Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00080
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text





FLRD ARCHITECT
FFLJOURNALoftheFLORIDA ASSOIATIO ACHITERIC I I






7o T74 Memor aned ieje's Purosae of 74a Man.,.




The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


e Architecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience. . The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing, in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W.
Goin lived and worked.

The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Edmond N. MacCollin,
President, 240 Bayside Drive,
Clearwater Beach, Florida.
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Iso .te . WITH THE DIFFERENCE THAT MAKES IT BETTER . .

FEBRUARY, 1961 1







76e



Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


nT 7%4 Isue ---

The Gift of Service .................... 4
Message from The President by Robert H. Levison, AIA
Churches Trends of a New Building Boom 9
South Miami Lutheran Church 8-11
Pasadena Community Church .. 12-13
Parish Hall, St. Mary's Episcopal Church 14
Pompano Beach Methodist Church 15
Three Noteworthy Small Churches 16
Architects Invited to Attend Church Conferences 11
News and Notes .................... 20
Message from Florida Northwest Chapter 22
By Roy L. Ricks, AIA, President
Shell Surround 24
By Frank E. Watson, AIA
Advertisers' Index ................... 27
A Letter to The Governor 3rd Cover
By Roger W. Sherman, AIA


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater American Institute of Architects, is owned by
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando listed monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud. Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
DIRECTORS reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
Immediate Past President: John Stetson; BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W. and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R. Walton; . Advertisements of products, materials and
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
Pulara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister FAIA, McMillan H. Johnson; come, but mention of names or use of illus-
Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, Mtrations, of such materials and products in
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Lawrence B. Evans, Jr.; FLORIDA NORTH either editorial or advertising columns does not
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, Jr., John R. nation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA: Charle L. Hendrick, John the right is reserved to reject such material be-
P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobon, Frederick W. Kessler. cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida . Printed by
Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
THE COVER Clinton Gamble, Dana B. Johannes,
The second of our 1961 series of covers designed by students at the University William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
of Florida was done by Charles Kirkland. It was selected for this particular
issue because it seemed to carry at least to the editor a kind of abstract
suggestion of some sort of chuch symbolism. We could be wrong, of course. ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Maybe we just liked it! Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 11

NUMBER 211 / I


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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-1; F ~-~~"l" ** *%g,


FEBRUARY, 1961


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Message fwm 74 Presaeiet..,



The Gift of Service

By ROBERT H. LEVISON
President, The Florida Association of Architects


We are sometimes so busy "getting"
that we find little time to give. Let's
stop for a moment and think about
this facet of our lives, both personal
and professional.
The art of giving embraces many
categories and encompasses many
areas. As Emerson said: "Rings and
jewels are not gifts but apologies for
gifts. The only true gift is a portion
of thyself." How then can we make
the "true" gift not only as people,
but as professionals as well?
As a member of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects your active par-
ticipation in civic affairs (on muni-
cipal boards, in worthy charity drives,
on committees for public improve-
ment, in civic and fraternal organiza-


tions, working with youth and old age
adult groups) and regular church
affiliation can raise your standing in
the community and add to the stature
of your professional reputation. The
personal satisfaction achieved through
such service is also of no mean
consequence.
Individually and collectively, our
greatest service to the profession
should be in raising our own personal
standards to the highest possible level.
In most foreign countries, Europe
and South America particularly, the
architect is considered "tops" among
all professional men-a superior in-
dividual from the standpoint of cre-
ativity and integrity. A survey con-
ducted last year in one of our own


groups, professional guidance and
mental health clinics, schools and
largest cities by a national periodical
whose weekly circulation runs into
the millions, indicated that the Ameri-
can man on the street considers our
profession number one in its responsi-
bility to the public. We must live up
to that responsibility.
HOW?
(Continued on Page 6)


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Gift of Service...
(Continued from Page 4)
We have the mind with its ideas,
its dreams and its realizations. We
have the heart with its love, its sym-
pathy and its understanding. We have
time-patience-and we have words.
Of the latter, two with the most
meaning are encouragement and
guidance.
Wilfred A. Peterson once said that
the finest gift a man can give to his
age and his time is the gift of a
creative and constructive life. To
achieve this end in a professional
sense, I would propose the following:
1. Give of your mind to the young
professional, the student and the
architect in training. Make them
into good, sound stock and your
contribution doubles each day.
2. Give of your heart the joy of good
fellowship with your associates and
fellow architects. Try to be sym-
pathetic to their problems in the
light of your own-and again try
to develop greater understanding.
Accept the logic that admits there
are two sides to every story. Listen,
learn and appreciate.
3. Take the time to serve your asso-
ciation, its committees and com-
mitments. You will be the one to
gain.
4. Use your words to boost, not
knock. Only then are you giving
the "true" gift to your profession.
In so doing, you and the entire
world around you will benefit and
profit. Not only the poet asks:
"Who profits most? 'Tis not the
man
Who, grasping every coin he can,
Unscrupulously crushes down
His weaker neighbor with a frown."
Society has long since consigned
him to an indeterminate limbo as
unworthy of his trust, unworthy of
friendship and unfulfilled in his po-
tential mission of life.
Neither does he profit most who
fails to grasp the brass ring of oppor-
tunity on the merry-go-round of
existence and chooses to shirk respon-
sibilities that might lead to bigger and
better opportunities-and greater ser-
vice to mankind.
No one can withdraw from the
human race, can turn away from its
flaws, its frailties and its virtues with-
out losing its vision and the promise
of his own.


G GEORGE C.
RIFFIN 0.
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 10025, Jacksonville, Florida
















THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Bird Termite Prevention System,
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CHURCHES...


