How many
architects do you know that aren't
guilty of at least one of these? How
many architects do you know that
have told an overly restrictive client
to "go to hell" who has fired a
client because he could not engender
a sense of social responsibility, who
has placed his own sense of morality
ahead of the fee? Not very many.
Zoning is only one of the very
many problems for which the prime


responsibility of solution lies with
the architects. I frankly have little
hope for the solution of any of these
problems as long as architects are
as they are-and as long as we re-
place one crutch with another.
DAVID REAVES
Architect, Gainesville

Thank You Sir .
EDITOR, FA:
Acting on the theory that the
living should have a few flowers also,
this is just a note to tell you how
much I think your publication, The
Florida Architect, has improved over
the past few years under your able
administration. There is no doubt
about it; you have done a wonderful
job.
Congratulations and the best of
everything in the future!
JAMES E. DUNN
District Engineer,
Portland Cement Association,
Orlando

Operation Re-Echo .
EDITOR, FA:
In reading the May issue of your
attractive and interesting magazine,
I enjoyed particularly your editorial
entitled "Low Cost Does Not Always
Mean Fair Value." Your discussion
of the importance of not only speci-
fications per se, but the necessity for
preventing deviations from the stand-
ard of quality established by the
specification, warmed my heart. The
statement that "Specifcations are an
essential part of the architect's 'total
design' job" should be re-echoed
throughout the architectural profes-
sion.
Your approach to the subject of
low cost, as expressed in your editorial
is of considerable interest to us. We
are convinced that it would be of
great interest to our readers. Could
you be persuaded to expand your
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






thoughts into an article for publica-
tion in our magazine, The Construc-
tion Specifier? We would be honored
to publish such an article.
CARL J. EBERT, FCSI, AIA
Editor, The Construction Specifier



Sound, Good

and Necessary .

Editor, FA:
A copy of The Florida Architect
(March, 1961, issue) was given to
me so that I might read your very
interesting editorial, "Cooperation ..
A Basis For Economic Growth."
Please accept my congratulations on
the sentiments expressed so well and
so strongly felt by many of us.
It would seem to me that your
editorial could be the basis for bring-
ing together various segments of our
economy to develop the germ of an
idea you refer to as "buy Florida."
It is sound, good and necessary.
I hope some way of bringing it to
life will be found.
E. H. FISHER
Sharmal of Miami,
Hialeah, Florida



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
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Corp. .. 1
Bird & Son . 9,10
Blumcraft of Pittsburg 12
A. R. Cogswell.. . 28
Dwyer Kitchens of Florida 24
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 6
Florida Home Heating Institute 26
Florida Power & Light Co. 11
Florida Prestressed
Concrete Assn. .17
General Portland Cement Co. 7
Hamilton Plywood . 4
Houdaille-Span, Inc.. 5
Meekins, Inc. 2nd cover
Merry Brothers Brick &
Tile Co. . 3
Richard Plumer 18,19
Portland Cement Assn. .. 25
Prescolite Mfg. Co . 6
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 27
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 8
Superior Solar Shade Co. 4th cover
Tempera Corp. . 6
F. Graham Williams Co. 29


JUNE, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK .D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 23)

Three New Seminars on
Atomic Shelter Structures

The atomic age has produced a
wealth of entirely new problems for
architects, engineers, scientists, ex-
ecutives, and others in management.
Consideration must now be given in
the design of structures to the effects
of atomic weapons, both from the
standpoints of nuclear blast and radi-
ation. These problems have prompted
The Pennsylvania State University to
offer three seminars in the area of
atomic shelter and survival in the
nuclear age this summer.
The first of the seminars, Planning
Aspects of Atomic Shelter, July 9
through July 21, is for architects and
engineers who are, or will become,
involved in planning and preliminary
design aspects of buildings, shelters,


