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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Broward county and Jax adopt ethical...
 The twins who work as an architectural...
 Experiment with progress
 Two recently completed small...
 Ethics...and the law
 It's a long trip, a long road
 Two outstanding new work books
 News and notes
 82 registrations granted since...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00074
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: August 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00074
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Broward county and Jax adopt ethical bidding codes
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The twins who work as an architectural team
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Experiment with progress
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Two recently completed small buildings
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Ethics...and the law
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    It's a long trip, a long road
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Two outstanding new work books
        Page 25
    News and notes
        Page 26
        Page 27
    82 registrations granted since January
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertisers' index
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












IThIe A'
FL R D ARCH-ISTECT,0i0 0 ** 0








F/A Panoramna...


NOW HEAR THIS PLAN A FIREPLACE FOR THE BATHROOM .

That's the latest recommendation for improving the home from Mrs. Edith Braz-
well Evans, editor of LIVING for Young Homemakers Magazine, billed in a news
release as "an authority on architecture and pioneer in magazine-industry efforts
to provide better design and livability for the American family." Mrs. Evans
urged her luncheon audience of 770 members of the National Association of
Plumbing Contractors' Women's Auxiliary to plump for "a bathroom for every
bedroom" big enough to hold a terry-covered chaise lounge and a fireplace.
The current bathroom situation is "tragic", according to Mrs. Evans who told her
audience it could be improved by women because ". we generally get what
we ask for sooner or later."

MORE ROADS. MORE CARS MORE CARS, MORE ROADS .

Right now, it's a vicious circle. But, according to Watson A. Bowes, a Denver
realtor writing in a recent issue of the Society of Residential Appraisers' pub-
lication, the future development of air cars, moving sidewalks, pilotless
planes and improved public transportation methods may make lots of the roads
unnecessary by lowering the need for auto use. The real problem, the realtor
said, isn't roads it's storage for the autos. It takes 120 sq. ft. of space to
house a downtown worker, 300 sq. ft. to house his car. Increased use of the
new national highways points to a critical problem of planning and land use
finding enough urban real estate on which to build storage space for the
additional autos which full development of road-building plans will involve.

NO NEED TO BUY IT JUST SIGN A LEASE...

The lease agreement is fast becoming the magic wand of American business.
It's an infant prodigy in the auto-renting field, an accepted convention of
realty transactions. Now you can even lease capital. But the latest is this: Noise
control equipment can now be leased by those who must have quiet conditions
in their work and don't want the bother of getting it at a capital expenditure.
The New York firm of Industrial Acoustics Company, Inc., will be glad to lease
almost any type of quiet-producing unit from an acoustic door, through "jet
aircraft ground run-up silencers" to complete soundproof rooms for hospitals or
industrial activities. So, if your clients need quiet it can be theirs with a min-
imum of financial pain at a small rental cost.

GLOW OF GLAMOUR OR GUIDING LIGHT...

That's the way the B. F. Goodrich Company describes the purpose of its new
luminous vinyl floor tile. Aptly called "Afterglow", the tile incorporates phos-
phorescent pigments that don't affect its normal appearance but give off enough
bluish light in the dark to distinguish objects nearby. The "glamour" part of
the glow comes from installation in such areas as foyers, cocktail lounges or
"party rooms". The "guiding light" application comes from use of the tile in
such utilitarian areas as exits, stairways, corridors in hospitals, theaters and
various types of public and institutional buildings. The tile seems to "store"
light. When exposed to a light source long enough to equal eight foot-
candles of light, the tile will emit steady illumination in the dark for about
12 hours, according to the manufacturer.









E dsonite g a solid-core door that's


Guaranteed...


Guaranteed as to materials One
homogeneous core of strong, tough, warp-
resisting Miratex, edge-sealed to solid white
fir stiles and rails and face-bonded on each
side to three layers of cross-banded veneers to
produce the 7-ply construction for which
Thompson doors are famed.

Guaranteed as to production .. Pre-
cision controlled at every step, with every
micro-accurate element bonded with plastic
resin and fused by special processing into a
single unit of quality craftsmanship, unusual
durability and stability.

Guaranteed as to performance Edson-
ite doors stand up under rugged use, indoors
or out, have demonstrated twice the resistance
to warping or twisting specified in the NWMA
door guarantee. Every Edsonite door-in flush
panel gum, luan or birch, and in 11 stand-
ard sizes-is covered by a written guarantee,
backed by the integrity of its manufacturer.


PLASTIC-WELl
INTO A SINGLE
Each single
is process-bon
the others
special adhesiv
waterproof, ro
bug-proof. Th
tective coati
cured into a fi
fills the pores
element, 9
against moistu
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lamination, a
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DED
E UNLT
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e that's
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,PSON DOOR CO., INC., 5663 N. W. 36th Ave., Miami, Fla.
ted in Florida by:
amsey & Sons, Inc. Roddis Company A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc.
V. 11th Terr. 315 N.E. 73rd St. 905 8th Ave.
Florida Miami, Florida Palmetto, Florida
311 PL 4-9568 2-1011


dsonite

AUGUST, 1960


... WITH THE DIFFERENCE THAT MAKES IT BETTER .


U.S. Plywood Corp. Huttig Sash & Door Co. Master Door of Orlando
3675 N.W. 62nd St. 1090 N.W. 23rd St. 2115 So. Division St.
Miami, Florida Miami, Florida Orlando, Florida
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Jacksonville Sash & Door Co.
1730 Evergreen Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida EL 3-8458


Il' I








74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


Ine 7Th Isse ---


F/A Panorama . . . .
Broward County and Jax Adopt Ethical Bidding Codes
The Twins Who Work As An Architectural Team .
Experiment With Progress . . .
The Air Conditioned School Comes To Florida
Two Recently Completed Small Buildings . .
1...Rompon Residence ............
2...Headquarters Building . . .
Ethics and The Law ..............
It's A Long Trip, A Long Road . . .
Message from the FAA President by John Stetson, AIA
Two Outstanding New Work Books . . .
News and Notes ................
82 Registrations Granted Since January . .
Advertisers' Index ...... ........
Here's The Man We're Looking For . .
The Executive Secretary


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolph; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugene
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, James E.
Windham, III; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, Jefferson N. Powell.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


. 2nd Cover


6
61



..15-19

. 18
. . 20
. 23


. 25
. . 26
. 28
. . 31
. 3rd Cover


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 10

NUMBER 81960
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











































,~~~ : .
It


INTE SO O. ;JC /R


INTERIOR OF JACKSON'S/BYRONS DEPARTMENT STORE


More revealing than sunlight, more impressive than
moonlight, STA-BRITE'S time-tested fluorescent light-
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customers to modern shopping centers. Miami's new
Palm Springs Shopping Center, a radiant shoppers'
paradise with almost 4 miles of Sta-Brite fixtures,
is only one of many installations by Sta-Brite's
specialists in shopping center illumination. Special-
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units suited to your individual needs.


Builder/Owner: Palm Springs Investment Company
Architect: Loyd Frank Vann Associates
General Contractor: Robert L. Turchin, Inc.
Electrical Contractor: Max Belin


3550 N. W. 49th STREET MIAMI 42, FLA. H


,F- U ,, r.T IT


STA-BRITE stock fixtures were furnished to meet specifi-
cations of each tenant in this beautiful new shopping
center. Jackson's/Byrons newest department store chose
fluorescent Model SPS2x8-496 in continuous runs of units
8' long x 2' wide with Sta-Plex plastic louvered shielding;
12'6" centers and 125' candles at counter level.