1%

iv A


Officials of Protestant churches which make up the National Council of Churches
have been quick to recognize that traditional design no longer provides adequate
expression for facilities needed in their expanding church service programs.
Basic religious symbolism has by no means been ruled out. But new architectural
forms are being warmly welcomed by every denomination, thus providing architects
with new and challenging professional opportunities . One example is the South
Miami Lutheran Church for which Polevitzky, Johnson and Associates were architects.
Above, is the Sanctuary, the initial structure of a four-building program. On the
opposite page is the Fellowship Building, completed last year. Other views and the
plot plan appear on pages 10 and 11.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Trends of A New Building Boom




During the last decade the volume of religious buildings increased more
than three times as fast as any other non-residential building type.
Church authorities forecast a continuation of this trend and estimate
that by 1970 the extent of our overall religious plant will have doubled.


The pattern of American commun-
ity development is being changed as
much by the construction of churches
as by the rapidly proliferating shop-
ping centers. In the last two decades,
the volume of religious buildings has
soared to an 880 percent increase;
and most construction departments
of the various Protestant denomina-
tions confidently expect that the
amount of enclosed space now used
for a variety of religious purposes will
more than double in the compara-
tively near future.
Thus, from the quantitative view-
point alone, church building presents
an opportunity of major proportions
to the architectural profession. And it
is an equally impressive opportunity
from the qualitative point of view. It
is safe to say that the values which
lie in good design and sound con-


struction are not only fully recognized
by church building administrators, but
constitute an integral part of the de-
velopment policies of most denomina-
tions which compose the National
Council of Churches.
One excerpt from a publication of
the Church Architecture Department
of the Southern Baptists illustrates
this point.
"No church building," says this
department, "should be undertaken
without the services of the best pro-
fessional architect .... Only the most
experienced professional architect can
make the wise decisions and choices
necessary in erecting worthy church
buildings. Southern Baptists will con-
tinue to have monstrosities and glaring
amateurish buildings unless and until
we employ the very best architects
when undertaking new buildings."


The statement reflects a similar
policy on the part of other denomina-
tions-and though designs in some
denominations may appear conserva-
tive in comparison, dramatic results
of the policy are increasingly evident
throughout the state. Within the
framework of a church building's
economics, creativity is being wel-
comed. To quote Dr. P. M. Boyd,
Miami District Superintendent of the
Methodist Church, ".... an architect
of ripe judgment, fair appraisal and
cooperative leadership is indispensable
along with a Building Committee of
vision and integrity .... Courage and
audacity for God's Kingdom are also
indispensibles if we are to match the
moral and religious needs of our peo-
ple. The impact upon the community
and the communist world is not going
(Continued on Page 10)


FEBRUARY, 1961







Churches...
(Continued from Page 9)
to be made by a timid, shrinking
Building Committee and architect."
Thus, by and large, the expanding
church building program has cut its
own bonds of architectonic tradition.
Current preoccupations are with novel
solutions to the various problems of
enclosing space for a growing number
of special uses. The architect's task
is no longer to provide merely a con-
ventional structure as a place for wor-
ship. It is to develop a religious plant
-in which facilities for educational
and fellowship activities may bulk
nearly as large in importance as the
sanctuary itself.
The church today, according to one
authority, Dr. J. Ray Dobbins, super-
intendent of Missions for the Miami
Baptist Association, encompasses
many needs and many activities. The
architect must plan for worship, teach-
ing, training, music, recreation, drama-
tics and social affairs. As the church
plant grows, administrative facilities
become increasingly important also.
But the problem is not a simple,
cut-and-dried procedure of designing
a complete church plant. Church
officials and church architects alike
emphasize the salient factor of change
that often virtually controls the design


of many church plants. Change is
created by growth-the expansion of
membership and the widening of the
Church service program. If architects
and church building committees were
to be given a single guiding caution,
say church planning authorities, it
would be a paraphrase of Burnham's
famous entreaty to "... plan no little
plans."
Location and land are the first two
items of any church building program
to prove the point. Most church offii-
cials set a minimum of two and one
half acres as necessary to accommo-
date a modest, but modern, church
plant. For the larger plant in or near
any metropolitan community the area
should be almost, if not quite, double
this. As to location, neighborhood
accessibility is of greatest importance
-and some authorities advocate a
location in the very center of the
community on the busiest of thor-
oughfares.
Though the architect may seldom
be involved with the actual selection
of the land, he is immediately con-
cerned with planning of the site and
the design of the various buildings
on it. Here the rule of thumb is to
provide for future as well as imme-
diate needs. Necessarily, of course,
both will be conditioned by the ulti-
mate size of the church membership;


and provision must be made for ade-
quate parking (in Dade County, for
example, the rule is one parking space
for each four seats) and outdoor
recreational space.
Obviously, specific requirements are
subject to wide variation, not only
relative to the character and size of
the building plot, but with respect
also to the liturgical needs and tradi-
tions of the particular denomination
involved. The architect should know
these variations and differences. But
most Protestant denominations main-
tain a headquarters planning and
architectural staff from which informa-
tion on specific customs and require-
ments may be obtained.
The second most important rule of
thumb is the need for the greatest
possible flexibility of building use.
This applies most particularly to the
initial stages of a new church building
program. Seldom does a church group
have sufficient money to complete its
plant immediately. More often the
plant development is a step-by-step
affair-though the church program
embodies as full a range of activities
as possible. This means, then, that
the architect must design in terms of
immediate multiple use as well as in
terms of ultimate special use.
Authorities are in general agree-
(Continued on Page 26)


Im.-n Fnrnov rnhm n


Left, the Sanctuary of the
South Miami Lutheran
Church; and, opposite, a
view across a landscaped
court toward the entrance
end and the curved portico
that links it with the two
Sunday School units and the
Fellowship Building . .
Here full freedom of design
has been utilized with no
loss of the religious "atmos-
phere" that churchmen
unanimously feel should be
a major factor of any
architectural expression.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Architects Invited to Attend Church Conferences

