Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00077
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00077
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text
E~nc~ng


Copy


46th Annual FAA


Convention


Issue


the
Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.


MAf-
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0D WIE.
ARCi1 ILCT


November


1960


1960








SPACEMAKING


.' 2;~


SEE
OUR EXHIBIT
AT
BOOTH 29


~;:~i;


I


Series 51 kitchen shown


S ,.. .......
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SEND FOR 16-PAGE CATALOG


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Suite 621, Dupont Plaza Center; FRanlin 1-4344
300 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami 32
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GENTLEMEN: 'i"am ame
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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


ot 7Ts Isce ---


F/A Panorama . . . . . . 5
Letters . . . . . . . . . 6
Purves Resigns as Head of AIA Staff . . . . . . . 8
The Community Today and Tomorrow . . . . . . 19
By William T. Arnett, AIA
Wes CAN Get Better Construction . . . . . . .. 23
Message from the President by John Stetson, AIA
Committee on Resolutions Guides Convention Business . . . . 25
Program 46th Annual FAA Convention . . . . . 27 32
What's Happening to Houses? . . . . . . . . 35
By Perry I. Prentice
Case of the Disappearing Dollar . . . . . . . . 37
Governor Names Stetson to Head Hurricane Committee . . . 39
P. 0. Department Revises Its Commercial Leasing Program . . . 40
New FAA Insurance Program Ready . . . . . . 40
News and Notes . . . . .... . . . .. .43
Advertisers' Index . . . . . . . . 55


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolph; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugene
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, James E.
Windham, III; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, Jefferson N. Powell.
Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
THE COVER
Following the lead of the November Convention Issue last year, this month's
cover design has been developed from the format used on the 1961 Conven-
tion letterhead and literature. We are grateful to the Convention Committee
for permission to use their design and to Peter Larkin, Fort Lauderdale
advertising artist, who created it.


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 10

NUMBER 111960
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


_ I__~ I










M B L Sa curtain wall and facing


enhances the
~ADE @@DO~V LDAUL AD
LPUMBLD@ 93LA T BUILDI0N
The six-story Public Safety Department portion of this new county
public building project features white 212-inch-thick Mo-Sai panels on
the end walls, as well as column and beam fascia.
The Y-shaped jail, 10 stories in height, uses easily anchored 6-inch-thick
white Mo-Sai panels for the complete wall unit. Exterior of panels has a
standard Mo-Sai finish, while inside of panels has a sand-troweled finish,
requiring only painting to complete the interior wall. This complete
Mo-Sai wall unit provides an especially economical and
attractive construction.













UA2 1 L I -L -1
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NOVEMBER, 1960







F/A Panorama...


IT MAY BE BETTER TO RENT THAN TO BUY . .
The cooperative apartment may be on its way out in Florida as a popular capital
investment and as a source of professional activity for architects. In the
opinion of at least one professional, well-versed in the financial intricacies of
both projects, the rental-unit apartment has a substantial edge on the coopera-
tive on at least three counts . First is the matter of financing. Straight rental
projects are generally attractive to conservative capital sources on a conven.
tional financing basis-whereas coops are usually financed through loans
secured by contingent sales commitments. Second is the time involved in
financing. Rentals can be built as soon as a mortgage is arranged. Progress
of coops depends primarily on pre-selling the units as a basis for mortgages.
Third factor is comparative costs from the tenants (or owners) point of view.
The renter assumes a monthly payment as a single obligation. The coop owner,
however, assumes responsibility for a pro-rata share of the mortgage and in
addition is usually assessed a sum monthly for "maintenance". In some cases
this has required an owner of a $40,000 apartment to pay upwards of $300
monthly in addition to his regular mortgage payments.

URBAN RENEWAL COULD BECOME A LEGISLATIVE ISSUE . .
Experience in Daytona Beach, Tampa and most recently in Metropolitan Miami
could provide a background for decisive legislation action next year toward
liberalizing current bans against tie-in with Federal aid by many Florida com-
munities seeking help in developing civic improvement programs. It now
seems possible that the Pork-Choppers will do some vote-trading with the big-
center counties toward the end of spreading the benefits of no-pain improve-
ments. Watch for re-introduction of planning and zoning bills and a new
attempt at a constitutional amendment to permit condemnation of private
property for public improvement by private operation.

REGENERATION OF JCC HOPEFULLY SLATED FOR 1961 ...
It's an open secret that building industry leaders have been concerned with
the way the Joint Cooperative Committee FAA-AGC-FES has fallen apart
at the seams during the past twelve months. Lack of strong leadership; absence
of unit coordination, support and initiative, and lackadasical committee opera-
tions are blamed for the present state of JCC affairs and prestige. Officials of
most professional and trade groups stress the need for cooperative activity in
every segment of Florida's construction industry. But lip-service has this year
replaced the action which started the JCC some six years ago . Look for a
near-future announcement of what could be a vital stimulant to reactivate a-
much-needed centralized effort.

NO CAUSE HERE FOR SLOW-UP DISCOURAGEMENT . .
In a very real sense Florida is now feeling her growing pains. Rate of growth
has slowed as confidently expected. Some indices are off as expected.
But the industrial parks in Miami, Tampa, St. Petersburg, Orlando, Jacksonville
are on the make. In Tampa, Jacksonville and Miami the traffic problems are
being solved, and as one result massive urban redevelopment are underway.
This improvement disease is catching. At least 24 other Florida communities are
waiting for a chance to emulate the big centers. In the meantime, most Florida
economic indices are comparatively on top-in spite of a tight money market
and the vicious swish of Donna.
NOVEMBER. 1960 5







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Letters


Modular or Metric . .
EDITOR, FA:
Re: "The Dot . The Arrow .
and The Grid" in The Florida Archi-
tect for October, 1960.
There is, I believe, general agree-
ment in the profession that some
system be devised which will simplify
and expedite the production of work-
ing drawings. However, I would be
inclined to cast my vote with the
"Nays" regarding the modular meth-
od. Perhaps, as the article points out,
my objection is partly the result of
incomplete knowledge of modular
drafting techniques.
It would seem to me that since
we are going to have to learn new
techniques, and since building ma-
terial manufacturers are going to have
to supply products in new sizes, we
would do well to consider the adop-
tion of the metric system. As Mr. F.
Ray Leimkueler points out in his
article "When Will We Adopt the
Metric System?" in the August issue
of the AIA Journal, the metric system
accomplishes the same result of sim-
plification as the modular system
without the complication of the latter
system.
Speaking as one who has had occas-
ion to use both modular and metric
systems, I found the metric far easier
to grasp and much faster to use.
It would be most enlightening to
many if this matter could be included
in a seminar workshop session.
ROBERT W. WENING, AIA
North Palm Beach, Fla.

NOTE: Advocacy of the metric sys-
tem is many years older than that
of the modular system, but has met
with even stiffer resistance. Reason,
probably, is habit; and various authors
have pointed to what appears the only
practical way to change the feet-and-
inches-thinking of the English-speak-
ing countries. This is through educa-
tion. Begin teaching the metric system
in schools now, and in three genera-
tions the trick could be done. . But
it appears that the metric is not a
substitute for the module. Metric
countries seem to have as many dif-
ficulties with variously dimensioned
"standards" as do we. Thus, a study
by the European Productivity Agency


on "Modular Coordination in Build-
ing" suggests that ". . designing and
construction work should be based as
far as possible on a common module
of 10 cm. for the countries using the
metric system and 4 in. for the foot-
inch countries."

The MBSA Viewpoint ...
EDITOR, FA:
Your October issue has arrived and,
needless to say, we are very impressed
with the cover and contents.
I was particularly impressed by the
factual and unbiased manner in which
you presented the modular picture
as reflected in practice among Florida
architects. The quotes indicating a
negative reaction to the use of mod-
ular measure are, in effect, contribu-
tory, because of the identification of
existing attitudes and attendant prob-
lems.
We cannot help but believe that
the principal reason for the existence
of such attitudes has been the com-
plete absence of authoritative infor-
mation which can serve as a technical
guide during the conversion phases of
architectural offices and the realiza-
tion of the inherited efficiencies.
Such efficiencies have been demon-
strated to exist as suggested in the
summary statement of your article,
with the result that the textbook guide
to modular dimensioning practices-
currently being prepared through a
foundation grant-will be assured of
becoming a means of demonstrating
how design and drafting advance-
ments can accompany the technologi-
cal progress of our materials producers.
Again, a sincere thanks for your
presenting the story of Florida Archi-
tects.
BYRON C. BLOOMFIELD, AIA,
Executive Director,
Modular Building Standards
Association

Appreciation . .
EDITOR, FA:
Just a line to say the article on
"Architectural Practice According to
Law" (in The Florida Architect for
October, 1960) is about the best de-
lineation I've seen on the subject. It
really sets it forth clearly and con-
cisely. HAL HARRISS, AIA
Sanford, Fla.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


U_ I





VISIT US AT
BOOTH No. 14


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NOVEMBER, 1960


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FORT MYERS EDison 4-5262


Purves Resigns As


Head of AIA Staff


EDMUND R. PURVES, FAIA, has re-
signed as Executive Director of the
AIA, a post which he has held since
1949. His resignation is effective as
of December 31, 1960. His successor
as chief of the AIA staff will be
WILLIAM H. SCHEICK, AIA, vice pres-
ident of the Timber Engineering Co.,
and former Executive Director of the
Building Research Institute of the
National Academy of Sciences.
Although Mr. Purves' contract with
the AIA expires at the end of this
year, he has consented to accept a
new contract for 1961 as Consulting
Director. As such he will advise the
new Executive Director, will tour AIA
regions to strengthen communciation
between the Institute's headquarters
and its various organizational ele-
ments. In addition he is slated to
represent the Institute abroad at inter-
national professional conferences-an
area of activity in which the AIA, ac-
cording to AIA President PHILIP
WILL, JR., FAIA, has been weak.
In announcing the new organiza-
tional set up, the AIA president ex-


pressed warm appreciation for the
retiring executive's ". . record of
service and accomplishment which
will stand alone in the history of the
professional society."
"We look to the Executive Direc-
tor for the knowledge, leadership and
judgment which give us direction and
purpose," Mr. Will said. "In Edmund
Purves we have found all of these
qualities. When he joined the Insti-
tute in 1941, we had a membership
of 3,000, lacked any form of contact
with the Federal Government and
enjoyed little or no recognition as a
profession wtih a service of high value
to the community.
"Today, we number nearly 14,000
members, have 131 Chapters and 12
State societies, maintain effective and
widespread liaison with the govern-
ment, business community and build-
ing industry, and hold a prestige sec-
ond to no other profession. In large
measure we look to Mr. Purves as the
source of this strength and vitality."
Born in Philadelphia in 1897, Mr.
(Continued on Page 14)


Edmund R. Purves, FAIA, right Executive Director of the AIA, congratulates
his successor, William H. Scheick, AIA, in a meeting at Institute headquarters
at which the new executive was introduced to the AIA staff. Mr. Scheick will
assume the title of Executive Director of AIA on January 1, 1961.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




*1


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"w, ----


1~


Here's How Hollolite Panels Give You Greater Design Freedom


More design freedom for Florida architects has been the
objective of Holloway Materials Corporation through-
out the development cycle of Hollolite Panels.
Designed for uses ranging from decorative trim to
entire walls, Hollolite Panels incorporate several fea-
tures which free the architect from design restrictions
imposed by the material. Among these are:

35 varieties of marble and granite, as well as specified
domestic stones, are available as aggregates. These
may be combined with a wide range of binder colors,
including non-fading blue, aqua and yellow, a full
selection of domestic oxide colors, and gray, white,
or black.
TX li A )PRII A 7 LA I 'RY
"Florentine" aggregate is available in
large, small, or mixed sizes and in rough or smooth
form. Aggregate surfaces can be ground and polished
to a high gloss as specified. "Contemporary" Hollolite


Panels, without aggregate, are also available. They
can be furnished in brushed or tooled finish, textured
mold finish, or architect-designed sculptured form.
A V 0 0
Hollolite Panels are available as tiles, handlift panels
or curtain wall panels. This selection of sizes enables
architects to design Hollolite portions in scale with
the rest of the building.

A T N Under the supervision of
Holloway representatives, Hollolite Panels can be
readily installed by local crews. Tiles are installed by
regular tilesetters, handlift panels by stonesetters, and
curtain wall panels by crews skilled in heavier in-
stallations.
A. Y J' II CI Modern
manufacturing and shipping methods used by Hollo-
way bring you Hollolite Panels at a very attractive
price when compared with other architectural facing
and curtain wall materials.


S2" and 7 thick, are
cast either 6" square or 12" square.
Flush ground terrazzo tiles are also
available for floors and walls. Cus-
tom sizes can be cut.


are 31% x 15Y%" x 2".
They are easily handled by stone-
setters without special equipment,
and using any of the standard
methods.


ALI P are avail-
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1'2 '~'


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GLOBO MISTO. Round aggregate in mixed sizes. Shown one-half of











actual size.
GLOBO MISTO. Rounndte r aite tin mixe s. Swo


GLOBO MISTO LUCIDO. As above, with aggregate surface ground
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RUVIDO MISTO. Rough aggregate in mixed sizes. Shown one-half
of actual size.


RUVIDO MISTO LUCIDO. As above, with aggregate surface
ground and highly polished.


Please send me more details about
Hollolite Panels.


NAME


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HOLLOWAY

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PRE-CAST DIVISION







15 Years of Concrete Know-how


Assure Quality of Hollolite Panels


For Holloway Materials Corporation,
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pre-cast concrete units have been de-
livered. Holloway has evolved several 4 La
procedures which will be of definite
benefit to users of Hollolite Panels.
Among these benefits are:

QUALITY CONTROL. for Hollo- .
lite Tiles and Panels is performed in
this modern laboratory by a registered
professional engineer.

Holloway Materials Corp.
has a registered staff engineer to aid architects with the structural
considerations of Hollolite Panel installation. In cooperation with
the Company's resident architect, the Holloway engineer helps
Syou arrive at the most effective, economical use of Hollolite Panels.
Tile samples are furnished on request for all tile projects. Complete
shop drawings, including structural details of erection, are submit-
ted for architect's approval on every curtain wall panel installation.
All Hollolite
Panels are cast, cured, and finished in Holloway's Winter Park,
Florida plant. Expert supervision and careful craftsmanship put
quality into every tile and panel. A modern, completely equipped,
engineer-staffed laboratory is your assurance of a uniformly
reliable product.
Holloway's policy of
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1 I -
touch to the Company's responsibility to you. From the earliest
> E plans to on-time delivery, Holloway assumes complete control of
W 41 Hollolite Panels for your job.
S:" ._ A Holloway representative will visit your city soon with the
complete technical details of Hollolite design, fabrication, and
() 0 erection. Watch for your invitation, and plan now to meet with him.
>: In the meantime, you can obtain interim information simply by
S< filling in and mailing the attached card.


o I

0


I- P. 0. DRAWER 1347 WINTER PARK, FLA.
01 J






























First Methodist Church, Coral Gables. Dean Parmalee, AIA, architect.