Call on Sta-Brite for the imaginative, economical solution
to YOUR lighting problem. STA-BRITE is at your service
instantly, with quality controlled fluorescent fixtures en-
gineered to your requirements or delivered from inventory.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE FOR OUR LATEST FREE CATALOG


STA-BRITE FLUORESCENT MFG. CO.
3550 NORTHWEST 49th STREET
MIAMI 42, FLORIDA


NA M E ........................................... .

ADDRESS ................................... .......

CITY........................ STATE. ... .............


- TII-G F Tr ",,


AUGUST, 1960







Broward County and Jax


Adopt Ethical Bidding Codes


The Four-Hour Bid Plan, now operating effectively in other
states, promises to solve construction industry problems here.


At long last the building industry
in Florida has begun to clean its own
house. After almost six years of ef-
forts to find some practical answer to
the problem evil of bid-shopping, at
least two significant groups of build-
ing professionals have developed bid
codes and have set in motion the ma-
chinery to make them work.
In Broward County, sparked by the
Broward Builders Exchange at Ft.
Lauderdale, the Bid Code is already
going into operation on two jobs. In
Jacksonville, under sponsorship of the
Northeastern Florida Chapter, AGC,
a Construction Practices Board has
drawn up a code for ethical practice
and procedure for receiving subbids
and are about to test its operation on
a $1-million school job.
Each of these new codes is based
on the four-hour bid plan- a plan
now generally accepted by the con-
struction industry in such various
areas as San Diego, St. Louis, San An-
tonio, Augusta, Lynchburg and the
Carolinas. A story of the plan ap-
peared in The Florida Architect for
September, 1958. Since then various
contractor and building groups
throughout the state have shown in-
creasing interest in it. But it has re-
mained for the two organizations
above to actually put the four-hour
subbid plan into practical operation.
In Broward County, for example,
the Builders Exchange got together a
committee, drew up a Bid Code and
issued it to some 500 contractors and
subcontractors with a pledge card.
Nearly half the pledge cards were re-
turned with signatures. The Broward
County Chapter, AIA, has endorsed
the plan officially and most members
have become signers of a pledge to
abide by its provisions. The first two
Bid Code jobs have already been is-
sued in Ft. Lauderdale, one a four-
story store and office building for
which Howard McCall is the archi-
tect, the other a residence by architect
Ray Peck.


Though differing in phraseology
and form of presentation, the new
ethical bidding practice codes of both
the Broward Builders Exchange and
the Northeastern Construction Prac-
tices Board are essentially the same.
Both are based on the general agree-
ment that prime contractors will not
ask for, nor accept, subbids later than
four hours prior to the hour set for
the general bid filing. In addition, the
prime, or general, contractor will not
invite nor accept bids from subcon-
tractors to whom he would not award
a subcontract if the subcontractor
were a low bidder.
There is more, of course, to each
Code. Each is sufficiently detailed so
that agreed upon obligations of both
general and subcontractors are made
clear. The Jacksonville Code does not
contain a section relative to architects
- and herein lies the principal differ-
ence between the two documents. In
Jacksonville the contractors are ap-
parently confident of policing their
own actions and feel secure in the act-
ive cooperation of architects toward
this end.
In Broward, however, the architect
is regarded as of first importance in
the successful operation of the Bid
Code plan. In addition to establish-
ing routine procedures for issuance of
drawings, setting the time and place
for bid filing and the like, the Code
specifies that the architect shall "In-
vite bids from a list of not more than
six contractors who have demonstrat-
ed their integrity, skill and responsi-
bility and their ability to perform
work of similar nature and who are
signators to this code" and shall "Not
invite or use bids from any prime con-
tractor to whom, for any reason what-
soever, he would not award the work
if such a contractor is a low bidder."
A spokesman for the Broward
Builders' Exchange has designated
the architect as a key figure in the
successful operation of the Bid Code.
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








































STRAN-STEEL'S COMPLETE BUILDING SYSTEM


CUTS CONSTRUCTION COSTS IN FLORIDA


Stran-Steel's completely integrated building sys-
tem is designed to provide permanent, noncom-
bustible commercial and industrial structures at
the lowest possible cost. How?

Stran-Steel lightweight components-joists, studs
and channels, columns, beams, colored curtain
wall and ribbed decking-are engineered so that
each part fits perfectly with every other part.
There is little or no special fabricating required.
Buildings go up fast-with less bridging, better
lateral beam support and little welding!

FORT MYERS
SBOB DEAN'S STEEL BUILDINGS, INC.
2104 ANDERSON AVENUE, ED 2-1132
JACKSONVILLE
BUILDERS PRODUCTS CO.
S P.O. BOX 3161, EL 4-7843
PENSACOLA
STEEL BUILDING PRODUCTS, INC.
NORTH PALAFOX HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX 127
HE 8-9689
STRAN-STEEL IS A DIVISION OF
AUGUST, 1960


Stran-Steel's distinctive nailing groove makes it
possible to apply collateral materials directly with
ordinary nails. Wide flange beams, in a variety of
sizes, are especially adaptable to multiple-floor
projects. They save space and materials, and
eliminate beam boxing and false ceilings.

Every man-hour of construction time saved is
money saved for your clients. Ask your nearest
Florida Stran-Steel dealer listed below how he can
help you provide your clients with the best design
at the lowest cost. Stran-Steel dealers are listed
in the Yellow Pages under Steel.

Stran-Steel's Basic Architectural Products




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AND STUDS CHANNEL STUDS
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Structural Steel
Complete Engineering &
Fabricating Facilities
Bar Joists
Aluminum & Steel Sash
Steel Doors & Frames
Miscellaneous Iron &
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Ornamental Iron
Steel Roof Deck
Steeltex
Highway Products
Corruform
Sonotubes
Metal Culverts
Polyethylene Plastic Film



FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION


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ORLANDO GArden 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE EVergreen 4-5561
WEST PALM BEACH TEmple 2-2493
FORT MYERS EDison 4-5262


Ethical Bidding Codes...
(Continued from Page 4)
"Architects really are the control-
ling factors in this plan." said the
commentator. "If they will live up to
the procedures specified for them in
the Code, they have the power to en-
force the Code by refusing to invite
bidders who are not signators to it."
L.-E. Davis, president of the Brow-
ard Builders' Exchange, called the
Code a cooperative 'honor sys-
tem' of owners, architects, contractors,
subcontractors and suppliers in the
construction industry to set a stand-
ard for competitive bidding which
will assure quality performance for
the contsruction dollar."
If these two Bid Code experiments


prove successful in the Broward
County and Jacksonville areas, it is
probable that groups elsewhere will
rapidly adopt similar measures. In
Dade County efforts toward this end
have as yet not resulted in action.
And to date, the same is true if the
Orlando area. But it is reported that
interest in the new code measures is
running high in the Tampa-St. Pet-
ersburg area and in the locale of the
Palm Beaches.
Information relative to the Brow-
ard County plan can be obtained
from the Broward Builders Exchange,
404 N. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauder-
dale; and on the Jacksonville program
from Northeastern Florida Construc-
tion Practices Board, 3110 Beach
Boulevard, Jacksonville 7.


