Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00076
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00076
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

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The



Sanford W. Goin



Architectural



Scholarship


SArchitecture was both a cause and a pro-
fession to Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. As a
cause he preached it everywhere as the basis
for better living and sound development in
the state and region he loved. As a profes-
sion he practiced it with tolerance, with
wisdom, with integrity and with humility.
He was keenly aware that in the training
of young people lay the bright future of the
profession he served so well. So he worked
with them, counseled them, taught them by
giving freely of his interests, energies and
experience . The Sanford W. Goin Archi-
tectural Scholarship was established for the
purpose of continuing, in some measure, the
opportunities for training he so constantly
offered. Your contribution to it can thus be
a tangible share toward realization of those
professional ideals for which Sanford W.
Goin lived and worked.

The Florida Central Auxiliary has
undertaken, as a special project,
to raise funds for the Sanford W.
Goin Architectural Scholarship.
Contributions should be addressed
to Mrs. Edmond N. MacCollin,
President, 240 Bayside Drive,
Clearwater Beach, Florida.
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OCTOBER, 1960


. . WITH THE DIFFERENCE THAT MAKES IT BETTER . .


AhZ









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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


Net 74Cs Ruae---


New Construction Rules Issued by Hotel Commission .


College Plant Brochure Wins D-O-M Award

Architectural Practice According to Law .
Know Your State Board Number Four


The Dot, The Arrow and The Grid . . . .
The Three Tools of Modular Measure

What Price Stupidity? ............
Message from The President, By John Stetson, AIA

Next Month The Convention . . . . .
A Preview Rundown of the November Program

ASTM Launches New Drive for Increased Membership .

News and Notes . . . . . . .

Advertisers' Index ........... . ..

F/A Panorama . . . . . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolph; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugene
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, James E.
Windham, III; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, Jefferson N. Powell.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


.. 6


. 11


. 14


. 19


. 22

. 26

. 30


. 3rd Cover


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,-
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.


THE COVER Printed by McMurray Printers


We're grateful for the cooperation of Norman M. Giller, AIA, of Norman
Giller and Associates, Miami Beach, in making available for a cover illustration
the plan of the modularly-designed building for the Petty Officers Mess now
under construction at the U. S. Naval Air Station at Mayport, Florida. His
office has used the principle of modular coordination on a number of
buildings-another of which is illustrated as part of the story beginning on
page 11 . .


ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 10

NUMBER 101960
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































NO MOVING PARTS .. nothing to %wear out.
The ARKLA-SERVEL 25-Ton after r Chiller is
a tactor\-sealed absorption refligeration unit that
h.;s no mo ing pjrts. Long-life. trouble-free. lo%%
maintecnance is aSstired. The absorption unit
cannot be damaged through u\erlo-ading or con-
tinuous operation. because steam controls pro-
%ide automatic modulation of steam input.
COMPLETE SAFETY.\\ ater.s.fest o all liquids.
is the refrigerant; lithium bromide is the absorb-
ent; and steam is the source of energy. The entire
unit operates under a relatikelk high %acuum.


TOP PERFORMANCE

OIL-FIRED, STEAM-ACTIVATED, ABSORPTION-TYPE

25-TON
ARKLA-A^


MODEL 3000

WATER CHILLER
REFRIGERATION TOTAL CAPACITY
...300,000 BTU PER HOUR



LOW-COST OPERATION. OIL is the cheapest.
safe'.t and most dependable fuel for real long-term
sat ings. Steam to operate the chilled water unit
is normally obtained from a direct-connected
OIL-lired boiler, although waste plant steam, or
steam from any other boiler supplied for the
purpose can be used as the energy source. This
\\ after Chiller utilizes any steam pressure between
3 and 15 psi.

EASY INSTALLATION. Because of its light
floor loading and freedom from vibration, the
ARKLA-SERVEL 25-Ton Oil-operated Absorp-
tion-t\ pe Water Chiller can be installed in single
(or multiple) units on any floor. The unit is
compact and will pass through most standard
commercial doors. Size: 7'6" length; 30" width;
6'6" height.
In addition to the standard workmanship-
materials factory-warranty, each unit is actually
operated before it leaves the factory, so as to
assure full rated capacity.


Plumbing and heating contractors, air condi-
tioning contractors, architects and builders are
invited to write for full details.





0 1L C0 M PA N
F S 7 ABLI S HFD 1


1217 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD, MIAMI, FLORIDA


OCTOBER, 1960


1








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* 44
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Write or call for free catalog.
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Phone FRanklin 1-4344


New Construction Rules



Issued by Hotel Commission


As a result of almost two years'
study, the Hotel and Restaurant Com-
mission has issued a revision to its
Rules of Construction for buildings
falling within the jurisdiction of the
Commission. Provisions of the new
manual become effective as of Octo-
ber 1, 1960. However, they are not
retroactive; and working drawings al-
ready in progress prior to that date
may be completed under the old rules,
according to a memorandum issued by
LEWIS M. HITT, Supervising Architect
and Deputy Commissioner in charge
of the Southeast District which in-
cludes Dade and Munroe Counties.
Though not changed in all details,
the new construction manual is rad-
ically different from the former docu-
ment in a number of important in-
stances. Architects and others who
have business with the Commission
will find the new booklet much easier
to work with. The format has been
completely revised the new one be-
ing a 7V by 10-inch booklet of some
48 pages in contrast to the awkward
4 by 9-inch, 96-page character of the
old one. Also, organization of the ma-
terial has been substantially changed.
Sections and paragraphs have been en-
tirely re-numbered and arranged in a
sequence that appears more logical -
and will undoubtedly be easier to use
- than formerly. Included are repro-
ductions of both a building permit
application and license that were miss-
ing from the former document.
The current revised edition of the
Commission's construction rules was
developed to widen its scope of ap-
plication to construction categories
which the Hotel and Restaurant Com-
mission is legally charged with regu-
lating. Need for various specific revi-
sions was recognized also as the result
of certain new technical standards de-
veloping in the light of practical ex-
perience with operations under the old
rules. The new provisions represent
the combined judgment of the Com-
mission's Board of Supervising Archi-
tects which is composed of duly reg-
istered architects in charge of the
Commission's eleven districts.


Here are some of the most im-
portant changes embodied in the new
manual:
New definitions have been devel-
oped for all building categories. There
has also been a change in room-count
procedure, with dining space now in-
cluded even though such space may
exist as part of a living-dining area.
The minimum size for an apart-
ment has been increased from 200
sq. ft. to 300 sq. ft. Also, the mini-
mum horizontal dimension of any
counted room has been raised to 8 ft.
from the former 7 ft. requirement.
Principal stairways must now have
a clear width of 44 inches equal to
halls and the minimum width for
all other interior stairways is now 30
in. instead of 24 in. as formerly. A
new requirement is that all exterior
stairs must be fitted with non-slip
treads.
Old Rules 815 and 816 have been
eliminated. Some of their provisions
have been substantially changed and
combined with different sections in
the new rule book. As an example, the
old Rule 816 permitted two types of
one-exit apartments, with no second-
ary stairs required in two-story apart-
ment. Section 7.6(b) of the new
rules requires two means of exit for
every building, even two story units,
"of which one shall be an inside
stairway, and the other may be an
outside stairway or fire escape."
The new rules specify a minimum
of 3 ft. by 6 ft. 8 in. for exterior
doors; and a 42 by 42 in. minimum
floor area for toilet vestibules.
The foregoing are by no means all
the changes embodied in the new
Rules for Construction. They are,
however, indicative of how completely
previous requirements have been mod-
ified. The Hotel and Restaurant Com-
mission's rules now apply to the con-
struction and operation of "hotels,
apartment hotels, motels, apartment
motels, resort, beach and fishing
camps, apartment houses, rooming
houses, guest houses, cabins, trailer
courts, restaurants, lunch and sand-
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















This one is quiet!


Solite lightweight masonry units have a high acoustical value. They
absorb up to 50% of roorn noise-banish echoes. Quiet. Just one
more reason to specify Solite.
~ ~ ---


c.-3 ."r -


&I a


L'


41


........ ..

77. "k~p
46, Ir L w


BETTER BUILDING starts with your architect or engineer. Their skill
and experience will save you time and money-assure you a build-
ing that is professionally designed for your lasting satisfaction. ,


S 1 '4 *
U I


OCTOBER, 1960 5


i 8


































FOR FLORIDA
ARCHITECTS
AND BUILDERS

Reinforcing Steel
Structural Steel
Complete Engineering &
Fabricating Facilities
Bar Joists
Cast Iron Covers & Grates
Fabricated Steel Grates
Miscellaneous Iron &
Aluminum
Ornamental Iron
Steel Roof Deck
Steeltex
Highway Products
Corruform
Sonotubes
Metal Culverts
Polyethylene Plastic Film
Florida's only steel mill


FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION


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TAMPA 8-0451
ORLANDO GArden 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE EVergreen 4-5561
WEST PALM BEACH TEmple 2-2493
FORT MYERS EDison 4-5262


New Rules Issued...
(Continued from Page 4)

which stands and catering services."
Supervising Architect Hitt suggests
that all architects whose practice in-
cludes any of these construction cate-
gories obtain the new manual at once.
He suggests also that they register for
it with the Supervising Architect of
their local Hotel and Restaurant
Commission District. Thus, when pos-
sible future changes are issued by the
Commission, they can receive memor-
anda covering such changes from the
Commission's local office. These offic-
es and the Supervising Architects
in charge- are:
Northwest District: F. J. SINDELAR,
1924 Palofax St., Pensacola; West


Coast District: J. BRUCE SMITH, 939
Beach Drive, North, St. Petersburg;
Southwest District: RICHARD E. JES-
SEN, 1 529 Grand Central Ave., Tam-
pa;North Central District: ROBERT H.
MAYBIN, 1717 N. Monroe St., Talla-
hassee; Central District: THEODORE G.
ANDREW, P. 0. Box 1345, Orlando;
Southeast District: LEWIS M. HITT,
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami; Mid-
west District: CHESTER PARKER, 125
East Beach Drive, Panama City;
Northeast District: CURT C. SCHEEL,
702 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville; East
Central District: JOEL W. SAYERS,
200 Seabreeze Blvd., Daytona Beach;
East Coast District: ROBERT RICH-
ARDSON, JR., 107 North County Road,
Palm Beach; South Central District:
W. G. CRAWFORD, 2114 N.E. 21st
St., Ft. Lauderdale.


