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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 Walton named to state board
 Gamble named two major AIA...
 Be careful with that seal!
 "Man, climate and the architec...
 AIA convention exhibit awards
 Reorganization was the convention's...
 News and notes


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00072
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: June 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00072
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Walton named to state board
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Gamble named two major AIA committees
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Be careful with that seal!
        Page 11
    "Man, climate and the architect"
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    AIA convention exhibit awards
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Reorganization was the convention's prime concern
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    News and notes
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












































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JUNE, 1960






74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


In 7i Isuae ---


Letters . ..
Walton Named To State Board .
Gamble Named to Two Major AIA Com
Be Careful With That Seal .
Second of a series on the Architects'
"Man, Climate and The Architect" .
The November Convention by Betty
AIA Convention Exhibit Awards
Residence of Russell T. Pancoast, FA
House in Laurel Grove, Jacksonville
National, Air Line Nose Hanger
St. Paul's Lutheran Church Fellowsh
Reorganization Was the Cotvention's Prii
Message from The President by John
News and Notes .........
TCAA Design Award... Office Prac
Awards... New FAA College Buildi'
FA Panorama . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John. Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th 'Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesvill
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolph; FLORIDA NORTI
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samue
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugen
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, James E
Windham, III; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, Jefferson N. Powell.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miam

THE COVER
Readers who were interested in the cover design for the March issue-thi
ultra-free abstraction of yellow and white on a' black background-wil
be interested in learning that this month's cover design originated from the
same source-Gene Choppa, U/F architectural student who showed hi!
versatility in the sketch problem given last fall in Course AE-432.


. 6
mittees 8
S.. .. .11
'Law of Florida
. .. 12
J. Ritter
. 15 to 20
IA .. 15
. .. 18
19
ip Hall 20
me Concern ... .. 21
Stetson, AIA
. .25
tice Seminar. Student
ng Committee -. .
. ... 2nd and 3rd Covers



The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
e American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
i, reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
H ... Advertisements of products, materials and
I services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
e comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
confirm to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copytor illustrations.
.Accepted as.controlled ctculation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

s ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher



VOLUME 10I 9 0

NUMBER -6 A
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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.sothe.il es .125


Letters


Angle on Renewal .. .
EDITOR, FA:
Thank you so much for sending me
the March issue of The Florida Archi-
tect following my request therefore
-and more particularly your letter
wherein you noted some of my legis-
lative activity.
You are correct in my interest con-
cerning your urban renewal article.
But I hasten to advise you that the
legislation I offered in Tallahassee was
not so interested in Federal participa-
tion in urban redevelopment project,
but merely to give governmental units
the authority to condemn that is
exercise the right of eminent domain
for purposes of private redevelopment.
Being the reactionary that I am, I
somewhat frown on the Federal par-
ticipation in projects which best can
be done either by local governmental
authority or by private interests.
Thanking you again and with warm-
est regards, I remain,
THOMAS M. CARNEY
State Representative,
Pinellas County

Approval .
EDITOR, FA:
I received the May issue and in-
tended to write immediately but un-
fortunately was out of the office for
several days and under the weather.
'I am greatly pleased with the pre-
sentation of our needs and the pro-
posed solution. There are a few very
minor misinterpretations of the data
I sent you, but I do not believe we
will get into any trouble leaving them
as is for the time being. In any case,
I think you have written an excellent
and persuasive statement and have
mounted it in a format that is attrac-
tive, straight-forward, and free of that
Madison Avenue ultra-slickness which
inevitably increases, rather than allays,
suspicion.
I took over my copy to be sure
President Reitz saw it. He had already
received his copy and expressed en-
thusiastic appreciation for its support
and high quality.
Please accept my thanks from
myself and my colleagues for the
constant support you have given us


during the past three years and the
unlimited thought and effort which
has produced such a successful and
timely brochure.
TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA
Dean, College of Architecture
and Fine Arts
University of Florida

And Disapproval...
EDITOR, FA:
What I am going to say is strictly
a personal opinion and in no way re-
flects the feelings of the Department
of Architecture at the University of
Florida. This does not mean that
there are not many others who share
my sentiments.
If there has ever been a golden
opportunity passed up, it is the pro-
posed building for the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts. In all due
respect to the architects involved and
to the sincere faculty members who
have been struggling for so long with
this project, I honestly believe the
proposed building to be a discredit to
Florida architecture and to the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Naturally, under the fear of losing
its accreditation, the college has been
fighting desperately for a new home
for many years. Acquiring the state
funds is almost a full time job in
itself, especially in a school where the
new Agricultural Engineering building
has a far better drafting room than
most of the architectural students
have ever seen. In light of all these
problems and the limitations which
building on a university campus im-
poses, I still think we have fallen
way short in achieving the kind of
building we could have, and should
have demanded.
This five-story, curtain wall and
brick building, by the very fact that
the College has endorsed it, will stand
as a symbol of the best effort of the
College and of the profession, whether
we like it or not. At least the tempo-
rary building we now occupay makes
no pretense at being good architec-
ture. It is certainly overcrowded,
poorly lighted, poorly ventilated and
ill-equipped. When we move into the
new building we will lose any of the
personality or character that we may
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


S4







Concrete panels made with Trinity White-the whitest white cement
lu4


The white decorative panels were
made with 100% Trinity White port-
land cement. The darker panels were
made by combining 50% Trinity
White with 50% standard gray
cement.


