Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00079
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1961
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00079
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text
the florida architect
official journal of the florida association of
architects of the american institute of architects, inc.


the


presidents'


jail.


ISSue


'6






ait&an 7owm 7Te eamusa..


U/F Alumni


WHY THIS MESSAGE:
Bec3a; the Uo '.er:il\ of
Flori.da a S laie-c.erated
ar.d fnanrcd nlItur.or, it
Sr. r,ro tI.U.- rr :.r b-.:r r.-..
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f.:.r :r,.,d- rl 1.d r... tjh.
r'en st f.l.jr :jr: HercE rhj:
3D:,,al l.:.r lhumni heF ID


- Everywhere!


* Your University needs $90,000. That sum is required
to provide funds on a matching basis so students at your
University can take advantage of the National Defense
Loan Fund established by the U. S. Government. For each
dollar from the University the NDLF will allocate nine
to provide a revolving fund of almost a million dollars to
help struggling students complete their education.

* The U/F student body has pledged its help to raise
some $20,000 of the sum needed. Students are looking to
you alumni for the remaining $70,000. A gift from each
of you will reach the goal-and every dollar thus donated
is tax deductible.

* There's no better time than right now to help your Uni-
versity-and there's no better reason for helping your
University than to make sure that some fine, up-and-
coming youngster gets the loan he needs in time to help
him over the rough financial spots on the road to a college
degree. And who knows-maybe the boy your dollars aid
today will be serving your business later with the skill
and knowledge you helped make it possible to acquire.

* Remember your own college days. If you had a rocky
financial path to walk-give so others may find the going
easier. And if things went smooth and fine for you-give
so that others can avoid some of the frustrations and
heartbreaks you didn't know existed.




MAKE A FIRM PLEDGE NOW
Write a check today to:
University of Florida Endowment Corp.
And send it promptly to:
University Alumni Association; P. 0. Box 3535
University Station, Gainesville, Fla.


WELCOME THIS OPPORTUNITY TO HELP






















SI'L


REINFOIRINC ( E W
EACH FAC.i


LATIH FLA.TER
L i:ASI iN STOilNE
- WLt'Co LINE


TYPICAL SPANDREL PANE


First National Bank of Miami


IN STONE Sunshade canopies of precast concrete were made integrally with the ceramic tile-
faced precast curtain wall panels for The First National Bank of Miami. Canopies
ranged from 3 1/2 feet on the north to 5 1/2 feet on the east and south elevations,
and provide almost complete shade for the windows. Architects estimated canopies
saved 20 per cent on air-conditioning costs. Flat tile-faced panels, 2 1/2' x 9', were also
used on east and west elevations.
Each panel is supported with continuous angles cast in the back of the panel and
-L resting on steel beams. Clip angles and plates at
bottom of each panel give firm anchorage. Light-
weight insulation, lath and plaster are applied
sociates THE directly to the back of the panel. This type of
spandrel panel was used on the north and south
7 elevations and partially on the east wall.


action Company


y/I/ HOME OFFICE:
High Point Road, P. 0. Box 1558, Greensboro, No. Carolina
FLORIDA PLANT:
COMPANY 301 N W 741h w St P ( Ror 47.54 M-nmi Florida


Architects: Weed-Russell-Johnson As
Miami, Florida
General Contractor: Rooney-Turner
Frank J. Rooney I Turner Constru
Miami, Florida | New York, N. Y.







74e




Florida Architect

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


n 7&4i IaCe ---


Better Design Through More Efficient Practice . .
By Daniel Schwartzman, FAIA
The Architect and The Engineer . . . .
By Francis R. Walton, AIA
In Expectation of Greatness . . . . .
By Philip Will, Jr., FAIA, President, AIA
1961 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters . . . .
Nothing Just Happens . . . . . .
By Robert H. Levison, AIA, President, FAA


. 8


. 13

. 13
. 14


The Chapter Presidents Speak:
Florida Central By A. Wynn Howell
Jacksonville By Ivan H. Smith . .
Daytona Beach By William B. Greening
Mid-Florida By James E. Windham, III
North Central By Chester L. Craft, Jr.
Palm Beach By Harold A. Obst . .
Broward County By Robert E. Hansen
Florida North By James T. Lendrum .
Florida South By Herbert R. Savage .
FAA Merit Awards 1960 Convention .
Advertisers' Index . . . . .


. 15
. 16
. 16
. 21
. 26
. 26
. 27
. 28
. 29
. 22-25
. 33


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1961
Robert H. Levison, President, 425 S. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Arthur Lee Campbell, First Vice-President, Rm. 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Second Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Third V-President, 2520 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
Verner Johnson, Secretary, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Jack W. Zimmer, Charles F. McAlpine, Jr.; DAYTONA
BEACH: Francis R. Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Robert C. Wielage, Eugene
H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA,
McMillan H. Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Lawrence B. Evans, Jr.;
FLORIDA NORTH WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: JAMES
L. Deen, H. Samuel Kruse, C. Robert Abele; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert
Broadfoot, Jr., John R. Graveley, Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.; MID-FLORIDA:
Charles L. Hendrick, John P. DeLoe; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson,
Frederick W. Kessler.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami

THE COVER
Through the cooperative initiative of Larry Salkin of the U/F Student Chapter,
AIA, several of the 1961 covers of the Florida Architect wlil be the designs
of U/F architectural students as last year. This month's cover was adapted
from the design sketch of J. A. Huberman.


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida . Printed by
McMurray Printers.
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Clinton Gamble, Robert H. Levison,
William T. Arnett, Roy M. Pooley, Jr.

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher

VOLUME 11

NUMBER 1THE 196

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




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Waterproof, weatherproof, flame and stain-
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28 exciting colors. Send to DWOSKIN now for
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* 15 tons of molten steel pour from
the huge electric furnace at Florida
Electric Steel Mill in Tampa.


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FORT MYERS EDison 4-5262


Better Design Through


More Efficient Practice


By DANIEL SCHWARTZMAN, FAIA


This article has been adapted from a speech given by the Chairman
of the AIA's Office Practice Committee in summary of the FAA's sec-
ond annual Office Practice Seminar held August 12, 1960, at Dunedin.


It was considered fashionable not
so long ago to think of "Office Prac-
tice" as a subject which interested
only those members of the profession
who had limited design ability, or
those who were concerned only with
the administration and b u s i n e s
aspects of architectural practice.
This point of view was fallacious
and all of us now realize it. I have
had occasion to discuss this subject
with several of our most gifted archi-
tects, whose reputation for outstand-
ing design is worldwide. Their concern
was that the complication of today's
architectural practice was so demand-
ing of their time, that it seriously
interfered with the time required for
the design phase of their projects.
Since they had a dedicated profes-
sional attitude, the time was found,
but at the expense of their own near-
exhaustion.
Now, not all of us are fortunate
enough to have partners or business
managers that can relieve us of the
burden of office administration. It is
also true that most of the better archi-
tectural design in the world is done
by those with individual practices, and
with organizations of modest size.
This is not meant to deprecate the
work of our larger architectural organi-
zations, who, through great teamwork,
have been successful in maintaining
a consistently high level of design
excellence in their work. This is pecu-
liarly an American phenomenon, and
requires organizational skills that are
at the genius level.
I sincerely believe that, with few
exceptions, architects in general are
extremely conscientious and arc dedi-


cated to doing their best possible work
for their clients (within the limita-
tions of their design abilities, time
available, and the demands of the
project budget) without putting fi-
nancial return ahead of the design
needs of the project.
The one thing that could give us
all more time for design within the
imposed limitations of our projects
is to have a background of mental
security that comes with efficient
office procedures. This is the field in
which the American Institute of
Architects has done its most useful
work for the members of the pro-
fession. And it is generally understood
by all concerned that there is much
more yet to be done, in a professional
world in which the demands are ever
increasing. A clear demonstration of
this can be found in the current out-
break of court cases in which the
architect has been held liable not
only for the accuracy of his own
services, but also held responsible for
the defects in the work which are
beyond his absolute control.
Our present AIA Architect-Owner
Agreement Form is a great improve-
ment over the previous form-which
was left unrevised for so many years
in spite of generally recognized ina-
dequacies, because of the question-
able attitude that it was "court-
tested" and it would be dangerous
to revise it. Our present agreement
form, improved as it is, still leaves
us vulnerable to unreasonable respon-
sibility for matters not under our
complete control. This is a result of
our reluctance to give up any aspect
(Continued on Page 8)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Saluting:


Architects: Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham.
Engineers: Oliver Parsons and Associates; Oboler and Parke.