College Plant Brochure Wins


Document-of-the-Month Award


The eight-page, full-color section
entitled "Challenge to Statesman-
ship" which appeared in the May,
1960, issue of The Florida Architect
was named by the AIA Chapter Af-
fairs Committee as its Document-of-
the-Month selection for August. The
section was reprinted for use as an in-
formative brochure and has been cir-
culated to various key individuals and
organizations throughout the state.
GEORGE F. PIERCE, JR., AIA, chair-
man of the national Committee,
made the announcement in a letter
accompanying one of the brochures
sent to all AIA Chapters and State
Organizations. His comment of the
brochure follows:
"The D-O-M for August is a reprint
of an editorial in THE FLORIDA AR-
CHITECT. Roger W. Sherman, AIA,
Editor-Publisher of this journal,
worked up this brochure with the help
and backing of the Public Relations
Committee of the Florida Association
of Architects under Edward G. Graf-
ton, AIA, Chairman, and with Clin-
ton Gamble, AIA, past AIA Director
and Chairman of FAA's special com-
mittee concerned with the develop-
ment of the Arts and Architecture
Building at Gainesville. This article


was distributed to FAA members,
members of the Florida Legislature,
and other sponsors.
A major project for the FAA for
1960 is to awaken people to the need
the University of Florida has for a
College of Architecture and Fine Arts.
'Challenge to Statesmanship' presents
their arguments in a clear, convincing
manner. These buildings can be com-
pleted in 1962 if the funds are ap-
propriated in the 1961 Legislature.
"The college education crisis, as we
all know, is not confined to Florida.
However, we feel the professional pre-
sentation of the FAA may stimulate
other architectural groups to alleviate
the present crush and to plan for fu-
ture over-crowding. It also is an ex-
ample of how the profession can take
the lead in supporting any worthy
project."
The AlA's D-O-M monthly select-
tion is usually given in recognition of
some especially noteworthy publica-
tion issued by, or under the direct
sponsorship of, a Chapter. It is note-
worthy that its August award was a
product of AIA State Organization
and District activities in which all 10
Florida Chapters have an important
cooperative interest.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Curtain Walls Made with Trinity White Southland Center, Dallas


* Orientation View. The podmurn
and the e lr,.-:r end, *..f bc.th he
S.:.?uthland Tc. er and Sieraicr,.Dallas
are curlaon walls rnade with Trn,.Iy
WVhe.

4a Close-up. Lcck.rng upward 550
feel al Curfan all on the 2 '.:tcry
Souchlard Life buIlddng


C I


V


Owners: Southland Life Insurance'Co., Dallas
Architects & Engineers: Welton Becket,
FAIA, & Associates, Los Angeles and Dallas
Curtain Walls: Manufactured by Wailes Pre-
cast Concrete Corp., Los Angeles and Dallas


A Product of
GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
Chicago Chattanooga Dallas Fort Worth Houston
Fredonia (Kan.) Jackson (Mich.)
Tampa Miami Los Angeles


The advantages of concrete curtain walls
are well established. To these advantages
Trinity White Portland Cement makes
an added contribution-the beauty of
purest white and truer colors.


OCTOBER, 1960


.f
















































G GEORGE C.
RIFFIN 0.0
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 10025, Jacksonville, Florida


0 6 lu Pr c








i Talhs se.....A Ya s


nZow ouawr State caw...


This is the fourth of a continuing series of articles on the
Architect's Law of Florida-Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes.
The series has been designed to bring to practicing architects
and others clarification of various provisions of the law. Some of
these provisions have been the subject of misunderstanding on
the part of many practicing architects. To make certain that
explanations of them are both clear and accurate, these articles
have been submitted to members of the Florida State Board of
Architecture prior to publication.







Architectural Practice



According To Law


One of the criticisms often leveled
at the Architects' Law of Florida -
Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes,
1955-is that it states no clear-cut
definition of architectural practice. To
some degree that criticism is justified.
But the statute does contain a defini-
tion of architectural practice even
though it may be expressed in a man-
ner most architects would not employ
to describe their professional activity.
The definition is contained in the
first long paragraph of Section 467.09.
It says, . any person who shall be
engaged in the planning or design for
the erection, enlargement or altera-
tion of buildings for others or furnish-
ing architectural supervision of the
construction thereof shall be deemed
to be practicing architecture . ."
There it is. This definition is the
basis for requiring registration.
If you analyze the definition care-
fully, it begins to take on a firm and
positive character, rather than the
negative one which a quick and casual
reading might assign to it. The activ-
ities are pretty definite; they must be
performed "for others"; their scope of
application is broad but reasonably


specific. Thus, this definition, odd as
it may at first appear, provides a fairly
clear and sufficiently definite standard
against which compliance or non-
compliance can be measured.
It is noteworthy that the definition
itself is preceded by the one word
"Otherwise ... which refers to fore-
going material in the paragraph. This
material designates who can "make
plans and specifications" without the
necessity for registration as well as to
what classification of buildings such
plans and specifications apply.
For example, no one need be reg-
istered as an architect to make draw-
ings for, or supervise the erection of,
" . any building upon any farm
for the use of any farmer, irrespective
of the cost of such building . A
person need not qualify as an archi-
tect to plan for and supervise the
building of any one or two-family resi-
dence costing less than $10,000 or
any "domestic outbuilding appurten-
ant to any such one or two-family
residence regardless of cost." Also, no
professional qualification or registra-
tion is necessary for planning or su-
(Continued on Page 31)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































Construction goes fast at 1550 N. Lake Shore Drive. Architects: Shaw, Metz & Here, the 35-story apartment
Dolio, Chicago, Ill. Contractor: Crane Construction Company, Inc., Chicago, Ill. building nears completion

"30 floors in 90 days! Fast construction comes easy

-- with concrete frame and floors!"

jX Says MORTON J. CRANE, President, Crane Construction Company, Inc.


"This is the new 35-story apartment "And with concrete, your material is always right
building at 1550 Lake Shore Drive in there when you need it. We topped out this job 2
Chicago. With just 3 sets of forms and a precise months ahead of time. That means extra rent for
timetable for concreting, stripping and reshoring, the owners."
we made fast work of it. From the 5th floor up, Such construction efficiencies plus the ready
we cast one story every 3 working days! availability and versatility of concrete are good
"Planning concrete frame and floor construction reasons why more and more engineers and builders
this way lets the other trades follow right up. When today are choosing concrete for structures of all
the 35th floor was cast, the building was enclosed kinds and sizes.
up to the 30th floor, and trim carpenters, lathers FOR STRUCTURES...
and plasterers weren't far behind. MODERN
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION I
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida CO
---,--.-----------------------concre-te *


A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


OCTOBER, 1960

















--V














MODULAR BUILDING STANDARDS ASSOCIATION

iHE AAtFrCAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHiTECTS
THE PRODUCERS' COUNCIL. INC
.N AIIINAA ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERS
.ASSOUAIiF GENERAL CONiRAC'IORS 0f AMEPI(A


MEMO TO: Mr. R.oger V%. 3h. rman, A-I, Editor, THiL FLORIDA ARCHITECr
FROM: C.E. Silling, FAIA
As President of MBSA, I am grateful to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT for its role
toward increasing architect awareness of the sweeping changes now taking place
in architectural offices throughout the U.S.
Within the two years that MBSA has been in existence, it has already enlisted
sufficient support to completely resolve the urgent need for authoritative publi-
cations to facilitate instruction of modular principles in schools of architecture,
and to provide a comprehensive technical reference guide for architectural of-
fices in the process of converting to modular drafting.
Although the association has just completed its first full year of membership
services, the number of new architect members continues to grow while more
than four-out-of-five contributors in 1959 renewed their membership affiliations
for 1960.
Your readers are urged to be among the many individuals and firms convinced
that their participation is timely, rewarding and beneficial to themselves, as
well as the entire profession. An inquiry to MBSA, address listed below, will
yield the prompt return of complete membership services information.



A non-piefft irgnezatlon dedicated to lowering holding costs tlro dimensional coordination af boldlaeg
products and cnns pnnats. Offices 2029 K Street. NIW Washington 6. D.C. Telepthene FEderal 1T1113


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















The Dot...





The Arrow...