The Twins Who Work



As An Architectural Team


Those attending the 1960 FAA
Convention at Hollywood this No-
vember and if you're a member of
the FAA this should mean YOU -
will be most privileged to meet and
learn from two of the most remark-
able men in the architectural profes-
sion. They are the OLGYAY twins -
ALADAR and VICTOR and, as the
generally acknowledged top-ranking
authorities on solar control, they will
share their learning and experience








The Olgyay Twins--
Aladar, left, Victor, right
- authorities in the de- -
sign and use of solar con-
trol devices, whose dis-
cussion of this important
subject will be one of the
highlights of the 1960
FAA Convention's tech- '
nical seminar program. ,


with Florida architects at one of the
most important design seminars of
the Convention.
The Convention theme MAN,
CLIMATE AND THE ARCHITECT -
was almost made to order for this
brilliant team which has contributed
significantly to the design solutions
of man's climate problems. For many
years they have interested themselves
in architectural research both are
(Continued on Page 8)


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








This one is Dry!




fI 0. ,


V


,, The critical relative hu- -.
-4 V midity level of Solite light- B
.,' weight masonry units is ,'U
.,", l*' extremely high. Condensa- I '
Stion-and resulting damp-
ness-are eliminated. Dry.

specify Solite. ,





BT B N trts ath ourhie C o r ndengn. r ll
A. ..r n. 9e, "i ae tn mone,..ys. .ur y.t o ,

























ang ex speroenessinall deimineand morey- lassure you adbu.
SAUGUST,1960





ti A-- ...
.., .. .. .. .
N,.. k,.





lk ,k.


-~" F ,' + + r -





BETTER BUILDING starts with your architect or engineer. Their skill
and experience will save you tinie and money-assure you a build
ing that is professionally designed for your lasting satisfaction.



PLATS OF ICE



AUGUST, 1960 7













PROFILE


PREFABRICATED
STEEL BUILDINGS
~ PROFILE
Tapered beam
from.ng and
roof synIem
RIGID FRAME
Worehou!es
Manulocluring
Siruclures

Profile Tapered Beam Froming System,
Milcor Sieel Roof Decks,
Ribform Prefobricaled Sieel Buildings,
Corosaron Decoratoive Panels,
Reynolds Melol Co. Produces,
Corrulux Fiberglaii Panels,
Uliralle In;ulation
PROFILE DEALERS
BRADENTON
Rich's Sales and Service
CLERMONT
Wolfe and Konsler
CLEWISTON
Paul Bussey
FORT MEYERS
Tully Mansell, Gen Conlrocior
FORT PIERCE
Hutchinson Sleel Co.
JACKSONVILLE
Easr Coast Siel Buildings
LAKELAND
B E. Fulghum
OKEECHOBEE
Orin D Lee
ORLANDO
Ailind Induslries
QUINCY
Monroe Engineer;ng
ST. PETERSBURG
Indjsirial DevelopmenI Co.
SARASOTA
Sandearen Sleel Buildings
SEBRING
Sebinq Weld;ng and Tank Co
TALLAHASSEE
Guardian Steel Producis
TAMPA
Bay Consrruction Co.
WEST PALM BEACH
Sirman Industries
See any of the above Pro-
file dealers for free esti-
mates financing plan
and immediate delivery, or
write

PROFILE
STEEL PRODUCTS CO.
Box 11425, Tampa, Fla.
Div of- Florida Steel Bldqs., Inc


The Twins...
(Continued from Page 6)
now Research Associates with the
rank of Associate Professor at Prince-
ton University's School of Architec-
ture with particular emphasis on
design means capable of controlling
the effects of solar radiation on inter-
ior conditions in buildings where peo-
ple work and live.
They have researched theories. But
more than that, they have translated
their findings into such practical
terms that their volume, "Solar Con-
trol and Shading Devices", published
by the Princeton University Press in
1957, is recognized as a final technical
authority on the subject. This volume
is the current climax to a host of pub-
lished articles and books reporting
various aspects of the twins' archi-
tectural research findings. In 1952
their work, both here and abroad -
was the subject of a monograph, "The
Work of Architects Olgyay and
Olgyay" published by Reinhold.
These accomplishments in a field
of such specialized interest to Florida
architects is remarkable in itself. But
the careers of these two brothers are
unique in that they are almost identi-
cal. It is as if each man functioned
as one lobe of a composite brain,
for all their lives they have worked
together as a closely integrated intel-
lectual and professional unit.
Natives of Budapest, Hungary,
both received diplomas as architec-
tural engineers from the Royal Poly-
technical University, Budapest. Both
won the Prix de Rome and studied in
Italy during 1943-45 then followed
this by a year of housing study in
London. Both were named Kendall
Fellows at Columbia University in
1937-38, then were granted architec-
tural registration in Budapest. In
1951 they were granted NCARB reg-
istration here and shortly thereafter
won Guggenheim Fellowships. Prior
to their present appointments at
Princeton, both served at the MIT
School of Architecture after a four-
year term as assistant professors of
architecture at Notre Dame.
So far as information is available
they have gone separate ways in only
one professional detail. Aladar, in
1957, became a member of the New
Jersey Chapter, AIA. Victor's name,
however, is not listed in the 1960
AIA membership list.


DURATHIN


helps you win


the battle


of quality versus


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ing-without sacrificing straightness, strength
or durability. This new economy-priced ceramic
facing material is available in a virtually un-
restricted choice of colors and textures, in
sizes up to a maximum of 18" x 24". Because
of its thinness, light weight and large-sized
units, %" CV Durathin costs less to buy and
install yet assures the durability, lasting color
and low maintenance associated with Ceramic
Veneer. Face distortion and size tolerance are
limited to 16 of an inch or less, and units are
available with bull nose on one, two, orthreesides.

For complete information
about %" CV DURATHIN
write to:

FEDERAL
SEABOARD
TERRA COTTA
CORPORATION
10 East 40th St., New York 16, N. Y.
Plant at Perth Amboy, New Jersey


IAAAAI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















Concrete panels made with Trinity White -the whitest _


. ~4*
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concept in modern kil

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look,, as designed for

Paul McCobb. This c

cabinetwork is made ol

ern maple, finished i

shown) and in strik

colors. Leg stanchions

satin aluminum. S

especially suited fo

kitchens, and also ma

built-in storage thr

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possibi
public
import
School
Jackso
bold a
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cation has been
cities of air coi
schools. The su
antly during the
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nville last fall. ,
nd progressive si
with the cooperc
: Department,


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of air conditioning
program is now wel
has already shown


suits.
first


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.. This is
hase of the


public Instructic
three-year stuck
in schools. Th
I under way ar
significant r
a report of tU
project. .


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is now underway rela
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presently incomplete
to have far-reaching ef


design all
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in public s
T' Inh s-V


tive
ich,
stag(
.fects


experiment
to school-
even in its
0, promises
Son school


over the country. It is a
,e experiment to determine
values of air conditioning
schools.
i.0 r i 0 i n n T ic '


study is the first of its kind ever at-


tempted
educator
engaged
schools i


5
Sd
1
S;


so far as is known to the
and building professionals
n it. Full air conditioning in
, of course, not new in itself.


Throughout the country some 200
schools have been built. In many cases
they appear to have cost no more than
would equivalent educational facilities
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schools


have


been


ultimate capacity (
though original c

the basis of 16 cl
other basic spaces
parative diagrams
ing pages. For the
building programs,
was virtually ideni
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no


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except


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Park Junior Hig
L. Colwell, arci
large part of
and involves e:
connecting wall
perimeter walls,
ventilation is
requiring two
classrooms or u:
haust fans to
breeze cooling.
tion cost of 1
higher, without
equipment, thai
comparison sc
which was plar
plete air condi


construction cost index shown a small,


probably be much more substantial


almost $16,00 -on


I


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complete


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air


conditioning


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All indications are that the ultimate construction /cost of the completed 32-
classroom Oak Grove Junior High School, Bruce and Parrish, architects, will
prove substantially lower than that of the comparison school without air
conditioning, including operating and maintenance costs.