Museum of Science and Natural History ... A fine example of
functional design for a public building.


' BETTER FUEL COUNCIL of DADE COUNTY

A Better Fuel Council member is ready to assist in solving
your commercial heating problems. Just call FR 1-2447.


JANUARY, 1961


.


i Isja fB~B










The CONCRETE oq


CURTAIN WALLS

of McCormick Place-new $34,000,000 exposition center on Chicago's lakefront

were made of Trinity White portland cement and exposed white aggregate



A


Al.








i..-











(Top) Model of McCormick Place as seen from Lake Michigan. (Above) Close-up of the sculptured concrete panels

McCormick Place is one of the largest concrete structures Shaw Metz &
in the world-three blocks long by a block wide and high Associates,
as a ten-story building . 2,010 curtain wall panels made Architects;
of Trinity White and white aggregate were used. Sculp- American-Marietta Co.,
tured panel designs by Constantine Nivola. Concrete Products
Division,
Manufacturer.

La .i a c. A Product of ceaE. .
General Portland Cement Co. ,rc. o
I JChicago Chattanooga Dallas Fort Worth
Houston Fredonia, Kansas Jackson,
PORTLAND CEMENT Michigan Tampa Miami Los Angeles
6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











ANNOUNCING...

the lifetime solution to Florida home comfort


ASUN CLVALLEY



SUN VALLEY


OIL-Fired

ALL-YEAR

AIR CONDITIONER


An Air Conditioning Unit that HEATS and COOLS from a
single coil under a vacuum-sealed system.
* Patented and exclusive . NO MOVING
PARTS in heating or cooling cycles ...
* Designed to give top-quality performance for
20 years-or more. Lowest depreciation of any
central heating-cooling unit ever built.
* Low Cost Operation ... OIL is the cheapest
and safest fuel. Real long-term savings.


The patented principle of operation with
NO MOVING PARTS works something
like a coffee percolator... The oil flame
boils the solution, and the water vapor
produced goes to the condenser. It then
flows into the single coil over which air
is passed by the blower. Heat is remov-
ed from the air and the water vapor
(through the process of absorption) re-
turns to the liquid state and flows to the
generator to again be used.


* Compact and vibration-free ... no noisy com-
pressor ... performs the 12-month climate control
job with a single, inexpensive OIL flame.
* Simple, automatic-just dial the thermostat for
desired temperature.
* The ARKLA-SERVEL "SUN VALLEY" refrigerant
solution is Lithium Bromide and distilled water,
as harmless as ordinary salt water.
Now manufactured in 3V2-ton size for the average
size home and 5-ton size for larger homes and
small commercial establishments.


5-YEAR FACTORY WARRANTY
Plumbing and heating contractors, air conditioning
contractors, architects and builders are invited to
write for details and charts of Cycle of Operation.





WI
0 1 L M PA


JANUARY, 1961


. r


*4


0,


t7







A Problem


In Churches


Better Design...
(Continued from Page 4)
of the hard-won prestige of the archi-
tect as the key professional figure in
the construction project. It leaves us
on relatively unsafe ground with
respect to the full responsibility we
are assuming for the work of our
engineering consultants; the checking
of shop drawings; the certification of
payments to contractors and super-
vision of construction.
The Board of Directors of the Insti-
tute has recognized this and has com-
mittees and legal counsellors hard at
work under urgent priority studying
this problem. The Office Practice
Committee has completed, after much
study, an "Architect-Engineer Agree-
ment Form" which the "Documents
Review Committee" of the Board is
now studying. If adapted, this should
be extremely helpful in clearing up
the cloudy areas of joint professional
responsibility which have recently
gotten some of our colleagues into
liability difficulties.
Another a s p e c t of architectural
practice which we have a tendency
to neglect is "Employee and Asso-
ciate Relationships." The recent up-
surge of work which has landed rela-
tively inexperienced but otherwise
capable men into positions of respon-
sibility in our offices, has sharply
focused our attention on those
problems.
May I suggest to you that the way
to anticipate and obviate most of the
situations which have a tendency to
upset the morale of our offices (and
no architectural organization can do


* SOLUTION

1. Specify room-by-
room control of heat -
safe and clean due to
electricity. ELEC-
TREND provides this...

2. Specify efficiency
of heating to give
positive through-room
circulation. ELE C-
TREND provides this...

3. Specify space-sav-
ing and economy
through in-wall, and
two-way heat distribu-
tion. ELECTREND pro-
vides this ..


ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING
COMPANY
Comfort Convenience Economy
4550 37th Street No. St. Petersburg
Phone: HEmlock 6-8420


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


its best work without a high "esprit-
de-corps") is to spell out in full detail
every possible aspect of Employer-
Employee relationship into a written
"Office Regulations" which is given to
the Employee on the first day of his
employment. These regulations must
state in unmistakable terms (1) what
the Employer may reasonably expect
and (2) what the Employee will re-
ceive in customary benefits including
hours of employment, vacations, sick
leave, etc. This regulation form can
also become part of your employment
and profit participation agreements
with your key associates.
The New York Chapter has recently
conducted a survey among its mem-
bership to find what the customary
procedures in the important aspects
of "Employer Employee" relation-
ship and the results are most reveal-
ing. This information will be invalu-
able to offices setting up their own
regulations and I strongly advise the
Florida Association of Architects to
undertake a similar survey.
The Office Practice Committee of
the Institute is now preparing a
typical questionnaire form that can be
used for such a survey, which we hope
will be ready by the next convention.
I also want to call your attention to
an "Office Regulation" prototype
published in the recent AIA Hand-
book of Practice, which I helped to
prepare. This can also serve as a useful
guide.
I am glad that I have had the
opportunity to discuss at least two
aspects of Office Practice which are
of such great importance to the pro-
fessional well being of all of us.


... how to get needed

heat economically


IT~


The ARCHITECT . and The ENGINEER
ARCHITECTS design for human use and feelings . ENGINEERS
design for physical forces and laws . The design of mechanical and
electrical processes and the carrying structure and conduits can be done
by engineers working as teams. All of the devices and systems manu-
factured and assembled in buildings were at their original time of con-
ception the product of an engineering or manufacturing mind . The
choice, arrangement, assembly and disposition of these items and systems
for human use is the work of the ARCHITECT who at times may need
the advice and aid of specialists in the design and functioning of these
devices and systems . The elimination of the ARCHITECT who studies
the human use and feelings and the substitution of the ENGINEER
specialists in the design of buildings for human use is to reverse a natural
process and will work to stop study and growth of betterment in
human environments. FRANCIS R. WALTON, AIA.















1


UA


new construction and is


NEW BUILDING MATERIAL BUILT RIGHT

INTO NEW CONSTRUCTION GUARANTEES

PROTECTION AGAINST TERMITES & BLOCKS

ENTRY OF UNDERGROUND MOISTURE VAPOR



Now for the first time, architects can specify a product that will guarantee to their clients
homes or public buildings that are free from the menace of subterranean termites, ants and
moisture vapor originating underground.