Florida elements of the Natioanl Council is Executive Director of the Department of
of Churches, in active cooperation with Church Building and Architecture of the
three Florida AIA Chapters will conduct a National Council of the Churches of Christ,
series of three consecutive conferences on U.S.A., in New York. Rev. Edward S. Frey
Church Building and Architecture from Feb- has similar responsibilities as Executive Direc-
ruary 27 to March 4. Purpose of the three- tor for the Department of Church Architec-
city program is to bring to those concerned ture of the United Lutheran Church in
with the subject a better understanding of America, also headquartered in New York.
good planning and adequate facilities for The third speaker, Rev. James L. Doom,
worship, education and fellowship, earned a degree in architecture from Georgia
First of the three meetings will be held Tech and later, in 1943, graduated from
in Grace Lutheran Church at St. Petersburg, the Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur,
February 27 and 28. The Central Baptist Ga. He is now serving as consultant in church
Church of Miami will be the location of the architecture for the Board of Church Ex-
second meeting on March 1 and 2. The third tension, Presbyterian Church in The United
meeting will be held in the Riverside Presby- States, with headquarters in Atlanta.
terian Church of Jacksonville, March 3 and 4. Their discussions of planning and design
Each of the three local conferences will problems relative to the various facilities
be similar in character in that a roster of needed for a modern church service program
main speakers will address each and each will form the core about which each confer-
will include a series of workshops on such ence will be developed. Local churchmen and
subjects as site planning, progressive con- architects will contribute toworkshopsessions.
struction programs, special requirements for Working with local church groups are
various church activities, financing, and ar- committees from the AIA Chapters in-
chitectural services. Each also will include evolved. In St. Petersburg the architects'
an architectural exhibit of outstanding group is chairmaned by Howard F. Allender;
churches assembled by the Church Architec- in Miami by James E. Ferguson, Jr.; and in
tural Guild of America as well as a show- Jacksonville by H. Lamar Drake.
ing of church work by local architects. Architects are invited to attend the con-
Main speakers are all ordained ministers ferences and are urged to submit, as early
who have extensive backgrounds in church as possible, examples of their religious work
planning and design. Rev. Scott T. Ritenour they deem suitable for exhibition.


FEBRUARY, 1961







Pasadena Community Church

St. Petersburg

WILLIAM B. HARVARD, Architect


William Amick, photos


Outdoor worship has long been a custom of this Methodist
Church; and this new sanctuary, completed last year at a bud-
geted cost of $650,000, was designed to retain an atmosphere
of openess and close contact with its gardened setting. For this
reason the seven-story-high structure-roofed without a single
interior column-is enclosed with glare-reducing gray glass
walls except at the chancel end. Piers between glass areas
enclose air-conditioning ducts and are faced with variegated
green glass mosaic. The roof is surfaced with chips of red clay
tile embedded in plastic. Inside, the ceiling is finished in soft
white plaster and indirectly lighted with concealed floodlights
controlled by dimmers. The central peak of the ceiling is 75
feet above the floor to impart a desired "soaring" character
to the interior; but a sense of intimacy has been gained by
the low ceiling height at the corners of the huge room. The
roof is framed with four main steel plate girders carried to
caps supported by concrete piles and joined at the peak with
four additional steel frames. At the narthex a mezzanine con-
tains service rooms; and the seating and lighting of the choir
loft has been arranged for religious plays and concerts.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


L

*.


.1


O

























On the opposite page is a
view looking toward the
entrance from the nar-
thex. Right, a closeup of
the exterior wall treat-
ment and anchorage for
one of the main plate
girders framing the roof.

















The sweep of the folded
roof planes contrives a
low silhouette for such a
large building and blends
well with the surrounding
buildings. The site has
been landscaped with re-
flecting pools around the
building.







In the chancel area, fin-
ished entirely in walnut,
the choir loft will accom-
modate augmented ora-
torio groups of 300.
Seating of the 2000
capacity auditorium is
upholstered in blue green
to harmonize with the
mosaic-faced piers of
the window walls. The
floor is vinyl tile over a
concrete slab poured with
a reverse incline to aid
visibility. Aisles, chancel
and narthex are carpeted
in burnt orange.
FEBRUARY, 1961

































Parish Hall, St. Mary's Espiscopal Church, Tampa


MARK HAMPTON

Architect



The problem was to provide a meeting hall and activities
center which could also work well as a temporary church
until the sanctuary itself could be built. It.is part of a
program which will include a rectory, a classroom build-
ing, a youth center, a chapel and the church itself -
plans for which have all been completed. In addition to
the auditorium and stage, now used as a sanctuary, the
building contains church offices, a library and lounge,
a completely equipped kitchen, robing rooms for the
choir and acolytes and apartments for the sexton and
curate. Construction is flat slab reinforced concrete
with buff masonry panels.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


William Amirk nhotn







Pompano Beach Methodist Church


HANSEN, ROMANO, SULLAN, HANSEN, Architects


























The architectural concept of
this church grew from the
fact that it was planned as
an addition to a 30-year old
existing structure of simple,
modified Gothic character.
A conscious effort was made James Forney, photos
to harmonize the old and
the new-yet to incorporate
within the new sanctuary a
contemporary sense through
use of modern materials and
craftsmanship. This explains
the high pitched roof -
same as the existing struc-
ture general proportions
and use of old brick for the
facade. It also explains the
structural system used a
series of reinforced concrete
bents, with heavy wood
decking spanning them. Side
walls are light-weight hon-
eycomb panels faced with
matt-finish porcelain outside
and figured red gum on the
interior. These panels are
surmounted by cement-glass
panels depicting the history
and growth of the church.
The same type of window
serves as a background for
the cross above the altar at
the chancel and won a Bro-
ward Builders Exchange
Craftsmanship Award in '58
. Now under construc-
tion is a 110-foot steeple,
the upper portion of which
will be executed in alum-
inum tracery to reflect the
form of the pointed arch
shell at the narthex entrance
. Development of this
new sanctuary involved some
remodeling to the old struc-
ture which is now used as a
chapel, with adjoining class
rooms and church offices.
FFBRUARY, 1951 15







Three Noteworthy Small Churches...