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and rep

Pinellas


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tioning equipment
gas-fired boiler an
conditioning comr
natural gas. This e


With


rooms are nearly
have windows on
equipped with ex
regulations relative(
Building units are
but covered, walk,
residential-type,
serving adjoining

In the Oak G
rooms are rectang
dimensions abutti
/
thus materially
lengths. Windows
with lockers b'ene
and ceiling height,
to nine feet in all
ces. All-season ai]
thermostatically (
cooling and veni
by a series of H
ventilators set on
inside walls and s
in counters and s
When Oak Gr,
ultimate extent of
present 120-ton re
will increase to 1


I- -
















2:22:2:22:2::: Iwith
Facts and

.;.... Figures!


: Mere words just can't tell the story of this
latest triumph of natural gas. That's why
Swe urge you to let us show you how you can
Solve your comfort cooling problems for
years to come, with revolutionary new

GAS GENIE
natural gas

AIR CONDITIONING
... JUST NATURALLY BETTER

For full details, contact our nearest office.
THE HOUSTON CORPORATION
a Florida corporation
Miami Jacksonville Orlando Lakeland Daytona Beach Eustis
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Two Recently Completed Small Buildings




1... ROMPON RESIDENCE
Pinellas County, Florida
Wakeling and Levison, Architects
Donald S. Williams, Associate
John C. Horvath, General Contractor

Wm. Amick


AUGUST, 1960













































Photos by Wm. Amick


The Z-plan of this house was deter-
mined by a combination of three
factors. First was the site, chosen by
owner and architect for its cluster of
water oaks and its orientation to per-
mit opening private areas to the south.
Second was the desirability of pre-
serving as many of the trees as pos-
sible; and third were the requirements
of the owner relative to living needs
and general room arrangements.
One requirement, for example, was
that the master bedroom be self-con-
tained as a unit completely private to
the rest of the house. Another was the
grouping of office, laundry, pantry
and kitchen in an equally self-con-
tained service unit. Still a third was
a screened patio as large as the build-
ing budget would allow.
The Z-plan developed naturally
from placing the garage and service
unit nearest the street and the master
bedroom toward the south on the op-
posite side of the lot. Location of the
living-dining area and the other two
bedrooms followed logically to round
out space requirements. One particu-




















With the exterior bi-
fold door fully opened
the screen patio merg-
es with dining room,
living room and guest
bedroom to provide
one great unobstructed
indoor-outdoor living
area. Yet privacy can
be easily achieved
where and when de-
sired by simply closing
doors as needed.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









larly fortunate result of this arrange-
ment is that the middle bedroom can
be, like the living room, completely
opened to the patio or when the
interior gallery wall is closed, can be-
come a private family room or den.
As to the exterior, need for design
balance and privacy from the street
and adjacent properties dictated high
and continuous operating windows in
the bedrooms which also permit-
ted complete furniture flexibility. In
the living room operating windows are
in relatively unusable wall space and
are floor to ceiling for maximum ven-
tilation. On the patio side, a series of
exterior bi-fold doors was the obvious
answer to the owner's requirement
that the patio be completely openable
to living areas.
Structure involves a post and beam
system with 8-foot bays, framed with
2 by 4 joists 2 ft. oc. and sheathed
with standard sheets of plywood.
Bearing walls are exposed concrete
block, integrally colored. Portions of
the exterior are faced with horizontal-
ly reinforced walls of limestone brick.


The sunken tubs in both bathrooms-and the
adjacent pool-were poured as part of the
foundation which was designed as a flat slab
and integrally waterproofed. It also serves as a
cover for under-floor heat distribution ducts.
Bathroom floors are tiled, those in bedrooms
and kitchen are cork. Floor in the living room
is carpeted.


AUGUST, 1960







2... HEADQUARTERS BUILDING, Florida Conference


of Seventh-day Adventists


Orlando, Florida


1 I RE AR TEE S.
VECH TAR






I-R
-ONFERENCE PASSAGE



. I I .. N
rss" oE Cr EcEAR
CRE TER

F~;L4~


Ti L

BASEMENT PLAN


Kemp, Bunch and Jackson, Architects

Mann Construction Co., General Contractors







--tT T T LJT I L,,S J


0_ I I C A TjR 1
T- RO "~




LOBBY ECRETARY S-CRETARY S1E CI E TAE Y SECQE7ARY'SERTAW -C- SECRETARY


I L 0 AS
|- _kl-.T__ _QL 0a_ EL &N
t B, -,o, ,,__. -_ _


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


*"-Mi,


(1001 OI
RLCLIVINB


PLANTERa




?Iir; -(1; Y'I`
.~-i
'
,i
~.':-9
':


The building houses the State
Headquarters for the Florida Con-
ference of Seventh-day Adventists. It
also contains the Book and Bible
House which serves the publication
needs of this denomination's congre-
gations throughout the state; and all
administrative and fiscal functions are
headquartered in this building.
The site slopes down to the north
and overlooks a large lake across Rol-
lins Avenue. Provision has been made


for expansion of the one-story wing
to the west. The entire building is
air conditioned. Construction is in-
combustible throughout and of semi-
fireproof rating.
The architects' comment on this
building: "This building is rated as
one of our more successful smaller
jobs from every standpoint not the
least of which was the excellent
handling and construction 'know-how'
of the general contractor."


Siourd Fischer. photos


AUGUST, 1960


01 -4

















































GGEORGE C. C
RIFFIN 0.
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 10025, Jacksonville, Florida


XI06UE Ie"Cc State 4aw, '


Ethics


...and The Law


This is the third of a continuing series of articles on Archi-
tects Law of Florida Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes.
The series has been designed to bring to practicing architects
and others clarification of various provisions of the law. Some of
these provisions have been the subject of misunderstanding on
these provisions have been the subject of misunderstanding on
the part of many practicing architects. To make certain that
explanations of them are both clear and accurate, these articles
have been submitted to members of the Florida State Board of
Architecture prior to publication.


To many architects the line be-
tween the ethics of professional prac-
tice and conformity with the laws
regulating that practice is, at best, a
very dim and fine one. They argue
-with at least some philosophical
justification that the statutes were
originally written to protect the public;
and that since unethical practices
tend to do the public harm, pro-
visions of the law should be construed
to cover professional behavior as well
as professional competence.
So, in the past the State Board of
Architecture has received complaints
from architects relative to "unfair
competition," "job stealing," "fee
cutting" and the like. Such com-
plaints are now less frequent; but
there still exists sufficient misunder-
standing about the regulatory pro-
visisions of the Architects' Law in
Florida to justify some clarifying
comment.
Those who have studied carefully
the various provisions of Chapter 467
have concluded that the legislature
by this statute intended to guard the
public's interest relative to the prac-
tice of architecture. To accomplish
that purpose a State Board was estab-
lished to administer the law. The law
itself charged this Board with making
detailed rules and regulations; but it
also provided the Board with a broad
background of both purpose and
procedure upon which its authority
could be based and against which


its decisions on both policy and pro-
cedure could be measured.
The law recognizes the practice of
architecture as a personal service
activity -and even as a professional
type of activity. For example, Section
467.08 prohibits the issuance of a
certificate except to "individual per-
sons"; and Section 467.11 requires, for
registration by exemption, "satisfac-
tory evidence of continued honorable
professional conduct" in addition to
technical competence as evidenced by
an NCARB certificate. Recognizing
also that abuse of the privilege to
practice might occur, legislators pro-
vided for suspending or revoking the
registration privilege under certain
circumstances and as a result of
certain acts.
These provisions are detailed in
Section 467.14. In part this section
reads, "Any architect's registration ...
may be suspended or revoked
. for gross incompetency, or negli-
gence in the construction of build-
ings, or for a dishonest practice or
practices on the part of the holder
thereof as an architect for will-
fully misleading or defrauding any
person employing him as an architect,
or for the violation of this or any
other law of this state relating to the
practice or architecture or any lawful
rule or regulation made by the Board
pursuant to law ."
These are admittedly broad and
rather inclusive conditions under
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