This new material, Bird Termite Prevention System, is a manufactured product made by
the Building Materials Division of Bird & Son, inc., of East Walpole, Mass. It is used in
not to be confused with pest control products used after damage has started.


The Bird Termite Prevention System is as much a part of the building of new construction as the foundation, the
cellar floor, or the slab: It was designed to prevent damage by underground moisture vapor and underground pests,
to block these damaging factors from entry into the building, and so eliminate expensive corrective measures.


Does two jobs at once
Bird TERMIBAR, Termite & Vapor
Barrier, is available in easy-to-
handle rolls a base sheet of heavy
felt saturated with deadly Dieldrin,
one of the most stable and effective
insecticides known, and laminated
in a multi-ply fabrication including
two plastic vapor barrier films that
renders a house impervious to
the transmission of underground
moisture vapor. This composite
construction gives a low perm vapor
barrier protected from rot and
breakdown by copper naphthenate,
time tested and time proven.
Architects helped develop
product
This multiple termite and vapor
barrier, Bird TERMIBAR, was de-
veloped through the coordination of
leading architects, Bird & Son, inc.,
and the Shell Chemical Corp. It is the
result of years of research and con-
sultation among men who deal in
building and men who deal in insect
control. Their combined efforts have
resulted in a termite control product
that eliminates the need of specially
treated lumber, a bothersome item
of building expense.


Detach and mail this
Post Card for
free Information


When TERMIBAR is installed under
slab construction, the vapor barrier
is established with the use of a min-
imum amount of costly crushed
reck an important factor in sec-
tions where crushed rock is expensive.
Before Bird & Son, inc., put
TERMIBAR into production they
waited for the favorable findings of
the U.S.D.A., Forest Service in
Gulfport, Miss., on the deadly prop-
erties of Dieldrin, the insecticide in
the product. The Laboratory's find-
ings were the result of over 10 years'
careful research and testing.


Detach and mail this
Post Card for
free Information


BUSINESS
NO POSTAGE NECESSARY, IF
40 POSTAGE WILL BE PAID B


BIB


Quality controlled product
...application is foolproof
No areas can be over-saturated, or
completely overlooked .. distribu-
tion of the insecticide is uniformly
controlled in manufacture and is
evenly spread under the entire
building with the laying of the
TERMIBAR membrane.
Bird TERMIBAR is checked from its
manufacture to installation by re-
sponsible Bird authorized operators.
A Bird & Son 5-year guarantee of
the installed Bird Termite Preven-
tion System is available to protect
the property owner and the repu-
tation of the architect.


FIRST CLASS
Permit No. 844
Charleston, S. C.


REPLY MAIL
MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES
Y


L" & SON, inc.

Building Materials Division


FIRST CLASS
Permit No. 844
Charleston, S. C.


i I "


------ -----





THE MOST EFFECTIVE TERMITE PROTECTION


SO FAR DESIGHED-


YET EASY TO INSTALL

Quality controlled Termite
Protection from manufacture
4 through Installation.
First six-foot strip of Bird TERMI- 0 Termbar exterminates
BAR Barrier is laid with six inches Termbar exterminates
bent up inside wall to back up ex- termites on contact and
pension joint. Subsequent strips controls moisture.
are overlapped six inches.
Termibar is Installed by
trained applicoators.
0 Termlbar assures uniform
2 Insecticide coverage.
Openings around pipes and other 0 The Bird Termite Prevention
objects projecting through con- System assures positive
create slab are filled with Bird termite protection guaranteed
TERMIBAR Caulk (Asphalt Ce- by Bird & Son, Inc.
ment containing Dieldrin).
Termibar allows architects
complete freedom in design
and choice of building material
3 because subterranean termite
can't get into a building
Wire mesh is laid over Bird protected by the Termite
TERMIBAR Barrier, and screeds
are installed. Expansion joint, Prevention System.
protected by TERMIBAR Barrier Bird & Son, inc., developed this
at vertical wall, is nailed to wall. Termite Resistant Vapor Barrier
.. ., Termite Resistant Vapor Barrier
in cooperation with Shell Chemi-
N cal Corp., N.Y.C., and is the sole
U.S. Licensee under U.S. Patent
No. 2,952,938.


Kindly send me information about the
BIRD TERMITE PREVENTION SYSTEM

Name

Company

Street

City Zone_
State


I am: an Architect D1


a Builder I


a Dealer E]


*Termibar is
registered trade- mar
of Bird & Son, inm
for component
used in ii
Termite
Preventic
System.













and Son, inc.
o East Walpole, Massachusetts
0 Charleston, South Carolina
o Shreveport, Louisiana
I Chicago, Illinois


I















I


THE KEY TO ARCHITECTURAL PRESTIGE

Florida architects have done much to up-grade home-building
standards. The Medallion Home award is another incentive for The Medallion Home campaign
their creative talents in furthering modem living . ."Better Liv- is backed by multi-million dollar
ing-Electrically." It offers a challenge in designing All-Electric promotions in newspapers and
Kitchens, planned for modern electrical appliances, plus modern magazines, on TV and radio. Call
our office for full details and spec-
Light-for-Living throughout the house. ifications to qualify your homes
ifications to qualify your homes
Regardless of size, type, or price, the Medallion Home award is for Medallion Awards.
given by Florida Power & Light Company to any home that meets
the following electrical requirements:
ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN-LAUNDRY that includes at least 4 major
electrical appliances . water heater, range, and the choice of clothes
dryer, dishwasher, or other "Reddy-servants."
FULL HOUSEPOWER (100-200 amp service) with large enough wire
and ample circuits, outlets and switches for maximum convenience and
efficiency... now and in the future. oi
LIGHT-FOR-LIVING properly planned for every part of
the house and outdoors, for decorative beauty and utility.


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO. rRIC
Helping Build Florida
JANUARY, 1961





























O The Administration Building of the University of South Florida, Tampa, dramatically illustrates the beauty
and dynamic symmetry of concrete grille blocks. The units were made with Trinity White Portland Cement


Modern Concrete Grille Blocks

create fresh character and charm

Precast concrete grille blocks, the latest creation in
masonry units used individually or in combination -
broaden the design opportunities for both homes and
commercial buildings. They are not only decorative, but
serve a practical purpose as a sun screen.
Available in a variety of styles, shapes, sizes, texture
and colors, they offer unlimited scope for personal expres-
sion in wall treatments.
Concrete grille blocks-living concrete-are realistic
evidence of the creativeness and progressiveness of
America's concrete masonry manufacturers.
Grille Block units courtesy ol Clauss Tropical
Specialties, Fort Myers, Florida . and
Cochran Concrete Company, Sarasota, Florida




GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY -
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
PENINSULAR DIVISION, JACKSON, MICHIGAN 0 VICTOR DIVISION, FREDONIA, KANSAS
12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~llllLllllY~Adft;p







In Expectation



of Greatness


By PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA
President, AIA


For several years now it has been
my privilege, as an outside observer,
to have seen something of Florida
both as a piece of real estate and
also as a regional division of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects. Seeing it
a Region, I have been immensely
heartened by the rapid progress of
the FAA in terms of all AIA objec-
tives. One senses that the profession
is now united in fellowship and mu-
tual respect, whereas only a few years
ago there was evidence of discord and
jealousy. Through public service the
architects have earned from govern-
ment a new and higher order of re-
spect. Architects are now looked upon
as responsible citizens of special skills


who can be called upon to serve the
public welfare. For this progress, under
the leadership of such men as SAN-
FORD GOING, CLINT GAMBLE, SAM
KRUSE and JOHN STETSON and many
others, I salute the architects of Flor-
ida.
You have forged the FAA into an
effective instrument of service and
created the climate in which great
accomplishment is possible. The great
question you now face under the
dynamic leadership of BOB LEVISON
and his new team of officers is: For
what purposes shall this instrument
be used?
That the purposes will be worthy
I have no doubt. As a friend, admirer


and one who cheers from the side-
lines, may I express the hope that
you ami high enough, that you set
objectives in scale with the needs
of your great State and to the limit
of the vision and mission of the Archi-
tectural Profession.
Florida is a unique State. Not only
is its climate enviable; but its geo-
graphical isolation grants it a special
(Continued on Page 30)


1961 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters


BROWARD COUNT
President ____________
Vice President _______
Secretary __ _ _
Treasurer -.__ _____
DAYTONA BEACH
President -________-
Vice President ____ ._
Secretary _ _
Treasurer_ _________
FLORIDA CENTRAl
President ____.
Vice President __- -.
Secretary _.
Treasurer ______
FLORIDA NORTH:
President __________
Vice President______
Secretary ._
Treasurer


---Robert E Hansen
----Jack W Zimmer
----Victor A Larson
James M Hartley.