DOT




ARROW


GIlD


And The Grid...


the tools of modular measure


The Dot; the Arrow; and the Grid.
These are the three graphic tools that
form the basis for the modular meth-
od of architectural drawing. The Grid
is employed, horizontally and vertical-
ly, to establish the basic module of 4"
- or even multiples of that measure.
The Arrow is used for dimensions re-
lated exclusively to the location of
these grid lines. The Dot is used only
when essential to the clarity of the
drawing and then only as dimensional
reference to points other than grid
lines.
This modular method is now nearly
40 years old, for the first research on
it began in 1921. Since then it has
been the subject of a study committee
of the American Standards Associa-
tion (1938 to 1946) and a spirited
promotion by such bodies as the AIA,
the Housing and Home Finance
Agency, the National Association of
Home Builders, the Producers' Coun-
cil, the AGC and the Building Re-
search Institute.
The modular idea has been publi-
cized nearly, if not quite, as much as
the AIA's need for better public re-
lations. Important advantages and sig-
nificant economies have been reported
by those firms who have achieved a
working mastery of the Dot, the Ar-
row and the Grid. In 1957 the Modu-
OCTOBER, 1960


lar Building Standards Association
was formed under the joint sponsor-
ship of the AIA, the AGC, the NAHB
and the Producers' Council; and
through an able and active secretariat
this association is now spreading the
word to all who will listen.
But it would appear that as yet only
a minor proportion of architects are
listening or, if listening, are apply-
ing all they hear to the detailed rout-
ines of their own offices. The MBSA
issued a questionnaire early last year
to architects of 1,713 projects esti-
mated at $50,000 or more asking,
among other things, whether "modu-
lar drafting" had been used on these
projects. Of the 902 architects that
answered (incidentally a whopping
percentage return) only 102 said
"yes" which averaged up to be an
11 percent acceptance of the modular
method. From seven states the re-
sponse was a neat zero. Highest in
acceptance percentage was Minnesota
with 28 percent. Florida's "yes" per-
centage was six.
Thirteen Florida architects com-
prised this six percent, indicating,
therefore, that some 216 replied to
the MBSA questionnaire. Queries to
most of these offices in the "yes" per-
centage indicated that "modular draft-
ing" as advocated by the MBSA is


almost non-existent in this state.
Those replying to The Florida Archi-
tect's letter disclosed the fact that
"modular" covers a wide technical
territory. Planning on the basis of
some evenly divisible or evenly multi-
plied module seems fairly well accept-
ed. But the use of the three modular
planning conventions the dot, ar-
row and grid appear conspicuous
by their absence in drafting room
practice here. At any rate, the state-
ment is borne out by the response re-
ceived thus far.
Here are typical comments:
"I know about modular drafting,"
says the chief draftsman of a young,
very up-and-coming firm. "I've used it
elsewhere, but we can't work with it
in this area. It takes too long for the
men in the office to understand it -
and it also takes too much effort to
get the contractors to learn to work
with it. We use a kind of half-way
modular system. Sometimes we use
grid lines; but we still use the old sys-
tem of dimensioning and don't at-
tempt to mix up dots and arrows."
It's undoubtedly a good thing for
more or less standard buildings," says
the management executive of another
successful office. "But we can't get
our designer to live with it. We tried
(Continued on Page 12)


.............. .............


~?E'*IE"33annrrrlp*lrea~3~~


";"~"""''""







Modular Method...
(Continued from Page 11)
once; got all set to carry through our
regular office procedures with the full
set of modular conventions. But we
had to give it up because we just
couldn't work out such things as win-
dow and door openings-not to speak
of overall proportions in line with
our designer's wishes."
The ranking principal in a leading
mid-state firm writes:
"Where possible in our work we
use a modified type of modular system
which we have developed ourselves.
The MBSA probably wouldn't con-
sider it a system at all. In effect it
makes use of unit lengths divisible by
four. We try to keep these as large
as possible, but it usually works out
that 2"-0' is about as high as we can
go. In general this pattern applies
only to the frame and to any bearing
walls. Fenestration is included if the
design permits.
"We do a wide variety of work, in
some of which- such as military -
design requirements rule out a modu-
lar system as being too restrictive. This
applies also to traditional architecture


which, as you know, is still in con-
siderable demand in this part of the
state. My endorsement of the modu-
lar principle is probably misleading in
view of our office practice. But I do
feel that it should work out well in
offices doing contemporary work ex-
clusively and which are not restricted
by the Owner's definitive drawings."
A partner in a large and active firm
of architects and engineers has this to
say:
"I have held your letter concerning
modular coordination in order to ques-
tion others in our organization as to
who it was who responded affirm-
atively to the MBSA questionnaire. I
can't find anyone here who likes it.
"Actually, we do not think much
of the system as far as preparation of
working drawings is concerned. We
used it faithfully about eight years
ago on a medium sized office building
. . Dimensioning to imaginary lines
caused nothing but grief in coordinat-
ing structural to architectural draw-
ings. The contractor and the construc-
tion people thought it caused them
much more arithmetic with dimen-
sions. Even though fractional dimen-
sions are somewhat alleviated, actual


layout work still requires taking small
fractions and split dimensions into ac-
count; and the figuring still goes on
and by a greater number of people.
We have not used the system since.
"With respect to modular-sized ma-
sonry units, sash, etc., we dimension
vertically in modular sizes, but do not
expect accurate results horizontally
for brick units. One large supplier of
brick . represents eight brick manu-
facturers. Not a one makes modular
size brick. Another has one or more
sources of modular brick but which
modular brick? It seems there is a
special Texas modular size also."
Almost exactly the opposite reac-
tion comes from the principal of a
smaller, though most active, office in
the north-central part of the state:
"We use the module extensively in
this office. I am sending a set of
working drawings which, to me, ex-
hibits the extent we have used mod-
ular coordination. From the very pre-
liminaries the building was laid out
in volume on a rigid module system.
The entire design approach was 'less
is more', with exposed steel structure
outside and in. In order to obtain the
full advantage of the module of ma-


,~- 1~~


3 .~-*,. -


cI,


- .


A module can be almost any dimensional unit which is convenient for the designer and practical for the
builder. In this small house, for which Norman M. Giller and Associates were architects, the unit was a
"Presto Pacer" reinforced concrete block. It has been used both horizontally and vertically as a modular
control of the entire design.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







trial, particularly for the panel walls
of the building, we let the walls by-
pass the structural columns on the in-
side thereby utilizing cement-as-
bestos sandwich panels full size, 4 by
12 feet.
"The exposed metal structural 'long
span' roof deck is all of the same mod-
ular length, running in three rows of
equal widths and lengths. Even the
general lighting of the building be-
came modular, for simple, standard 4-
foot fluorescent strips were recessed in
the coffers of the steel decking with
plastic egg-crating attached to the
bottom surface of the coffers to form
an integrating lighting system in the
ceiling.
"It is certainly my opinion that
through modular coordination on this
project we were able to save expensive
labor in cutting materials on the job.
And by repetition of dimensions we
'standardized' volumes of materials
for further fabrication economies. My
opinion .is borne out by the fact that
the building was constructed for
$7.90 a square foot."
So, generally, runs the course of
varied opinion in our state. Overall, it
could probably be summed up some-
thing like this:
The broad values of the modular
principle are widely recognized. Most
offices, probably, would adopt modu-
lar planning more widely if they could
be convinced that structural compon-
ents were available to carry the modu-
lar concept through to a satisfactory
conclusion. There is evidence that use
of modular materials is increasing as
more manufacturers swing into line
to make these available. Thus, it is
safe to say that in Florida, as else-
where, the trend toward more com-
plete modular design is up.
But modular drafting as advo-
cated by MBSA through use of its
three graphic tools-is something else.
Even the most enthusiastic propon-
ents of the modular idea among Flor-
ida architects admit that the grid is
seldom used, the dot practically
never, with the time-honored arrow
still generally controlling all dimen-
sional points on working drawings.
Judged by the recent spot-check
of this subject, the reason for avoid-
ing the full technique of modular
drafting stems chiefly from a desire to
avoid the various confusions which
can arise from an incomplete under-
standing of the technique itself. The
OCTOBER, 1960


general feeling seems to be that it
does not simplify graphic communica-
tion, but rather introduces a certain
indefinite quality to the dimension-
ing of drawings which engenders mis-
understandings and thus does not pro-
vide a clear meeting of minds be-
tween architect, contractor and sup-
plier.
It is quite probable that this atti-
tude exists because of incomplete
knowledge of modular drafting tech-
niques on the part of architects here
- and their consequent inability to
clarify them to contractors and sup-
pliers. Certainly, the whole idea oi
modular coordination was born from
efforts to simplify rather than com-
plicate, to increase rather than reduce
technical efficiency, to produce econ-


omies rather than to increase costs, to
reduce errors rather than compound
them. Elsewhere many of these ob-
jectives appear to have been reached
by those who have gained complete
understanding of the modular con-
cept and who have achieved a prac-
tical familiarity with the techniques
of its development.
One outstanding example is the of-
fice of C. E. Silling & Associates of
Charleston, W. Va. This was "con-
verted to modular measure in 1948"-
and its principal reports that, . .
modular measure and high profits
have been the constant rule of our
office ever since." Commenting on
the results of his "conversion," Mr.
Silling said, during a modular co-
(Continued on Page 24)


This is a perspective of a modularly-designed building for which Norman M.
Giller & Associates were architects. The plan has been reproduced on the
cover of this issue. Here the module was a four-foot square and the column
spacing and all interior partitions have been centered on multiples of four feet.
The unit is evident in the finish of the floor which is terrazzo laid with four-
foot strips both ways.