7Te ngajw flleain i M-O-I-S-T-U-R-E


. . the major cause of exposure-damage to wood


Even indoors, absorption of moisture by untreat-
ed wood can cause swelling, warping, surface-
checking and end-splitting each the start of
progressive deterioration . To guard against
such moisture-damage, specify that all woodwork
in any building be WOODLIFED, preferably by dip-
ping or flooding . WOODLIFE'S "anti-wicking"
action prevents moisture seepage; and by pene-
trating the surface with an invisible, water-
repellent solution, WOODLIFE coats wood cells and
makes protection last and last and last.


FU.'
FSRA=


ria m---


containing
PENTAchlorophenol


Ingredients in Woodlife also protect wood from
decay, fungus, stained attack by wood-eating
insects. They act as a poison to render wood
immune from attack by the micro-organisms
and insects which feed on untreated wood.


VISIT THE WOODLIFE EXHIBIT AT BOOTH 42


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI --- FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto . Call Palmetto 2-1011


NOVEMBER, 1960








ARCHITECTS




LAMBERT products because

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SEE OUR CATALOG IN SWEETS AND
WRITE FOR ADDITIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION


Purves Resigns ...
(Continued from Page 8)

Purves studied architecture at the
University of Pennsylvania, saw active
service in World War I, and began
architectural practice in Philadelphia
in 1927. He became a member of the
Institute in 1930, served as President
ef the Pennsylvania Society of Archi-
tects for two years, and from 1938
to 1941-the year he joined the AIA
staff as Washington Representative-
he was a member of the AIA Board.
Shortly after he returned from a
three-year service with the Seventh
Air Force in World War II-during
which, in 1944, he was named a
Fellow of the Institute-he was ap-
pointed Director of Public and Pro-
fessional Relations for the AIA. He
assumed the post of AIA Executive
Director in 1949.
His successor, William H. Scheick,
was born in 1905 at Uniontown, Pa.
He studied architecture at Carnegie
Tech and the University of Illinois,
winning the AIA School Medal and
the Warren Prize and becoming a
LeBrun Scholar in 1932. He taught
architecture at both Oklahoma A & M
College and the University of Illinois
until he was appointed as the first
Executive Director of the Building
Research Advisory Board of the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences in 1949.
Two years later he was named Execu-
tive Director for the newly-formed
Building Research Institute. Since
1958 he has been vice president of
the Timber Engineering Co. in charge
of research and development.
Mr. Scheick served for five years
as director of the Small Homes Coun-
cil at the University of Illinois and
for ten years has acted as a consultant
to Parents' Magazine Family Home
Department. He was initiator of the
Small Homes Council publication
series and the publishing programs of
the Building Advisory Board and the
Building Research Institute. He has
served as Secretary to the City Plan-
ning Council of Champaign-Urbana,
Illinois and the University of Illinois.
Corporate membership of the AIA's
new Executive Director dates from
1945. He is currently a member of
the Washington-Metropolitan Chap-
ter. Mr. Scheick is married, the father
of three sons and lives at 1214 High-
land Drive, Silver Spring, Md.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









C


Weldwood plain sliced %" Architecturl al wanut, installed in a carefully mismatched plank style. Office of the president, Southland Life
Insurance Company, Southland Center, Dallas. Arch: Welton Becket, FAIA ,& Assoc., Los Angeles. Inst: Adleta Show Case & Fixture Mfg. Co., Dallas.


How many faces has walnut paneling?


I THREE POPULAR TYPES OF VENEER CUTS
Type of cut Result in the panel





Plain slicing-The log is cut in
half. then sliced with a razor sharp A unique and variegated figure, as
blade moving parallel to a line strikingly illustrated above.
through the log's center.





Quarter slicing-The log is stripes,tra some
quartered and sliced so the blade A series of stripes, straight in some
strikes the log at right angles to woods, vared ,n others.
the growth rings.

I ,E


Half-round-Segments or flitch- A bold variegated grain marking
es of the log are mounted off- A bold varegated grain marking
center on a lathe so the blade that differs from plain slicing be-
cuts slightly across the annular cause the blade partially follows
growth rings. the annular rings,
L J----------
NOVEMBER, 1960


It all depends on how you slice it...

Walnut can be many woods when it is made into paneling by
Weldwood. It can be quarter sliced, half round, or plain sliced as in
the office above. However it's cut, it is dignity, it is warmth, formal
yet friendly, luxury without maintenance. And like Benge, rose-
wood, teak, and Korina-among others-walnut is just one of the
many species in Weldwood Algoma-Made paneling.
A visit by a Weldwood Architects' Service Representative places
at your command the incomparable production facilities and experi-
ence of United States Plywood. He will be happy to help you plan
a Weldwood paneling installation in your next commercial or
residential design. For details, plus a free copy of Weldwood's
40-page illustrated guide to veneer cuts, flitch matching, and
specifications, "Weldwood Architectural Grade Plywood Panels,"


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NOVEMBER, 1960







N


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600 kitchens are unequalled for
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decorator colors, with choice of
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Downtown Miami 1985. Air view of the model prepared by the Metro Planning
Department and the Florida South Chapter based on a three-stage planning program.



The Community-Today and Tomorrow


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT, AIA
Professor of Architecture, U/F









This article was first delivered
as a summary of a Roundtable
Discussion held during the sec-
ond quarterly meeting of the
Florida Association of Realtors
at Clearwater earlier this year.
The author, for some years
chairman of the FAA commun-
ity Development Committee,
was formerly President of the
Planning and Zoning Associ-
ation. He is an earnest and
informed student of the various
factors which have shaped the
current trends in our commun-
ities as well as those which are
now forming to create sweep-
ing changes in the future.
NOVEMBER, 1960


Those of us who live in Florida
stand on the threshold of a tremend-
ous period of change in our urban
environment. Relentless forces are at
work in our cities and our state. But
there seems to be growing awareness
that these forces can be turned to the
constructive uses of our communities.
The difficulties ahead are enormous;
but if the difficulties are enormous,
so are the opportunities.
Within the lifetime of many who
read this, we will need to rebuild all
of our major Florida communities.
We will need to double-and in some
cases, redouble all our existing
structures to accommodate our rap-
idly expanding Florida population
and replace obsolecent and dilapidat-
ed structures.
Concerning this period of change,
three facts need to be kept in mind.
First, Florida's growth in recent years
is among the most rapid in the na-
tion. Second, Florida's urban areas
are growing faster than the state area
as a whole, but their growth is far


from uniform. And third, Florida's
population explosion will require, in
certain areas of the state, a tremend-
ous expansion of physical facilities
and services.

Growth, Urbanization,
and Facilities

Florida, with an increase from 2.8
to 4.9 million, has gained 2.1 million
people since 1950, probably the fast-
est growth of any major state in the
nation. From 1950 to 1960, the popu-
lation of the United States increased
about 18 per cent, but during the
same period, Florida's population in-
creased approximately four times that
fast. Most of Florida's gain in popu-
lation is accounted for by migration
from other states rather than by na-
tural increase.
Most of Florida's growth has oc-
curred not in the rural areas but in
the urban areas. In 1940, 55 per cent
of the population of Florida was ur-
(Continued on Page 20)







The Community...
(Continued from Page 19)

ban, in contrast to 33 per cent in
Georgia, and 71 per cent in Califor-
nia. By 1950, 65 per cent of our popu-
lation was urban, as against 45 per
cent in Georgia, and 81 per cent in
California. Florida's eight predomin-
antly urban counties-Escambia, Du-
val, Orange, Hillsborough, Pinellas,
Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade -
accounted for 50 per cent of our pop-
ulation in 1940, 59 per cent in 1950,
and probably 65 per cent in 1960.
These eight counties have accounted
for some 70 per cent of our state gain
in recent decades. But Florida's
growth is far from uniform, for while
54 of our counties gained population
between 1950 and 1960, 13 actually
lost population.
The magnitude of the problem of
providing physical facilities and ser-
vices in our exploding urban areas is
well illustrated in Dade county. The
Miami metropolitan area is the fastest
growing and youngest of the major
metropolitan areas in the United
States, for in 30 years its percentage
gain in population has exceeded 500.
In 1890, when the Miami area had a
population of 961 persons, Atlanta
was already a major city of 65,000.
Some 900,000 persons now live in the
Miami Metropolitan area, in contrast
to only about 1,000,000 in the At-
lanta metropolitan area.
The population count in the Mi-
ami area increases by one person every
10 minutes. According to estimates
prepared at the University of Miami,
the population of the area will reach
1.0 million by the early 1960's and
2.3 million by 1985. The Miami-
Palm Beach metropolitan area is ex-
pected to have a population of 4.2
million 25 years from now. And 40
years from now, according to esti-
mates of the Urban Land Institute,
its population may reach 6.5 million
and constitute one of the 10 "super-
cities" in the United States.
PAUL WATT, director of planning
of Metropolitan Dade County, has
estimated that 1.4 million new resi-
dents in the Miami area by 1985 will
mean 435,000 new dwelling units,
380 more public schools, 2,100 more
policemen, 3,500 more firemen, and
210 million more gallons of water per
day. These new residents will need
85 square miles for residences, 40


square miles for streets and high-
ways, 55 square miles for public and
private uses, and 30 square miles for
industry and commerce. This repre-
sents a total of 210 square miles, or
130,400 acres of new development.
Urban uses in Dade county now oc-
cupy 6 per cent of the area of the
county. By 1985, urban uses are ex-
pected to occupy 16 per cent of the
county, or about half of all the land
in the county available for urban de-
velopment.
What is true of the Miami metro-
politan area will undoubtedly be true
to a somewhat lesser degree in the
Tampa St. Petersburg metropolitan
area, the Jacksonville metropolitan
area, and other metropolitan areas in
Florida. But while the urbanized
areas of Florida continue to grow, it
seems likely that the other areas of
the state will lose population.
In this connection, it is well to
keep before us the fact that Florida's
economic base differs widely from
the pattern for the total United
States, as DR. JOHN WEBB, of the
University of Florida and others have
been pointing out. In Florida, growth
seems to result from a combination
of the effect of desirable living condi-
tions, climate, and shifts in the na-
tional economy resulting in rising per
capital income. Thus, we find that
employment opportunities develop in
trade and service industries without
requiring a local foundation of ex-
tractive industries, agriculture, or
manufacturing.
What is happening to our urban
communities; and what problems does
their rapid growth bring about?

Some Problems of
Urbanization
As citizens and governing bodies
of our central cities are becoming in-
creasingly aware, the growth is taking
place primarily in suburban and peri-
pheral areas. Decentralization is con-
tinuing, especially in the case of resi-
dential developments. Commerce,
too, is following this trend, with
wholesale and retail functions moving
to outlying locations. Suburban shop-
ping centers make it possible for the
housewife to shop for "downtown"
merchandise in outlying areas, and
to park free a few feet from the
store. Similarly, industry is seeking
larger peripheral sites at lower cost
and with lower taxes.


This outward growth produces
many problems. Central cities strug-
gle to meet the competition of lower-
cost peripheral land, and are left with
blighted areas, still fantastically ex-
pensive to redevelop. Expanding sub-
urban areas often awaken too late to
the unregulated development that is
taking place. Traffic congestion
plagues the core of cities. Costly cor-
rective measures are tried, but seldom
have more than incidental effect on
the basic problem the overcrowd-
ing of land.
The financial positions of both
central city and suburb frequently be-
come precarious. Suburban areas need
costly municipal services, while at the
same time trying to preserve their low
tax rates. Central cities stagger under
the necessity of extending municipal
services, trying to reduce congestion
and attempting to eliminate blight -
all in the face of falling tax revenues
and soaring municipal costs.
The problems of growth and de-
velopment are complicated by the
fact that communities are built not
only through private enterprise, but
by public effort as well. The develop-
ment of approximately 60 per cent of
our urban areas proceed parcel by par-
cel as individuals find opportunity for
investment. But 40 per cent of the
city is public property streets,
schools, parks, hospitals, and other
public facilities. There must be a bal-
ance between what citizens do as in-
dividuals and what citizens do in mu-
tual cooperation through the agency
of government.
Is there no way out of these over-
whelming urban problems? More and
more people are becoming convinced
that an enlightened and continuing
program of community planning may
be one answer. After all, as many
have pointed out, there is a kind of
inescapable logic in the observation
that if it is desirable for families to
plan, for business to plan and for in-
dustry to chart its course, then urban
areas might stand to gain by the same
sort of process.
A recent issue of The Florida Ar-
chitect, official journal of the Florida
Association of Architects of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects, contains
an open letter to Florida's next gov-
ernor. It was written by the editor,
ROGER W. SHERMAN, one of the keen
observers of the Florida scene. "Please
consider," he says to our next gov-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







ernor, "the haphazard, strip-town
building now mushrooming through-
out the state at an almost runaway
pace. It is turning our highways into
sign-lined commercial slums, our sub-
urban areas into sprawling, uncon-
trolled and sub-standard speculations.
Lack of a firm, long-range land pol-
icy; absence of any planned coordina-
tion between cities, counties, regional
areas, and state government; and the
political power of quick development
dollars have combined to produce a
state-wide situation which is a mount-
ing threat to the preservation of sound
values and an ever-increasing compli-
cation to the orderly conservation
and enlightened use of the natural
beauties and resources which have
provided the foundation for our rapid
growth.
"This many-sided blight," he con-
tinues, "is a kind of creeping decay
which is threatening our cities, our
suburban areas, our incomparable
shore line, even our matchless open
country.
"Thus, Governor," he concludes,
"I urge upon you the formation of a
policy and a program to arrest its
progress; and I urge further that you
provide the constant and firm lead-
ership necessary to assure the wide
acceptance and adequate development
of both."