PORTLAND CEMENT


A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
CHICAGO CHATTANOOGA DALLAS FORT WORTH
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TAMPA MIAMI LOS ANGELES


JUNE, 1960


c i :i~l Pza r : :.n





Cr



















































G GEORGE C. 0
RIFFIN O.
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 10025, Jacksonville, Florida













i m h.0


Letters__
.-(Continued from Page 4)
have now. Instead of gaining any
identity on our campus, the College
will be losing itself behind the un-
identifiable and unoffensive curtain
wall.
If I believed the proposed building
to be an honest expression of the phi-
losophy of the College, or that it was
the,best solution we cold have had,
I might feel less offended by it. I
feel it was almost an act of despera-
tion on the part of the faculty; and
I am confident that there are several
architects in Florida who would have
jumped at the chance to create an
imaginative piece of good architecture
which would assert that the profession
of Architecture and the whole build-
ing industry in Florida are something
more than passive in attitude. This


was a chance to give the building in-
dustry a real shot in the arm. It could
have been the spark needed and de-
served.
I suppose that I am just tired of
passive, unoffensive architecture. It
especially disturbs me to see it hap-
pening to a group that should be any-
thing but passive. If this is the best
the leaders and educators of the pro-
fession can demand, what can we
possibly expect from the average man?
With all of the concern for good
public relations in the profession, why
have we completely overlooked, this
splendid opportunity for the best ad-
vertising possible-good architecture?
It is buildings like this one that will
keep our public relations men busy
for a long time.
LOWELL L. LOTSPEICH
June, 1960, graduate in Architecture
University of Florida


Walton Named To State Board


FRANCIS R. WALTON, AIA, Day-
tona Beach Chapter, has been ap-
pointed by Governor LEROY COLLINS
as a member of the five-man State
Board of Architecture to fill the un-
expired term (two years) of RICHARD
BOONE ROGERS, AIA, of the Mid-
Florida Chapter. Rogers, who was
reappointed to the Board in 1958,
resigned because of his wife's illness.
During his membership on the Board
he had served two terms as that


FRANCIS L. WALTON, AIA
appointed


body's able presiding officer.
The new Board member is now
serving his second term as secretary
of the FAA-his first being in 1951.
He will continue as an FAA officer
until the expiration of his secretary-
ship December 31, this year. He has
been active in both chapter and state
professional affairs since becoming a
corporate member of the AIA in
1946. He served as secretary and treas-
(Continued on Page 8)





















RICHARD BOONE ROGERS, AIA
resigned
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






WHEN AMERICA BUILDS FOR ECONOMY.., IT BUILDS WITH CONCRETE


.1 2+,.


sjLIYr~ 4'


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Kh .e '-'


Sears, Roebuck & Company's Tampa store ...

concrete folded plate roof achieves

large, unobstructed floor area


One of the basic requirements here was to achieve
unobstructed floor space with economy. Architects
Weed, Russell, Johnson & Associates found the an-
swer by using a concrete shell in the form of a folded
plate. This construction made it possible to span the
entire floor area with only one interior row of columns
... and suspend the second floor from the roof. The
result: 163,715 square feet of fully flexible floor space,
so important to any retail selling operation.
Folded plate design is, in itself, unique and iiterest-
ing. And only concrete can give the added boldness of
the wide, cantilevered overhang.
It's one more example of the way new uses of con-
crete are bringing big economies and added vitality
to both conventional and modern architecture.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and exten .the uses of concrete
JUNE, 1960


FOR STRUCTURES...
MODERN

concrete
Im NE


Isometric view showing
125-foot c on c spacing of
main columns. Floor slab
is supported by 3-inch
plates welded together to
form a hanger. Hangers are
spaced 25 feet c on c.







Walton Named ..
.(Continued frem Page 6)
urer of the Daytona Beach Chapter
and also as Chapter president for two
terms. He has represented his chapter
on the FAA Board of Directors and
has held membership in several FAA
standing and special committees. At
various times also he has served as a
Chapter delegate to AIA conventions.
A, native of Daytona Beach, Wal-
ton obtained his degree in architec-
ture at the University of Florida in
1934. His professional practice began
in 1940 as a principal in the Daytona
Beach firm of Walton, Spicer, Leete
and Gehlert. Currently he conducts
his practice independently at 152 Bay
Street, Daytona Beach.