In this store building for which Barrett, Daffin & Bishop were architects a
"material module" has been utilized to control the entire building layout.
This is a four by twelve foot wall panel. Though this was the controlling unit,
the effect was an overall modular coordination on the basis of a four foot
module which was utilized both horizontally and vertically.






esa449e fem 74h Pre'det...




What Price Stupidity ?


By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


It took an unladylike apparition
by the name of Donna to emphasize
the present critical and criminal lack
of properly written and enforced
building codes. in the State of Flor-'
ida. The weather bureau repeatedly
stated these past few weeks that Don-
na was by no means the most intense
hurricane ever to hit Florida. Why
then, in this era of better construction
methods, did she create such havoc?
Why did winds of 100 to 125 miles
per hour do relatively a thousand
times the damage as, for instance,
the hurricanes that were clocked at
over 150 miles per hour a little over
ten years ago?
Where now lies a section of Florida
that can say, "We don't have to build
like Dade, Broward or Palm Beach
Counties. We never have hurricanes
here!"? Looking at a map showing the
course of hurricanes since World War
II indicates no such utopia. So now
we are all faced with the inevitable
increase in insurance rates that seems
to follow major catastrophes. Fortun-
ately this time it appears South Flor-
ida can share this increase with the
rest of the state. Again there will be
a loud cry from those stricken (for-
tunately not this time physically) for
a better warning system, better storm
shelters, adequate protection from
high tides, protected, permanent un-
derground utility systems and any-
thing else that they themselves do not
have to provide. Let the government
do it!
It is time for everyone to stop and
take stock. While hurricanes are not
common, somehow they come along
often enough to require a duly consti-
tuted respect for their potent power.
Insurance companies long ago joined
with national and local fire-fighting
authorities to provide every form of
public education as to cause and cure
of fires. Newspapers did not wait un-
til the fire alarm sounded to write


editorials and publish articles con-
cerned with ways and means of avoid-
ing conflagrations. True, we cannot
stop hurricanes from forming by edu-
cation. However, it is time for pub-
lic officials, insurance companies and
the construction industry to lend an
ear to a wee, small voice crying out
from behind political smokescreens.
The foolishness of thinking "It can't
happen to me" must stop. A thousand
miles of curving devastation affecting
so many in Florida cannot be ignored
unless we are all blind.
The Miami Herald, in its edition of
September 13th, carried a front page
story titled, "Building Code Blamed
for Keys Tragedy" (actually it was a
lack of code that was the cause). On
the same day an article appeared in
the Palm Beach Post-Times noting
that the Palm Beach County Com-
mission authorized a commissioner
and the county building inspector to
make an immediate inspection of the
areas afflicted by Donna to determine
if the Palm Beach County Code re-
quired any changes to cover every
possible protection of the property
owner building in this county. What
a contrast! One county closes its eyes.
Another takes immediate steps to im-
prove an already effective code.
It is high time that a uniform build-
ing code be adopted by the State of
Florida with the authority of enforce-
ment vested in city and county gov-
ernments. Where codes now exist
that are equal to, or stricter than, the
State code, these could remain in
effect. Towns, cities and counties not
now covered should be compelled to
provide this protection for their pres-
ent and future citizens. How many
thousands of people must needlessly
die, and how many millions of dol-
lars lost, before we awake to the fact
that the greatest part of these losses
are avoidable? Such a code should be


written by the construction industry,
design professions and insurance com-
panies with the protection of life,
limb and money of prime concern.
Pictures of the tragedy in the Keys
pointed out many weaknesses of con-
struction accomplished in the past few
years. Walls stood, but perimeter
beams and roof were gone. Reason:
No vertical tie between foundation
and perimeter beam. Other buildings
collapsed from lack of any wall brac-
ing. It could be noted particularly
that low pitched roofs were affected.
Wonder if anyone has determined the
amount of lift created by a roof 30 by
50 feet with a 21/2 to 12 pitch in a
125-mile wind? It takes a lot of house:
to hold it. Yet, there standing un-
scathed amid the ruins of later day
construction, was an old, frame, hip-
ped-roof, typical conch keys residence.
No, it probably would not pass the
building codes of the other Southeast
Florida counties. But we could learn
a lot from some of the earlier builders
and designers.
We have almost every conceivable
corrective and protective law or code
in this State. Our milk is controlled
as to price and butter fat content. The
sales of securities are controlled. In-
surance programs and premiums are
continually scrutinized by legal-
beagles and insurance experts. Barber
shops and their employees are super-
vised. But at least 70 percent of the
land area of this State now number
ten in the nation-is protected by no
zoning or building restrictions. Our
biggest industry is almost completely
without State supervision. Unscrupu-
lous builders and developers were, are
and will continue preying on the buy-
ing public, selling to the uninformed
lots in dangerously low locations as
well as poorly constructed buildings-
all because the proper authorities re-
fuse to heed.
Who is going to "carry the ball"
through the Legislature? Who will
write the necessary act to set up a
Minimum State Building Code? Or
will we all follow the words of the
song, "When It Rains My Roof Is
Leaking, But Who Needs A Roof On
Such A Sunny Day?" Maybe we won't
have another hurricane for another
ten years. It seems so much easier to
be just plain stupid. We kill a lot of
people that way, and it costs us a
lot of money.
But we don't make anyone mad.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








































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ABOVE TRIM AVAILABLE
FOR ALL BLUMCRAFT POSTS


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Mutschler kitchen specialists offer
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Nominations for 1961 Officers...


In accordance with Article VII,
Section 3, of the FAA By-Laws, Presi-
dent JOHN STETSON appointed a Nom-
inating Committee subsequent to the
Board of Directors' meeting August
13. Named were: RICHARD E. JESSEN,
Chairman, Florida Central Chapter;
DAVID A. LEETE, Daytona Beach
Chapter; JEFFERSON N. POWELL,
Palm Beach Chapter; FORREST R.
COXEN, Florida North Central Chap-
ter; and JAMES E. WINDHAM, III,
Mid-Florida Chapter.
The Committee's unanimous choice
for the slate of 1961 FAA Officers
was: For President, ROBERT H. LEVI-
SON, Florida Central Chapter; For
Secretary, VERNER JOHNSON, Florida
South Chapter; For Treasurer, RoY
M. POOLEY, JR., Jacksonville Chapter;
and For Third Vice President, WIL-
LIAM F. BIGONEY, JR., Broward
County Chapter.
Only one of the 1961 nominees
at present holds the office for which
he was nominated. This is RoY M.
POOLEY, JR., who was elected as the
FAA Treasurer last year. Nomination
of WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR., as Third
Vice President is to fill the vacancy
that will be created in the required
vice-presidential representation of the
FAA's South Florida Area. This post
is currently being filled by VERNER
JOHNSON as FAA First Vice President.
His term expires this year.
Nominated also were members of
the important Regional Judiciary
Committee. Named by unanimous
decision were: KENNETH JACOBSON,
Palm Beach Chapter, as a three-year
member; and WAHL J. SNYDER, FAIA,
Florida South Chapter, as a one-year
alternate.
Following the custom established
last year, the Nominating Committee
will present its report to the Conven-
tion at the Thursday morning busi-
ness session. At that time also other
nominations can be made from the
floor ". . for any or all offices about
to become vacant. ." according to
the By-Laws. Article VIII, Section 3-A
also says "Elections may proceed by
acclamation or by ballot at the will
of the Convention." If the vote is by
ballot, the procedure will follow that
initiated two years ago.
OCTOBER, 1960


FAA voting procedure at the 1960 Convention will be radically
different from that of past conventions. In line with By-Law
changes adopted last year, voting will be done solely by duly
qualified Chapter delegates. Each Chapter will be represented
by one vote for each number of Corporate members as listed
in the By-Laws. One delegate may cast all the votes accredited
to his Chapter. But all delegates at the Conevntion must register
as such and must submit proof of their status in the form of
a credential card signed by the President and Secretary of his
Chapter.




For President... For Secretary . .


ROBERT H. LEVISON


For Treasurer ..


ROY M. POOLEY, JR.


VERNER JOHNSON


For 3rd Vice President...


WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR.




























.4 "





'AA






Airr


THE KEY TO ARCHITECTURAL PRESTIGE


Florida architects have done much to up-grade home-building
standards. The Medallion Home award is another incentive for
their creative talents in furthering modem living . ."Better Liv-
ing-Electrically." It offers a challenge in designing All-Electric
Kitchens, planned for modern electrical appliances, plus modern
Light-for-Living throughout the house.
Regardless of size, type, or price, the Medallion Home award is
given by Florida Power & Light Company to any home that meets
the following electrical requirements:

* ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN-LAUNDRY that includes at least 4 major
electrical appliances . water heater, range, and the choice of clothes
dryer, dishwasher, or other "Reddy-servants."
* FULL HOUSEPOWER (100-200 amp service) with large enough wire
and ample circuits, outlets and switches for maximum convenience and
efficiency ... now and in the future.

r ~ LIGHT-FOR-LIVING properly planned for every part of
the house and outdoors, for decorative beauty and utility.


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT
Helping Build Florida


The Medallion Home campaign
is backed by multi-million dollar
promotions in newspapers and
magazines, on TV and radio. Call
our office for full details and spec-
ifications to qualify your homes
for Medallion Awards.


CO.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


- -:
























DR. MARSTON BATES
. . researcher, author, zoologist


ROBE B. CARSON
. climatologist, author


DR. CLARENCE A. MILLS
. .. biochemist, researcher, teacher


Next Month


--- The Convention


"Man, Climate and The Architect"- that's the
theme for a three-day conference packed with
pleasure and profit in every star-studded session.