William P Greening
-. .. _Carl Gerken
Harry M Griffin
Alfred G Kemmerer
L:
A. Wynn Howell
Mark G Hampton
_H Leslie Walker, Jr.
__ -Jack McCandless

-....James T Lendrum
S_ __Myrl J. Hanes
John L R Grand
McMillan H Johnson


FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
President _ __________Roy L Ricks
Vice President -... _Ellis W Bullock, Jr
Secretary __. ___ _ Chester A Parker
Treasurer Ula J Manning
FLORIDA SOUTH:
President _..... -..._ Herbert R Savage
Vice President __ .. John 0 Grimshaw
Secretary . _. --- Earl M Starnes
Treasurer--- ____. Charles S Broward. Jr
JACKSONVILLE:
President Ivan H Smith
Vice President ___ -____Albert L Smith
Secretary _James 0 Kemp
Treasurer __ W Mayberry Lee
MID FLORIDA:
President _.. ___. James E. Windham, III
Vice President .___. George A Tuttle, Jr
Secretary_ __ Fred G Owles, Jr
Treasurer ___. _George W Bagley. Jr.


FLORIDA NORTH:
President .- ----. Chester Lee Craft, Jr
Vice President Charles F Kuhn
Secretary _ _
Treasurer ____ _.-Prentiss Huddleston


PALM BEACH:
President_
Vice President __
Secretary. __ _
Treasurer_


_ --Harold A. Obst
-- ----C Ellis Duncan
. -.---- Reed B Fuller
.Robert W Wenirg, Jr


JANUARY, 1961







74e A44 Presdentd L ook 7, 19961..,


Nothing Just Happens!



... Somebody




Must




Make It Happen


With its coming of age, the Florida
Association of Architects must be-
come more excited at the prospect
of making things happen-things that
are of vital consequence to us pro-
fessionally as individuals, as members
of progressive communities, and as
citizens of a state whose frontiers
have advanced as rapidly as those
of any state in the Union.
To keep pace with these advancing
frontiers-the advent of industry with
its accompanying sociological expan-
sion and building complexes-Florida
architects must extend their consis-
tent efforts and energy, not only dur-
ing the coming year but during the
years to follow. We now have one
of the greatest opportunities ever af-
forded the members of any profession.
We have a chance to lead in the
development of our State's most flour-
ishing industry-construction.
Since the first cave man crawled
out of his cave into the sunlight and
interlaced leaves and branches for a
roof, the building instincts of the
human race have been channeled
toward developing shelters for its fam-
ilies, erecting temples in which to
worship, and creating surroundings
in which to earn a livelihood.
Today's basic urges are the same
as they were 7,000 years ago when
the ancient Egyptians built wattled
huts along the Nile and the early
Saracens established rude villages on


By ROBERT H. LEVISON
President
The Florida Association of Architects


the Persian plateaus of Persepolis and
Susa. From these wattled huts and
rude villages evolved the patterns of
a world. Pathways emerged that led
to exploration and trade, commerce
and industry, castles and cathedrals-
and ultimately, to the contemporary
architecture of FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
and MIES VAN DER ROHE.
But even in 5000 B.C. it took some-
body to make things happen. If cave
men had stayed in their caves, im-
pervious to the attractions of golden
sunlight and blue skies, man still
might be as blind as a hoot owl-
and architecture, as such, still waiting
to be born. But because of the cave
man's initial curiosity and enterprise,
for thousands of years now architects
have led the human race in its eternal
quest for cultural stability. The sum
of their dreams in masonry, glass and
metal has detailed the rise of history
and the march of civilization.
A short time ago our Florida Asso-
ciation became a more integral part
of the century-old American Institute
of Architects. With this more impor-


tant position in the national pattern,
we must necessarily assume greater
responsibility. Many problems con-
front us. Some arc routine, to be
solved with the simple application of
common sense. Others present a chal-
lenge to be met only with the dili-
gent application of uncommon intel-
ligence and cooperation. Some can
be resolved by frank discussion of
ways and means between the parties
involved. Others require the broad
vision and determined perseverance of
trained professionals, plus the pains-
taking and patient education of the
public.
Along these lines, we must increase
our public service. Each community
offers many and diverse opportunities
for serving our fellow citizens and
improving their acquaintance with our
profession. In accepting these oppor-
tunities, we not only bring credit to
ourselves but to our profession as a
whole and, in so doing, advance the
entire cause of human relations.
In service to our profession, let us
continue to maintain personal stand-
ards at the highest level. Let us
assume further responsibility for what
we and others have conceived. The
most certain and obvious method for
achieving professional success is to be
willing and able to assume responsi-
bility with its concomitant problems
and headaches. I know of nothing
that commands greater respect than
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






a responsible professional in any field.
Nothing is of greater influence and
significance to his community and
his times than the quality of that
responsibility. Cheap, incomplete
services are worse than none at all.
They injure the reputation of the
individual and cast doubt on the pro-
fessional integrity of his colleagues.
As WILLIAM McFEE once said: "Re-
sponsibility is like a string we can
only see the middle of. Both ends are
out of sight." Although we may not
be able to see both ends, let us at least
make sure the middle doesn't sag.
We must renew our efforts to make
our Association's committees more
effective. We must increase and insti-
tute more informative seminars for






Florida


Central











By A. WYNN HOWELL
President

The past year has been one of
many events, both good and bad. Na-
tional and international differences,
state and national political campaigns
and elections, a violent hurricane in
our own state, and disasters of many
sorts elsewhere have all had our
attention and interest. All these things
take their toll in emotions and energy;
but being the Americans that we are,
we are able to meet the great chal-
lenges that lie ahead. We have a new
Governor and a new President; and
regardless of our individual party af-
filiation we will support them with
our best efforts.
In our Chapter we find many situ-
ations and opportunities to challenge
us. The vast area that makes up the
Florida Central Chapter offers a di-
versity of interest and opportunity
JANUARY, 1961


the purpose of sharing with our
younger members the experiences and
lessons learned by the older ones. For
this we need action-programs and
willing workers, the help of all of you
who have ideas and experiences to
share. This will require the personal
effort of every individual and a dedi-
cation to the task assigned him, no
matter how seemingly inconsequential.
Let us all renew and extend our
goals in directions that count-pride
in our craftsmanship, individually and
collectively. Contributions to our
communities, for their benefit and
our own. A willingness to accept re-
sponsibility.
Let the FAA be the somebody that
makes things happen in 1961!


U


unique in the State of Florida. Cap-
able men live and work in these
diverse areas and part of their chal-
lenge is to lead in all worthwhile
efforts both in their individual com-
munities, Chapter wide, State wide
and Nation-wide.
In making committee appoint-
ments I have tried to select those
whom I believe to be capable, sincere
and determined to work. Especially
important is the field of Public Re-
lations. It is appalling how little the
public still understands the profession
and the function of its members. We
often blame the public for our failure
to be heard and known, but the fault
lies with us. This year we must make
ourselves known, but we must be
known as professionals. The image
we want will be the one we create.