which disciplinary action could be
taken by the Board. And the inac-
curate interpretation of these con-
ditions furnishes the basis for most
of the misunderstanding that exists.
Those who read this section as a man-
date for the State Board to guard
the ethics of the profession have
missed one very important point.
That is the clear provision that the
Board has disciplinary jurisdiction
only in reference to those acts com-
mitted by a registered person .
as an architect."
Herein lies the difference between
legal conformity and ethical behavior.
The law in practical effect enforced
through the State Board of Archi-
tecture -has no control over the
behavior of an architect as a person
-over his morals or his personal,
as distinguished from professional,
integrity or his individual relationship
with his professional colleagues.
When an architect conducts an ad-
vertising campaign, or submits free
sketches to get a job, or quotes sub-
standard fees or deprecates fellow-
practitioners to his own advantage,
he is not subject to legal discipline
under the statute. For all these things
form a pattern of personal behavior.
He has not committed such acts as
an architect, but as an individual.
For that this law cannot touch him
-unfortunate as that fact may seem
to be.
One might argue that such acts
of unethical behavior could be con-
strued as the "dishonest practice or
practices" noted in Section 467.14.
Morally dishonest and even intellectu-
ally dishonest they may be. But they
cannot be held as being legally dis-
honest under the statutes since they
involve only the private actions of
an individual and do not concern
the individual's relationship with the
public as as architect.
The function of the State Board
is spelled out in Section 467.03. In
essence it is to regulate the
practice of architecture under the laws
of the state." It has not been given
specific jurisdiction over the ethics of
the profession or the power or author-
ity to either establish or maintain
ethical standards for professional be-
havior. This is the function of a
professional organization. As such it
is one of the chief responsibilities
of the AIA at Chapter, State, Reg-
ional and National levels.
AUGUST, 1960


CARLSTADT* Aluminum Railing:
sturdy, attractive, easy to fabricate and install
Standard tubing and pipe components from stock make up aluminum
railings for the most rugged applications. CARLSTADT* railing
components are designed for greatest strength to withstand hard usage,
as in schools and public buildings. A wide variety of stock handrails,
posts and accessories allows the architect freedom of design, while
affording the economy of quantity production.

More than 8,000 items in stock. See Catalog No. 8 or Sweet's
Architectural File No. 6e/BL. Phones: Carlstadt, N. J., GEneva8-4600;
Philadelphia, MArket 7-7596; New York, OXford 5-2236

JULIUS BLUM &CO.INC.,CARLTADTNEWJE


'.1


'TRDEMAR
*^TRADEMARK


/9/&-1/966





WHEN AMERICA BUILDS FOR ECONOMY... IT BUILDS WITH CONCRETE


Sears, Roebuck & Company's Tampa store ...

concrete folded plate roof achieves
large, unobstructed floor area


One of the basic requirements here was to achieve
unobstructed floor space with economy. Architects
Weed, Russell, Johnson & Associates found the an-
swer by using a concrete shell in the form of a folded
plate. This construction made it possible to span the
entire floor area with only one interior row of columns
... and suspend the second floor from the roof. The
result: 163,715 square feet of fully flexible floor space,
so important to any retail selling operation.
Folded plate design is, in itself, unique and interest-
ing. And only concrete can give the added boldness of
the wide, cantilevered overhang.
SIt's one more example of the way new uses of con-
crete are bringing big economies and added vitality
to both conventional and modern architecture.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


FOR STRUCTURES...
MODERN

concrete


Isometric view showing
125-foot c on c spacing of
main columns. Floor slab
is supported by 3-inch
plates welded together to
form a hanger. Hangers are
spaced 25 feet c on c.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






tes44age womw 74 Peideeat..,



It's a Long Trip, a Long Road...

By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


It becomes increasingly apparent
that few people have the slightest con-
ception of the knowledge and effort
required of a man seeking admittance
to the practice of architecture. This
lack of understanding plus a failure
by some practicing members of the
profession to recognize the complex-
ities of a well-rounded education and
experience portfolio have combined
to advise a gullible public that all a
man needs to practice the profession
of architecture is a pencil, a drafting
board, access to a blueprint machine
and a few ideas. To fasten responsi-
bility for this general misconception
is impossible.
Forgetting for the moment the
usual suggestion that we should,


through our public information pro-
grams, educate the buying public to
these complexities and leave it at that,
let's see where we stand. In recent
years more and more architectural
schools have tried to convince embry-
onic architects that graduation is only
a step upward toward the ultimate
goal. Five years of higher education
is proving barely adequate as a basic
training, leaving much for the stu-
dent to learn during his first three to
five years in an office. Several foreign
universities have increased their
schooling period to eight years. This
includes several periods of office ex-
perience mixed with more formal ed-
ucation, thereby allowing the student
to apply theory in a positive manner


as well as research subjects in which
he finds himself lacking, while still in
school.
Prior to World War II the aver-
age architect was familiar with less
than a third of the products now gen-
erally used in the construction field.
During any year, if progressive, he
used less than half the construction
techniques and methods he applies
today. Air conditioning was a luxury
not employed in homes and in few
buildings overall. Church and school
building programs were at a standstill
from 1929 to 1947. Office buildings
just were not being constructed, nor
were new factories or apartment
houses. One of the few cities enjoying
new hotel construction was Miami
Beach.
For a man to hold himself forth as
an expert on all forms of architecture
requires more than just so many years
of study and experience. It necessi-
tates a native born insight and under-
standing of man's methods of shelter-
ing himself and the form of his struct-
ures specifically designed for the task
at hand.
(Continued on Page 30)


/
/
//
/
/


/


//


I


Celcure and only Celcure gives you positive
non-leaching protection. The chemicals are
permanently locked into Ihe wood and there is
no danger of Celcure coming out in ground
moisture, rain or even running water.
AMERICAN CELCURE WOOD PRESERVING CORP.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


ALWAYS SPECIFY


AUGUST, 1960


011-leaFo aill
proteot o


-, /, -
/a








Design for modern

Living ELECTRICALLY

Good homes start with good planning. And basic to good planning and
S"better living are the comforts and conveniences embodied in Medallion
it ,1 Homes--the hallmark of electrical excellence. People do want FULL
& (HOUSEPOWER with plenty of outlets for today's and tomorrow's
'-^ electrical appliances. People do want LIGHT-for-LIVING for comfort,
atmosphere and beauty. People do want all-electric kitchens and laundry
.for cleaner, cooler Florida living. There's professional pride in
designing award-winning Medallion Homes that up-grade the standards
foi modern living-electrically.
























ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN-LAUNDRY that includes at least 4 major
electrical appliances water heater, cooking range, and the choice of
clothes dryer, dishwasher, or other "Redd)-servants."
ULL HOUSEPOWR 100-200 amp ser ice with large enough wire
and ample circuits, outlets and switches for maximum convenience and


outdoors, for decorative beauty and utility.