Plans are complete. Schedules have
been neatly meshed. Speakers are pre-
pared. The fun and frolic department
is resting on its laurels. And a hard-
working committee of the Broward
County Chapter is putting the final
polish on last-minute details. On the
morning of November 10 less than
six weeks from now its members
will officially don their smart new
jackets as the traditional badge of of-
fice and declare the 46th Annual FAA
Convention in session.
And what a convention it promises
to be! Here are just some of the high-
lights that await FAA members, their
wives and guests.
What should an FAA Convention
offer?

The stimulus of brain power ... ?
This Convention is bulging with it.
Pictured above are three of the top
speakers who will share with their
Convention audiences their special
knowledge of how climate affects man-
kind, DR. MARSTON BATES, professor
of Zoology at the University of Mich-
igan, has a tremendous background of
investigation in the field of "human
OCTOBER, 1960


ecology" and the effects of hot cli-
mates on man and his activities -
including five books which are best-
sellers in their field.
ROBE B. CARSON, climatologist, has
been a practicing "weather man" in
Miami for nearly 20 years. His special
interest is methods by which man can
guard himself against both the intel-
lectual and physical effects of climate.
This means architecture and his
discussion of it will unquestionably
set many minds aclicking.
DR. CLARENCE A. MILLS, long a
distinguished research scientist and
currently director of the Laboratory of
Experimental Medicine of the Univer-
sity of Cincinnati, will discuss both
the social and economic relationships
between climate and man and how
man can advance by controlling his
climatological environment.

Practical, how-to-do-it informa-
tion ... ? DR. PAUL SIPLE, an expert
on climatic effects in all regions, will
help cover this. As another of the
Convention's brain trust (see F/A for
July, 1960, page 8) this researcher, ex-


plorer and inventor will discuss cli-
matic factors in structures where men
live and work.
ALADAR and VICTOR OLGYAY the
design-research team now teaching at
Princeton University's School of Ar-
chitecture are two other down-to-
earth intellectuals (see F/A for Au-
gust, 1960, page 6) who will discuss
design means to enable man to con-
quer climate with comfort. Informa-
tion on such devices as solar screens,
air conditioning installations, plan-
ning factors, insulation will be avail-
able in abundance with all Conven-
tion speaker specialists contributing
via a series of uniquely programmed
conference-seminars which Program
Chairman JOHN M. EVANS has been
carefully developing.

Progress on the FAA business
front .. ? That's basic, of course,
for any FAA Convention. This year
is can be vital for with Florida now
a full-fledged AIA District, the FAA
may well be on the threshold of a
new, expanded and vastly more signif-
icant activity. This could mean much
(Continued on from Page 20)







The Convention Is Next Month...


G. CLINTON GAMBLE
Arrangements


MRS. WILLIAM F. BOGONEY, JR.
Ladies' Program


WILLIAM A. GILROY
Entertainment


to the profession in Florida and to
every member of it. Each will have
a chance to hear and discuss important
committee reports, policy recommend-
ations and various courses of action to
shape future developments and pro-
grams. On many fronts with which
the FAA is intimately concerned this
could well be a year of far-reaching
decisions.

Opportunities to look and to
learn ... ? Plenty will be available.
In the annual Product Exhibit, 57
booths will display the most up-to-
date offerings of 52 different firms
who supply materials and equipment
architects can specify with confidence.
And at each, trained representatives
will answer questions as technical as
any architect might wish to ask.
From the inspirational, or even crit-
ical, viewpoint, depending how you
look and what you want to learn -
work of your contemporaries will pro-
vide additional opportunities. The ar-
chitectural exhibit this year will be
geared to the climate-theme of the
Convention; and the committee,
headed by PAUL R. JOHN, has indicat-
ed that jury awards would be given to
designs showing most . imagina-
tive solutions to climatic problems."
Any such buildings completed since
January 1, 1957, are eligible for sub-
mission, as are renderings of un-built,
but client-okayed designs. Incidental-
ly, if you haven't sent your own work
in yet, better get busy. Deadline for
submissions is October 27.
Plans proposed by THOR AMLIE,
chairman of the student activities
committee, for exhibition of student
work are unusual and ambitious. Last
spring he suggested to the U/F De-
partment of Architecture a program
involving design of three building
types, each stressing use of various
types of climatic controls. Jury awards
were to entail a prize of $50 to the
student-winner in each design cate-
gory. The whole plan is admirably
suited to make student participation
an integral part of the overall Con-
vention theme and program.

Good program organization ... ?
That's already a foregone conclusion.
FAA official routines and reports have


been so arranged and streamlined that
this year the Convention will hold
only two three-hour business sessions
- one Thursday morning, the other
Saturday morning. Thursday after-
noon and all day Friday have been set
aside for listen-learn-and-look sessions
- the hourly scheduling of which will
be published in the traditional pro-
gram spread of the November Con-
vention Issue of The Florida Archi-
tect. Indications are this will be one
of the smoothest-flowing FAA conven-
tions on record.
PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA, AIA Pres-
ident, will fill the speaker's spot at
Thursday's luncheon. And this year
the Friday night banquet will feature
what might well become a new pro-
fessional tradition. The State Board
of Architecture has suggested attend-
ance at the banquet by all those new-
ly registered to practice in Florida
during 1960. To these, State Board
President FRANKLIN S. BUNCH will
present certificates of registration in a
ceremony that has been planned as
both brief and simple, but that will
undoubtedly be impressive.

Top-flight entertainment . ?
Bring your wife and come and get
it! The big evening is Thursday. Cock-
tails first, of course, at the poolside.
Then a fantastic evening straight from
Hawaii! Leis for everybody. An out-
of-this-Florida-world luau at the Ca-
bana Club cooked and served with
the skill and craft for tantalizing fla-
vors that only Hawaiians possess. Hula
dancers, fire dancers, inimitable Ha-
waiian music. And to cap it all, a na-
tive south-sea-island revue headed by
the really exotic artistry of MANU and
PUANANIA.
Then, of course, there's pool or
ocean swimming, golf, tennis, shuffle-
board, boating, fishing or sun-bathing
for those who find the inclination to
indulge and the time to do so.
And for the ladies? First an invita-
tion to attend all lectures and seminar
meetings since climate affects wo-
mankind as well as mankind. Then, on
Friday, a luncheon at the hotel at
which Dr. Siple will speak, followed
by a "festive occasion" a Saks Fifth
Avenue fashion show at Sunrise Cen-
ter. After tea a shopping tour at other
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Center stores with a return to the ho-
tel in time to ready-up for the cock-
tail party and Convention banquet.
And the card and hospitality rooms
will always be available.

A chance to win a prize . ?
Some very fine ones are available. For
Corporate members the first is an al-
most-all-expense trip for two to the
AIA Convention in Philadelphia,
April 25 to 28, 1961. Included is a
cash allowance of $278 for air-fares
from Miami, and another for $56 to
include $14 per day hotel accommoda-
tions for four nights. The prize pack-
age also includes tickets to the Aca-
demy of Music concert of the Philhar-
monic Orchestra and to the buffet-
ball at the Bellvue-Stratford following
the concert on April 25; and, of
course, tickets to the AlA's Annual
Convention Banquet.
Second prize is a $200 gift certifi-
cate to cover a choice of art objects
at The Gallery, in Fort Lauderdale;
with a third prize, for the same pur-
pose, of a $100 gift certificate.
For associates, there will be two
such gift certificates, the first for $75,


the second for $50. The student prize
will be a $50 gift certificate for pur-
chase of books or magazines subscrip-
tions.
In addition, the committee promis-
es at least one door prize for some
lucky attendant at luncheon on each
Convention day.
As in past years, door prizes will be


awarded on the basis of drawings from
luncheon ticket coupons. And elegi-
bility for other prizes will be on the
basis of demonstrated attendance at
exhibit booths. As last year, cards
stamped with booth numbers will be
utilized.
This year one of the product ex-
(Continued on Page 22)


QUALITY


DISTRIBUTED BY:
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc.,
924 Sligh Blvd., GA 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc.,
2860 22nd Ave., No., Phone 5-7627
Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc.,
1607 S.W. 1st Ave., JA 3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc.,
1043 Haines St. Expressway, EL 6-8542

OCTOBER, 1960


21


ROBERT E. HALL THOR AMLIE
Publicity Student Activities







Conventions...
(Continued on Page 21)
hibitors is adding another gem to this
roster of Convention prizes. At Booth
No. 3 a trio of Zonolite represent-
atives CHUCK BRESLAUER, TOMMY
THOMPSON and JOE MITCHELL will
award to some fortunate visitor, who
has registered his eligibility with
them, a Nassau trip-for-two, with ac-
commodations at the Fort Montague
Hotel. Details at the Convention -
and Bon Voyage to the winner!

All this . ? Even more! A fine
Convention headquarters with fine
food, fine service, wonderfully land-
scaped grounds, an ideal, on-the-beach
location. As MAG BIGONEY, chariman
of the Ladies Activities Committee,
put it ... a delightful place for a few
days of informal relaxation in our won-
derful Florida climate. Why not plan
to stay on through the weekend and
enjoy a short vacation!"
Yes all this; and deductible, too!
Try as you may, at next month's 46th
Annual FAA Convention you can't
lose from winning!