I feel that we have a great oppor-
tunity for service in our visiting the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
at the University of Florida. We need
to know what is being taught as well
as to offer suggestions as to what we
feel the students need to best equip
them to come into our offices. My
frequent visits to Gainesville convince
me that many students don't know
what to expect after graduation.
At the risk of some degree of con-
demnation I want to express some
dissatisfaction with some of Mr. Will's
statements in his address at the recent
FAA Convention in Hollywood. Many
thought provoking and challenging
statements were contained in the ad-
dress; but I question the reference
to the small office as the place for
design of a home or minor alteration.
Mr. Will, of course, stated a truth,
but not nearly a whole truth.
The field of the lone architect, or
of the small office is, I believe, the
whole of architecture manifested
through sincerity, ability, and hard
work. While it is true that archi-
tecture has been upgraded by good
large offices, so has architecture been
upgraded by individuals. The whole
history of architecture is proof that
architecture has been upgraded by
individuals. I believe that upgrading
and progress may come from all of-
fices, both large and small. The
tragedy of our present state is that
both large and small offices have too
often downgraded architecture. To
all firms I would say, "Do your best
to be creators and not imitators."
Our Chapter is naturally pleased
to have one of our members as the
new President of the FAA; and we
pledge our best efforts to support BoB
LEVISON and his fellow-officers in all
their efforts toward the positive and
challenging betterment of the pro-
fession throughout the State of Flor-
ida. Whatever concerns the individual
concerns all, and whatever concerns
all certainly concerns the individual.
When the state officers and commit-
tee chairmen call on us for help, I
believe that we in Florida Central
will be willing and able servants.
Finally, I would ask that all of us
support our very fine journal, The
Florida Architect. ROGER SHERMAN
wants our contributions to the mag-
azine. Here again we may forge ahead
in good Public Relations and make
ourselves heard and known.







Jacksonville




By IVAN H. SMITH
President



Jacksonville Chapter objectives for
1961 are in a large measure influenced
by the imminence of the State Legis-
lature meeting and to the continuance
of programs activated in 1960.
Approximately eighty percent of the
Chapter's officers, directors and com-
mittee chairmen of 1960 are continu-
ing over into 1961, largely because
programs begun need continuity of
leadership to bring about intended re-
sults. This is particularly true of Chap-
ter committee work in connection
with plans to create a Metropolitan
Planning Commission and in the
interim to solve urban traffic and
parking problems. The Jacksonville
Area Chamber of Commerce chair-
men of these two important subcom-
mittees are architects, with other
architects actively serving.
Voters of Duval County in Novem-
ber passed a thirty-five million dollar
school build ding bond issue. The
School Board has previously requested
architects to assist in the formulation
of academic programs, for guidance
in planning new buildings. These are
nearing completion; so for 1961 we
plan to expand these efforts in co-
operation with the School Board
Architectural Department in the pre-
paration of architectural programs for
design of new buildings.
The local AGC Chapter in 1960
put into practice the Four Hour Bid
Plan, which our chapter endorsed.
We are now requested to advise on
refinements in the plan and to assist
in other desired corrective measures
of abuses currently found in the
competitive bidding system.
The Chapter hopes to sponsor
panel type meetings with professional
engineers that will improve under-
standing and create a better climate
for working together. A seminar in
connection with church building is
being planned for March. Chapter
practice of interviewing all applicants
for corporate and associate member-
ship by the Executive Committee will


be continued. We believe these inter-
views tend to give emphasis to the
requirements of ethical practice, call
attention to the desirability of attend-
ance at Chapter meetings, and in
turn acquaint us with the applicant's
professional interests so that effective
committee work assignments can be
made.
As to the meeting of the State
Legislature, the Jacksonville Chapter
is committed to support of the State
FAA legislative policies affecting the
profession on the local level, as well






Daytona


Beach


By WILLIAM B. GREENING
President

The Daytona Beach Chapter has
enjoyed an orderly growth during the
year just passed, and now numbers
19 corporate and 8 associate members.
This year the chapter established
a new classification for membership
called "allied" members. This is for
those not practicing or employed by
an architect but who have a vital
interest in the profession. Our allied
members include a man from the
Florida Power and Light Company,
a representative of a mechanical engi-
neering firm, and a member of the
faculty of the new Daytona Beach


as statewide.
The December organizational meet-
ing of the Chapter's new Executive
Committee appointed all committee
chairmen and endorsed the above
principal objectives. We also outlined
the following additional specifics for
inclusion in our 1960 program:
We will actively give support,
where indicated, to effecting the re-
quired appropriations for the con-
struction of the proposed new build-
ing for the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts at the University of
Florida. We will encourage Chapter
members to work closely with the
faculty and students at the University.
We will assist the State Board of
Architecture and its representatives
in their efforts to enforce State regis-
tration laws and regulations.
It is our desire to support the new
FAA President and the Board in its
policies; and we will encourage attend-
ance at the FAA Board meetings by
Chapter directors by reimbursing their
transportation costs to Board meetings
from Chapter funds.
We will encourage our Public Rela-
tions Committee to enlarge its activi-
ties and to use services, where appro-
priate, of a public relations consultant
within the limits of the budget.





Junior College. We have 7 allied
members in all.
We have attempted to present pro-
grams at our monthly dinner meetings
which would be of interest not only
to corporate or associate members but
also to our new classification members.
Architect representation in civic
affairs is increasing. Associate member
DeWitt McGee is the City Planner,
Joel Sayers is a member of the Day-
tona Beach Planning Board, Carl
Gerken is a member of the Zoning
Board of Appeals, Ralph Spicer is a
member of the Daytona Beach Board
of Review, Bill Greening and Carl
Gerken are members of the Builders'
Exchange Board of Directors.
These accomplishments of the re-
cent past are noted here to give credit
to our retiring officers and to show
the chapter's progress. The new offi-
cers' aim is to extend the influence
of the FAA and to promote an aware-
ness of the need for sound architec-
tural planning in the community.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


















This


-.., ,.~


* E*4~



A -~
A.


Loooo
;- *s1


pal


*,*


... blends a touch of texture u

to produce a new concept's


*Trademark of B B Chemical Company


c0


I


'F7- "O0,7





BOSTIK: worldwide background to performance
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS are a colorful result of the BB
SChemical Company's emphasis in discovering, developing and
marketing finishes and adhesives to industry for over three
quarters of a century.
SUsing this background of finishing know-how, amassed at
home and abroad in other BB Chemical affiliates, the company
was one of the first to research and develop both clear and
II Ipigmented urethane coatings.
TE XTU RED COATINGS Urethane coatings have proven their worth in all manner of
of many uses applications and in all areas of the world . from resisting
1Of mIR y UISOS torrid heat in the boilers of steel mills deep in the Ruhr Valley
to fighting corrosion in the holds of oil tankers sailing Lake
Michigan . to coating wooden dye sticks in Southern textile
mills ... to protecting the laboratory floors at the BB Chemical
.. plant in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Now, urethane chemistry takes another dramatic, colorful
step forward. From the BB Chemical Company laboratories
comes a touch of texture and a shade of color to produce a new
concept of form... BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS.













New protective and decorative BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS
have been developed to answer the needs of architects, en- -
gineers, contractors and owners who are concerned with..
designing and building structures whose exteriors demand pro- .
tection, durability and beauty. -.
They are designed to be spray-coated on poured, precast and
prestressed concrete; masonry, brick and concrete block;
asbestos board, masonite and overlay plywood. *
A . M. .
BOSTIK: product of polyurethane chemistry -
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS are the end result of a chemical
reaction that takes place when an isocyanate activator in
solvent is introduced to a pigmented urethane resin. Upon
mixing, a cross linking reaction occurs and the film cures to a
tough, weather resistant surface.
Aggregates of various sizes are introduced to the base film to
produce a "textured" effect which can be dramatically pro-
nounced or just a bit above smooth.