/ Call any FP& L office 1 MATCH FOR
"or lull detads and M

AL-E E I Specifications .TODAY ,i a ELECTRIC LIVING

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
e n aHelping Build Florida
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Two Outstanding New Work Books


The AIA Building
Products Register
What was an idea in 1950 has be-
come a brilliant reality in'1960. Be-
tween those ten years a tremendous
amount of creative thinking, shrewd
technical and analytical reasoning and
editorial experimentation has brought
forth what will probably prove to be
one of the most generally valuable of
architectural working, tools. The first
edition of the AIA Building Products
Register, 1960, has already merited
the acclaim of publishing profession-
als who recognize the purpose behind
it and have only admiration for the
continuing energies which overcame
the enormous difficulties of its pro-
duction. It is unthinkable that build-
ing professionals will not also recog-
nize its value- even at the price of
$25 per volume.
Essentially the Register provides a
quick method for the comparative an-
alysis of the products of various man-
ufacturers which fall within 23 gener-
al classifications. Under each classifi-


cation are various subdivisions. In
combination they present salient in-
formation factors of over 1300 prod-
ucts. In addition, the Register is a
new source for the coordinated di-
gests of 700 technical standards and
specifications. A newsletter will bring
data on other products and standards.
Thus, in one volume, building pro-
fessionals have close at hand the in-
formation which formerly required
endless hours of time and energy to
assemble. The Register is available
from the headquarters of the AIA,
1735 New York Ave., N. W., Wash-
ington 6 D.C.

Reducing the Cost
of Public Housing
Strictly speaking, this is not a book
- it is the remarkably complete re-
port of a remarkably thorough re-
search inquiry into housing costs and
methods for reducing them. The ma-
terial in "Methods of Reducing The
Cost of Public Housing" was com-
piled under a research grant by the


New York State Division of Housing
by a team of graduate students of
Pratt Institute under the direction of
Professor John Callendar, formerly a
moving force in the John B. Pierce
Foundation.
Though concerned with "public"
housing, the 139-page volume seems
quite as applicable to almost any sort
of multi-family dwelling construction.
The admirably presented results of its
analytical research concerns such
problems as planning, structural sys-
tems, various types of exterior wall
constructions, interior elements and
mechanical equipment.
This report does not deal with the-
ory. It is an intensely practical collec-
tions of technical facts, figures, charts,
diagrams and drawings documented
with unit costs in every phase of pre-
sentation. It contains a whole series
of recommendations toward the end
of lowering housing costs-and
through this device effectively reveals
how outmoded codes and regulations
are withholding from use a whole
series of technical improvements.
Inquiries about this report should
be addressed to Dean Olino Grossi,
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn 5, N. Y.


QUALITY


WOOD /



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Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc.,
924 Sligh Blvd., GA 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc.,
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Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc.,
1607 S.W. 1st Ave., JA 3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc.,
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-- 3*'
w~
f'e-r .; d .-`. 'V f '. ,k i
-' 't 'V..R


AUGUST, 1960


I-,~







News & Notes


Safe for Another Year ...
The 1960-61 list of Accredited
Schools of Architecture was recently
released by the National Architectural
Accrediting Board. On the list were
51 schools of architecture throughout
the country that had been given
Board approval.
Architects throughout the State as
well as the faculty of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts at Gaines-
ville, will be glad to know that the
University of Florida was on the
Board's Accredited List this year.
Thus, for another year at least, Flor-
ida will be spared the shame of having
her only recognized college for archi-
tectural education stricken from the
Board's Accredited List because of in-
adequate quarters and insufficient in-
structional facilities.
However, the Board's list is revised
annually and is valid only until the
next list is issued. If the 1961 Legis-
lature acts favorably on the appropria-
tion for new College buildings, the
NAAB will probably continue the
Gainesville accreditation. If not,


A r -~ ---------~~ C~mt


New Auxiliary for Palm Beach
These are the 21 wives of Palm Beach architects who attended a tea, at the
Home of Mrs. John Stetson, early last month, for the purpose of organizing
an Auxiliary to the Palm Beach Chapter, AIA. The new Auxiliary is planning
to hold its first formal business session in September. Back row, left to right,
are: Mrs. Charles E. Toth, Mrs. Robert Fulton Blake, II, Mrs. John Dugger,
Mrs. Stephen J. Ginicchio, Mrs. J. Raymond LaThomus, Mrs. Kenardon M.
Spina, Mrs. Robert H. Brainard, Mrs. Joseph Paluga, Mrs. Gustav Maass, Mrs.
Duane Johnson, Mrs. Howarth Lewis, Jr. Front row: Mrs. Lawrence S. Funcke,
Mrs. Henry K. Harding, Mrs. Kenneth Jacobson, Mrs. Norman Robson, Mrs.
John Stetson, Mrs. John Gesbocker, Mrs. Frank Stetson, Mrs. R. Carroll Pea-
cock, Mrs. Gerhard A. Seizer, Mrs. Harold A. Obst.


Design for more SALES APPEAL with


.Concealed Telephone

Wiring

Today's home buyer looks for more built-
in conveniences. The better living extras
attract more prospective buyers--and
.. help sell individual units and complete
subdivisions faster.
Concealed telephone wiring is becoming
more and more popular with home buy-
ers. Families like the convenience of

of wire-free walls.
It's easy to include the "plus" feature
of concealed wiring for telephones in your
home designs. Just call our Business
Office. We'll be happy to work with you.



T RSouthern Bell
w..omsw;r f wuilh I 7

26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





chances seem good that its next list
will omit the name of the University
of Florida.

Write To Your Delegation...
Indications are that not all archi-
tects recognize the serious implica-
tions of secondary boycotts in con-
struction. Any sort of secondary boy-
cott by one trade could hold up coni-
pletely any progress on a job; and this
could well be as devastating to an ar-
chitect as to a general contractor or
owner. A bill HR9020 -which
would legalize secondary boycotts has
been referred to the Rules Commit-
tee of the House but has not yet been
acted upon.
All management elements of the
construction industry are, under-
standably, trying to kill this bill. Ar-
chitects can help by writing to their
Florida legislative representatives,
Write particularly to Senators SPES-
SARD HOLLAND and GEORGE SMATH-
ERS at the Senate Office Building,
Washington, D. C. It is expected
that passage of the Senate version of
the bill will be pushed now that nom-
inating conventions are over.


MARK THE DATE. .
IT'S AUGUST 12th
The 1960 Office Practice
Seminar will be held on
that date-at The Hotel
Fenway at Dunedin, just
south of Clearwater ....
One of the featured
speakers will be Robert H.
Raine, CPA, of the Clear-
water firm of Turnburke,
Brock and Paine. His
topic will be "Tax Angles
for Architects" and
what he says might well
save you twice the ex-
pense of getting over to
hear him say it. Bet-
ter be there, for sure .


The Percentage Tells ....
Florida men were architects for
twenty percent of the houses selected
this year for publication in "Recird
Houses of 1960" by editors of Archi-
tectural Record from ". the best
houses from all parts of the United
States including Hawaii." Twenty
houses were selected; and of these
(Continued on Page 28)
AUGUST, 1960


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always borne in mind the importance of honest
values that come from basic quality .
This policy of ours has provided a headquarters
for quality. And an architect can specify any
of the many products we handle with confidence
in its character and with assurance of its high
performance in the buildings he designs .


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71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI --- FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto ..
Call Palmetto 2-1011






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 27)
four were the design products of Flor-
ida architects.
Architects whose designs were chos-
en for inclusion in this fifth annual
publication of award winning houses
were: NIMS AND BROWNE, Miami;
M.\ Ia HAMPTON, Tampa; PAUL RU-
DOLPH, S.j313.tih, and WILLIAM RUPP,
Sarasota. California was next best,
with thirce sl.ktloonrs.
Criteria for selection included ap-
pearance, interior as well as exterior,
spatial organization, structural design
and ingenuity of electrical and mech-
anical systems.

School Cost Report
Recently the AIA Memo called at-
tention to a report of the Ford
Foundation's Educational Facilities
Laboratories relative to costs of school
construction. This is a question of
particular importance in Florida -
even though, in this state school costs
on the basis of square foot figures,
are substantially less than the national
averages. The report covered a wide
range of investigation on school costs,


including the intangible costs in-
volved through developing schools
which are useful as community facil-
ities as well as educational units.
The content of the report suggests
that it would be a valuable reference
tool for any architect'dealing with a
county school board and the State
DlcpaittiL it of Education. Copies of
the report are available without
charge from Educational Facilities
Laboratories, Inc., 477 Madison Ave-
nue, New York 22, N. Y.