ASTM Launches New Drive


For Increased Membership


The very rapid recent growth of the
Construction Specification Institute
throughout the country is more and
more focusing attention on the need
for better specifications and ways of
obtaining them. The CSI has estab-
lished a basic policy of reducing the
wordage of specifications through ref-
erences to standards of both materials
and performance which have been cer-
tified as acceptable for the specifica-
tion purposes involved.
This has developed into a wide-
spread recognition by the CSI of the
varied work of the AMERICAN SOCIETY
FOR TESTING MN. ILRI LS. And since
the use of reference standards must
involve knowledge of the standards re-
ferred to, the AS TN I has begun a new
drive to invite as members not only
those presently on the CSI member-
ship rolls, but also architects, engi-


neers and others whose professional
activities involve construction specifi-
cations which make use of references
to ASTM standards.
The ASTM is a non-profit, national
technical society which, for 60 years
has concentrated in research, standard-
ization of testing methods and specifi-
cations for material. During that time
it has established innumerable stand-
ards of material values and uses
and has had a great and direct influ-
ence on the development and efficient
utilization of many new products. The
Society's program of making the re-
sults of its technical activities public
has brought about the issuance of
hundreds of technical books, pamph-
lets and reports; and the care with
which these have been developed -
and revised when new research facts
have made revision either necessary or


N RCHASEOF

PIR C winANSE


SAn architect's specifications are the point of
purchase ... the selling points of his work.
When incorporated in his design, the materials make the
structure more lasting, more durable and more beautiful.
The use of Celcure Treated Lumber further
enhances the architect's work. Celcure's
twenty year guarantee against rot or termites
eliminates a major maintenance problem and adds
further intrinsic value to the structure.

ALWAYS SPECIFY Q FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-.:





:- .4
B.. y




":..'.)
', ,: ....
,.L. i-l






desirable-has recommended their
use to a growing body of technicians
as a precise designation of standards
relative to material classification or
material use.
Use of such reference was illustrat-
ed by HENRY KENT, professional spe-
cification writer and a member of the
Greater Miami Chapter, CSI, during
the FAA Office Practice Seminar on
August 13, at Dunedin. Speaking on
methods of writing "streamlined" spe-
cifications, Mr. Kent said, in part:
"We quote reference matters such
as Commercial Standards or ASTM
Specifications. We do not repeat
the provisions of these references, but
we augment the references by identi-
fying a certain grade, or type, or table.
"We carefully choose and specify
a certain manufactured item. We are
satisfied with its performance; and
therefore we refrain from specifying
its properties or particularities. We
may, however, specify achievable mo-
difications of the item.
"We are primarily interested in re-
sults; and therefore we specify the
wanted results and refrain from spe-
cifying procedures. We acknowledge
that the result is the function of the
factors and that we have to be satis-
fied with the result to be achieved by
a dictated manner of procedure.
"No person or party is mentioned
when we specify material. Thus, we
might specify Portland Cement Type
I with the three words, 'Cement,
ASTM C150'. We do not use the
word 'all', because all cement is meant
in the absence of specifications for
other Portland Cements."
It seems obvious that a growing
body of standards for reference pro-
vides a common technical language by
which more exact designations of de-
sired performance or quality can be
made. Familiarity with this technical
language in growing measure the
indexed publications of the ASTM -
is now being recognized as one im-
portant means for assuring improved
building value through more exacting
specification of what is desired.
Membership in the ASTM is open
to individuals at a yearly membership
fee of $18 which includes a substan-
tial amount of published material.
Full information relative to complete
membership privileges can be obtained
by writing ASTM Headquarters, 1916
Race Street, Philadelphia 3, Pa.
OCTOBER, 1960


CONNECTORAIL*

The New Pipe Railing System:
flush non-welded pipe railings for greatest economy!

Connectorail is a complete new system of wrought aluminum pipe railing
fittings. Assembly is easier, faster, without welds or exposed fasteners.
Color matches perfectly after alumiliting. These accurately fitted parts
are available from stock for 14" and 1V2" Schedule 10 Light Wall
Pipe to suit all common conditions and stair angles. Components are
furnished with smooth mill finish or etched and alumilited as required.
More than 8,000 items in stock. Request special bulletin on Connectorail
and AlA award winning Catalog No. 8. Phones: Carlstadt, N. J., GEneva 8-4600;
Philadelphia, MArket 7-7596; New York, OXford 5-2236.

JULIS BUM CO IN ALTDNWJRE


7 <
L
I*TRADEMARK
* TRADEMARK


/9/1-/960






Modular Method...
(Continued from Page 13)
ordination conference held by the
Building Research Institute last fall:
"Nothing spreads contentment at
all levels of society like a quality re-
sult at an added profit. For instance,
our $10,675,000 highly technical lab-
oratory building with five bids in a
total spread of $19,000 on plans
drawn at 1/16" scale; or our $13,500,-
000 hospital estimate awarded for a
bonded contract at $13,172,000 with
six bids in that spread and again with
1/16" drawings; or our recent $8,-
888,000 estimate on agriculture and
engineering buildings awarded for
$8,827,000."
That same conference produced
plenty of evidence that the modular
concept was on the move toward a
wider acceptance by architects as well
as contractors and material and equip-
ment suppliers. The MBSA survey
result of 11 percent acceptance by
architects in 1959 compares with only
a 7V percent affirmative return from
a similar survey conducted by the
AIA's Office Practice Committee in


1956. Further, it was reported that
a number of government agencies -
among them the U. S. Army, Corps
of Engineers and the Veterans Ad-
ministration were swinging smartly
over to modular practices. Another
conference report by H. Dorn Stew-
art, president of the Producers' Coun-
cil indicated that the practices as well
as the principles of modular measure
were being increasingly adopted by
manufacturers of building products.
In part he said:
"To mention only a few, new mod-
ular bathtubs from three different
companies were introduced in 1958
and 1959. Two well-known steel com-
panies recently introduced modular
panels and components for school ap-
pliances. Three major companies will
be introducing finished wall panels
into the 1960 residential market.
Modular window assemblies including
structural mullions, new forms of mod-
ular masonry units, modular lighting
with integral mechanical functions,
modular partitioning systems, and
even appliances have taken on these
new dimensions. For example, one
through-wall unit air conditioner has


been noted to accommodate simpli-
fied installation in a masonry wall
vertically and horizontally, as well as
conforming to the requirements of
the modular spacing of studs."
Finally, as one direct result of the
MBSA program, the A62 Executive
Committee of the American Stand-
ards Association has been reconstitut-
ed. Twelve sub-committees have been
set up to study and recommend mod-
ular standards covering manufactured
masonry units, doors, windows, nat-
ural and cast stone, structural wood
and steel, glass and miscellaneous
metal products, domestic kitchen and
laundry equipment (including cab-
inets as well as appliances), manufact-
ured toilet partitions and shower
stalls, and integrated ceilings.
The modular bandwagon has been
refurbished. Under a strong new im-
petus it has already begun to roll. It
might be well if Florida architects
took whatever steps are immediately
necessary to scramble aboard. If they
do it soon enough, they might help
to do some of the steering along the
rocky road to better building prac-
tices.


REMEMBER:


ALUMINUM

WON'T RUST


plants to serve you

(in the South and Southwest)


0 Titus now has 2 plants in the South and Southwest that
manufacture the complete line of Titus quality extruded
aluminum grilles, registers, diffusers, outside louvers and
penthouses. These plants are located at TERRELL, Texas,
and HIALEAH, Florida. 4.
Yes, architects, engineers, contractors and their clients -
are now assured of today's best service on the world's best
air diffusion products.
See your local Titus representative OR WRITE DIRECT FOR
TITUS CATALOG EAG 7-59.


EXTRUDED ALUMINUM
AIR DIFFUSION PRODUCTS




Home Office & Plant: WATERLOO, IOWA


24 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















































"We're reminding ourselves to check for

economical home heating...and that means oil!"


Let's face it -Florida homes do need heat. But home
heating needn't cost much in Florida. And it won't if you
insist on economical oil heat.
Lots of your neighbors have learned from experience that oil
heat averages about HALF the cost of heat from other fuels.
Here's what they say: "A few dollars kept the whole house
warm all winter." "I am convinced our central oil heater
is the most efficient and economical home-heating system I
could have found." "The operating costs are extremely low."
"I wouldn't use anything else for home heating."
"Oil heating has cut our fuel costs in half."
Tie on a string. Write yourself a note. Do what you must
remind yourself that clean, luxurious, efficient oil heat is by far
the least expensive, safest, most dependable for Florida homes!


LUX URIOUB


Have you checked on
Home Heating costs
in Florida?


I I U L_ UH t Lj U Here's what you'll find: Oil heat
--- averages HALF the cost of heat from
0l' 1 f other fuels. No premium price to
,' -. l," 'I -' -) pay when fuel oil is used only for home
MUCH SAFER MORE heating. Supplies are dependable-
DEPENDABLE. TOOl fuel oil is always available. Oil home
heating is much safer (no obnoxious
fumes or combustible gases) . .
gives clean, automatic, circulating heat .. assures peace of mind, maximum
comfort for your family... by far the best solution of Florida's home heating problem.