The Opportunities Ahead

In these very difficulties lack of
a firm, long-range land policy; absence
of any planned coordination between
governmental units; and the political
power of quick development dollars -
lie tremendous opportunities.
In the matter of control of land
use, not many Florida communities
seem to have any real understanding
of what they are trying to do, and
why. Actually as STUART CHAPIN has
pointed out in Urban Land Use Plan-
ning, there are three sets of values in-
volved in the problem. First, profit-
making values or values concerned
with the urban land market. Second,
public-interest values or values con-
cerned with living conditions. Third,
socially-rooted values or values con-
cerned with the preservation or ad-
vancement of customs, traditions, and
beliefs.
On any given issue, these values
may lead to the same or to quite dif-
ferent conclusions. That the prob-
NOVEMBER, 1960


lem of basic policy behind land use
control is difficult, does not lessen the
necessity of arriving at a sound and
consistent approach, for we are con-
cerned with nothing less than the
physical future of our urban commun-
ities.
In the matter of governmental co-
operation, we are faced with one of
the central problems of our day in
Florida. At one end of the scale,
much of the growth of our cities is
taking place in the area beyond the
city limits, and beyond the legal
boundaries of our municipalities. Yet
county government, established pri-
marily to administer state functions,
is ill equipped to cope with the prob-
lem of providing urban services.
At the other end of the scale, there
is little evidence so far that our state
government is willing to grant to
Florida cities and counties the au-
thority needed to cope with the forc-
es of urbanization. FRED BAIR, editor
of Florida Planning and Development,


rightly points out that in a state as
largely urban as Florida, planning,
zoning and subdivision regulation for
cities, counties, and regions is not a
matter for local bill treatment.
Florida is an urban state, he points
out, and it is time the legislature
began providing general powers, care-
fully spelled out according to an ur-
ban bill of rights, so that cities and
counties can begin dealing intelligent-
ly with their problems without run-
ning to the legislature for special
favors.
Finally, there is the political power
of quick development dollars. To milk
the public may be an inalienable
right. But I submit that it is neither
right nor necessary for the public to
subsidize the dairy. It is high time
we began to take a hard look at the
public cost of the "fast buck". It is
high time that we understood that
stability depends upon the quality of
development. It also depends upon
(Continued on Page 51)


One effective means for committing community suicide is to permit develop-
ment of unregulated construction in areas already harboring the fertile seeds
of blight. These crowded housing developments in Miami's colored section are
almost new. But they have already showing the characteristics of new slums
due to poor land use, inadequate planning and design and high population
density. This lack of overall planning, coupled with the absence of regulatory
measures to assure adequate buildings, constitutes one of our major community
problems.





















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Better Construction



By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President, FAA


Recent developments coupled with
a loud outcry from a worried citizen-
ry have teamed together to add im-
petus to the necessity for state-wide,
adequate building and zoning codes,
or for some protection for people who
are building, or plan to build, within
our State. Governor Collins recently
appointed a committee to study the
effects of Hurricane Donna on build-
ing of all types, as well as roads,
bridges and the flooding in low-lying
developments within the state.
This committee will make recom-
mendations as to the adequacy of
existing building codes, effectiveness
of enforcement; comment on the re-
sults of the lack of codes in some
areas and make recommendations to
the trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund for a possible state-wide
building and zoning code to protect
the lives and investments of Florida's
citizens and visitors. Every person
who has ever experienced a bad hurri-
cane knows how very necessary this
study and the adoption of such laws
is to us all.
The purpose of this article is to
question the present methods of en-
forcing good design and construction
in our state. For the moment let us
suppose that the medical profession
was forced to carry on under such an
antiquated system as is the construc-
tion industry. Can you imagine a
"Medical Treatment and Surgery
Code," enforced by ex-interns and
lab technicians, two thousand pages
long, covering the do's and don't
of care and cure? At our present rate
of building code revisions, rewrite
and composition, we are rapidly ap-
proaching a chaotic state of con-
NOVEMBER, 1960


fusion. If our lives can be entrusted
to men and women with the college
training and experience that doctors
possess, why cannot engineers and
architects (who have the same ex-
perience in years) be given equal
freedom to practice in the construc-
tion field?
We need codes, zoning and build-
ing-not because of a lack of knowl-
edge on the part of participating
professional designers, but because too
many people are permitted to design
and build structures without even a
basic knowledge of construction safe-
ty or land planning. Our municipal,
county and state governments are
faced with growing costs of operation
and complexity of enforcement within
their building departments for codes
which too soon become obsolete. Who
bears the cost of this protection?
Every person who wants to build or
add to a building directly pays for
this-and the taxpayer indirectly helps
to carry the burden. It would seem we
have regulated ourselves to death.
Perhaps it is time to retreat and re-
group.
One solution (which will, no doubt,
be unpopular with many so-called
designers), would be to make all con-
struction the joint responsibility of
the designer and the bulider. Plans
signed by the author, who would be
held responsible for not only the de-
sign safety, but also for construction
supervision, could be filed with the
proper municipal, county or state
authority. The building permit would
establish the name of the builder.
If all designers are properly licensed
within their respective profession, and
have an occupational license to prac-


tice, then control can be exercised
with a minimum cost and effort.
A State Licensing Law covering all
builders and contractors would pro-
vide adequate control for this portion
of the process. Under existing laws
the responsibilities already exist for
architects, but by far the overwhelm-
ing bulk of construction bears no
architect's name. Who is going to
assume the responsibility for the huge
losses; the cities, the counties or the
state? Someone must!
Every person permitted to prepare
plans for any addition or construc-
tion project should be required by law
to attach his name to the plans from
which this work is accomplished. He
should also be required to certify to
the building department that the con-
struction work was accomplished in
strict accordance with the plans. This
would eliminate over 90 per cent of
the present duties and efforts of our
building departments, plus placing a
full design responsibility where it be-
longs.
There would be absolutely no addi-
tional cost to political subdivisions
for this public protection plan. Actu-
ally, it can be operated at a consider-
able savings, plus returning new tax
monies through the additional occu-
pational licenses levied against those
not now paying a cent for the busi-
nesses they are already operating. We
have the State Boards (Architectural
and Engineering) now in existence,
capable of assisting the state, coun-
ties and cities in setting up this pro-
gram.
A great many people are concerned
about the protection for trailerites or
mobile home dwellers. They should
receive very special consideration. As
things now exist, less than two per
cent of them are safely enough housed
to remain at home if winds reach
75 miles per hour in their area. Their
losses were fantastic this year. The
majority of hurricane shelters were
operated for their protection. Most
suffering loss or damage could not
afford any part of it. Too many de-
stroyed trailers were no longer mo-
bile, but were actually tied to poorly
constructed additions, making them
(Continued on Page 25)









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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







President's Message . .
(Continued from Page 23)
in effect badly constructed permanent
homes.
Very few trailers have ever been
constructed that can meet the poorest
building code if they are anchored
in any way to the lot on which they
reside. If we are going to allow these
vehicles to remain in the hurricane
areas, we should require adequate pro-
tection for them and for adjoining
properties. While most trailerites are
not tax payers in the respect that they
own no real estate, still they do pay
taxes and do vote-and do deserve
the assurance that their homes will
not collapse about their ears.
If government control were limited
to establishing wind and live load
criteria, minimum livable heights
above water tables (as to geographi-
cal areas), and simple fire and sani-
tary rules-then make it the responsi-
bility of the designer to work out plans
covering not only good design but all
features necessary to protect life,
limb and the wallet, we might have
something. Qualified professionals can
easily protect themselves against nui
sance suits through professional
Errors and Omissions Insurance poli-
cies; but what of the unqualified-
who will assume their responsibilities?
The buying public is demanding-
and deserves-complete protection
against unnecessary loss.
Then finally, why should the own-
er of a properly constructed and
safely designed building be forced to
pay the same insurance premium as
a "jerry-built" owner? It is way past
time for a more adequate recognition
of good, safe design by insurance ap-
praisers. If the companies now under-
writing fire and windstorm insurance
would join in this effort and lower
premiums for good construction, they
would greatly help save lives and
place the responsibilities of loss on
the guilty. Can the architects and
engineers really assume complete de-
sign responsibility if by doing so they
are assured of protection from the
unscrupulous by process of the law?
Do the builders and contractors de-
sire to match this with a contractors'
licensing and responsibility law? It
is something to consider. We actually
are responsible, you know, because we
are licensed. How about the others?
Why shouldn't they be uncovered and
controlled?
NOVEMBER, 1960


Committee on Resolutions

Guides Convention Business

The following three men have been named as a Resolutions
Committee to function as outlined in the Report of the FAA
Board of Directors-copies of which have already been mailed
to the FAA Membership: Robert H. Levison, Chairman; H. Sam-
uel Kruse and William T. Arnett.
In a preface to the Board's Report, FAA Secretary Francis R.
Walton outlined the Convention Rules for resolutions and new
business. Since this procedure was only adopted as effective
for last year's Convention, some of the FAA members-and
possibly also Chapter delegates-may not be wholly familiar
with the now-current procedure. Secretary Walton's outline is
therefore re-printed here as a matter of helpful information.

Resolutions and new business shall be placed before the
Convention and actions shall be taken only in the following
manner, and at the following times:
I ... All resolutions or discussions concerning matters con-
tained in the Board's Report shall be in order and may be
placed before the Convention only if the relevant section
has been read and is still under consideration. Resolutions
concerned with matter contained in the Board's Report shall
not be considered by the Committee on Resolutions.
2 ... All resolutions offered by the Board will be printed
in the Board's Report and action taken thereon at the time
the relevant sections are placed before the Convention.
Amendments to these resolutions or supplemental resolutions
and statements concerning the section under consideration *
shall be in order only while the relevant section is before
the Convention.
3 ... All resolutions concerning matters not contained in
the Board's Report and all matters of new business, shall be
presented to the Committee on Resolutions before a time set
by the Board and report to the Convention.
The Committee on Resolutions will take one of the following
actions and report such action to the Convention on each reso-
lution and item of new business received by it:
1 ... Deem the resolution a matter dealt with in the
Board's Report and return it promptly to its sponsor with
advice to present it when the relevant section of the Board's
Report is before the Convention. The Committee shall con-
suit with the Secretary as necessary in making the above
ruling.
2... Deem the resolution inappropriate to come before
the Convention and return it promptly to the sponsor, with
notice that it may be placed directly before the Convention
at the time the report of the Committee on Resolutions is
made, provided the consent of the Convention can be obtained
by a two-thirds vote of the delegates present at the sessions.
3 ... Modify the resolution or combine it with other
resolutions, preferably with the consent of its sponsor.
4 ... Refer the resolution to the Board for consideration
with the consent of its sponsor, and so report to the Con-
vention.
5 ... Report the resolution to the Convention with recom-
mendation to disapprove.
6... Report the resolution to the Convention without rec-
ommendation.
7 ... Report the resolution to the convention with recom-
mendation to approve, and move its adoption.



25



































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th Annual Convention

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS





The Theme MAN, CLIMATE and THE ARCHITECT


Two meanings are embodied in the theme-phrase for this 46th Annual
FAA Convention. Both, perhaps, can best be clarified by questions which
the various discussions on the Convention program will analyze and seek
to answer at least in part.
The first question is: What are the physical factors which most im-
portantly shape a climate-environment for man . And of these climatic
factors, which so decisively affect human well-being and behavior as to
require specific channeling or control toward the end of providing man
4 with the best environmental conditions in all types of shelter?
The second question is: In light of man's reaction to these various
climatic factors, what are the criteria of tolerance and comfort which
generally control the highest development of creative design. . And,
specifically, what means are, or may be, available to Florida architects
toward assuring the inclusion of such comfort criteria as a basic and
essential element of building design?
Thus the meaning of the theme two important questions. Of even
more importance, professionally, are answers to them. To formulate such
answers is the programmed purpose of this meeting.
PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA
President, AIA


~ ~ i -


JAMES H. HARTLEY JOHN M. EVANS
General Co-Chairman Program


NOVEMBER, 1960 27











These Experts Know Most of the Answers


The men who will explore the
theme of the Convention in terms
of both theory and practice represent
as authoritative a combination of spe-
cialized knowledge and experience as
any gathering of architects has been
privileged to share. Each of the five
guest speakers has achieved significant
stature in his field. But the force
and value which will develop from
their individual contributions to Con-


vention discussions springs from the
unique fact that each has studied the
relationship of his particular interest
to the broad theme of this Conven-
tion.
Individually they will report the
results of their experience and re-
search. Each has developed a wide
range of specific conclusions bearing
on the technical interest of the Con-
vention. Each will seek to relate these


conclusions to the overall aspects of
the Convention's theme. Collectively
these five experts know most of the
answers to the questions that the
theme implies.
And their contributions will be col-
lective as well as individual. As the
Convention Program indicates, they
constitute an integrated panel of fact
and inspiration from which every con-
vention listener will gain.


DR. MARSTON BATES
Zoologist, Researcher, Author
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Currently a professor of zoology at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, Dr. Bates has a wide background
of investigation in the field of human ecology and
the effects of hot climates on man and his activities.
He is the author of five books, including the best-
selling "Where Winter Never Comes", and has
served with distinction .as a member of the National
Science, the Guggenheim and the Rockefeller
Foundations. Climate, he believes, is a natural
resource for exploitation by man. .






ALADAR OLGYAY, AIA
Architect, Teacher, Consultant
Princeton, New Jersey

The importance of devices to control the effects
of climatological elements on man's physical and
mental well-being can hardly be over-emphasized.
As a member of a talented twin-brother team, Mr.
Olgyay has not only researched the ways in which
people react to such elements. He has been active
in perfecting means to assure maintenance of
interior comfort conditions, particularly in the field
of solar shading devices a subject of special
interest to Florida architects. .


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










DR. PAUL A. SIPLE,
Climatologist, Explorer, Inventor
Washington, D. C.

A thorough understanding of man's comfort
needs is, of course, the basis for any sort of
adequacy in building design. But equally impor-
tant is the technical knowledge necessary to formu-
late designs that will fully meet environmental
requirements. Dr. Siple has been notably active in
both technical fields and is thus especially able to
discuss the structural ways and means by which the
environmental requirements of man can be success-
fully developed in terms of building design..





DR. CLARENCE A. MILLS
Biochemist, Researcher, Teacher
Cincinnati, Ohio

Currently the Director of the Laboratory of
Experimental Medicine at the University of Cincin-
nati, Dr. Mills has a distinguished background as
a research scientist whose particular interest is the
effects of climate on man's physical and mental
behavior. Author of "Climate Makes the Man",
he will discuss both social and economic relation-
ships between climate and man. Ways by which
man can advance by controlling his climatological
environment, give a basis for better design. .





ROBE B. CARSON
Meteorologist, Author
Miami, Florida

Wind and water can be as significant factors as
can heat and cold relative to the adequacy of build-
ing design; and this fact is clearer to Mr. Carson
than to most men. A practical "weather man" now
supervisor of the Miami Flight and Weather Service,
he has seen the effects of many hurricanes and has
formulated many methods through which these
effects can be minimized. Most relate to the design
and structure of buildings which will be the subject
of important panel discussions. .