POLYURETHANE: outstanding newcomer to
architectural design
The urethanes make one of the most resistant organic coatings
ever developed. They possess a combination of desirable
qualities heretofore unobtainable in conventional coating
materials.
As a basic component of BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS, the
urethanes provide high resistance to abrasion, wear, impact
and mechanical abuse. Useable indoors or out, they are ex-
tremely resistant to industrial fumes, salt spray and smog.
They are virtually invulnerable to the attacks of solvents, oils,
grease, water and similar substances. ..
As tough and durable coatings, the urethanes are setting a new -y cr r pn.
standard of excellence for the construction industry.


I




9
Bb


BOSTIK: in colors that befit imaginative design
The BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS color spectrum embraces
over a dozen tones. Some are shown in this story; others appear
A in color charts available on request. All colors may be inter-
mixed for an infinite variety of shades.
All are durable. All will retain their true tones without fading
far longer than other types of applied finishes. All make it pos-
SVsible to suit color to the personality of the structure . in-
dividually or in combination.

BOSTIK: proved in the laboratory and on location
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS demanded and received -
substantial proof of their worth and performance capabilities
before being marketed commercially. Testing and develop-
ment programs were conducted in the laboratory and on loca-
:ition, both in this country and abroad.

On Location Applications:
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS had their first full-scale test in
Stockholm, Sweden, where in 1955, over 400,000 square feet of
precast concrete was given "the BOSTIK look." Due to the out-
standing weather resistance of these textured coatings no
further re-treatment of the surface will be required for many
years.
It is interesting to note that, due to the many commercial
TO FLOD Te l" as it a s on te fl successes BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS have enjoyed in Sweden,
plate r e c t Y* s e cr architects, engineers and construction firms in England,
colmn of thi moer bec hos in MisceseamTi.ETRE OTNG aeenoenwdn
Loan M i Germany and other European countries are rapidly becoming
Cing C r By & ., aware of and putting to use their excellent protective and
Miam a Adecorative capabilities in many kinds of building applications.

From success in Sweden, "the BOSTIK look" came to Florida
,- ^...- where it was sprayed on the roof and supporting concrete
columns of a suspended design house in Miami.
In all, over 4,000 square feet of concrete was sprayed in an
area where harsh sunlight, torrential rains and wind-driven
sand can take their toll of exterior surfaces. The house continues
to retain "the BOSTIK look".
Another application, important for its future potential, was
the use of BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS to coat roof sections of
medium density overlay plywood at a mobile mission church
in Burlington, Massachusetts.
Z 2. J The 70,000 square foot addition to the BB Chemical plant in
Middleton, Massachusetts, was sprayed with four colorful
shades of BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS to demonstrate their
remarkable corrosion resistance in a highly chemically con-
centrated atmosphere. In addition to protection, "the
T BOSTIK look" brought a new kind of beauty to what might
S pt to t l an i ue of have been just another industrial chemical plant.

In Laboratory Performance:
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS have been, and continue to be,
L subjected to a continuing testing program which encompasses
a full round of comprehensive performance tests.
These include WeatherOmeter tests, FadeOmeter tests, Salt-
Fog tests, Hot-Cold-Wet-Dry Cycle tests, a year-round re-
search program in Florida, plus practical field applications
throughout the country.
TEXTURED COATINGS The knowledge accrued from tests in the laboratory and on
.. blend a touch of texture with a shade of location assures architects, engineers, builders and owners con-
tinuing standards of coating excellence when specifying, build-
color to produce a new concept of form. ing and designing with BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS.
*Trademark of B B Chemical Company






ARCHITECTURAL SPECIFICATIONS for

BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS


GENERAL CONDITIONS:
The General Conditions of the specifications
covering the over-all project shall form an
integral part of this section.
EXTENT OF WORK:
Work included in this section covers all labor,
material, equipment and supervision necessary
for the installation of BOSTIK TEXTURED COAT-
INGS by an approved franchised applicator to all
areas set forth in the exterior coating schedules,
drawings, and specification.
MATERIALS AND WORKMANSHIP:
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS are the end result
of a chemical reaction occurring when an isocya-
nate activator in solvent is introduced to a pig-
mented urethane resin. Upon application, a cross-
linking reaction occurs in which the film cures
chemically to form a tough, weather-resistant
surface.
All BOSTIK liquid materials shall be first-quality,
freshly compounded, and applied to wall surfaces
directly from factory-sealed drums, without
dilution or additives. Aggregates to be used shall
be Wausau Quartz or approved equal delivered
dry to the spray gun from a portable CXW sand
blast unit manufactured expressly for the BB
Chemical Company and supplied by Spray
Engineering Company, 100 Cambridge Street,
Burlington, Massachusetts. All installations
shall be made by technically trained factory ap-
proved mechanics, using technical equipment
specifically designed for this purpose.
PREPARATION:
All exterior exposed concrete, masonry, block,
or cement based surfaces to have spray-applied
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS shall be dry and
free from dirt and other materials.
Any major surface imperfections shall be
remedied before spray operation begins. No
BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS shall be applied
to deteriorating surfaces without prior sand-
blasting to sound substrate and/or approval of
franchised applicator. No spraying will be al-
lowed in rainy or foggy weather or when the
temperature is below 450F.


APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Application shall be made by an applicator who
is licensed and franchised by the BB Chemical
Company. Evidence of franchise must be sub-
mitted to architect in writing.

BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS are packaged in
a unique 2-part system consisting of five gallon
drums, with four gallons of Part A pigmented
binder in the bottom, and one gallon of Part B
clear, activator in the top insert. After removing
cover, lift out insert, and pour Part B into Part
A. Mix thoroughly for three to five minutes, with
conventional mixing paddle. Quantities mixed
at job site, should be governed by requirements
for one day's application. Once mixed, the coat-
ing should be placed in a standard pressure feed
tank with duplex control head. Materials remain-
ing mixed for more than 8 hours shall be dis-
carded and removed from the site.

BOSTIK TEXTURED COATINGS are applied to ma-
sonry surfaces by a two coat spray application,
using the Spraco Triple Spray Gun Model #2470,
as manufactured by Spray Engineering Company
expressly for the BB Chemical Company.

After spray application of the gritted base coat,
the top, or sealing coat, may be applied with the
same gun and material by merely shutting off
the flow of the aggregates and proceeding to spray
over the base coat. Cleaning of equipment follows
the usual spray equipment procedure using BB
Chemical Company's solvent cleaner or a mix-
ture of methyl ethyl ketone and isopropanol in
equal parts.

COVERAGE:
A minimum mil thickness of 60 mils for the
finished coating is the standard coating thickness
when an aggregate is used that will pass a 20
mesh screen and be returned on a 35 mesh screen.