See the oil heating disp
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE Buildorama, Dupont Plaza
Miami
BUILDORAMA, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, MIAMI
M R. ARCHITECT* Ads like this one have emphasized the fact that clean,
M R. A- luxurious OIL heat is much cheaper, safer, more depend-
able. People want the best especially when it costs the least. They'll accept your recom-
mendation for efficient oil heat, which costs about half as much as heat from other fuels!
OCTOBER, 1960


lay at
Center,







News & Notes

Florida Products for
Florida Construction
At its meeting on September 13,
the Board of Commissioners of State
Institutions which is actually the
Governor and his Cabinet adopted
the following resolution which should
be of interest to every element of
Florida's construction industry:
"WHEREAS, it should be the 4 E
policy of this State to promote the \
development of all segments of the i
economy of the State in the best
interests of its citizens; and
"WHEREAS, the production and,
manufacture of lumber, timber and
other forest products constitute a sub-
stantial segment of the economy of
this State; now therefore,
"BE IT RESOLVED BY THE
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 1961 0f
OF STATE INSTITUTIONS that 1961 0
all state agencies, including county Newly inst
agencies which receive state funds for of Clearwat
local construction, school buildings, Frank R. M
Mr. Coggai
etc., are hereby directed to draw and associate o
word specifications with respect to was formed
lumber, timber and other forest prod- has made





Designs for
Modern Living
include


Conceaded hfeephone



New homes sell easier when provided with facili-
ties for additional phones as they are needed.
Buyers today are quick to recognize the ad-
vantages of telephone planning. The idea of
adding phones, or moving them to new loca-
tions easily and neatly is an important "plus"
feature to prospective buyers.
For more information on the advantages of
concealed telephone wiring, just call your Tele-
phone Business Office.


Southern Bell
... wig wih he, Fatm&


officers of The Architects League of Clearwater
ailed officers for 1961 recently elected by The Architects League
er are, above, left to right: Joseph L. Coggan, AIA, Vice President;
udano, AIA, President; and Roy M. Henderson, Secretary-Treasurer.
n and Mr. Mudano operate their own offices. Mr. Henderson is an
f the Clearwater firm of Wakeling, Levison and Williams. TALC
I some two years ago and under retiring president Dana B. Johannes
very rapid strides in bettering professional relations in its area.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I-I--~- I II -- L-






ucts to be used in building or con-
struction projects under their jurisdic-
tion so as to provide a fair competitive
position for Florida forest products,
and to specify and use forest products
produced and manufactured in Flor-
ida or species which are native to Flor-
ida in instances where structural
strength, natural beauty and lasting
qualities are equal and adaptable to
the use intended."
The resolution was forwarded by
ROBERT H. BROWN, JR., AIA, Archi-
tect-Engineer of the Board's Construc-
tion Division. It recalls a similar reso-
lution passed by both houses of the
State Legislature in 1959 calling upon
state agencies to utilize wherever pos-
sible the professional services of Flor-
ida architects, engineers and contract-
ors and to approve for use or specify
in all possible instances, Florida ma-
terials, products and services in build-
ing and construction projects within
the agencies' jurisdiction.

P/R Is A Two-way Street.. .
One of the tests of good public re-
lations for any professional body, say
the experts, is the extent to which that
body has become of value to its com-
munity and worth notice as such by
various elements of the community.
On the basis of this P/R test archi-
tects of both Tampa and Clearwater
are doing very well.
In August members of the Greater
Tampa Association of Architects par-
ticipated in a week-long television pro-
gram in cooperation with station
WFLA-TV. The series-called "The
Architect" and occupying a 10-minute
mid-morning spot was geared to the
interest of the public in the better-
ment of Tampa's civic environment.
The idea was to answer questions
from the public relative to such
important building types as churches,
schools, commercial buildings and, of
course, houses.
Participants in the program includ-
ed H. LESLIE WALKER, president of
the GTAA, ANTHONY L. PULLARA,
RICHARD S. HINES, ALFRED T. FLOYD,
JR., and FRANK MCLANE, JR. What
they offered was so well received that
the WFLA-TV program director is
now reported to be planning another
series along the same lines.
In Clearwater TALC architects
were on the receiving end of an award
program sponsored yearly by the
(Continued on Page 29)
OCTOBER, 1960


Headquarters for





Quality.. ..







Our business was started many years ago as
a service to the construction industry in our
state. It has grown as Florida and the demand
for buildings has grown. But it has not grown
haphazardly. Our purpose has been to make
available as wide a range of building products
as practical. But in selecting them we have
always borne in mind the importance of honest
values that come from basic quality. .
This policy of ours has provided a headquarters
for quality. And an architect can specify any
of the many products we handle with confidence
in its character and with assurance of its high
performance in the buildings he designs . .



7a4 v S t8e...

IPIK SOLID CORE DOORS

You can depend on IPIK doors for every job.
These solid core flush panel doors are guaranteed
against warping and delamination. They are
engineered for endurance and proved by per-
formance in thousands of distinguished build-
ings all over the country. Their construction
provides a rigidity found
/in no other door. And
the range of sizes and
finishes will meet any
gIPiK design requirement.
Gucarteeeed-- o Warp





n A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI --- FRanklin 3-0811
PRODUCT Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto .
SCall Palmetto 2-1011
















MODULAR BUILDING PANELS
October 1960


Greetings Mr. Architect:

Let' s get acquainted. As a creator of fine buildings, you are the
logical person to know that we have completed a factory right here in
Florida to supply the widest range of decorative and structural build-
ing panels. Now you can offer your clients better, more attractive
and more economical construction with panels by GENPAN.
Facing materials? Anything you want!


Aluminum
Asbestos Cement
flasweld


Core materials? You name it!
Foamed Polystyrene
and the 11EW
Foamed-in-place Polyurethane


Grpsum Board
Hardboard
Plastic


Plywood
Stainless Steel
Etc.


Honeyconb, phenolic
paper or asbestos
And Others


Thickness? Any! Sizes? A big range to choose from


Fiberglass Plastic
and Most Metals
up to 4 ft.
up to 20 ft.


Plywood Asbestos Cement
Hardboard Clasweld
up to 4 ft. up to 4 ft.
up to 12 ft. up to 10 ft.


Costs? Our aim is to operate a low overhead business dedicated to
ingenious and never-ceasing effort to produce quality panels at the
lowest possible cost and still make a reasonable profit. Therefore,
we are governed by two basic requirements: Orders must be for at least
10 panels of any one type of facing and core, and must be on a cash
basis because we have no margin for credit or collections.

We are at your service. Give us a call or drop us a line and we'll
come running.

Very ruly yours,

George W Meek, President


Lars H. Boman, Viceresident Md In


FACTORY:
SALES OFFICE:


1205 Sixth St. Page Park, Fort Myers, Florida (WE 6-1555)
* 1702 Gleason Avenue Sarasota, Florida (WA 7-8158)


Sead 1o"

0W 5

Genfemen ~
I Please furnish more data on the following:
( Exterior solid and Opaque p one a
I n) terior Panels aque panels ( ) Translucent Panels
I Name ( ) Please call on us
I Firm
Address
C Aity
State
THE. FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Widths
Lengths


_ _


I ~IPB I







News & Notes___
(Continued from Page 27)
Clearwater Board of Realtors. The
awards covered an outstanding com-
mercial building by the office of
WAKELING, LEVISON and WILLIAMS
and a residential design by EUGENE
H. BEACH. This recognition of archi.-
tectural values by the realtors is the
more significant since their award pre-
sentations are made each year on the
basis of outstanding services to the
community.

An Open Letter to
The FAA President
JOHN STETSON, FAA President;
Dear Sir: In the wake of disaster, it
is normal and admirable, if not uni-
versal, that man's humanitarianism
reaches its highest attainment. When
our own lives and property are threat-
ened, the looks on faces show grati-
tude at being spared.
Official relief agencies move swiftly
to ease suffering and protect health
and property. Government agencies
begin programs of assistance to restore
property and the economy. But these
agencies seem divorced from the indi-
vidual and are personal only to those
involved. Contrastingly, there remains
the disgusting human element which
moves quickly to take advantage of
the misfortunes of others for their per-
sonal gain.
The idea of profiting from the mis-
fortunes and hardships of others is re-
pugnant to me as it is to most of us.
Yet, the profession stands to benefit
from our current disaster. The ques-
tion is: Shall our approach and intent
be one of benefit to our fellow citi-
zens or of benefit to our fellow pro-
fessionals only?
It seems obvious that now is the
time to gain full public support for
new, statewide building codes and
regulations and an augmented public
acceptance of, and insistence on, the
utilization of qualified professional
services in the design and construction
of buildings. In addition to pressing
the advantage for the adoption of
codes and regulations, it seems proper
that the profession begin its own pro-
gram of assistance to those who lost
their fortunes in offering services
without profit and at a minimum
cost, thereby sharing our good fortune
with the unfortunate.
(Continued on Page 30)
OCTOBER, 1960


ATTENTION: Architects, Electrical Engineers, Contractors and Design Consultants

THERE'S NO SUCH THING

AS A LIGHTING PROBLEM

WHEN YOU USE STA-BRITE!

There must be at least one fixture available among the tremendous
variety listed in our new Pricer that will meet your Immediate needs
Our stock items... and they are usually in stock... range from the
uncomplicated bare-tube, 8-watt channel to luminous ceilings that
cover large areas. We also feature fixtures that are fabricated of
aluminum to meet and beat the corrosion problem . not only in
subtropical Florida, but everywhere.
And in addition our design and engineering department is not
averse to going to work on your more complicated special problems
...will meet even the most unusual specifications, and produce fixtures
In strict accordance with architectural and engineering designs.
CALL ON US SOON.