NOVEMBER, 1960











Program -

THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATE
HOLLYWOOD B


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9
9:00 A.M. Installation starts on product ex
hibit booths, Mayfair Room; and on archi
tectural exhibits, Esquire Room and Recep
tion Areas.
11 :00 A.M. Registration opens for Chapte
Members, Guests, Students and Exhibitc
Personnel, West End of Lobby, to continue
until 6 P.M. Identifying badges, indicating
registration, will be required for admission
to all FAA business sessions and othe
scheduled Convention affairs.
2:00 P.M. Meeting of FAA Board of Directorn
John Stetson, presiding. Time Room. Th
meeting will be open to all FAA member
wishing to attend.
4:00 P.M. -Meeting of the FAA Educatio
Committee, location to be posted.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10
8:00 A.M. Breakfast for Committees or Grou
Conferences. Committee Chairmen to ar
range as needed.
9:00 A.M.-Registration continues until 1:0
P.M., West End of Lobby. Opening of Prc
ducts Exhibit. Officiating at Ribbon-Cut
ting Ceremony will be John Stetson, Pres
FAA, William F. Bigoney, Jr., Pres., Browar
County Chapter, and Hon. William G. Zinki
Mayor of Hollywood. Architectural and Stu
dent Exhibits open, Hospitality Area.
9:30 A.M. First FAA business session; Joh
Stetson, Pres., FAA, presiding. South May
fair Room. Consideration of Board's Repori
nomination of FAA Officers.
12:30 P.M. -Visit Product Exhibit, Mayfair
Room.
1:00 P.M. Luncheon. Welcome to Conventio
and introduction of guests, John Stetsor
Pres., FAA, presiding.
Address by Philip Will, Jr., FAIA, Presideni
AIA.
Presentation of Awards to Product
Exhibitors.
2:15 P.M. First Workshop Session, Sout
Mayfair Room, James T. Lendrum presid
ing as panel moderator.
Address by Dr. Clarence A. Mills, "Climat
and The Man."
Panel Subject: "Biological Objectives c
Climate-Architectural Design."












[6th Annual Convention

F ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
HOTEL HOLLYWOOD NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 1960


Panelists: Dr. Mills, Aladar Olgyay; Dr.
Marston Bates; Dr. Paul Siple; Robe B.
Carson.
5:00 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit
6:30 P.M. Cocktail Party Hotel Garden
7:30 P.M. -Gala Entertainment, Cabana Area
. Hawaiian Luau, with dancing, music
and special native features.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11
8:00 A.M. -Workshop Breakfast .... Informal
panel composed of Aladar Olgyay, Robe B.
Carson and John M. Evans to discuss specific
architectural problems of the Florida cli-
mate. Windsor Room.
9:00 A.M.-Visit Products Exhibit, Mayfair
Room
9:30 A.M. Second Workshop Session, South
Mayfair Room, John Stetson, Pres. FAA,
presiding.
Address by Aladar Olgyay, "The Architect
Facing the Facade" -a lecture illustrated
by slides.
Discussion panel on design of solar shading
devices. Panelists: Aladar Olgyay, Robe M.
Carson, John M. Evans. Moderator to be an-
nounced prior to the meeting.
12:00 Noon -Visit Products Exhibit, Mayfair
Room
12:45 P.M. Luncheon, Pageant Room. Verner
Johnson, FAA First Vice President, presiding.
Address by Dr. Paul A. Siple.
Presentation of Architectural Exhibit
Awards.
2:15 P.M. Second Workshop Session Con-
tinued, South Mayfair Room. Moderator,
Alfred B. Parker, FAIA. Panelists to be
announced prior to the meeting.
4:30 P.M. Address by Dr. Marston Bates,
"Cultural Adaptation to Warm Climates,"
South Mayfair Room.
5:00 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit, Mayfair
Room.
6:30 P.M. Cocktails, Ocean Terrace.
7:30 P.M. The Convention Banquet, Pageant
Room, William F. Bigoney, Jr., President,
Host Chapter, presiding.
Presentation, by Franklin S. Bunch, Presi-
dent, State Board of Architecture, of regis-
tration certificates to newly-registered
Florida architects.
Introduction of 1961 FAA Officers.
After-dinner dancing, Rendezvous Room.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12
8:00 A.M.-Visit Products Exhibit, Mayfair
Room. Exhibits will not be dismantled until
after 12:00 noon.
9:00 A.M. Second and final FAA Business
Session, South Mayfair Room.
12:30 P.M. Luncheon, Coronet Room, G. Clin-
ton Gamble, presiding.
Announcement of Product Exhibit Atten-
dance Awards.
Summary of Workshop Sessions and Panel
Discussions by John M. Evans.
2:00 P.M. 46th Annual FAA Convention
adjourns.

CONVENTION NOTES:
All FAA members may take part in any Convention
discussion, but voting by ballot on all questions calling for
Convention action is restricted to those Chapter Delegates who
have been properly accredited and registered at the Convention.
Delegates will be seated in an area assigned for their use at
the front of the meeting area.
Admission to Convention meetings and affairs will be
accorded only to those who have previously registered for the
Convention. Evidence of registration is a badge, the color of
which designates various registration classifications as follows:
Corporate Members (and Chapter Delegates), blue; Associate
Members, green; Student Members, orange; Exhibitors, yellow;
Ladies, white; Guests, gray; Press, purple.
Members of FAA Committees should periodically check
the hotel's bulletin board for notices of meetings, particularly
at the beginning of the Convention.
Host Chapter members will be wearing striped blazers,
their ladies similar identifying headbands. They will be avail-
able throughout the Convention to provide information and
answer questions.
Ladies of the Convention are cordially invited to attend
all sessions of the Convention. Full information on the Con-
vention Ladies' Program may be obtained at the Registration
Desk at the West End Lobby. The Newcastle Room will be
open for cards all day during both Thursday and Friday.
The Hospitality Area, staffed by Ladies of the Broward
County Host Chapter, will be open during Convention hours
for coffee and orange juice. It will be located at the Fireplace
Lobby. Adjacent to it, the Tatler Bar will be open during
Product Exhibit hours for refreshments on a dutch-treat basis.
Breakfast will be served daily, beginning Thursday, November
10, on the Ocean Terrace.
Eligibility for Products Exhibit attendance awards must be
established by obtaining, in person, stamps on the Products
Exhibit Card covering all exhibit booths. Awards will be made
in three classifications: Corporate, Associate and Student. Cards
must be fully stamped and turned in by 12:00 noon, Saturday,
November 12.
Saturday afternoon provides opportunities for individual
recreational activities as may be desired. Those interested in
tennis, golf, sailing or sight-seeing should contact William A.
Gilroy, Entertainment Chairman, or any other member of the
Host Chapter.


I I I I ..~I_~





Florida Home Heating Institute is still spreading
the "word" on oil heat economy. It's reaching
your clients in ads like this one . .


THE LADY SAID NO to high-cost home heating

and she'll say YES only to low-cost OIL heat!


Of course Mrs. Wilson wants permanent heating
in her home in cold snap weather. And she
knows home heating needn't cost much in Florida.
That's why she won't even consider a home
that's not equipped with economical oil heat.
She checked up on home heating costs and learned
that oil heat averages about HALF the cost of
heat from other fuels. So she's doing her house-
hunting in the new communities featuring
cheaper, safer, all-round-better oil home heating
Moral: Insist on luxurious oil heat and
"live economically ever after"!


LUXURIOUS





MUCH SAFER MORE
DEPENDABLE. TOOl


Have you checked on
Home Heating costs
in Florida?
Here's what you'll find: Oil heat
averages HALF the cost of heat from
other fuels. No premium price to
pay when fuel oil is used only for home
heating. Supplies are dependable-
fuel oil is always available. Oil home
heating is much safer (no obnoxious
fumes or combustible gases) . .


gives clean, automatic, circulating heat... assures peace of mind, maximum
comfort for your family... by far the best solution of Florida's home heating problem.


FLORIDA HOME -g4 HEATING INSTITUTE

MR. ARCHITECT: By the end of June just about everyone in Florida who readsnewspapers, watches TV
or listens to radio will be reminded that OIL home heating is much more economical, safe, dependable.
See our oil heating display at Buildorama, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami.
9:1 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























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length; 94 flat beams up to 59' in length.


SJohn A. Burton IV, Architect, Sanford, Fla. Herbert S.
Hirshberg, Designer, Titusville, Fla.


"We Glow With


Pride'.'. NEW CIVIC

CENTER DESIGN GIVES BEAUTY

WITH $18,000 SAVINGS

"We are extremely pleased with our Civic Center, and
glow with pride at the many complimentary comments it
has drawn," says City Manager W. E. Knowles, Sanford,
Florida. "Rilco laminated wood members are a major
portion of the structure, and one of the important reasons
why we are so completely satisfied. They add considerably
to the attractiveness . they are delivered to the job site
ready to install, making possible the most efficient utiliza-
tion of labor and equipment." City officials estimate this
type of construction saved $18,000!
Reports Herbert S. Hirshberg, designer on the project:
"Acoustical properties of the auditorium are excellent due
to the shape and materials used . both are exploited here
with notable success."


Rilco wood structural members are custom fabricated to
exact specifications. And Rilco's unusual flexibility and
strength to weight ratio allows unlimited design possi-
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with you, without obligation. Write for free commercial
construction catalog.


YEANDLE & FOX
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS LAMINATED PRODUCTS, INC.
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Linden, N. J. P.O. Drawer 978, Leesburg, Fla.

Visit Rilco Booth #48 at the Florida AIA Convention


NOVEMBER, 1960







and M. m. uN mu P
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34


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and Jackson. General Contractors,
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panels faced with Muranite Glass
Mosaics were manufactured by The
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.-- --- 5











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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








What's Happening to Houses...?



By PERRY I. PRENTICE
Publisher, House and Home Magazine


Said Armel Nutter, Past President
of the Society of Residential Apprais-
ers: "The lenders who put up the
money and the appraisers who set up
the price can do more than anyone
else to raise the standard of housing
in America." Echoed Harold Boe-
schenstein on a more negative note:
"We won't get anywhere selling qual-
ity until the appraisers and lenders
get into the act and give full credit
for the extra cost of quality in their
valuations."
But great power like this carries
with it great responsibility. To whom
much is given, from him much shall
be asked. So, as a spokesman for the
industry over which appraisers exer-
cise such power, this writer wishes to
ask some questions:

1. What is being done to encour-
age better design, better planning
and all the better living the archi-
tects are learning to design in to-
day's homes?

Houses are style goods as surely as
women's dresses are style goods. A
good appraiser can walk down any
street of any American town and tell
by the style in what decade each
house he passes by was built. The tur-
reted neo-gothic houses that were
fashionable in the gay '90s were hard
to sell in the '20s; the almost window-
less Spanish houses that were so pop-
ular in the '20s are almost unsaleable
in the '60s. So you can be very sure
that the kind of houses that were
fashionable in the '40s will be hard to
sell long before today's new mort-
gages run out. But how many still
make appraisals looking backward?
How many people recognize in the
valuations the good and practical
reasons why people in 1970 will want
houses very different from the houses
they planned in 1930- houses plan-
ned for tomorrow's rear living, houses
planned for tomorrow's servantless liv-
ing, houses designed with big over-
hangs to minimize heat gain and les-
sen the need of repainting?
NOVEMBER, 1960


How many, in brief, are helping
the architects fit the style of tomor-
row's changed way of living and
changed costs of living?

2. What is being done to encour-
age better construction-better con-
struction that will save the home
buyer thousands of dollars over
the years?

A house without inside plumbing
is penalized by deducting from valua-
tion whatever it is thought it will cost
to tear up the walls to put in a bath-
room. A cold climate house without
central heating is penalized by de-
ducting from valuation whatever it is
believed it will cost to tear the house
apart to put central heating in now.
But what is being done to encour-
age air-conditioning, without which
Housing Administrator Norman Ma-
son and FHA Commissioner Julian
Zimmerman both said that most hous-
es built where summers are hot (al-
most anywhere from Texas to Minne-
sota) will soon be obsolescent?
How about adequate wiring? Many
home buyers have to spend close to
$100 within a few months to provide
added electrical service that would
have cost only $10 during construc-
tion.
What about adequate insulation,
which will save its added cost in just


a few years in cheaper heating bills
and save its added cost twice as fast
in cheaper cooling bills? What about
adequate room sizes adequate stor-
age?
What about inadequate labor-sav-
ing equipment in the kitchen, and the
second bath that is fast becoming a
must for the three-bedroom houses?
Are all these things being reflected
in the valuations?

3. What is being done to en-
courage the use of quality products
throughout the house-quality prod-
ucts that are a bargain because
they cost no more to install than
the cheapest products that will just
get by FHA, quality products that
can make the house much more
livable for just a few dollars more?

Are the builders right when they
say they get the same valuation if they
use second line fittings in the bath-
room, a cheap and noisy wash-down
toilet with a short-lipped bowl, com-
petitive-grade switches and outlets
that are bound to make trouble, cheap
hardware?
Whether the builders are right or
wrong really makes very little differ-
ence. So long as so many of them
think the added cost of quality will
have to come out of their own pock-
(Continued on Page 36)


This article was presented in the form of an address at the
International Appraisal Conference in Washington and appeared
first in text in "The Residential Appraiser", official journal of
the Society of Residential Appraisers. It is published here in
slightly abstracted form by arrangement with that publication.
. . The author-founder, editor and publisher of "House and
Home" Magazine-has gained valid and wide recognition as an
especially competent observer of the residential construction
field. Architects will undoubtedly agree with his remarks relative
to the residential appraiser's part in establishing house values-
as well as the need for improvements to make the values real.







Houses...
(Continued from Page 35)
ets because they can't count on ap-
praisers to cover its higher cost on the
valuations so they can finance it un-
der the mortgage, the results will be
the same.
4. What is being done to debunk
the biggest and costliest land-price
hoax since the Mississippi bubble
burst nearly 250 years ago?
Said Professor Mason Gaffney of
the University of Missouri: "Today's
suburban land prices are predicated
on an artificial scarcity, maintained
by holding off the market vastly un-
derestimated quantities of land in an-
ticipation of vastly overestimated fu-
ture demands."
In other words, today's land prices
are based on a shortage that does not
exist. New roads and faster transporta-
tion are making new lands accessible
far faster than new families are form-
ing to use these lands; and even close-
in more land is available than we can
build on in our generation.
We worry about land for a popula-


tion of 200 million. But how many of
us realize that a population of 200
million could be housed with no
more density than the model village
of Winnetka, Ill., in 32 circles, each
with a 22-mile radius?
Today's fancy land prices are all
very well so long as the illusion of
scarcity can be preserved, so long as
everyone thinks the land he pays too
much for today can be sold for a
still higher price tomorrow. But what
will happen when the inevitable day
comes when prices can go no higher
and the speculators rush to cover?
5. What is being done about ap-
praising for tomorrow's market?
Are highest valuations reserved for
the kind of houses people are likely
to want to live in, in the vastly dif-
ferent world of 1980, when the aver-
age family will have a bigger income
in constant dollars than junior exec-
utives made right after this last war?
Or are the highest valuations being
given to the kind of houses and the
price-class of houses that proved the
best mortgage risk in yesterday's mar-
ket?