J. BROOKS HAAS

Architect


The St. Luke's Episcopal Church
is the initial building in a pro-
gram to include a future rec-
tory, parish hall, and school. A
low budget dictated a structure
of steel A-frames covered with
wood sheathing. Wall enclos-
ures are glass, clear and set at
an angle along sides, framed in
wood as vertical panels at ends.
The cross at the porch is a basic
element of the facade design
and forms a shelter canopy for
rwrrthe entrance. Cost, including
pews and equipment and com-
plete air conditioning for just
under 4000 sq. ft., was $18.50
per foot.


GEORGE E. WADDEY

Architect

The Community Church at Lauder-
dale By The Sea is built on a tri-
angular lot which had substantial in-
fluence on its design. The entrance
facade is 21' in width, while the two-
story fellowship hall and classroom
building behind the chancel spreads
to 69'. Structure of the sanctuary is
laminated wood beams with t & g
wood planking, all of redwood; that:,
of the fellowship hall of prestressed C -
concrete slabs. Exterior of the nave
is white painted stucco, that of the
narthex portion Florida travertine, laid
in a random ashlar. Roof of the sanct-
uary is surfaced with green asbestos
shingle tile. The nave is flanked on
both sides with aluminum frame win-
dows, the upper portion glazed with
decorative plastic panels, the lower
with redwood slat jalousies. -.. -

A. WYNN HOWELL
Architect

In the design of St. Edward's
.Episcopal Church at Mount
Dora a series of powerfulstone
piers with glass walls between
support a wood planking roof
to define the church space as
essentially a pavillion. Stone,
wood and glass have been used
as simply as possible, inside
and out, to create a sense of
combined power and repose that
supports worship but does not
dominate it. In plan the church
is a traditional cruciform, with
the altar to the east, lighted
from above by a skylight. The
design concept grew from litur-
gical needs and a desire that
the building blend pleasantly
with the character of its site.
16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







6-- 10- 0' -
















CONVENTIONAL FRAMING


|- 100' ~
















PRESTRESSED FRAMING


YOU GET MORE USABLE FLOOR SPACE WHEN

YOU BUILD WITH PRESTRESSED CONCRETE


When you pay for square footage make
certain you get the maximum amount pos-
sible for your money. For example, take
a building 100'-0" x 100'-0", as shown
above. Theoretically, you are getting a
10,000 square foot structure. However,
with conventional roof framing, this struc-
ture probably will require 16 support col-
umns spaced 20'-0" apart. As a result, you
lose flexibility for the efficient location of
machinery, arrangement of offices and
storage facilities and create ineffective
traffic and production flow patterns.
With prestressed concrete construction you
can roof over this same 100'-0" x 100'-0"
area with only 3 columns! Instead of 20'-
0" x 20'-0" bays you get 50'-0" x 25'-0"
bays . a more efficient, profitable return
on your investment.
Prestressed concrete offers many advan-
tages to the architect, engineer, contractor
and owner. Longer spans, fewer columns,
shallower beam depth and a minimum of


maintenance are among some of the rea-
sons why it will pay you to consider this
modern structural system on your next im-
portant building.
The Florida pre-stressed concrete produc-
ers have issued a brochure showing the
variety of standard structural units avail-
able in the State. Write to one of them
or to the Association office for your free
copy.


MEMBERS
Capitol Prestress Co., Jacksonville/Concrete Structures, Inc., No. Miami/Dura-Stress,
Inc., Leesburg/Duval Engineering & Contracting Co., Jacksonville/Florida Prestressed
Concrete, Inc., Tampa/ Juno Prestressors, Inc., West Palm Beach/Maule Industries,
Inc., Miami/Meekins-Bamman Precast Corp., Hallandale/Perma-Stress Inc., Holly Hill/
Pre-Cast Corporation, Miami/Prestressed Concrete Inc., Lakeland/Southern Prestress
Concrete Inc., Panama City/ Southern Prestress Concrete Inc., Pensacola/West Coast
Shell Corp., Sarasota/R. H. Wright, Inc., Fort Lauderdale.

3da prestressed concrete assn.

3132 N. E. 9th Street / Fort Lauderdale / Florida


FEBRUARY, 1961





















. UNITS

o o


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new shapes and forms in precast concrete

make easy work of roof and floor design!

Prestressed or reinforced . slabs, girders or special purpose
masonry units, precast concrete shapes itself to every roof and floor
design problem-even for the longest spans.
By using readily-available, standard units, you are sure of design
characteristics and strength proved through years of testing and
formula development-plus the dependable quality that only con-
trolled factory production can build in.
And with concrete, you get the extra benefits of fire resistance that
cut insurance premiums and sprinkler costs. For insulating and
sound control, concrete's thermal and acoustic advantages are well
known. Upkeep? With concrete there isn't any to speak of. No rust,
no rot, no painting problems.
Finding the right precast concrete for your next job is easy. As
close as your phone. And you'll be dealing with a local businessman
whose interests are the same as yours.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


MODERN







THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


V On


Ok m







































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The ARKLA-SERVEL 25-Ton Water Chiller is
a factory-sealed absorption refrigeration unit that
has no moving parts. Long-life, trouble-free. low
maintenance is assured. The absorption unit
cannot be damaged through overloading or con-
tinuous operation, because steam controls pro-
vide automatic modulation of steam input.
COMPLETE SAFETY.water. safest of all liquids,
is the refrigerant; lithium bromide is the absorb-
ent; and steam is the source of energy. The entire
unit operates under a relatively high vacuum.