COLOR SELECTION:
All color selections shall be made and approved
by the architect before the applicator shall
proceed.
BULLETIN NO. T-161







Mid-Florida



By JAMES E. WINDHAM, III
President



The year, 1960, has been one of
slow but steady progress for the Mid-
Florida Chapter and it is our hope
that some of the actions taken and
progress started during this period will
begin to show results during the com-
ing year. Probably our greatest activity
has been in the associate members
who wish to participate in reviewing
and preparing for the State Board
examination as well as to acquaint
them with many factors of the pro-
fession and the A.I.A. which they were
unable to acquire in school.
Another successful venture was our
annual Beaux Arts Ball held in Octo-
ber. This was our second such event
and served as a great fun and get
acquainted function, as well as being
a most successful public relations
project. Plans are already being formu-


lated to make the next one even better.
One of our most important projects,
from a professional standpoint, has
been the formation of a joint com-
mittee with the Associated General
Contractors, Orange County General
Contractors Association, Home Build-
ers and Central Florida Builders Ex-
change. The purpose of this commit-
tee is to study the local building codes,
primarily in respect to licensing re-
quirements a n d t h e requirements


necessary to obtain a building permit
and to assist the City of Orlando in
revising and bringing them up to date.
Due to several revisions and amend-
ments to the Orlando Building Code
in the past, there is at present no
requirement that an architect or
engineer prepare plans and specifica-
tions, nor that a licensed general
contractor construct any type of build-
ing whatsoever, regardless of size or
complexity, except at the discretion
of the building official who inci-
dentally has been doing a good job,
but cannot be expected to police or
check design of all projects going
through his office. At the present time
this committee has drafted a mutually
agreeable revision to the code, which
in itself is a great accomplishment,
and is ready to present it to the City
for study and possible adoption. It is
my hope that this committee can
remain in effect to help work out
other problems which exist between
the various groups named.
One of our greatest problems on a
local level is poor attendance at meet-
ings and general lack of interest and
cooperation, as well as participation,
(Continued on Page 26)


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JANUARY, 1961


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Merit Award -1960 FAA Convention...


Residence for
Nat Ratner
Miami Beach






RUFUS NIMS,
ROBERT B. BROWNE,
Photos by Joseph W. Molitor Architects


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































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JANUARY, 1961


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Photos by Rhoda Deutschman
Design for Naranjo Hotel

Guatemala City, Guatemala

WATSON, DEUTSCHMAN and KRUSE, Architects and Engineers


JANUARY, 1961






Mid-Florida...
(Continued from Page 21)

by too many of our members. It
appears as though the purpose of
many in joining the organization has
been to pay dues, when convenient,
apply the A.I.A. behind his name, and
then sit back and wait for the chapter
to do something for him. This does
not apply, of course, to all members
as was shown by the fine cooperation
of many during the staging of the
Beaux Arts Ball.
Nor can the necessity of good
leadership be minimized for the suc-
ccss of any organization. It does, how-
ever, become a little difficult to lead
that which is not there to lead, as
other officers have found out in the
past. It would seem as many times
as it has been said the fact would
eventually register that any organiza-
tion is made up of individual members
and any benefits to be derived from
the organization depends to a great
extent on the degree of active and
interested participation of each indi-
vidual member toward common goals
arrived at by mutual agreement with
individual compromises when neces-
sary. The primary purpose of our
organization is not one of personal
gain, but rather that of promoting and
providing better professional services
for the good of the public. Success
in this will result in individual gain
for each member.
It is our aim, this year, to attempt
to stress more active participation by
all members, channeled into construc-
tive programs with specific aims so
that the effort will reap the best
possible results. One method of
achieving this, begun last year, is more
thorough investigation of prospective
members, including personal inter-
views by our membership committee.
This, I feel, gives the prospective
member a sense of more importance
in the organization as well as helping
to prevent those who are not seriously
interested in the good of the pro-
fcssion and are not willing to work
toward this end from becoming mem-
bers.
We have many talented and high
caliber members in this area, a good
slate of incoming officers, and plenty
of room for accomplishment and im-
provement. So there is no reason why
1961 should not be a very successful
year for the Mid Florida Chapter.


North


Central A


By CHESTER L. CRAFT, JR.
President

We of the Florida North Central
Chapter of the A.I.A. for the year
1961 shall rededicate ourselves to the
objects of the American Institute of
Architects and with rekindled desires
shall maintain standards of leadership
among the chapters of the Institute.
More specifically, the program for
the year shall be bi-fold: first, to build
"with-in," and, to build "with-out."
I. To build "with-in":
1. To increase interest and coopera-
tive action in the affairs of the Chap-
ter, the FAA and the AIA;
2. To continue development of
interesting pro grams for Chapter
meetings so as to make attendance
an asset;
3. To have each member be "a
member in good satnding";
4. To increase Chapter member-
ship so as to include those qualified
professionals who are not presently
within our organization.
II. To build "with-out":
1. To continue the development of
our public relations program as exem-





Palm Beach




By HAROLD A. OBST
President



The big item of the agenda for
the Palm Beach Chapter will be the
1961 FAA Convention. The Boca
Raton Hotel, once called the "mil-
lionaires' hidden paradise," has been
chosen as the site of the convention.
The theme of the convention has not
been selected yet, but the various con-
vention committees, under KENNETH
JACOBSON, general chairman, arc al-
ready at work.


plificd recently in the sponsoring of
the competition for the design of the
Tallahassee Junior Museum;
2. To adopt as our prime program-
interest for the year that of com-
munity development in general and
more specifically, of the greater Talla-
hassee area;
3. To maintain aggressive interests
and leadership in community cultural
projects such as the Randall House,
the recently organized Tallahassee
Fine Arts Council, and the Junior
Museum.
Shall the year 1961 be one filled
with positive thinking and positive
action a banner year? It can be
so if we all work together.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Wth BOB WENING as chairman,
the Chapter will serve the various
communities within the boundaries
of the Palm Beach Chapter, to assist
in urban renewal and town planning.
The Chapter has already had one
meeting devoted to this subject, and
more will be planned for the coming
year.
The newly organized auxiliary is
to be installed in January simultan-
eous with the installation of the chap-
ter officers. BEVERLY STETSON is the
first president of the auxiliary. The
purpose of the local auxiliary is to
assist the chapter in every way pos-
sible, with special emphasis for the
coming year on the convention. Other
officers are JoY SHOUP, vice president,
TRIDDY PEACOCK, secretary, and MARY
JACOBSON, treasurer.
In the spring, the Palm Beach
Chapter plans to have an exhibition
of work of the members at the Nor-
ton Art gallery, location of a similar
exhibit in 1953, entitled "Architecture
Under the Sun." Chapter members
have already expressed much interest
in this project.
As 1961 will be a Florida legis-





Broward


County

By ROBERT E. HANSEN
President
For 1961 the Broward Chapter will
put increasing emphasis on education
and individualism.
The community planning and zon-
ing committee is expected to be espe-
cially active in its program of public
education on urban growth and re-
development problems.
In Fort Lauderdale two new split
level cross traffic intersections (The
New River Tunnel and the Third
Avenue Bridge over New Bridge)
point the way toward vertically sep-
crated intersections in the heavily
trafficed areas of our communities of
the future. By helping stimulate pub-
lic thought on such problems we
hope to hasten construction for State
Road 9, with its five elevated cross-
overs in the Lauderdale area and sim-
JANUARY, 1961


lative year, the Chapter will work
with President BOB LEVISON on the
legislative program of the FAA, and
for such items as a new building for
the College of Architecture at the
University of Florida, revision of the
mechanics' lien law, unified building
codes, cooperation between the archi-
tectural and engineering professions,
and other legislative items.
This, in bare outline form, ex-
presses the main areas of concentra-
tion for 1961, of the Palm Beach
chapter-with the Convention taking
precedence, and assistance in urban
renewal of various communities being
next in importance. The chapter is
also considering the sponsorship of a
Beaux Arts ball, but at the time of
writing nothing has been done to
further this particular project. As
president of the chapter, I hope that
all members, from our two Fellows
down through our junior associates,
will take an active and enthusiastic
interest in all chapter activities in
1961. If the FAA Convention is to
be a success, all members will have
to pitch in and actively support their
chapter.


ilar growth projects to avoid the
"fifteen years late" tag which the
tunnel earned before it was com-
pleted.
We hope to join other chapters
and other interested groups to work
toward an adequate building code for
all of Florida, along with unified
qualification requirements for con-
(Continued on Page 28)