Economist Miles Colean has said:
"By FHA income-requirement stand-
ards the next decade will offer us a
potential market for:
"3.3 million more homes priced
from $12,400 to $14,200 (9.5% of
total);
"5.2 million more houses priced
from $14,200 to $17,500 (17% of
total);
"6 million more houses priced from
$17,500 to $23,600 (25.5% of total);
"9.97 million more houses priced
over $23,600 (45% of total).
"In other words, today's mass mar-
ket is the quality house. The shelter
shortage is over . ."
6. What is being done to hasten,
to encourage, the transformation of
home building from an ancient and
wasteful handicraft to a modern
assembly line of industry?
The waste of labor and the waste
of money for on-site fabrication is too
great to continue. Anything and ev-
erything can be made better and
cheaper in a factory. So tomorrow's
house will be built with parts instead
of pieces factory-fabricated parts


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






sized to standard dimensions so they
will fit together and work together
with a minimum of wasteful on-site
labor. Tomorrow's house will be built
with prefabricated wall panels, floor-
ing panels, roof trusses, roofing pan-
els, plumbing assemblies and mechan-
ical cores.
And tomorrow's home will look
very different, because so great a
change in the way houses are built
is bound to bring a corresponding
change in their appearance.
At long last the housing industry
is entering the industrial revolution,
and home building has a chance to
become America's biggest growth in-
dustry. For two generations the hous-
ing industry has "had the pants sold
off it" by other industries competing
more efficiently, more concertedly,
and more aggressively for the consum-
er dollar. Now industrialization will
give home building its chance to
catch up.
How soon and how fully home
building can seize this opportunity
will depend in large measure on
whether appraisers help or hinder the
transformation of the industry.


ea In, oam Gie tWAn4dcer.. ?


Case of the Disappearing Dollar...


Three travelling men arrived simul-
taneously at a small town containing
only one modest country hotel. Each,
of course, asked for a single room. But
the hotel was so crowded that only
one large room and bath was avail-
able. The time was late evening. The
hotel's clerk had long since gone
home and the lone night bellboy was
pinch-hitting for him.
"Sorry, gentlemen," he said to the
three men. "Only one space is empty,
and it's expensive. But I can put in
another bed and you can all sleep
comfortably for ten dollars each."
The men agreed, paid the aggre-
gate thirty dollars to the bellboy and
retired.
The clerk came in early next morn-
ing and the bellboy reported to him
what he thought was a smart trans-
action.
"That's all fine," said the clerk.


"But you overcharged them. That
room rents for only twenty-five dol-
lars. Take this five dollars and refund
it to them."
The bellboy took the money. But
on the way upstairs he decided to
give each of the men a dollar refund
and keep the two remaining from the
five for himself. This he did and left
the men pleased that the room had
cost each only nine dollars.
Then the bellboy began to think
and wonder. The men had paid him
ten dollars each, thirty dollars in all.
He had refunded them a dollar each,
thus making the room charge nine
dollars each, or a total of twenty-seven
dollars. So, he figured, the difference
between the two totals came to an
even three dollars. But out of the five
dollars the clerk had given to him,
he now had only two!
What happened to the other dollar?


NOVEMBER, 1960
































See Us In
BOOTH 51
Florida Architects
Convention


A,







r S1 E 170 U=
kC T L 4V
LW E St_


z











MUSSIEM WAFTENS

A
00s"',*










NUNN=


l / /C^A/ ///f//i//y LITERATURE

Yours for the Asking


MANY ARCHITECTS and others are finding this authoritative litera-
ture on new and better fastening methods helpful. It tells how
STRONGHOLD Annular Thread and SCREW-TITE Spiral Thread Nails
make house frames stronger, keep floors and underlayment smooth
and squeak-free, virtually eliminate "popping" nail heads in gypsum
board drywall, hold shingles secure in winds up to three times hurri-
cane force; often with fewer nails, shorter nails, slimmer nails-and
with important savings in time, labor, materials. STRONGHOLD and
SCREw-TITE Nails have revolutionized fastening methods. This litera-
ture shows you why. Write us for it.
Four pieces shown have won awards in PC-AIA and/or PC-NAHB
literature contests; two are entered in current competition.


Practically all of the authorita-
tive data available on the hold-
ing power of threaded nails is
the result of the continuing pro-
gram of research sponsored by
us, and reported in these VPI
Bulletins.


Copyright I.N. & P. Co., 1960. Trade


Sample board at right is 12 x
18 inches, has actual samples of
nearly 50 "Stronghold Line" im-
proved fastenings that hold bet-
ter, tighter, longer-enable you
to use new cost-saving techniques
and materials.


Made only by

Independent Nail & Packing Company
Pioneer Developers and Largest Manufacturers of Threaded Nails
Marks Reg. BRIDGEWATER, MASSACHUSETTS


;R THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Governor Names Stetson



To Head Hurricane Committee


A six-man Hurricane Damage Study
Committee has been appointed by
Governor LEROY COLLINS ". . to
act in an advisory capacity to the
state regarding a proposed hurricane
damage study." Named as chairman
by the Governor was JOHN STETSON,
AIA, of Palm Beach, president of
FAA. Others selected were: NORMAN
L. BRYAN, of Deland, an engineer
and member of the firm of Reynolds,
Smith and Hills; LAWRENCE FARRAR,
of Jacksonville, specialist in storm,
tide and hurricane problems with the
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers;
WALTER G. STEPHAN, partner of the
Miami engineering firm of Stephan
and Saffir; M. A. YELVINGTON, City
Planning and Building Director of
the City of Sanford, and PHILLIP H.
Hiss, builder and superintendent of
the Sarasota County Board of Public
Instruction.
This group was charged by the
Governor with developing a program
for surveying ". . all of the various
aspects of the building procedures
and codes followed in the state and
how they might be improved so the
buildings and structures could better
withstand the force and effect of hur-
ricanes." The Governor's statement
also directed the committee to ". .
propose methods of studying and
recommending improved procedures
regarding land dredging and filling,
bulkhead lines, road and bridge build-
ing, zoning and building restrictions,
as well sa related subjects."
It is noteworthy that an architect
was selected as chairman to coordinate
the work of individual committee
members. Of significance also is the
fact that two of the committee have
had special experience with building
codes. Mr. Stephan was formerly a
building inspector in Miami and is
the author of the new South Florida
Building Code for the Dade County
League of Municipalities. Mr. Yel-
vington is president of the Building
Officials Association of Florida and
a member of the Engineering and Ad-
visory Committee of the Southern
Building Code Conference. Named
NOVEMBER, 1960


by Chairman Stetson as a staff as-
sistant was STEPHEN J. GINOCCHIO,
AIA, of Palm Beach.
The Committee held its first meet-
ing with the Governor on October
13. The result was an outline of
activity that included a first-hand sur-
vey of hurricane damage throughout
the heavily-hit areas of the state, and
the compilation of a comprehensive
report of conditions encountered and
recommendations covering possible
areas of improvement in these fields
of interest: 1 ... Protection of build-
ings against direct wave action; 2...
Flooding of low-lying areas; 3 ... Pro-
tection of bridges and bridge ap-
proaches; 4 ... Roof resign; 5 ... Hur-
ricane bracing and anchoring; 6 ...
Road elevation and construction;
7 ... Hurricane shutters, and, 8 ...
Construction and anchorage of mobile
homes.
The report will contain technical
data, charts and photographs. Present
plans are to develop it in a manner


JOHN STETSON, AIA
JOHN STETSON, AlA


suitable for public distribution in
printed form. Among other material
planned for inclusion is a map indi-
cating areas throughout the state
which are susceptible to heavy damage
by hurricane-caused flooding and wave
action from both the ocean and gulf.
Other important sections of the
report will undoubtedly deal with rec-
ommendations on code revisions and
the assumption of legal responsibility
for adequate design and construction
on the part of those who plan build-
ings and other structures.


No Joking ... A Very Serious Suggestion!


-4- fea-4L-HI'A.

pi=^--)- uj| |-i


The Tile Council of America, Inc., apparently disturbed by the possibility of
an atomic war, has developed this "basement fallout shelter" which, it says,
"can be used as a photographic darkroom". Lining one wall is, A, a two-weeks'
supply of food and medicines; B, shower; C, chemical toilet; and, D, water tank.
For Florida . ? Imagine conditions of a basement in our state's flood-
susceptible lowlands! And what would you guess to be the proportion of our
population who like to develop and print their own pictures?


,~~..~R.~......~~~r~U~~~~~~~,~~~


I
























The new Hollywood Post Office will cover approximately 92,000 square feet,
including 38,500 sq. ft. for parking area and vehicle servicing. Present
plans call for a one-story building with a portion of the central unit, shown
above, designed for a future 18,000 sq. ft. second story addition.


Post Office Department Revises


Its Commercial Leasing Program


Pictured above is a model of a new
U. S. Post Office, the first to be au-
thorized under the revised procedure
recently adopted for the Commercial
Leasing Program of the P. 0. Depart-
ment. It is now under construction
at Hollywood, Florida, site of the


46th Annual FAA Convention. ROB-
ERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, AIA Florida
District Director, and his associates
are the architects.
The Commercial Leasing Program
is not new with the P.O. Department.
It was set up to make possible the


use of financing and construction ca-
pacities of private enterprise on local
bases, thus avoiding large outlays of
public funds and assuring also, that
owners of the property will pay local
taxes. Under the general terms of the
program post offices have been pri-
vately owned and leased to the De-
partment.
This is still in effect. The current
revision to past procedure involves
the relationship of the architect to
both the owner and the P.O. Depart-
ment. Formerly, the building owner
was the architect's client-though
technical requirements were set by
the Department. Neither the Depart-
ment nor the architect had much to
say about the letting of the construc-
tion contract; and there have been
instances in the past when the owner
factor ran rough-shod over both to
the effect that neither architect nor
the Department could control the job.
Now, however, the architect works
directly for the P. 0. Department;
and when working drawings are com-
leted, the Department advertises for
bids with the guidance and advice of
the archtiect. This is as it should be;
and is a situation which AIA head-
quarters has been trying to develop
for some time past.


New FAA Insurance Program Ready


At the FAA Board meeting just
prior to the 1959 Convention CLIF-
FORD F. GOULD, CLU, was appointed
as Insurance Consultant for the FAA
-his duties being to survey the insur-
ance needs of FAA members, to rec-
ommend types of insurance that could
meet the needs indicated by his sur-
vey, to develop coverage specifications
for such insurance and, finally, to
select, on the basis of reliability and
rates, insurance organizations which
could best meet overall requirements.
Since that time a survey questionnaire
has been completed and its results
analyzed. Mr. Gould reported the
results of this survey to the FAA
Board at its meeting August 13.
At that time he was authorized to
proceed on a three part insurance
program for FAA members. This in-
cludes programs for disability insur-
ance, professional liability insurance


and the insurance of valuable papers.
These three types of insurance were
revealed by the survey as being not
only of most interest to FAA mem-
bers, but also most needed. Of those
replying to the survey questionnaire
(339 architects employing a total of
1,061 people, 876 male and 187 fe-
male) 52.5 percent had no disability
income protection; only 23.3 percent
were covered by any sort of profes-
sional liability insurance, and but 19.2
percent were insured against the loss
or damage of valuable papers.
The survey questionnaire also dis-
closed some statistical facts relative
to firms which have adopted some
sort of group life insurance program.
The FAA insurance consultant recom-
mended that any action on this phase
of an insurance program be deferred
for the time being. Currently a quirk
in a state law makes the development


CLIFFORD F. GOULD, C.L.U.


of group life insurance on an asso-
ciation-wide basis almost prohibitively
expensive for firm principals. Plans
are now under way to pass an
amendment to the Florida statute
(Continued on Page 48)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












Saluting:

Vernon D. Lamp, AIA Architect

Walter Butler Company Engineers

For State of Florida Office Building, Miami, Florida


DESIGN: Conservative Contemporary. Flair
was deliberately avoided in this building to
prevent its becoming 'dated' within a few
years.
PRIME CONSIDERATIONS IN DESIGN
AND CONSTRUCTION: Economy Flex-
ibility Maximum utilization of space.
SQUARE FOOTAGE: 150,000.
APPROXIMATE COST: $14.60 per square
foot.
SPACE UTILIZATION: 75% of floor area is
revenue producing.
FLEXIBILITY: Plan permits changes in
room arrangements at minimum cost and in-
convenience. Wall partitions are not perma-
nently identified with main structure, permit-
ting quick and inexpensive change to any
desired configuration.


NOVEMBER, 1960


Ceiling panels arranged to permit access to
plumbing, wiring, heating and air conditioning
fixtures at minimum cost and inconvenience.
Design permits addition of future second floor
over all first floor area to accommodate ex-
pansion of agencies.
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING:
Building is fully air conditioned, with heating
by oil-fired boilers.
CONSTRUCTION: Concrete structural
frame. Floor slabs are coffured pan, 2-way rib
reinforced, carried on flat band beams.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: William A.
Berbusse, Jr., Inc.
OWNER: Board of Commissioners of State
Institutions, Tallahassee, Fla.


BETTER FUEL COUNCIL of DADE COUNTY


LITTLE BILL says...
S"Electricity-plus-Oil can't be beat,
for lowest cost and maximum heat!"


A Better Fuel Council member is ready to assist in solving
your commercial heating problems. Just call FR 1-2447.



41








The Psychology of Color


It's more important than most realize. Here are some
notes on how color can lift you up-or mow you down!


Color! It's an amazingly important
factor in determining how we feel
and what we buy.
Right now, are the walls around
you painted blue or green? If they
are, according to a psychological
study made at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity, then you are probably more
calm and relaxed than you would be
if the walls were a neutral color such
as gray. The room seems larger than
it actually is, for things that are blue
and green tend to recede into the
background, appearing farther away
than they actually are.
Warm colors such as red, yellow
and orange, on the other hand, tend
to stimulate you, according to the
Johns Hopkins study, and to seem
closer than they really are.