1961 School Building
Architectural Exhibit
The American Association of School
Administrators has announced that its
1961 Architectural Exhibit pr,,r in,
will include three separate exhibits at
San Francisco, February 25-28, St.
Louis, March 11-14, and Philadelphia,
March 25-28. The exhibits are co-
sponsored by the AIA; but all
architects are invited to submit en-
tries of the recent school buildings
they have designed.
Entries may be of public, private
or parochial schools for all grade lev-
els up to and including the 14th
grade, erectcd. or under contract for


erection, in the United States since
January 1, 1958. However, buildings
entered in former AASA exhibitions
are not eligible for entry now.
Deadline for receiving entry blanks
in the AASA office 1201 Sixteenth
St., N.W., Washington 6, D.C.- is
September 15, 1960. Full information
regarding any phase of this exhibit
may be obtained by addressing DR.
SHIRLEY COOPER, Associate Secretary
of the AASA at this address.




82 New Registrations
Granted Since January
A total of 82 new registrations to
practice architecture in Florida have
been issued by the State Board since
January this year, according to a list
released last month by MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, AIA, secretary-treasurer
of the Board. Of these, 20 were grant-
ed "by exemption" to applicants hold-
ing unexpired registrations in other
states and exhibiting satisfactory evi-
dence of professional activity. Eight-
een registrations were granted on the
basis of the applicant's holding an


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Bagwell Steel Products, Incorporated is an affiliate of the General
Steel Tank Company, Birmingham, Alabama, that has
served the south for over thirty-three years. All of the technical
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problems with us. We welcome the opportunity to quote on
your difficult steel plate and tank specifications. We will meet
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Write for data on out standard tanks and also for our
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NCARB certificate. One iegistrati..n
on the basis of a senior examination
was granted to WILLIAM F. BREIDEN-
BACH, of Tampa.
The remaining 43 Tegistrtii:ons ere
issued on the basis of the written jun-
ior examination. Examinations were
given to 189 applicants, thus ind;cit-
ing a passing percentage of 22.8. Of
the total taking the tests, 54 were do-
ing so for the first time and 135 were
repeat examinees. Only three passed
all exams successfully on their first
attempt.
Of the 43 who passed their tests,
only 13 were graduates of the Uni-
versity of Florida. 22 were graduates
from other universities or colleges;
and eight of the examinees had not
graduated from any architectural in-
stitution. Of the 146 who failed to
pass the tests, 44 had not graduated
from an ardlitectural school and 53
held diplomas from colleges or univer-
sities outside Florida. University of
Florida graduates failing the examina-
tions numbered 48.
The following are those registered
on the basis of the junior exams:
RURICK F. EKSTROM, CHARLES H.
VANN, Coral Gables; EDWARD R. BY-
WATERS, RICHARD W. Dooc.r. Fort
Lauderdale; TILMON P. CHAMLEE,
i1ot .\ icr : RICHARD C. HALEY, HER-
BERT S. W\\R[.HI. JR., Gainesville;
RICHARD J. VEENSTRA, BILLIE W.
KELLAM, HUGO S. THORSEN, JAMES
L. GARLAND, EMILIO ZELLER, WIL-
LIAM N. MORGAN, T\ R-LOUIsE BOY-
ER, Jacksonville; RONALD L. LANE,
Lake Park; GARVIN T. DREGER, Largo;
ROBERI W. MURPHY, WALTER W.
BAGGENSEN, JR., STUART COHEN, KAL-
VIN J. PLATT, JR., ROBERT W. CLARK,
JERRY D. TILLINGER, ALFRED MARCH-
ESANI, HOWARD AHERN, CHARLES F.
KNIGHT, WILLIAM C. ZEIGLER,
GEORGE SHELDON, Miami; NORMAN
L. WAX, Miami Beach; GEORGE D.
GUNN, Miami Springs; TOM FUEHR-
ER, No. Miami Beach; FRANK E.
SMITH, JR., C;LEN S. GUTHRIE, JOHN
B. STEELE, KENNETH L. WARRINER,
Sarasota; JOSEPH I. MITCHELL, JR., C.
RANDOLPH VEDDINC. St. Petersburg;
JAMES D. BULLARD, Tallahassee; EU-
GENE R. SMITH, III, JAMES A.
GREENE, TERESA J. MULLANE, Tam-
pa; DALE T. KINCAID, Winter Haven;
CHARLES F. WILLIAMS, Winter Park.
The only successful examinee with an
out-of-state address was JOSEPH R.
SAVAGE of Cincinnati, Ohio.
AUGUST, 1960


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MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA- NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
SAirko Air Conditioning Company
Cawthon, Dudley M., Inc.
SCentral Roof & Supply Co.
SConditioned Air Corporation
SHamilton, Sam L., Inc.
SHill York Corporation
McDonald Air Conditioning
Miami Air Conditioning
Miami Super Cold, Inc.
Poole & Kent Company
Sydco Corporation
Zack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

SUPPLIERS
A & B Pipe & Gen. Sheet Metal
Steel Co. & Roofing
SAir Filters Co. Gondas Corporation
SAirtemp Div. Graves Refrigeration
SChrysler Corporation Lowry of Fla., Inc.
SBrophy, George oe Middleton and Co.
SClark Equipment Co. cMurray, H. L,, Co.
SDean, A. C., Co. O'Brian Associates
Florida Electric Motor Trane Company J




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President's Message...
(Continued from Page 23)
A long time ago the National
Council of Architectural Registra-
tion Boards recognized the growing
complexities of the practice of archi-
tecture and recommended three years
of experience after graduation from
an accredited college for the young
architect before registration. Florida
still is in the horse and buggy stage
in recognizing this necessity, although
our State Board has recommended
this change for years. By the time we
get around to requiring three years of
experience, other more progressive
states will require five years of pro-
fessional experience.
The public, and particularly the
politicians, do not knl'w the reason
for this; and I fear too many students
and practicing architects fail to see its
necessity. Maybe we should attach a
proper title such as "internship" to
this most important period. At any
rate, we must face up to the possi-
bility of either limiting practice to
specialized fields, or extending the
educational period to sufficient time
for a man to grasp all of the funda-
mentals necessary for general practice.
As for practicing professionals, stop
selling yourselves short. N.1 profes-
sional man today is expected to main-
tain such a tremendous store of
knowledge on any subject or have
available for immediate answer so
many solutions to so very many prob-
lems. Stop and consider sometime
what is expected of you. Unless you
have far more than a working knowl-
ege of all phases of land development,
financing, building construction,
building law, landscaping and interior
decoration, a client may feel you un-
worthy of a co:Imnisition.
In other words, you are expected
to be land surveyor, land planner,
cartographer, geologist, structural en-
gineer, designer, artist, sculptor, me-
chanical engineer, specification writer,
material researcher, accountant, quan-
titative analyst, acoustical engineer,
financial expert, labor relations expert,
real estate informant, economist, con-
struction lawyer, materials purchasing
agent, equipment wholesaler, interior
decorator, radio and I i-I:i expert, san-
itary engineer, landscaper, industrial
engineer, golfer, fisherman, civic lead-
er, traffic engineer, insurance consult-