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TOP PERFORMANCE

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REFRIGERATION TOTAL CAPACITY
...300,000 BTU PER HOUR



LOW-COST OPERATION. OIL is the cheapest,
safest and most dependable fuel for real long-term
sa ings. Steam to operate the chilled water unit
is normally obtained from a direct-connected
OIL-fired boiler, although waste plant steam, or
steam from any other boiler supplied for the
purpose can be used as the energy source. This
Water Chiller utilizes any steam pressure between
3 and 15 psi.
EASY INSTALLATION. Because of its light
floor loading and freedom from vibration, the
ARKLA-SERVEL 25-Ton Oil-operated Absorp-
tion-type Water Chiller can be installed in single
(or multiple) units on any floor. The unit is
compact and will pass through most standard
commercial doors. Size: 7'6" length; 30" %width;
6'6" height.
In addition to the standard workmanship-
materials factory-warranty, each unit is actually
operated before it leaves the factory, so as to
assure full rated capacity.


Plumbing and heating contractors, air condi-
tioning contractors, architects and builders are
invited to w rite for full details.


FEBRUARY, 1961


[


BELCHER
inviedt %%i tefor ull eai
0 IL CO PA Y



















Hip homes cook with natural gas,
the cool fuel! Automatic natural
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food and out of the kitchen.
Florida homes are finding that
natural gas is just naturally better
for Seven Big home services.
Switch to natural gas
in your home!


natural
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THE HOUSTON CORP.





Custom-Cast

Plaques


We can fill all your design needs
for any type, size or shape of
cast bronze or aluminum
plaques, name panels or dec-
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FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami


News & Notes


1961 Committee Chairmen
Named by President Levison
Chairmen for 18 FAA Committees
were appointed by FAA President
ROBERT H. LEVISON at the January
meeting of the FAA Board. At the
same time some small revisions were
made in the FAA's Committee struc-
ture. Two were discharged-one con-
cerning a new Executive Director and
the other relating to an FAA Head-
quarters Feasibility. A third-College
Building-was merged with the newly
named Committee on Government
Relations. Chairmen appointed were:
AIA-EJC Liaison-RUSSELL T. PAN-
COAST, FAIA; Awards and Scholar-
ships WAHL J. SNYDER, FAIA;
Chapter Affairs (vertical)-C. ROB-
ERT ABELE; Collaboration with De-
sign Professions-A. ROBERT BROAD-
FOOT, JR.; Community Development
-WILLIAM T. ARNETT; Convention
-VERNER JOHNSON; Education (ver-
tical) T. TRIP' RUSSELL; Home
Building Construction Industry -
JOHN STETSON; Hospitals and Health


(vertical) WALTER B. SCHULTZ;
Government Relations-ANTHONY L.
PULLARA; Membership H. LESLIE
WVALKER; Office Practice (vertical)-
ROBERT H. LEVISON, EARL M. STAR-
NES, co-chairman; Preservation of His-
toric Buildings (vertical) BELFORD
W. SHOUMATE; Public Relations (ver-
tical)-EDWARD G. GRAFTON; Publi-
cations G. CLINTON GAMBLE; Re-
search-TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA;
Schools and Educational Facilities
(vertical)-C. ELLIS DUNCAN; Com-
mittee on Basic Practice-G. CLIN-
TON GAMBLE.

Good Old 1960 . !
It seems that some people have
been complaining that the first year
of the Sixties was more of a fizzle
than the sizzle that economic experts
predicted just a year ago. But it wasn't
so in the construction industry, ac-
cording to a release from the F. W.
Dodge Corporation issued late last
month. This stated flatly that by
year's end the total of construction
contracts awarded in 48 states and the


FAA Honors Pancoast, Gamble...


Wirip


As part of the FAA's 46th Annual Convention at Hollywood last fall, two
of the state's outstanding architects were awarded plaques in recognition of
their individual contributions to the advancement of the profession. Russell
T. Pancoast, FAIA, received the award for his service on the State Board of
Architecture. The inscription on his plaque read: "The Florida Association
of Architects records its deep appreciation of your untiring and devoted service
to the profession as a member of the State Board of Architecture for thirteen
years." G. Clinton Gamble received a similar plaque with this inscription:
"The Florida Association of Architects records its deep appreciation of your
indefatigable and inspiring labors as Director, Florida District, A.I.A." Pre-
sentation of the awards was made by the FAA's 1960 President, John Stetson,
shown here with Pancoast, left, and Gamble, right.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






District of Columbia set a new all-
time record -- slightly ahead of the
previous record set in 1959.
The construction fat might have
fallen into the statistical fire if con-
tracts in December had not soared to
a fantastic 22 per cent gain over the
total volume of awards during Decem-
ber 1959. One reason for the advance
lay in the 92 per cent rise in heavy
engineering as roads and bridges.
Though residential awards were down
12 per cent, the aggregate of non-
residential construction registered a 26
per cent gain.
For the year commercial and manu-
facturing buildings showed substantial
volume gains-and school construc-
tion volume shot up 13 per cent, or
more than $300 million over 1959.