Color preferences tell a lot about
a person. Do you favor the stimu-
mulating, advancing colors? Then the
chances are you're an extrovert or
would like to be. Quiet, restrained
folk prefer cool shades of blue and
green. And for some unexplained rea-
son, beige, slate blue, ivory and other
subtle hues obtained by mixing colors
tend to be popular with executives
and those of better-than-average edu-
cational background.
Equally intriguing are other un-
answered hue-done-its. Why, for in-
stance, should dark blue symbolize
steadfastness to those of Western
European descent . trouble to the
Cherokee Indians . and death to
the Chinese? Why does a blue light
make people feel that time is passing


"Gr ry isa true Beoiik...k he hos a. colored telephonee'


more quickly . yet actually retard
the growth of plans?
Regardless of personal color prefer-
ences, nearly everyone is a color con-
servative in the sense of expecting -
and sometimes demanding to see
certain colors in certain places. Most
people, for example, would tend to
shun a doctor who painted his walls
(Continued on Page 54)


QUALITY


DISTRIBUTED BY:
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc.,
924 Sligh Blvd., GA 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc.,
2860 22nd Ave., No., Phone 5-7627
Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc.,
1607 S.W. 1st Ave., JA 3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc.,
1043 Haines St. Expressway, EL 6-8542


<. -. A.

-THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT -. .
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes,


Jax Chapter Scores Again .
An informational folder recently is-
sued by the Jacksonville Chapter is
undoubtedly in line or certainly
should be-for selection as a Docu-
ment-of-the-Month by the Chapter
Affairs Committee of the AIA. It is
a three-fold, three-color, letter-sized
pamphlet, expertly designed and writ-
ten, that outlines the services of an
architect and includes one of the most
lucid and complete presentations of
the various methods of payment for
architectural services that has yet
been developed.
Even casual study of the pamphlet
shows that much study has been put
into both the text and the format.
Every AIA Chapter-especially Jack-
sonville's nine sister Chapters of the
Florida Region could profitably
study this document. And they could
well be pardoned if the character of
style and content were basically
adopted to serve specific local needs.
The architectural profession in
Florida needs more such pieces of
informational literature. Members of
the Jacksonville Chapter responsible
for the information this contains are
to be congratulated; and credit is also
due to the JOHN E. RoPP Art Studio
in Jacksonville which designed the
folder.


National Committeemen ...
Florida architects are now serving
as members of thirteen national AIA
committees, according to a recent an-
nouncement of Florida District Di-
rector ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA.
They are: JOHN STETSON, AIA-AGC
Liaison and Pan American Congress;
ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA, AIA-Pro-
ducers' Council Liaison; ALFRED B.


Scheming Up Spectaculars for 1961


In the shadow of Inde-
pendence Hall, Philadel-
phia, the symbol of the
1961 AIA Convention,
most of the Steering
Committee of the Host
Chapter are hatching
schemes to make the
AIA Convention Week
in Philly the biggest and
best yet for architects.
Left to right are: Charles
E. Peterson, Beryl Price,
Chairman, Herbert H.
Swinburne and Harry W.
Peschel. Two of the
"spectaculars" al Iread y
planned for are a com-
mand performance of the
Philadelphia Orchestra
and tours of Colonial
Philadelphia's historic
shrines.
NOVEMBER, 1960


PARKER, FAIA, Home Building In-
dustry; ROBERT ABELE, Chapter Af-
fairs; T. TRIPP RUSSELL, Education;
WALTER B. SCHULTZ, Hospitals and
Health; ROBERT H. LEVISON, Office
Practice; BELFORD SHOUMATE, Pre-
servation of Historic Buildings; ED-
WARD G. GRAFTON, Public Relations;
C. ELLIS DUNCAN, Schools and Edu-
cational Facilities; G. CLINTON
GAMBLE, Structure of the Institute,
and JAMES T. LENDRUM, Architec-
tural and Building Information.
The District Director also reported
that various changes in the AIA com-
mittee organizatoin had resulted in
the removal of two other Florida arch-
itects as national committeemen.
ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II, had been
serving on the Disaster Control Com-
mittee which was discharged at the
AIA Board's September meeting. The
Awards and Scholarship Committee,
on which WAHL J. SNYDER, FAIA,
had been serving, was also discharged.
VERNER JOHNSON, who had been serv-
ing a three-year term as a member
of the AIA-Producers' Council Liai-
son Committee, was replaced by the
District Director. Reason for the
change was that the AIA Board
wished representation by a Board
member on this committee and the
appointment would maintain repre-
sentation for the Florida District.
(Continued on Page 44)


ENGINEERS TO BUILD HEADQUARTERS . This is a preliminary sketch
of the State Headquarters Building proposed for the Florida Engineering
Society. No . an engineer will not "draw the plans". Hendricks and
Phelps, of Orlando, have been retained as architects for the project which
will be built in Orlando. It will contain approximately 1700 sq. ft. to include
administrative offices and meeting rooms and is being designed to permit
future additions. The building is being financed through sales of building
bonds to FES members.


I I -1 _-






News & Notes


(Continued from Page 43)
Reminder ...
Nominations for the fifth annual
R. S. Reynolds Memorial Award must
be submitted to AIA headquarters in
Washington, D. C., prior to De-
cember 12, 1960. Started in 1957,
the Reynolds Award involving a
cash payment of $25,000 and cer-
tificates of honor to both architect
and building owner-is conferred an-
nually on an architect whose sub-
mission is judged to be most signifi-
cant as a contribution to the advanced
utilization of aluminum in building
design.
The award competition is interna-
toinal in scope. Thus far, no building
in the United States, nor any of this
country's architects have been selected
for the Award. In 1957 the jury picked
the Visitors and Factory Lounge Cen-
ter, S. E. A. T. Automobile Factory,
Barcelona, Spain. In 1958 the selec-
tion was the Transportation Building
of the Brussels Worlds Fair in Bel-
gium. In 1959 the honor went to
architects of the Sydney Myer Music
Bowl at Melbourne, Australia. The


jury's selection this year was the build-
ing in Vevy, Switzerland, housing the
Neslte International Headquarters.
Information on the Award program
and nomination forms may be ob-
tained from AIA headquarters. Data
relative to the building and architect
nominated must be submitted by
February 24, 1961. Judgment of en-
tries will take place March 1-2, 1961.
Presentation of the Award has been
scheduled for April 22, 1961.

January Deadline Set
For Design Award Program
AIA President PHILIP WILL, JR.,
FAIA, has announced January 27,
1961, as the deadline for entries in
sixth annual Homes For Better Living
Awards program. This year the pro-
gram will be expanded to cover all
50 states and will include, in addition
to custom built and merchant built
houses, a third category of garden,
or walk-up, apartments not over three
stories in height. The apartments may
have been built as rental units or tor
sale as cooperatives. This is the first
year that apartments have been in-


eluded in the Program.
The Program is sponsored by the
AIA in cooperation with Life and
House and Home magazines. Award
winning buildings will be announced
during the AIA Convention at Phila-
delphia during the week of April 23,
1961. They will also be published in
House and Home and exhibited
throughout the country. A selection
from winning entries will also appear
in a 1961 issue of Life.
Entries may be submitted by an
owner, architect or builder, but must
be postmarked for mailing to AIA
headquarters before midnight, Febru-
ary 24, 1961. Full information and
entry blanks may be obtained from
the AIA headquarters or from House
and Home, Time-Life Building, New
York 20, N. Y.

Award Program Jury . .
C. HERRICK HAMMOND, FAIA, of
Delray Beach, a former past president
of the AIA, JAMES T. LENDRUM, AIA,
Head, Department of Architecture,
College of Architecture and Fine Arts,
U/F, and GEN. T. A. WEYHER, Dean
of the University of Miami's College
(Continued on Page 47)


NEW INSULATION


FOR MASONRY WALLS


DOUBLES THERMAL EFFICIENCY


After ten years of research, Zonolite Company has
developed a water-repellent, vermiculite insulation for
concrete block and cavity walls.
Full scale wall specimens have been thoroughly
tested by Penn State University and the Structural
Clay Products Research Foundation for: Heat Trans-
mission; Water Permeability; Vapor Permeability.
Heat Transmission Test Results . Zonolite Mas-
onry Fill Insulation reduces heat transfer through a
masonry wall up to 50 percent. This means that
smaller heating and air conditioning units can be used.
Their cost of operation will also be lower.
Interior surface temperatures stay much closer to
room temperature allowing 30 percent less radiant heat
exchange with the body. This means greater human
comfort.


Water Permeability Test Results . A cavity wall
with a leaking exterior was tested for six days under
simulated wind-driven rains (5V2" of water per hour
in a wind of 50 mph). There was no water permeation
through the Zonolite Water Repellent Masonry Insu-
lation, to the other side of the cavity.
Vapor Permeability Test Results . The results of
this test, conducted at Penn State, proved that under
usual conditions of occupancy and climate, no vapor
barrier is required in a cavity wall insulated with
Zonolite Water Repellent Masonry Fill.
For complete information, send for Zonolite Book-
let MF-2 containing test data on heating and air
conditioning savings, coverage, and specifications.
Call or write Zonolite Company, 211 E. Robinson
St., Orlando, or P. 0. Box 211, Boca Raton, Florida.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









PRI0ETRESE

INRT AK


Clarifier and reservoir
with dome, each having
capacity of 2,000,000
gallons Foley, Florida


Two Graver clarifiers
and 1,000,000 gallon
clearwell Tuscaloosa,
Alabama.


Photographs courtesy of The Crom Corporation,


* Prestressed concrete tanks-for water, sewage, fuel
and a variety of industrial uses-offer all of the im-
portant advantages listed above. In addition, the
shoterete surfaces provide extra resistance to salt water,
acids and alkalis.
Above ground tanks have been built with diameters
up to 225 feet with capacity of 11,500,000 gallons.


0

0. *
IN WITH





G Ain STil, FIMLord
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nH~r o--s-ero-s-
K|| FlFLORIDA

BUY products? I
USE LORIDA
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NOVEMBER, 1960


aN '


4L zkx







The Dramatic Strength of


Texture, Color and Scale...


'; .lu i, .]3nd ',c..l Hlll H311fC IF',e P i T.:.rah C,.n r .orc iahiun Nc.rlh M,3-, Ef-,:h
P h il-p h. r in ,5n L ,r C I ` i.-.r Ie r C ,:r.. I r I.C. n- C .:. G e n e r 1 I .:. n I r .,C hlr :

The bold and imaginative character of
this design concept required use of out-of-
the-ordinary material for its complete devel-
opment. In FEATHEROCK the architect
found the ideal material to convey the sense
of strength and simplicity through texture,
color and scale . FEATHEROCK'S full
color range was used-from charcoal
through warm tan to silver gray Its rugged,
crystalline texture provides shade and
shadow where needed. And its light weight
only seven pounds per square foot -
made handling easy and installation
economical ....


Distributed in Florida by:
Kissam Builders Supply, Orlando . .
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., Hialeah . .


Steward-Mellon Co., Jacksonville . Steward-Mellon Co., Tampa . .
Doby Brick & Supply, Boca Raton . .


And in Georgia by:
F. Graham Williams Co., Atlanta

featherocl, INC,6331 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES 28, CALIFORNIA

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes,
(Continued from Page 44)
of Engineering, have been named as
a jury in an annual award program
for architectural and engineering ex-
cellence in Dade County.
The award program is sponsored by
the Better Fuel Council of Dade
County. Its purpose is to bring public
recognition to local architects and
engineers for outstanding work on
both private and public buildings.

More about Modular . .
Adoption of the modular measure
principle may save the construction
industry a billion dollars a year, ac-
cording to ELMER A. LUNDBERG, AIA,
recently-elected president of the Pro-
ducers' Council. Lundberg made this
statement as part of his address at
the final session of the Eleventh Na-
tional Conference on Standards held
last month under the sponsorship of
the American Standards Association.
Though he admitted that some sec-
tions of industry and some architects
are opposed to the adoption of the
modular system, Lundberg cited num-


erous instances wherein the system
was developing dramatically successful
results. He quoted one architect as
testifying that modular measure could
be expected to reduce draftsmen's
dimensional errors by a whacking 90
percent and to cut drafting time by
20 percent within the first year of
application.
From the constructor's viewpoint,
Lundberg asserted that job estimates
can be prepared "at least" 33 percent
faster from modular drawings. And he
mentioned the experience of another
builder who was saving 10 to 15 per-
cent of his field labor costs-and as
much as six percent of the total con-
tracts-through the consistent use of
the modular method. Producers too,
said the trade association executive,
are recognizing similar values. He
cited the experience of one producer
who had been able to cut in half
his 1,400 sizes and designs of wood
windows and 1,700 sizes of sash due
to standardization made possible by
the molular method.
From headquarters of the Modular
Standards Association comes news


that through a grant from the Ford
Foundation, a completely delineated
text book on molular measure will
be made available for architects, con-
tractors and building suppliers in the
near future.

Personals . .
Architects VERNON D. LAMP, AIA,
and CHARLES C. BROWARD, JR., AIA,
have announced a new firm for the
practice of architecture to be known
as Lamp-Broward & Associates, with
offices at 3434 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Lamp formerly conducted his
own office, but for the past five years
was associated with the Walter Butler
Co., engineers. Broward was formerly
associated with the architectural and
engineering firm of Connell, Pierce,
Garland and Friedman.
WILLIAM PARRISH PLUMB an-
nounces the opening of his office for
the practice of architecture and re-
lated design at 3021 N. E. 32nd Ave-
nue, Fort Lauderdale.
RICHARD A. BAKER has opened his
own architectural office at 2651 N.
Federal Highway, Room 210, Fort
Lauderdale.


"To put a point across"
S mmmmBmm-mmm m- mm m mm mm= = =m = mm i - M





Our point is this . characteristics of treated
"/ lumber vary with the type of treatment used. For
instance, some treatments leach out. . Celcure
is non-leaching. Many give off unpleasant odors
.* Celcure is odorless. Others contain poisons
that are extremely dangerous . Celcure is
non-poisonous and can be used anywhere without
worry. Celcure has many important advantages
which are unmatched by other treatments.


ALWAYS SPECIFY


PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER


NOVEMBER, 1960 47







ATTENTION: Architects, Electrical Engineers, Contractors and Design Consultants

THE LEFT HAND KNOWS

WHAT THE RIGHT HAND

IS DOING-AT STA-BRITE!