DESIGNERS
ENGINEERS
MANUFACTURERS

THE ULTIMATE
IN LIGHTING
FIXTURES

Whatever your
requirements
in lighting homes,
offices and factories
-depend on
STA-BRITE'S
quality fixtures
and experienced
engineering staff.

Write on your
Company letterhead
for Sta-Brite's
19B1 Price LIst


In Cooperatives...

Economical Heating Is a MUST


* Safety, room-by-room control, cleanliness and
positive e, through-the-room circulation are
equally important . ELECTREND provides all
these essentials in one efficient, compact unit.



ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
4550 37th Street No. St. Petersburg
Phone: HEmlock 6-8420


a







Custom-Cast


Plaques


.,.- - ..


FLORIDA FOUNDRY
& PATTERN WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami



TO SOFTEN WATER

TO CONDITION WATER








EGLIN P fc.:-RCE 8A4E N% i *LL'TIr:N
.. J irdr 1 u, jr l, UI llj
0- jh .. i u .'.I r I ,' d ,
.. 1 .A .L r e-

,j rur'cJ I -,... t n .- ,' .. . .








F'^h ," *1' f-,.',,,,! ,, .,m ,1
,\1 ,(,., ,'.:, :


S :


News & Notes
(Continued from Page 29)
For those who need more encour-
agement, such a program could well
introduce enough additional work to
return many architects to their offices
and many draftsmen to the dinner
table during this particular lull in the
construction industry.
The AIA with its organization, pub-
lic relations and political force is the
proper organization to propose such a
scheme and pursue it to its comple-
tion. Beyond the personal satisfaction
of giving help to our fellow citizens,
the fringe benefits are numerous and
real.
Think on it.
HAROLD E. SECKINGER,
Architect, South Miami

Miami Architect Heads
New Arts Commission
JAMES E. GARLAND, AIA, of the
Miami firm of Connell, Pierce, Gar-
land and Friedman, and a member of
the Florida South Chapter, has been
named by Governor LEROY COLLINS
as Chairman of the newly constituted
Florida Arts Commission. Other
members are: Miss ETHEL FISHER,
Miami; JAMES T. LARRIMORE, SR.,
Coral Gables; T. A. JOHNSON, Clear-
water; MRS. MARGARET MOORER, Tal-
lahassee; MRS. SARAH CAWTHON, Tal-
lahassee; Vice-Admiral H. S.- DUCK-
WORTH, Jacksonville; PAUL T. WARD,
Tampa; and HARRY M. PHILPOTT,
Gainesville.

Palm Beach Auxiliary
Names New Officers
Florida's fourth Chapter Auxiliary
held its second organized meeting
September 8 at West Palm Beach and
elected officers for 1960-61. Chosen
were: MRS. JOHN STETSON, President;
MRS. JOHN T. SHOP, JR., Vice Presi-
dent; MRS. CAROL PEACOCK, Treasur-
er; and MRS. KENNETH JACOBSON,
Secretary. A dinner at Howard John-
son's preceded the election meeting.
Appointed to the Charter and By-
Laws Committee were, MRS. CAROL
PEACOCK, Chairman; and MRS. LES-
LIE WEDLOCK, MRS. RALPH MOE and
MRS. ROBERT RICHARDSON. Other
committee chairmen named were,
MRS. NORMAN ROBSON, program;
MRS. LAWRENCE S. FUNKE, publicity
and MRS. HAROLD OBST, legislative
and liaison.


A. COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"




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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co 22
Belcher Oil Co. _ ... 3
Julius Blum & Co. __ 23
Blumcraft of Pittsburg .___ 15
A. R. Cogswell ________[__ 30
Dwyer Products of Florida
Inc. 4
Electrend Distributing Co. 29
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works -- 30
Florida Home
Heating Institute 25
Florida Power & Light Co. 18
Florida Steel Corp. 6
General Panel Corp. ... 28
General Portland Cement Co. 7
George C. Griffin Co. 8
Hamilton Plywood _-___ 21
Houston Corporation _..._ 32
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 10
Portland Cement Association 9
A. H. Ramsey & Sons Inc. ___ 27
Solite ___ 5
Southern Bell Telephone ___ 26
Southern Water
Conditioning Co. 30
Sta-Brite Fluorescent
Mfg. Co. __._..__.._ ___ 29
Thompson Door Co. ______ 1
Titus Manufactruing Co. ____ 24
F. Graham Williams Co. _-___ 31


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







State Law...
(Continued from Page 8)
pervising the erection of "any other
type of building costing less than
$5,000 . the notable exception
here being "schools, auditoriums, or
other buildings intended for the mass
assemblage of people."
This first paragraph of Section
467.09 also includes the definition of
inter-professional privileges between
architects and professional engineers
- which only permits engineers to
perform those limited architectural ser-
vices . which are purely incidental
to their engineering practice . It
also states that . no professional
engineer shall practice architecture or
use the designation 'architect' or any
term derived therefrom ..."- and
prohibits, in turn, all architects from
practicing engineering or designating
themselves as engineers.
All these provisions of the para-
graph precede the statute's sole def-
inition of architectural practice-and
as noted above, even this definition
is couched in the terms of the type of
personal activity which the law deems
to be architectural practice. Thus, any
confusion and ambiguity which this
section of the statute seems to offer
is a result of a definite conclusion to
a number of exceptions. It is a nega-
tive, rather than a positive definition.
But it is a definition nonetheless; and
in context it is probably as good and
workable a one as will be found in
architects' statutes in most other
states.
This legal definition of architectur-
al practice is strengthened and further
clarified in other sections of the stat-
ute. For example, Section 467.08 de-
fines it as a personal service activity
by providing that "...no certificate shall
be issued either with or without an ex-
amination to any corporation, partner-
ship, firm or association to practice
architecture in this state, but all cer-
tificates shall be to individual persons."
This latter provision relative to the
individual character of architectural
practice in Florida is not common to
architects' laws in all other states. In
certain instances this has complicated
collaborative associations for practice
between out-of-state organizations and
resident practitioners. Dangers inher-
ent in such situations will be the sub-
ject of a future article in this continu-
ing State Law series.
OCTOBER, 1960


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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IT'S GAS... 2 to I!














SCA FOR WATER HEATING ... 72% OF ALL U.S. WATER
HEATERS are gas units, reports a 1960 survey in The Wall
Street Journal, and FOR COOKING . 66% OF ALL
SRANGES are gas! Now that natural gas has come to Flor-
ida, folks here are fast discovering the superiority of natural
gas not only for cooking and water heating, but for home
heating, clothes drying, refrigeration, and air conditioning,
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







F/A Panorama...


DISASTROUS DONNA TEN YEARS OF AFTERMATH ... ?

Some think the overall effect on the State's economy might last even longer.
No telling, they say, how many industrial executives have changed their minds
about opening a new plant here or how many families have decided to
brave winter snows rather than chance it against high winds and tides. Such
decisions could, presumably, slow down the current rate of business and popu-
lation growth . On the bright side, Donna might well help to push some bills
through next year's legislature. Most will probably be local and permissive.
But zoning and code improvement in even one county could prove to be a long
step in the right direction . .


MIAMI IS HITTING BACK AT THE FLY-BY-NIGHTS ...

Latest movement to put a sound value under building operations-and to curb
depradations of cheap-john, irresponsible operators-is the program of the Metro
Building Department to award certificates of competency to firms in the Miami
Metropolitan Area that can qualify. It works like this: Department officials inves-
tigate firms manufacturing or supplying materials and offering to perform con-
struction services. If they're satisfied as to basic qualities, adequate business
standards and overall ability, they collect a registration fee and list the firm as
both competent and reliable . The fee is worth it. Investigation is tough and
thorough, can really get to mean something if continued at its current level ...
Other cities might well tie-in to this.


DESIGN MACHINES ARE ON THEIR WAY UP . .

High-speed computer operation may be a required course of study in future
design schools if the substance of two recent releases is any indication . In
one instance a system for using a computer to aid in the development of multi-
story structural frame analysis has been perfected by Moshe F. Rubinstein, an
engineer on the staff of Victor Gruen Associates. Using the "iteration" method
whereby a desired result can be achieved by a repetitive type of computa-
tional scheme- it was found that effort and costs were reduced and accuracy
enhanced . The other instance was a report that an IBM "Fortran" unit was
being used by the Sylvania Lighting Products organization to predict the per-
formance of some of the company's newest lighting fixtures and thus was
having a direct and important influence on fixture design.

WILL THE RICH GET RICHER AT THE SAME TIME ... ?

Nathaniel H. Rogg, director of the NAHB economics department, says all in-
dications are that by the end of this decade more than 25 percent of U.S. fam-
ilies will have an income of $10,000 or more ... Maybe that will help explain
where some of the money is coming from to support the 1960-70 construction
market, which, according to Dr. George Cline Smith, F. W. Dodge Corp. econo-
mist, will reach the huge aggregate total of more than $900-billion. For the
10-year period he forecasts an 83 percent increase for industrial construction,
64 percent for commercial buildings, 62 percent for schools. .. This means, on
the basis of approximate current and comparative percentages, that Florida's
share for the 10-year period would be over $17.5-billion that is, if we can
find places for all the buildings. . .























It's NEXT MONTH less than six weeks
from now! One of the best programs on
record is ready to go. Read the Preview that
begins on page 11 inside then make plans
to close up shop, forget your aggravations
and bring your wife to Hollywood for a
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Be sure to watch the mail for reservation
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be sure of good accommodations.


-rp


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UAL FAA CONVENTION

1960 HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL HOLLYWOOD


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