G GEORGE C. C
RIFFIN 0O.
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 10025, Jacksonville, Florida





r Bea a tingValue






Broward ...
(Continued from Page 27)
tractors and sub-contractors.
We will continue close cooperation
with other building groups, to further
the good of the profession and the
industry though communication and
education. The chapter is especially
proud of the continuing development
of the joint Craftsmanship Awards
program with the Broward Builders
Exchange.
In the area of public service, in
addition to urban planning activities,
our members are expected to increase
already sizeable voluntary activities on
planning and zoning boards and on
examining boards, neighborhood plan-
ning committees and the like.
There are enough community jobs
that need doing for everyone-and a
bit more. I believe we can find the
willing manpower to search out the
opportunities and do something about
such needs.
In 1961 we will aim toward in-
creased dissemination of educational
information within the profession.
A continuing project from 1960 will
be analysis and recommendations


gleaned from studies of "Donna."
New state and national administra-
tions give all of us excellent oppor-
tunity to help point the country
toward a goal of "united action, with
emphasis on educated individualism."
It seems especially important this
year that architects take the lead in
focussing attention on the need for
respect for individuality in setting up




Florida


North


By JAMES T. LENDRUM
President

In addition to its normal operation
through committees, t he Florida
North Chapter of the AIA will expand
on two activities which, while not
being on the original program for
1960, were undertaken and have


construction finance programs, in
urban planning and renewal, and espe-
cially in the planning of homes, where
individuality begins and must be pre-
served.
Perhaps it is the lot of the architect
in the world of the '60's to see to
it that the individual is not swallowed
up by mass planning or mass sales-
manship or mass psychology.


RESIDENTIAL

INTERIORS


Working closely with

architect and client

for residential

decorations and furnishings

of distinction


RICHARD PL MER



155 Northeast Fortieth Street


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





proven to be worthwhile.
Florida is well known for its "Old-
est House" in St. Augustine. However,
few people know of other buildings
in the St. Augustine area, or the
architectural heritage we have in other
buildings throughout the state. Two
members of the staff of the Depart-
ment of Architecture at the Univer-
sity of Florida (Professor F. B. Reeves
and Henry Edwards) have worked
with the Historic American Buildings
Survey during the summer months
and have aroused an interest in the
early buildings in Florida. In 1960
the Chapter financed a survey trip
by these two men which took them
through the western part of the state
where they made a survey and sub-
mitted a report in which they listed
seventy-one buildings suitable for
recording. Previously the Chapter had
advanced funds to cover direct costs
for preparing measured drawings of
The Bailey House in Gainesville. Here
the work was done by students under
the direction of Professor Reeves. It
is anticipated that these actions will
be followed by others in the hope
that the HABS will undertake a com-


plete survey, including photographs
and measured drawings of the early
architecture of Florida.
The Student Chapter of the AIA
at the University has been active and
encouragement was given the students
this fall when The Florida North
Chapter made a donation to two stu-
dents who attended The International




Florida


South


By HERBERT R. SAVAGE
President


In deepest humility I accept the
office as president of the Florida
South Chapter for this New Year of
1961. On behalf of the executive
committee I want to extend an open
(Continued on Page 30)


Student Convention at Mexico City.
They made sketches and photographs
and will present a report at the next
Chapter meeting. While no plans
have been made for future support
of the Student Chapter in the way of
direct financial aid, we will cooperate
fully and encourage them in every
way possible.


Fulfilling the original concept of architect and client for outstanding
business interior designs


POLEVITZKY JOHNSON & ASSOCIATES


Architects


M. R. HARRISON CONSTRUCTION CORP. Contractor
RICHARD PLUMER BUSINESS INTERIORS, INC.
Interior Design and Furnishings
JANUARY, 1961


RICHARD PLUMERI
BUSINESS INTERIORSJINC.

155 Northeast Fortieth Street, Miami, Florida








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Florida South...
(Continued from Page 29)
door policy to all who read this maga-
zine, as we know you have some
question which you want answered
with respect to the program and
problems of the Chapter.
Three items stand out in my mind
which are necessary to make a success
of our services as a Chapter: a
stronger service arm, the AIA and
FAA; a strong desire of the indivi-
dual practitioner to provide the public
with the best possible in architectural
services; and, last but not least, the
need of each and every member to
take an active and enthusiastic inter-
est in committee work by which we
carry out the wishes of the Chapter,
along with the program of the Insti-
tute.
To paraphrase, we are only as strong
as our weakest committee. Should the
strongest committee fail to get the
support of the membership we may
not accomplish the ideal for which
we are working. Therefore good public
relations is a must for all architects;
and our committees have been success-
ful only when the information has
reached the membership or the public.
I believe the Florida South Chapter
has carried out a progressive policy to
take into its membership, as asso-
ciates, young a r c h it ec t s and has
attempted to assist them whenever
possible in establishing an ethical and
respected practice. This has been done
by education or association with the
older, tried architects who can help
to avoid some of the rough road which
we face when there is no organization
nor counsel.




In Expectation ...
(Continued from Page 13)
kind of independence and opportun-
ity. It is the only State the majority
of whose boundary is physically de-
tached from other States or nations.
Except along the northern border the
principal populated areas are free of
direct contact with other expanding
cultures and economies. Your grow-
ing metropolitan areas are entirely
within Florida. As compared to inter-
state urban sprawl of our east coast
farther north and the Great Lakes
(Continued on Page 33)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































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JANUARY, 1961 31


More and more
homebuyers
are asking for
CONCEALED
TELEPHONE
WIRING

Whatever else the latest building boom may
have done, one thing is certain prospective
home buyers no longer have to be sold on
modern conveniences, like telephone planning.
They ask for them.
The advantages of adding or moving telephones
with a minimum of cost is a plus factor for
any new home.
Won't you let us show you how easy it is to have
modern, saleable concealed telephone wiring in
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developed after months of research, TEL was designed to answer s .
the need for deluxe appearance, low cost, and unlimited flexibility.
Most important, perhaps, Is the beautiful silver light it affords, and
the fact that it produces more foot candles than similar fixtures, at
less cost! TEL is unusually shallow; hugs close to the ceiling; has
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Europe, is applied over all kinds of construction material on
interior walls and ceilings, such as the bare concrete blocks,
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In Expectation...
(Continued from Page 30)
Complex, what an opportunity you
have! Florida can be anything its
citizens decide it should be!
Does this suggest to the profession
an opportunity and an obligation?
Has Florida ever set for itself goals
of its potential? If so, have the neces-
sary steps been taken to guide growth
toward these goals? If the answer to
either question is "no," it is time
to act.
We recognize that no single pro-
fession has the right or competence
to establish for Florida a complete set
of objectives: economic, educational,
environment, etc., etc. But, any indi-
vidual or group can discover the need,
assemble the right people, bring pres-
sure to the right points, and cause
action. With the physical develop-
ment of the State of such overwhelm-
ing importance we would hope that
architects might take the lead. The
FAA has the leaders and united sup-
port.
Perhaps we appear naive. But we
will risk it in the expectation of great-
ness.


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A. R. Cogswell . . 32
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Dwoskin, Inc. . . 3
Electrend Distributing Co. . 8
Florida Home Heating Institute 34
Florida Portland Cement . 12
Florida Power and Light Co. 11
Florida Steel Corp. . . 4
General Portland Cement 6
George C. Griffin Co. 27
Hamilton Plywood . . 21
Houston Corp. . ... 32
The Mabie Bell Company . 1
Richard Plumer . . 28-29
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 30
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co. 31
Sta-Brite Fluorscent Mfg. Co. 32
Titus Mfg. Co . .. 31
F. Graham Williams Co. . 32



JANUARY, 1961


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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-- Il II


1611






7a 7?4 ftemeow dad 74ie *'a P"Tzde & ltW& aWic-,.


The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


Architecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience. . The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing, in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W.
Goin lived and worked.

The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Edmond N. MacCollin,
President, 240 Bayside Drive,
Clearwater Beach, Florida.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER, AIA.




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