On the one hand we're manufacturing time-tested fluorescent lighting
fixtures that meet your ordinary demands from the simplest and
cheapest to the most complicated and expensive... and on the other
hand we're busy inventing revolutionary new things that we believe
will be sincerely welcomed! (Wait till you see what's coming up -
keep In touch!) And with all of our lighting fixtures, standard or
revolutionary, we carefully conform to underwriter's, building code,
and union requirements. The baked enamel on steel or aluminum,
for Instance, has been tested with great success by Pittsburgh
Laboratories for quality, color retention, and adherence. And all
fixtures are designed to harmonize, complement, and vitalize any
decor where good taste... and good light... are basic requisites.
CALL ON US SOON.


DESIGNERS
ENGINEERS
MANUFACTURERS

THE ULTIMATE
IN LIGHTING
FIXTURES

Whatever your
requirements
In lighting homes,
offices and factories
-depend on
STA-BRITE'S
quality fixtures
and experienced
engineering staff.

Write on your
company letterhead
for Sta-Brite's
191 Price List.


PON- CRAFT...


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Durability combined with
economy and beauty . .
Surfaces of decorative,
maintenance free plastic
laminated to a solid core of
wood a five-ply construc-
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fine interior doors for five
full years . Built to look
well and stand up under the
most rugged use in schools,
hospitals, office and public
buildings, hotels, apart-
ments and institutions.


VISIT US AT BOOTH No. 4

Thirteen Pon-Craft Dealers to serve
you in every section of the state


* PLASTIC
LAMINATE

1/10# HARDWOOD
CROSS SANDING

CORE-SOFr WOOD


cross section view
Poncraft door


ON LOCK & HINGE


PONTIAC MILLWORK COMPANY
2005 Pontiac Road Pontiac 17, Michigan


FAA Insurance...
(Continued from Page 40)

controlling this situation at the 1961
Legislature; but until this has been
accomplished, no effort will be ex-
pended to develop a group life insur-
ance program for Florida firms under
FAA sponsorship.
Of the three-pronged FAA insur-
ance program the matter of profes-
sional liability coverage is probably
the most important. Of the 339 achi-
tects replying to the survey question-
naire, only 79, or less than 24 percent,
indicated they were conducting their
business under coverage of insurance
protection against negligence, errors,
mistakes or omissions. Yet all are
legally responsible for the competency
of their professional work; and the
trend of court decisions seems increas-
ingly to extend the architect's pro-
fessional responsibility beyond the
technical competence of his docu-
ments into the performance of the
building constructed from them.
Thus, the professional man works
under the constant threat of having
to defend himself from what might
well become-to judge from records
of past cases-almost ruinous legal
action. At the best this could take
the form of a nuisance suit based
on some trivial error or omission. At
the worst it could become a case in-
volving devastating damages-pinned
on the architect through his responsi-
bility for supervision, perhaps, though
arising actually from some negligence
or mistake of a building contractor.
The professional liability insurance
program which is now ready for ac-
ceptance by Florida architects is very
similar to that sponsored by the Insti-
tute on a national basis. But, accord-
ing to the FAA's insurance consultant,
it was selected because the coverage
embodies certain technical advantages
and can be made available, he be-
lieves, at a somewhat lower cost.
Coverage clauses of four companies
writing professional liability insurance
were analyzed in detail and embodied
in a comparative report to the FAA
Board before the policy offered by the
Fidelity and Casualty Company of
New York was selected.
Literature covering the programs
will be available at the 46th Annual
FAA Convention-as will Mr. Gould,
or a member of his staff, for consul-
tation.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Design for modern

Living ELECTRICALLY

Good homes start with good planning. And basic to good planning and
better living are the comforts and conveniences embodied in Medallion
Homes- the hallmark of electrical excellence. People do want FULL
HOUSEPOWER with plenty of outlets for today's and tomorrow's
electrical appliances. People do want LIGHT-for-LIVING for comfort,
atmosphere and beauty. People do want all-electric kitchens and laundry
. . for cleaner, cooler Florida living. There's professional pride in
designing award-winning Medallion Homes that up-grade the standards
rnr modern living-electrically.


"tA


* ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN-LAUNDRY that includes at least 4 major
electrical appliances . water heater, cooking range, and the choice of
clothes dryer, dishwasher, or other "Reddy-servants."
* PULL HOUSEPOWER 1100-200 amp service) with large enough wire
and ample circuits, outlets and switches for maximum convenience and
efficiency... now and in the future.
* LIGHT-FOR-LIVING properly planned for every part of the house and
outdoors, for decorative beauty and utility.


...- .- THER
Call any FP& L office MATCH F
for/ull details and M
\^9- % specifications ..TODAY. ,/

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Helping Build Florida


NOVEMBER, 1960


E'S NO
OR A


ELECTRIC LIVING


d,_4











0


r


S


for our climate


We endorse and heartily applaud the
theme of the 46th F A A Annual Con-
vention "Architecture for Our
Climate".
The concept of controlling climato-
logical environment through imaginative
use of lighter and brighter colors is
one we have been proclaiming for many
years.
Researchers may forecast, shelter maga-
zines editorialize on national color trends.
But Floridians do not follow these pat-
terns. For them, we have developed in-
terior and exterior finishes in shades,


tones and hues that may be truly called
"Colors for Our Climate".
By the same token, Harris pioneered
"Paints for Our Climate" in odorless,
quick drying, alkali and mildew resistant
paints for Florida homes synthetic,
vinyl and epoxy finishes for industrial
and commercial use.
Modern equipment, continuous research,
quality control, have built the Harris
reputation. The Harris Standard Paint
Company, Florida's largest paint manu-
facturer, stands ready to serve you, the
Florida architect, with "Paints and Col-
ors for Our Climate".


TWO HEADS are often better than one. Rapid advances in paint technology
sometimes create a problem for the architect who seeks to specify the newest and best
product. Harris Paint technicians are available for immediate consultation. Call collect.
Specifications Catalogs, Color Charts, available upon request.


HARRIS
bete. PAINTS SINCE 1904
HARRIS STANDARD PAINT CO.
1026 North 19th St.


Tampa, Florida


4-4921


;0 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


C






The Community...
(Continued from Page 21)
the quality of other developments
that have preceded and will follow.
It depends, as ARTHUR GALLION
has emphasized in The Urban Pat-
tern, upon the standards at which a
community maintains itself, the main-
tenance of existing facilities, and the
standards it demands for future im-
provement. These standards deter-
mine the difference between degen-
eration or stability of our urban com-
munities, and upon them rests the
difference between speculation and
sound urban development.
Those of us who live in Florida
stand upon the threshold of a tre-
mendous period of change in our ur-
ban way of life. The forces of growth
and urbanization in our state are re-
lentless in their action. But almost
for the first time, there is growing
realization that these forces can be
turned to the constructive uses of our
communities. But such things do not
happen by chance. They happen only
when we plan it that way and when
we put our plans into action.


NO TIME OF )EAR FOR TB.
Is there evir a right time? Of
rourse not. But Christmas.
more than any olhrr season,
should be a time of gloin'ng
good spirts. hi allh and hap-
piness. In the fight against
TB, it cani at Ieasl be a time
of hope-w'hen millions of
.4,'nrirars help by using
Chrisltma Seals. .4 lswr yo ur
Christima Stcal letter today.


Ia I










If you offer Quality to give the Service architects
demand they want to know about it. And the best
place to tell them is in THEIR VERY OWN MAGAZINE.

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers and general contractors.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building"-for through draw-
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create . .

Architects' specifications control your sales. To help
them specify the product or service you offer, tell them
about it where they'll see it regularly HERE . .



Florida's ONLY OFFICIAL
FAA Journal . Owned, read
and used by architects






Florida Architect


7225 S. W. 82nd Ct., Miami 43


MO 5-5032


NOVEMBER, 1960












6th Annual Roll-Call --- 1959-1960



Listed here are firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA

grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they

make or sell are of a quality to merit specification. They seek your approval.


AICHEL STEEL & SUPPLY COMPANY
2205 Edison Ave., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lupton curtain walls and windows
Agency-Seitner Associates, St.
James Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION,
HEATING Cr PIPING ASSOCIATION,
INC.
1390 N. W. 43rd St., Miami( Fla.
Air-conditioning, refrigeration, heating
and piping installations, sales and
servicing.
Agency-Long Advertising Agency
815 W. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
AMERICAN CELCURE WOOD
PRESERVING CORP.
1073 E. 8th St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Wood preservative process
Agency-Bacon, Hartman &
Vollbrecht, Inc., Ist Federal Savings
Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
BAGWELL STEEL PRODUCTS,
INCORPORATED
6010 N. W. 9th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla.
Tank and steel plate fabrication
Agency-August Burghard, Inc., 1710
S. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
BELCHER OIL COMPANY
1217 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
Arkla-Servel oil-fired air conditioners
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden, Inc.
3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.
BETTER FUEL COUNCIL OF DADE
COUNTY
Oil heating
Agency-Woody Kepner & Associates
Inc.
3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.
JULIUS BLUM & CO., Inc.
Carlstadt, New Jersey
Decorative iron and aluminum units
Agency-Seery & Ward, Common-
wealth Bldg., Louisville, Kentucky
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts, aluminum
grilles
BOIARDI TILE MANUFACTURING
CORP.
General offices-Cleveland, Ohio
1800 N. 4th Ave., Lake Worth, Fla.
Agency-The Carpenter Advertising
Co., 1220 Huron Rd., Cleveland, Ohio
BUILDORAMA
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami, Fla.
Building products displays
Agency-Harris & Company Advertis-
ing, Inc., Dupont Plaza Center, Miami,
Fla.
A. R. COGSWELL
433 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Architects' supplies and reproduction
service
CRADLE DRAIN CORPORATION
707 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami, Fla.
Drain field systems
Agency-Agey Associates, Inc., 1451
No. Bayshore Dr., Miami, Fla.
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th St., Hialeah, Fla.
Decorative masonry materials
DWOSKIN, INCORPORATED
Main Office-Atlanta, Georgia
4029 N. Miami Ave., Miami, Fla.
Agency-Bearden-Thompson-Frankel,
Inc. & Eastman-Scott Advertising,
22 8th St. N.E., Atlanta, Georgia
DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
Suite 621, Dupont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, Fla.
Kitchens for motels, resorts, hotels
resorts, hotels
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency,
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Indiana
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
4550 37th St. N., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Lightweight garden and landscape rock
Agency-Sierra Advertisers, 6331
Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles,
California
FEDERAL SEABOARD TERRA COTTA
CORPORATION
10 E. 40th St., New York, N.Y.
Architectural terra cotta
Agency-Persons Advertising, Inc.
122 E. 42nd St., New York, N.Y.
FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43ro St., Miami, Fla.
Custom-cast plaques
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
Buildorama, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami,
Fla.
Oil and gas heating
Agency-Bevis Associates, Advertising
Ingraham Building, Miami, Fla.
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa,
Fla.
Portland cement
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Assoc., Inc.
206 S. Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Electric utility
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Miami, Fla.
Electric utility
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami, Fla.
FLORIDA SOLITE CORPORATION
Prudential Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
Manufacturer of Solite
Agency-Cabell Eanes, Inc., 509 W.


Grace St., Richmond, Virginia
FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
215 So. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.
Reinforcing steel and accessories
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Assoc.,
Inc., 206 S. Franklin St., Tampa, Fla.
FLORIDA TILE INDUSTRIES, INC.
608 Prospect St., Lakeland, Fla.
Manufacturers of glazed wall tile and
trimmers
Agency-Gray Advertising, Inc.,
Arcade Bldg., 442 W. Lafayette,
Tampa, Fla.
GARDNER ASPHALT PRODUCTS CO.
912 Ruby St., Tampa, Fla.
Roofing compounds
Agency-Nemarow Advertising
Agency, 8th and Wood Sts., Vineland,
N. J.
GENERAL PANEL CORPORATION
1702 Gleason Ave., Sarasota, Fla.
Agency-B & B Promotion Service,
4263 Ellen Ave., Ft. Myers, Fla.
GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT
COMPANY
111 West Monroe St., Chicago, III.
Trinity White cements
Agency-Harris & Wilson, Inc., 221
N. LaSalle St., Chicago, IlI.
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville,
Fla.
"B & G" windows and window walls,
"Griffco" aluminum products
HAMILTON PLYWOOD
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Ft .Lauderdale,
Fla.
Cabinet and paneling plywoods
Agency-Travis Messer, Advertising,
P. 0. Box 7368, Orlando, Fla.
HARRIS STANDARD PAINT COMPANY
INCORPORATED
1022-26 N. 19th St., Tampa, Fla.
Paint, varnishes, enamels
HOLLOWAY MATERIALS CORP.
Winter Park, Fla.
Precast concrete panels
THE HOUSTON CORPORATION
St. Petersburg, Miami, Jacksonville,
Orlando, Lakeland, Daytona Beach,
Eustis
Natural gas installations
Agency-Grant Advertising, Inc., 201
S. W. 13th St., Miami, Fla.
INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING
COMPANY
Bridgewater, Massachusetts
Special nails and fastening devices
Agency-Warner Alden Morse, P.O.
Box 720, Brockton, Massachusetts
LAMBERT CORPORATION
2125 W. Central Ave., Orlando, Fla.
Waterproofing materials, concrete


52 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











floor hardeners
Agency-T. R. Morehead Advertising,
1433 4th St. S., St. Petersburg, Fla.
THE MABIE-BELL COMPANY
Greensboro, North Carolina
Precast, lightweight concrete panels
Agency-David W. Evans & Associates
Evans Building, 110 Social Hall Ave.,
Salt Lake City, Utah
MARSH WALL PRODUCTS, INC.
Dover, Ohio
Marlite wall products
Agency-Howard Swink Advertising,
Inc., 372 E. Center St., Marion, Ohio
BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.,
511 Canal St., New York, N.Y.
Paints, varnishes, enamels
Agency-Monroe F. Dreher, Inc., Ad-
vertising, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New
York, N.Y.
MOORE VENTS
P.O. Box 1406, West Palm Beach, Fla.
Wall condensation preventative
MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla.
Kitchen design and construction
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency,
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Indiana
NATIONAL BRONZE COMPANY
2180 N. W. 24th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Bronze and aluminum tablets
PACQUA, INC.
Dillard, Oregon
Insect repellent board
Agency-Porter Advertising Agency
Incorporated, 515 Builders Exchange
Bldg., Portland, Oregon
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
632 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Pittsburgh 22
Pa.
Paints, glass, chemicals, fiber glass
Agency-Batten, Barton, Durstine &
Osborn, Inc., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
RICHARD PLUMER
155 N. E. 40th St., Miami, Fla.
Business, residential interiors
Agency-Tally Embry, Inc.,
Advertising, Pan American Bank Bldg.
Miami, Fla.
PONTIAC MILLWORK COMPANY
2005 Pontiac Rd., Pontiac, Michigan