State Board Grants
62 New Registrations
At its January, 1961, meeting the
Florida State Board of Architecture
granted registration to practice archi-
tecture in this state to a total of 62
applicants who fulfilled the Board's
requirements.
This year only three registrations
were granted by exemption; and only
six architects were granted registra-
tion on the basis of NCARB certifica-
tion. The following successfully passed
the written examination:
Atlantic Beach HERSCHEL E.
SHEPARD, JR.
Auburndale JACK L. TURNER.
Bradenton WALTER B. RISE, JR.
Clearwater WILLIAM J. CASA-
GRANDA.
Coral Gables STEPHEN C. LIT-
TLE.
Daytona Beach DONALD E.
BROTHERSON.
Delray Beach SAMUEL OGREN,
JR.
Ft. Lauderdale RONALD D. GAR-
MAN, ARTHUR SCHLETT, JR., GEORGE
L. BENNETT, OSCAR L. HANDLE, JR.,
GENE C. MONOCO, JOHN D. JENSE3
ALBERT TRULL, JR.
Gainesville-FREDERICK N. REED,
JR., CRAIG B. THORN, SADI KORUTURK.
Hallandale JOSEPH S. KANTER.
Hollywood JOSEPH H. DODDS.
Jacksonville WALTER J. PARKS,
II, DAVID B. BOYER, JOSEPH B.
HARMS, RICHARD W. PEARSON, JR.,
(Continued on Page 22)
FEBRUARY, 1961


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State Board . .
(Continued from Page 21)
GEORGE S. STUART, DON J. ALFORD,
CHARLES E. PATTILLO, III, RUSSELL
L. GUSTAFSON, J. DOUGLAS SNEAD, JR.
Lake Park-RONALD D. SCHWAB.
Maitland ROBERT I. WEBB, JR.
Miami CLYDE A. ALLEN, Louis
SHULICK, JR., SEYMOUR DREXLER,
LESTER PANCOAST, ELMER MARMOR-
STEIN.
Perrine DONALD C. RIDER.
Quincy WAYNE F. BETTS
St. Petersburg-ROBERT D.
HARNLY, ROBERT M. WEIMER, AR-
THUR H. KAPLE, ALFRED T. DRAKE,
DOUGLAS A. CAMERON, EUGENE P.
GRAHAM.
Tallahassee CARLETON F. LIL-
LIE, JR.
Tampa GEORGE M. GUTIERREZ,
PASCUAL N. SANABRIA, DAVID R. GOD-
SCHALK, EDWARD J. ROBARTS.
Winter Haven- B. T. JONES.
New registrants from out of the
state were, CHARLES M. YARBOROUGH,
Savannah, Ga., JOE C. BOWMAN, Penn
Laird, Va., ANGELO CHIARELLA, Roch-
ester, N. Y., MARVIN D. GOODMAN,
Jamaica, B. W. I.


Florida


Northwest


Message


By ROY L. RICKS
President

In the several years that the Flor-
ida Northwest Chapter has been in
existence we have steadily increased
our Corporate membership to include
practically every eligible architect.
This year we will make a concerted
effort to stimulate the interest of
those Corporate members who have
drifted from the Chapter, and to in-
crease our Associate membership.
Through increased interest in our
Chapter from within we will be more
effective as a group in our ability
to accomplish our objectives.
The geographical confines of our
Chapter include areas extreme in their


".:,i; a.'


degrees of development from one
of the oldest cities in the State to
one of the State's fastest growing
areas. This situation presents public
relations problems that extend from
very basic public education regarding
the profession to the more involved
concern of presenting the cultural
and sociological effects of good archi-
tecture.
(Continued on Page 26)


Homebuyers are looking for MORE!

Homebuyers are demanding that
today's home be more than just
comfortable it must have the latest
improvements to keep it "up-to-
date" for many years to come.
That's why they are asking for
concealed telephone wiring. The
added convenience of planned
S. telephone outlets and wire-free walls
is important to them.
May we show you how easy it is to
incorporate modern, saleable
concealed telephone wiring into the
Some or subdivision you are design-
>. ing. Just call your Telephone
,t .Business Office.


Southern Bell
"... Owig w #6 Putwe


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















This is the recently completed
Skelly Oil Building, Tulsa. The
upper 15 stories are pre-cast
concrete curtain wall panels made
with grey, green and white
aggregates and Trinity White
portland cement. They are
generally 4'6" x 5' and 4'6" x 8'
in size.
The pierced grill surrounding
the second floor is 20' high. Panels
are 4' x 4' x 8". White aggregate
was used with the Trinity White.
The pre-cast exposed aggregate
panels (Mo-Sai) and grilles were
made by Harter Marblecrete
Stone Co., Oklahoma City. Black
& West, Tulsa, were the architects.
Ask for full color book,
"Curtain Wall Panels and
Facings." Address-
111 West Monroe St., Chicago.




t~TY












A Product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
Chicago Chattanooga Dallas Fort Worth Houston Fredonia, Kansas Jackson, Michigan Tampa Miami Los Angeles
FEBRUARY, 1961 23
















The church stands unique among
buildings of the world. It supplies
not shelter, it is not a source of
wealth, simply Sanctuary, Architec-
ture for the soul to house the
spirit of man.
Forget the form, the structural
gainliness, the ostentation displayed,
the mongrel function.
Look beyond the physical seduction
so cunningly contrived to sell the
building, but not its purpose.
We have seen them, today's
churches- solid in their own plas-
ticity-truncated pyramids resting on
their apex, the fish skeleton, brilliant
glass irridescent boxes of fairy light-
ness, the cathedral and its grandeur,
the meekness of the little mission
chapel.