and facilities to resist the effects of
nuclear weapons. The course will
include a summary of effects of
atomic weapons, including blast and
nuclear and thermal radiation, func-
tional requirements for protection, re-
lationship of various protection criteria
to total system planning, planning
of integrated shelter systems including
architectural, structural, electrical, me-
chanical, and sanitary sub-systems.
From July 23 to August 4 will be
the second event, Structural Engi-
neering Aspects of Atomic Shelter,
a short course for structural and arch-
itectural engineers involved in the
analysis and design of structural sys-
tems and radiation shielding systems
of buildings, shelters, and structures.
Included will be a brief summary
of atomic weapon effects data, blast
loading of various structural systems.
The third seminar, to be held
August 13 to 18, is titled Survival
in the Nuclear Age-Ex-cutive Man-
agement. It is intended for architects,


executives, engineers, and others in
management responsible for the ad-
ministrative planning of industrial,
governmental, municipal, hospital,
and other facilities and complexes for
the incorporation of protection against
the effects of nuclear weapons. Under
consideration will be 'the survival
problem from the standpoint of exe-
cutive management, including the
significance of nuclear weapons effects
in relation to the survival of buildings
and personnel, and the continuity of
industrial and governmental capabil-
ity; the need for atomic shelters, and
the economics of protection.
Co-chairmen for the seminars are
GIFFORD H. ALBRIGHT, director of
the Shelter Research and Study Pro-
gram, and ALLEN F. DILL, deputy
director, Shelter Research and Study
Program. Further information may
be obtained from the Shelter Re-
search and Study Program, 133 Ham-
mond Bldg., The Pennsylvania State
University, University Park, Penna.


.,LL .7

al C- :
bn-KjkLX-mi


Prize-Winning Design .
This small house design won a first
prize of $1,000 for JOHN G. SHMERY-
KOWSKY, a 24-year-old senior in the
University of Miami's Department of
Architectural Engineering. Second
prize, a scroll, went to FRANK S. OF-
658.-5, a U/M junior. Third prize,
also a scroll, was won by MICHAEL
R. BOTWIN, a senior.
The student competition, super-
vised by Professor JAMES E. BRANCH,
AIA, chairman of the U/M archi-
tectural department, and Professor
JOHN E. SWEET, was sponsored by
the Heftier Construction Company
and called for a house containing
1,200 sq. ft. on a 75 by 100-ft. lot.
Under the terms of the award
Shmerykowsky may attend the 1961
Summer School of Fine Arts in Fon-
tainebleau, France, or may keep the
cash and work for the Heftier firm
during the summer. He will graduate
this month with a BS in architectural
engineering. Judges in the compe-
tition were JOHN L. AVANT, president,
So. Fla. Chapter, AGC; MRS. BETTY
JANE BISSETT, U/M home economist;
ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, AIA Re-
gional Director; SEBESTIAN POLLERA,
vice-president of the Heftier firm, and
Miss JANE E. WARD, AID, of Rich-
ard Plumer, Miami.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~ ~4~k~


'*"-T.As '.


I1 -- MI
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Next In


November...


S. .This year the Palm Beach Chapter will be
host to the FAA's 47th Convention and all who
remember the 1954 Convention at La Coquille will
be looking forward to a wonderful time this fall .
Site of this 47th annual conclave will be the
fantastic Boca Raton Hotel a crowning product
of Addison Mizner's genius. And the Convention Theme
now under development and soon to be
announced -will, by all reports, be as provocative
as any in all the FAA's bright convention history .










With a magnificent set-
ting on the Inland Wat-
erway and flanked by
one of the nation's finest
championship Cgolf
courses, the Boca Raton
Hotel offers everything
that the most demanding
conventioneer could want.
One of the finest muse-
um pieces of the Addison
Mizner era, it has been
lavishly re-developed to
provide complete facili-
ties for every comfort
and convenience .













UAL FAA CONVENTION
1961 BOCA RATON HOTEL BOCA RATON






The Deawille Hotel
Mimi Beach, Florida
':kMelvin GOsmao
ILIA Architect


IRSPIRtlliGI
Condominio Ponce de Leon, Santurce, Puerto Rico
H I. Httinger and Co., General Contractor
Reinaldo Perez, Architect
Tecenmmora Realty and Financing Corp., owners
V; .,,S -.. r ,,. ... .. .. .. .


riii
WI


MONUMENTAL
Dade County Jall and Public Safety BIil g
Coda & Associates
Architects
William Burbessee & Co.
General Contractor


WI


SYSTEM OF
CURTAIN WALL
AND
WINDOW WALL
CONSTRUCTION


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