Plastic laminated flush doors
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Dr., Orlando, Fla.
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.,
410 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.
PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
2229 4th St., Berkeley, California
Lighting fixtures
Agency-L. C. Cole Company, Inc.,
406 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif.
PROFILE STEEL PRODUCTS CO.
Box 11425, Tampa, Fla.
Structural steel products
Agency-Bill Simpson, Jr. Advertising
Inc., 2306 Gray St., Tampa, Fla.
A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th Terrace, Miami, Pla.
Architectural woodwork and supplies,
Woodlife, Marlite
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS, INC.
155 Washington St., Newark, N. J.
Glue laminated wood products
Agency-E. T. Holmgren, Inc., E717
First National Bank Bldg., Saint Paul,
Minnesota
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND
TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Atlanta, Georgia
Communications
Agency-Tucker Wayne & Company,
1175 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta,
Georgia
SOUTHERN WATER CONDITIONING,
INC.
301 15th Ave. S., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Water softener and conditioning
Agency-international Public Rela-
tions and Advertising, 1422 4th St.
S., St. Petersburg, Fla.
STA-BRITE FLUORESCENT MFG. CO.
3550 N. W. 49th St., Miami, Fla.
Fluorescent lighting fixtures
Agency-Harris & Company Advertis-
ing, Inc., Dupont Plaza Center, Miami,
Fla.
STEWARD-MELLON COMPANY OF
JACKSONVILLE
945 Liberty St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Contractors for marble, tile, terrazzo
STRAN-STEEL CORPORATION
Detroit, Michigan
Structural steel units
Agency--Campbell-Ewald Company,


4th Floor General Motors Bldg.,
Detroit, Michigan
T-SQUARE MIAMI BLUE PRINT CO.,
INC.
635 S. W. 1st Ave., Miami, Fla.
Photo copies-chromostats and
architectural-engineering supplies
THOMPSON DOOR COMPANY, INC.
5663 N. W. 36th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Hollow and solid core doors
BEN THOMSON, INC.
530 Putnam Road, West Palm Beach,
Fla.
Glazed cement coatings
TIFFANY TILE CORPORATION
500 N. West Shore Drive, Port Tampa,
Fla.
Manufacturers, installations ceramic
tile
Agency-Bill Simpson, Jr. Advertising
Inc., 2306 Gray St., Tampa, Fla.
TITUS MANUFACTURING CORP.
Waterloo, Iowa
Aluminum air diffusion products
Agency-Colle, McVay, Weston,
Barnett, Incorporated, 217 W. 5th
St., Waterloo, Iowa
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th St., New York, N. Y.
Plywood and plywood products
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Ave., New York, N. Y.
F. GRAHAM WILLIAM CO.
1690 Monroe Dr., Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, products
RALPH WILSON PLASTICS, INC.
600 General Bruce Drive, Temple, Texas
Manufacturers of Wilson-Art
decorative high pressure laminates
Agency-Greene-Bush Advertising,
Inc., P. 0. Box 3188, Waco, Texas
R. H .WRIGHT, INC.
A subsidiary of Houdaille Industries, Inc.
1050 N. E. 5th Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla.
Prestressed concrete products
Agency-Peter Larkin Agency, 3132
N. E. 9th St., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
ZONOLITE COMPANY
135 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, Illinois
Insulating fill
Agency-Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.
105 W. Adams St., Chicago, Illinois


A NOTE ABOUT THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT'S PUBLISHING POLICY ..

* As the Official Journal of the Florida Association of Architects -
which is a State organization of the American Institute of Arcihtects
- The Florida Architect is a professional magazine, in the strictest
sense of the term. It was developed to serve the overall interests of the
architectural profession in Florida. In doing so it also serves the building
industry of this state of which the profession is a part.

* So it is more of an educational and inter-industry public relations
medium than a commercial publication or trade paper. Because of this
character it has come to be regarded as an authoritative source of pro-
fessional and inter-industry news, a forum of professional opinion and a
strong voice that calls constantly for sound professional advancement,
for improvement of construction industry practices and for enlightened
and progressive community development in all sections of our State.


NOVEMBER, 1960 5=


e- --r ~el~I II ~c~---~----~








Man, Climate, The Architect ... and

INSULATED CURTAIN WALL PANELS
with the new core material
URETHANE foamed in place between two
facing sheets K Value as low as .12
POLYSTYRENE sandwiched between facing
sheets with K Value of .25
The way is open for thin curtain walls with a good U-value.
Avoid excessive mass accumulation of heat from the sun .
specify our lightweight, all insulated
GENFOME and GENPAN Panels
specially made for curtain walls and Florida climate. They're
fire, heat and moisture resistant with high strength.
Custom-made to your specifications . inexpensive . .
manufactured at our new plant in Florida.





MODULAR BUIL DIN 0 PANELS


FACTORY
1205 Sixth St., Page Park
Ft. Myers, Florida
Phone WE 6-1555


SALES OFFICE
4702 Gleason Ave.
Sarasota, Florida
Phone WA 7-8158


Psychology of Color...
(Continued from Page 42)
bright orange. Cool and quiet hues
are associated with the calm compe-
tence we expect from the medical
profession.
But taste for color can also be
cultivated. Auto makers proved this
in the past decade, to the point where
a black car has become almost a
rarity in this country.
Maybe even more significantly, the
same thing seems to be happening
with a basic, near-universal ingredient
of the home and office the tele-
phone. A new telephone survey shows
that close to 40 percent of all tele-
phones being installed in homes today
are colorful.
Which phone colors are people
choosing for their homes? The leader
by an overwhelming margin is white.
Next come beige and pink. The other
shades, roughly in order of preference,
are ivory, yellow, green, blue, gray
and red.
Market researchers have unearthed
some equally colorful findings that
help explain why you buy as you do in
supermarkets and department stores.
Brown will sell coffee, baked beans
or tobacco, but it won't do a thing
for hardware, which moves fastest
against a blue backdrop.
Health as well as wealth is affected
by color. Mental hospitals are experi-
menting with color therapy, soothing
hysterical patients with blue, stimu-
lating the depressed with yellow and
igniting a spark of life in the ex-
tremely withdrawn patient by using
red and orange.
One of the oddest aspects of color
psychology is the way different na-
tions look at color. White, not black,
was the color of mourning in ancient
Rome and even in modern China.
Red meant heaven to the ancient
Chinese, goblins to the neighboring
Tibetans. Blue is hated by an Armen-
ian tribe of nomads their worst
curse is "May you die in blue
garments!"
The Cherokees symbolized not only
qualities but directions with color.
Red was east and success; blue, north
and trouble; black, west and death;
white, south and happiness.
As the southeasternmost state of
the U.S. 50, maybe Florida should
adopt red and white success and
happiness-as its Official P/R colors.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


SK. COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"




THE BEST

in

Architects' Supplies




Complete Reproduction
Service




433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


Smooth for Floors


BOIARDI

PAVE TILE

THE COMPRESSED TILE of marble aggre-
gate and white Portland cement produced
in Cleveland, Ohio and Lake Worth, Fla.
by an Italian process.
NINE COLORS, four styles, in multiple
sizes and textures of unprecedented
creativeness in design.
EASILY INSTALLED by conventional instal-
lation methods. Write Dept. FA-11 for
illustrated brochure.
BOIARDI TILE MFG. CORP.
1525 Fairfield Ave., Cleveland 13, Ohio
Tel. TOwer 1-8130









ADVERTISERS' INDEX


American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co. __---__-_- 47
Belcher Oil Company __ 4
Better Fuel Council of
Dade County ____ 41
Blumcraft of Pittsburg 22
Boiardi Tile Mfg. Co.-_-_ 54
A. R. Cogswell 54

Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc. _____- -- ___ 3rd Cover
Dwoskin, Inc. ___ 26
Dwyer Products of Florida,
Inc. _____ ____ 2nd Cover


Electrend Distributing Co.__
Featherock, Inc. __ __
Florida Home Heating
Institute ___________
Florida Portland Cement Div.
Florida Power and Light Co.
Florida Steel Corp. _______
Florida Tile Industries
General Panel Corporation__
George C. Griffin Co.
Hamilton Plywood _-__-___
Harris Standard Paint Co. -.
Holloway Materials
Corp. ---------Insert 9
Houdaille-Span, Inc. ____ 16
Houston Corporation -_-___


Independent Nail and
Packing Co. _
Jo Ceramics -
Lambert Corporation of
Florida --- --
Mutschler Kitchens of
Florida --__--
The Mabie Bell Company
Richard Plumer ______.
Pontiac Millwork Co. ___


36


6
46

56
45
49
8
1
54
7
42
50

-12
-17
24

38
34

14

18
3
'-37
48


A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc._ 13
Rilco __- ________ ____ 33
Sta-Brite Fluorescent
Manufacturing Co. 48
United State Plywood Co.--- 15
F. Graham Williams Co. 55
Zonolite Company ____ 44


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 5-0043


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
CERAMIC GLAZED BRICK
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
GLAZED SOLAR SCREENS
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM


PRECAST LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATING ROOF AND WALL SLABS

We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154


NOVEMBER, 1960


ATLANTA
GA.











I want to


be warm


this winter!

Cold snaps are coming. Maybe bone-chillers like
we had in 1957-1958. Only folks with central
heating in their homes escaped misery and
suffering. U. S. Weather Bureau records show that
even South Florida homes require dependable heating
an average of 42 days a year when temperatures drop
into the 50's or lower.


NOW'S THE TIME TO INSTALL
ECONOMICAL CENTRAL OIL HOME HEATING!
....then
"SET THE THERMOSTAT FOR A WARM WINTER"
Oil lical a'crage- aloul IiI.1LF I lhe co-l of hlioe healing
%ilh oilier fudcl! No primnium pri:e to |i, I.l':-n le-l oil ik li,--J
onl) fI'r h,:,me hli.atin iSupl.lie_- are ilk J)_ MJu:..: Jl.I.. M1. hi -jal.-r
-n>:. fumeiii Clean. :irulJairin,. jul:.om lie hIwa. a-iirin-, iJ\i6iurII
rcoml.,rl- oni lele peace of min'1-lo erl \. B,-i -,oluion bi
far to FIr.ri.'s h.me hoelring problem.
.BI ^ ^ l i S M


NOW AVAILABLE AT YOUR DEALER'S
Newest models of economical oil
home heating equipment
Lillie or NO CASH DOWN lems lo 36 months o Ilongei I


FIREPLACE
FLOOR


MR. ARCHITECT:
Floridian- are -eeing and hearing lii- oil lhonme healing
-lory 'ia 16 ne%-paper- and inauazine-. fike TV -lalion-.
25 radio -Ialion. and thou-and- of happy lionime ouner-
Iho ha'e learned for ieni-eie- ldial clean. liuxurioui oil
heat is .afer. mnore dependable and t1111'( H cheaper! lour
reconiniendalion of superior OIL home healing %ill be
accepted %ilh gralilude and enlhu-ia-ni

FLORIDA HOME l, HEATING INSTITUTE
BUILDC.RA~F.A DIJFC.NT iLI-A- CENTER r.l.'1r.1


SEE THE OIL HEATING DISPLAY AT BUILDORAMA, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, MIAMI

56 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~"`~: :


Z,







F/A Panorama...


WHO LIKES WHAT COLOR MOST . ?
A survey of color preferences released last month by the Color Corporation of
America indicated that the family of beige tones is still the national favorite.
The firm's color preference report, issued semi-annually, is based on a compila-
tion of 86,000 retail paint sales in which customers requested specific colors or
tints. In the South-roughly the region comprising the Florida, South Atlantic
and Gulf States districts of the AIA-first preference is for beige in line with
national trend. Blue-greens are next. Pinks are less popular now than last year-
but mauve and yellow registered an increased acceptance. Blue is less popular
here than elsewhere; and southerners are not following the growing preference
for peach and oranges shades evidenced in other areas. Most color minded of
all US sections is the north east where strong colors-particularly deep shades
of blue, blue-green and golden yellow-are top favorites.

FACTS OF FINANCIAL LIFE FOR ARCHITECTS . .
To forestall political attacks on architectural fees paid for school designs, the
Broward County Chapter recently released some facts on where the money goes
for the low average fees-about 3.'2 percent-the county pays for architectural
services. Of this 31.2 percent, the architect pays out a gross of three-quarters
of one percent to the structural engineer, a full one percent to the mechanical
engineer and another one percent for draftsmens' salaries and overhead costs.
This leaves the architect about three-quarters of one percent for his personal
income. . On a $500,000 job, for example, the total fee would be $17,500-
but the architect would actually get only $3,750 as his personal share. Even
this couldn't be construed as all "profit," since the salary and overhead items
don't include any regular stipend for the architect himself. . The political
trick, of course, is to point to the gross total fee as being all-expense-free, per-
sonal income to the architect.

PITY THE POOR LAND AND MONEY BROKERS . .
On this same example deal, money for the school was probably raised though
the sale of bonds-in which case the broker may well have taken a full one
per cent cut, with the four to five percent interest on the principal going on
for some thirty years. Then, too, if the land for the school involved a modest
sales price of $50,000, some poor broker received a commission of from five to
seven percent-with all the hardship of doing without the expense of engineers,
draftsmen and overhead! In addition, the school budget is further nicked by
premiums for insurance. We have heard of one insurance man reputed to en-
joy an income of $40,000-purely as a broker-advisor for a single county's school
system.

IS THE BLANKET BROAD ENOUGH TO SHARE . ?
If architects should seriously consider the heavy undertaking of revising Chap-
ter 467 of the Florida Statutes-the Architects' Law-a careful study of Chapter
473-the Accountants' Law-might be rewarding. For example, Section 473.20
of that statute, dealing with grounds for revocation of certificates, says, ". . Any
certificate to practice . may be revoked . when it shall appear to the
board . (7) Because of the commission by the holder of a certificate of any
act which renders him unfit to associate with the fair and honorable members
of the accounting profession . ." This seems to be a blanket under which the
board acts not only as an agency to administer the statute, but also as an arbiter
of fair-practice standards and a guardian of professional ethics.




















. The first Convention of the new decade -
which some are already calling "The Sizzling
Sixties" will be at Hollywood in November.
The Broward County Chapter will be the host;
and members are already at work developing
the theme "Man, Climate and The Architect"
into a program which promises to be both pro-
vocative and unusual. . It's not too early to
plan for the 1960 FAA Convention right now.
There's a good chance you'll be invited to par-
ticipate as well as to attend . .







L IA CNtT N
UA F CONVENTION


. .. -.













UAL FAA CONVENTION


1960 HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL HOLLYWOOD




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