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OnI-e A1 lI rr..e 0w 7sr. am
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ant, investment broker, lawn main-
tenance expert, mortgage broker and
general contractor. Quite often you
may be called on to be a handyman
and even occasionally a baby sitter!
Now, in order to accomplish these
things to the satisfaction of your cli-
ents, you must have considerable
knowledge of the operation of hotels,
apartments, ice cream plants, laun-
dries, night clubs, hospitals, schools,
churches of all faiths, theatres, and
office buildings. It is further antici-
pated that Mr. Architect will serve on
municipal planning boards and com-
mittees, belong to civic clubs and gen-
erally be a social lion.
No wonder architects never retire.
It takes more than just a long life to
accomplish a part of all this. It may
sound grossly exaggerated; but any
man who has practiced for ten or
*more years has been exposed to all or
most of the preceding. It is obvious
that with this talent, and knowledge
to draw on, we are of incalculable
value and should so consider our-
selves. However, to gain only a small,
informative acquaintanceship with,
the services mentioned requires a long
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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Aichel Steel and Supply Co. 8
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration,
Heating & Piping Assoc. 30
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co .. 23
Bagwell Steel Products Co.. 28
Julius Blum & Co.. 21
A .R. Cogswell . 30
Dwyer Products of Florida, Inc. 29
Electrend Distributing Co.. 29
Federal Seaboard Terra
Cotta Corp. . 8
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 30
Florida Home
Heating Institute .. 32
Florida Power and Light Co 24
Florida Steel Corp ..... 6
General Portland Cement Co .. 9
George C. Griffin Co. .20
Hamilton Plywood . 25
Houston Corporation 14
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 10
Portland Cement Association 22
Profile Steel Products .8
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 27
Solite . 7
Southern Bell Telephone Co. 26
Southern Water
Conditioning Co. 30
Sta-Brite Fluorescent
Mfg. Co. . 3
Stran Steel . 5
Thompson Door Co 1
F. Graham Williams Co. 31


AUGUST, 1960


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer G. ED LUNSFORD, JR., Secretary
MARK. P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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Thousands of other Floridians who heat their homes
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See the oil heating display at Buildorama, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
32 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












Here's the Man We're Looking For...





SThe Executive Secretary


1I. I ilit hb a ii.in if \i-s',d m n i l d
amil ition. Jin iftLr dlrinnL.r pL.ak.r,
befhire .ilid ,tt.lr dinner eui'zlcr. niiAht
o'r,,. .i -l to travel all c ,i:, ind m ake,
out rpi-._rt, .,ll inhts ind .ipp ir fhc-li
the Ilnet d:a. and ablk t:o slep n .i
the fliior 4nd c.it ti\l, me.iak j do. ti,
o .ii..nonz!ll.' oni tri'. !lin_ i.'\l enses. i
Ii.. c.ikn irrtainLin friends ill the nt\t
tii\ 11n.
NlMut he ihle to cntert in '.\i..
si.'. etih irts ind tin,' r.iplie w\ithoiiut
LL co'lillng tuO' iiiiiro.j: be'. hAippiL
iarri-ld v ith a larg: .im il; jnd h.i',L
a \,idc riiiLe oft te!-phine nijmhers
knot'-in _nOn. -if tiFO L s ii'. _il (.d: milu t
inhlc duit: dri.. thlroi lii [ilI'V till
inclics dee-p it ten lielrn t and uirk
all sumrimmr \ithiLit per pirlin or
.iccquirinY B ().
1i-i-st b' a Iian's in.i .1 miodcl
m.in., .1 gEid hiusbind, fathrl', either.
a ol.id prir. idcr. a plutcrit. a d'.:m -
rcrit. i< republican. i n '-d<. lLr, n.1
old-dcalcr and a fast dealer, a teclh-
niciin. a piliticijn. a miathemati,:ian.
an old .irplane nech,-nic irid an
iiathnrit'. nn plumbing; l.l. codLs.
].\: Jnd ii.irkcting technliqueis-and
ah., knn, h._m to fi\ old ,irs. Must
he .i cnimptcnrit steno and thpi-t.
abkl to do I 0l '.\,.rds .1 miniuti ind
kcLp a citar g.i full bl.3t an
inrffensi\e ci:.r at that.
Must attend ill meetin s In\cn-i-
ti',o is, fu'lnera \ iit liospitail and
I.JAH co fnt.t and s~iuthe tlt: feeliin _"
of ill members, pro-pecti\e members
and ie\-liLmb i .T in hi; tcrritir',-- md
take time '.iout for o-ld-\ ill work n\1tli
thel' I:'ial Auxili ar', and the state' _ld
n.ition:il Ati\x!ian ac' Iell.
NMuiat in'm, the lj. n. kno.,. the


C o; ii n. r Iii.r o. ,r. 1n i tar thliit is
il l thi r L-i g I r lii i. i i. i[ liii ibl i n1.)r
Nimilecr. lMut be Able tu., cimputc
miei .gc. drift. crn iind speed. :i-s e.n-
siliinpti. n p`r I liLk pr minutes ,.I:ar
and tajr In tiru .nJd dcpr.ciJation I'n
the p.unut ib. Ciar mutt be nec'
Ceniu2h to? c.reite repecit in all those
\\ho -L it. but ,id enough ti jvi'nid
chjrgIs cf "puttiii. on their dog."
Nlimt ic ahbl ti tdit a m-ing.i1inl
i.th -lut sppi:ndin time on it. CI.'n
:ittr : ti'.1 to h iiiL..il l,. _,,r com -
mittte irieLttiin,. but not Suilmptuou
en iii-h to c.loie L',immeint b L tli'he
attind inc Musti know, labhir li,'v. crim-
in i1 lj'.., lair if N.uppl\ .-in dinmand
and hlo'\ tLi makc an (xcp.Ln'i aiLC',-unt
and \-uchier stick the fihrt time it
is uili-hmitted
Must hi.i\ uniilimitcd enduLirnce
and frequent Luitr-indulgenie iin \\ine,
\\ind jnd egb iMust he an flpert
tilkcr, hIr. d.inceir. tr.:ler. brihdc.
golf Jnd poker p,lr.cr. aut-horitT on
p lhiii Ntr\. ph\siulig,\, p '.chhiolog\. h\-
dr.ulics. catk. dogs ind tfih
NMu.t bIc i.icl.' enolu'h to be trusted
b\ huFb.ands and j.ttracti'.e enough
ti he inti.rcstin to. \\L'.c Pjroleci
ntcd not appl\.


N(O E Iihe toreninir appeared in
tlch mIllt rccillt iuC' Oft IDE Bruir-
11N. a li-iht-ihall.d .r ic, of the
Ilt//dill'r. d Beachi Ilaot. site of the
F.VA's X thll Annual Conventior n in
Novcmnber. It i, reprodduc'd hei e in
a 'pint of hilptul goodI.-ii'dl by per-
nli'.'n through the .',:o)d oifficts of
Hou Ln rd (C;anck, the. Hrlh\ ionrd Peach
Hi 'tC l's genial C'Min-1ntioii M\lLiiagr.























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.The first Con\ention of the new decade -
wchich some are already calling "The Sizzling
Sixties" \ill be at Hollvvood in No\ember.
The Broward County Chapter will be the host;
aid members are alrcad\ at work developing
the theme "Man, Climate and The Architect"
into a program which promises to be both pro-
,'ocatie and unusual. It's nor too earl\ to
plan for the 19,50 FAA Con\ention right now.
There's a good chance you'lll be invited to par-
ticipate as well as to attend .


Meadq,4'en,. U.te 9 Q, 4 : w



aso gt m o t he .st
conyenrfo ,fac ties, .on the .
ntire coast en additibn '
.o .ifes of .Space for..mneet- -, e
ings; ari exhibits, all sorts of ...
opporrinituid -exist for fun. .



46th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION

NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, .1960 HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL- HOLLYWOOD


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