Today's churches-an utter waste
unless they have inherent within them
the fourth dimension of architecture,
the spiritual dimension.
Space with atmosphere as elusive
as a handful of mist of a morning.
How fitting that we have to enter
in to feel it, expose our bodies as well
as our minds. Steep in the aura, ab-
sorb though all of our senses the Di-
vine Message.
Undenominatoinal, universal, yet
with very personal appeal, there is
great uncertainty in its predetermina-
tion. Often it is accidental. It is un-
related to size. It is more likely to be
present in the unpretentious.
You can't feel it in a sermon de-
livered to a crowd. You might find
yourself more spiritually attuned


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By FRANK E. WATSON, AIA


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


24


after seeing a Greek tragedy, hearing
a concerto, or spending an hour in a
room with Cezanne or Kandinsky.
But, I have found it.
In the Church of the Holy Family
in Philadelphia a conventionalized
Romanesque building of the 30's,
beautifully proportioned and sensi-
tively conceived.
Saint Patrick's Cathedral in the late
afternoon.
The Throne Room of the Lincoln
Memorial with his great epigram etch-
ed indelibly in the wall.
Chichicastenango in the center of
the square. The pungency of incense
made the air, strewn rose petals were
the carpet, only candles gave the light.
But, the spirit of God pervaded this
pagan house.
What quality could be common in
these temples? Could it be the lead-
ed, stained colors in the half light of
late day contiguous hangings and
soft shadow-icons in polychrome, the
dramatic effect at the altar baldach-
ino, the absence of a crowd, the
hushed echo of a cough?
Or the satisfying feeling that this
building was created but for your
use and God's use?


CURES
HARDENS
SEALS
DUSTPROOFS


~i~cr--------~


































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homebuyers' signatures on the dotted lines, but
also reflects the architects' pride in up-grading
residential standards.
The Medallion Home standards are practical
for homes in every price range. Here is what
makes a MEDALLION HOME:
1. An all-electric kitchen with a flameless elec-
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The Medallion Home program offers builders
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FEBRUARY, 1961 25


*
^






ATTENTION: Architects, Electrical Engineers, Contractors and Design Consultants

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If you don't see It, ask for ItI This could easily be the slogan of Sta-Brite
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good that you've no sooner said it than it's designed.. by Sta-Brite I
Specialists in Shopping Center and Retail Store lighting... as well as
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theatres
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Florida Northwest...
(Continued from Page 24)
Along with the attempt to better
educate the public generally, it is our
desire to, through Chapter action,
urge the various governing bodies re-
sponsible for public work to use the
methods suggested by the AIA in
evaluating and selecting architects
for these projects.
Our Chapter will maintain its in-
terest in the legislative affairs of the
State as concerns the construction
industry. We will continue the ef-
forts of Chapter member STUART
MORRISON, in maintaining contact
with our local legislators. If properly
informed by their constituents, legis-
lators will be aware of the problems,
and certainly more receptive to the
efforts of the FAA.
The illegal practice of architecture
remains a concern. Through lack of
enforcement of the law, this illegal
practice continues unrestricted. This
Chapter has been attempting to gain
assistance from local building officials
in curbing these activities. Some prog-
ress has been made; we will continue
this effort.
Florida Northwest Chapter is look-
ing forward to an active and product-
ive year. We hope, through increased
interest and participation, to accom-
plish at Chapter level the objectives
of the FAA and the AIA.




Churches...
(Continued from Page 10)
ment that the church auditorium, or
sanctuary, should be the dominant
central element of the site plan. It
may, or may not be the first part of
the plant to be constructed. Often the
group will utilize a secondary portion
of the ultimate plant until the growth
of membership and finances justifies
expansion. As a result the completed
plant will usually contain what most
churches now regard as highly desir-
able, if not an actual necessity-a
secondary auditorium of 200 to 300
capacity so designed and equipped as
to make it adaptable to secondary
religious services (as weddings, fun-
erals, prayer meetings) as well as to
fellowship activities.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


* R.COGSWELL
"SINCE 1921"



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Complete Reproduction
Service



433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


1






This character of flexible use should
follow through every element of the
church plant, except, possibly the
sanctuary when this is constructed as
a terminal portion of the church
building program. For example, edu-
cational activities are an increasingly
important part of any modern church
service program. But the classroom
type of educational facility is no
longer generally regarded as the most
desirable. Most authorities now fully
recognize the sharp differences that
exist between secular and parochial
educational needs and programs; and,
as one result, educational spaces are
now being planned for group classi-
fications rather than as a series of
permanently partitioned cubicles for
use by various "grades."
The character of such spaces is
more and more assuming that of a
large home living room. Many parti-
tions, both permanent and temporary,
are being eliminated in favor of un-
obstructed areas which can be inten-
sively utilized for various recreational
and fellowship activities in addition
to serving the purposes of group
instruction.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
B B Chemical Co . . 5
Belcher Oil Co. . . 19
Bird & Son, Inc. .. . 7
A. R. Cogswell . . 26
Florida Foundry
& Pattern Works 20
Florida Home Heating
Institute . . 28
Florida Power & Light Co. 25
Florida Prestressed
Concrete Assn. . . 17
Florida Steel Corp ..... 6
General Portland Cement Co. 23
George C. Griffin Co. . 6
Hamilton Plywood . . 4
Houston Corporation . 20
Lambert Corporation
of Florida . . 24
Portland Cement Assn. . 18
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 21
Solite . . . 3
Southern Bell Telephone . 22
Sta-Brite Fluorescent Mfg. Co. 26
Strong Electric . . 26
Thompson Door Co. . 1
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27


FEBRUARY, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK .D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 MONROE DRIVE. N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICK STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
LIMESTONE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
BRIAR HILL STONE ARCHITECTURAL TERRA C
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERM
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FL
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" AND ALUMINUM


OTTA
ONT
OORS


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154









S' Any way

f .,you look




Luxurious central

OIL HOME HEATING
is best by far for Florida homes!
1. Oil heat costs much less averages about HALF the cost
of home heating with other fuels. And no premium price to
pay when fuel oil is used only for home heating.
2. Much safer.
3. Much more dependable-fuel always available.
4. Little or NO CASH DOWN-terms to 36 months or longer.
SEE THE OIL HEATING DISPLAY AT BUILDORAMA, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, MIAMI

FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
BUILDORAMA, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


MR. ARCHITECT:

We have repeatedly given the above information to just about everyone
in Florida during the past year. And we have added, "BUILDING?
MODERNIZING? Don't take a beating on the cost of home heating!
Insist on OIL heat cheaper, safer, best by far for Florida!" Your
clients will be receptive to the inclusion of central OIL heating in
the plans of their houses. If we can help with information, let us
know.











A



Letter



To



The Governor


MY DEAR GOVERNOR:
Somewhat less than a year ago you were gracious
enough to reply to a series of questions on matters
of major interest to various elements of Florida's
huge construction industry. Your forthright answers
to those questions were published in the April, 1960,
issue of this magazine. You have recently assumed
the responsibilities of the office for which you were
then a candidate. Shortly the first legislative session
under your gubernatorial administration will be
called to order. Thus I venture to call your attention
once again to a matter which justifies the thoughtful
consideration of legislators as vitally affecting the
future well being of our state.
This is the Mechanics' Lien Law...As you know,
during the course of many years a wide range of
efforts have been made to revise many provisions of
this law. The end sought was removal of its many
ambiguities and the clarification of procedures in
fairness to construction organizations affected and
for the greater protection of the public these organi-
zations serve.
Most efforts to amend this statute in line with
these general objectives have proved abortive. Simi-
larly, various cooperative efforts by trade and pro-
fessional groups to develop even more drastic revi-
sions of the law have not been successful. Most re-
cent of these was a conference called in Fort Lauder-
dale by the Broward Builders Exchange last month.
A panel discussion and a series of group "workshops"
were constructive but only to the extent of clarify-
ing some of the more obvious tangles in procedure
and the legal pitfalls which the law now contains.
This meeting produced no firm recommendations
relative to measures for revising and streamlining the
law; and, in general, voiced only the practical ad-


monition to seek legal advice at every turn and
then to appeal what might appear to be an adverse
ruling of a court in the event of possible litigation.
This, in capsule, has been the history of all seri-
ous discussions on this statute. In spite of many
suggestions for eliminating some of its complexities
and ambiguities, the basic inequities and inadequa-
cies of this statute remain. It is now clear to many
responsible leaders in the construction industry -
as, also, to most members of your own legal profes-
sion that piecemeal efforts toward improvement
are not sufficient. As spokesmen have said, not even
the legal fraternity understands clearly what the law
means; and as each makeshift amendment is signed,
this meaning, in terms of any sort of practical inter-
pretation, becomes even more jumbled.
In short, judging from fairly recent court decisions,
the law does not actually protect those for whom
protection was first sought the mechanics, mate-
rial suppliers and sub-contractors who make up the
vast bulk of the construction industry. Worse yet,
from one viewpoint, is that under a certain chain of
circumstances involving "improper" procedures, the
bill-paying owner of a construction project and
thus by logical extension the public of our State -
may be open to the liability of having to pay twice
for part or even all of his job. Hardly less severe is
the necessity for his having to operate unwittingly
under the cloud of such a possibility as a result of
dangerously inadequate advice stemming from some
ultimately improper interpretation of the law's vari-
ous and vague provisions.
What Florida needs, Governor, is a brand new
Mechanics' Lien Law. You will agree, I think, that
the construction industry is justified in looking to
you for leadership toward this end. You will agree,
too, I think, that the objective can in time be
reached.
In view of past attempts, the method for reaching
it seems clear. Let the 1961 Legislature establish a
Mechanics' Lien Law Study Commission. Let this
group be charged with a thorough research of the
subject and the drafting of a new statute through
active cooperation of the Attorney General's office.

Let a series of public hearings be held on the various
phases and provisions of the new statute. Let neces-
sary revisions be promptly made; and then, at the
1963 session of the Legislature, let a new and work-
able Lien Law be introduced as an administration
measure fully backed by the construction industry,
the legal profession and a clearly informed public.
Need for this new legislation is pressing. And any
measures short of a completely new approach will
not achieve adequate, nor even practical, fulfillment.
Cordially,
ROGER W. SHERMAN






eaing' 7wrm 74e eaawe ...


U/F Alumni Everywhere!




Your University needs $90,000. That sum is required
to provide funds on a matching basis so students at your
University can take advantage of the National Defense
Loan Fund established by the U. S. Government. For each
dollar from the University the NDLF will allocate nine
to provide a revolving fund of almost a million dollars to
help struggling students complete their education.

The U/F student body has pledged its. help to raise
some $20,000 of the sum needed. Students are looking to
you alumni for the remaining $70,000. A gift from each
of you will reach the goal-and every dollar thus donated
is tax deductible.

There's no better time than right now to help your Uni-
versity-and there's no better reason for helping your
University than to make sure that some fine, up-and-
coming youngster gets the loan he needs in time to help
him over the rough financial spots on the road to a college
degree. And who knows-maybe the boy your dollars aid
today will be serving your business later with the skill
and knowledge you helped make it possible to acquire.


WHY THIS MESSAGE:
Because the University of
Florida is a State-operated
and financed institution it
cannot budget nor borrow
funds needed to provide the
one-to-nine matching sum
necessary to assure an allo-
cation from the National De-
fense Loan Fund. Thus do-
nations must be relied upon
to raise the $90 000 needed
to establish a basis for the
total revolving fund required
for student aid during the
next four ,ear" Hence this
appeal for alumni helo.


* Remember your own college days. If you had a rocky
financial path to walk-give so others may find the going
easier. And if things went smooth and fine for you-give
so that others can avoid some of the frustrations and
heartbreaks you didn't know existed.




MAKE A FIRM PLEDGE NOW
Write a check today to:
University of Florida Endowment Corp.
And send it promptly to:
University Alumni Association; P. 0. Box 3535
University Station, Gainesville, Fla.


WELCOME THIS OPPORTUNITY TO HELP




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