Gamble Named to Two
Major AIA Committees
CLINTON GAMBLE has stepped from
the position of AIA Director for the
Florida District-now held by ROB-
ERT M. LITTLE, FAIA-to member-
ship on two of the Institute's most
currently important committees. Re-
cently he was named representative
from the Florida District to the Com-
mittee on AIA Structure, of which
Central States District Director I.
LLOYD ROARK is chairman. Responsi-
bility of this group is to develop a
revised program for reorganization of
the Institute for submission to the
1961 Convention at Philadelphia.
This Committee's initial proposal was
rejected at San Francisco this year.
The former FAA president's other
appointment is to the Committee on
The Profession with the difficult
charge of delineating the image of
the architect as current trends and
'thinking suggest it will develop during
the next twenty years. This is a four-
member group including, besides
Gamble, AIA President PHILIP WILL,
JR., FAIA, JAMES M. HUNTER, FAIA,
the Institute's second vice-president,
and ALEXANDER C. ROBINSON, FAIA,
Chancellor, AIA College of Fellows.
Locally, Gamble is spearheading an
FAA effort to make certain that the
1961 State Legislature appropriates
funds necessary for construction of
the proposed new buildings for the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
at Gainesville. The building was the
subject of a special four-color section
in last month's (May) issue.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













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JUNE, 1960


*'
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i4

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Mutschler kitchen specialists offer
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For further details write:
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


SERIES 700. This is Ihe newest
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I


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..-M
110


- VWLIfiftm_ -


~pi3
I~







tw I/eato State aeaw,,.


Be Careful




With




That Seal!


This is the second of a continuing series of
articles on the Architects' Law of Florida -
Chapter 467 of the Florida Statutes. The
series has been designed to bring to prac-
ticing architects and others clarification of
various provisions of the law. Some of these
provisions have been the subject of misun-
derstanding on the part of many practicing
architects. To make certain that explana-
tions of them are both clear and accurate,
these articles have been submitted to mem-
bers of the Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture prior to publication.


The State Board of Architecture is
charged not only with administering
the law regulating the practice of ar-
chitecture. It is also charged with the
enforcement of the law's provisions;
and a large part of its "legal agenda"
at each Board meeting is concerned
with actual violations of Section
467.15 the improper use of an
architect's seal.
Use of the seal is a mandatory pro-
vision of the law. The first paragraph
of Section 467.15 provides that every
registered architect shall have a seal
" with which he shall stamp all
drawings and specifications issued
from his office for use in this state."
This is a certainly clear enough; and
files of the Board contain little or no
indication that registered architects
are practicing without owning a seal,
or without using it when and as re-
quired.
The trouble comes through too fre-
quent, rather than too infrequent, use.
The second paragraph of Section
467.15 says "No architect shall affix
or permit to be affixed his seal or his
name to any plan, specification, draw-
ing or any other related document
which was not prepared by him or
under his responsible supervising con-
trol It is the misunderstanding
and in some cases flagrant disregard of
this provision which forms the basis
for many of the violations with which
the Board has to deal.
Truly 'deliberate violation of this
section of the architects' law is actu-
JUNE, 1960


ally much less common than the flag-
rancy of exposed cases or the imag-
inative accusations of over-zealous
practitioners would suggest. These
do exist, of course. During the past
few years the Board has taken action
against several architects; and, as a
result of clear-cut evidence, has either
suspended or revoked their registra-
tion to practice. And it is true that
not all plan-stampers have yet been
brought under this disciplinary con-
trol by the Board. But in many in-
stances the Board knows who these
shrewd and deliberate violators are.
Little by little needed evidence ac-
cumulates; and in due time, having
sufficient proof against a violator to
justify action, the Board, after formal
charges are filed, holds a hearing to
determine final disposition by re-
vocation or suspension of registration
if the charges are proved.
Improper use of the seal can, of
course, be innocent. For example,
here is the case of a plan made by an
engineer or draftsman not regis-
tered aA an architect for an owner
which has been refused permit or ap-
proval by a building official because
it had not been sealed by a registered
architect. The drawings are taken to
an architect with the request that he
"check them over" or "revise them as
necessary" and then seal them so
that a permit may be issued.
Many of the Board's cases deal with
just such situations. If the architect
does seal the drawings as submitted to


him, he has done so improperly in
violation of the law. This is the case
also even though the architect may
have made some minor changes or
notes and may have done a consci-
entious job of checking over the ac-
curacy of the drawings. Under the
law use of his seal indicates that the
documents have been prepared"... by
him or under his responsible super-
vising control." Mere examination is
not sufficient. Checking is not suffi-
cient. Minor changes, or the addition
of notes which do not substantially
alter the general concept or details of
the project are not sufficient.
Another example: An organization
has prepared drawings for a building
in Florida and contacts a local archi-
tect as an "associate" to obtain a
building permit and to see the job
through construction. On the basis of
a series of conferences relative to this
arrangement, the Florida architect
seals the plans in the belief he is per-
fectly justified in doing so. He is not
so justified under the law; thus, how-
ever unwittingly, he has clearly vio-
lated the statute.
Still another example: An architect
registered in Florida but with a home
office in another state, sets up an of-
fice here. He staffs it with an unreg-
istered man as manager. It prospers
in the name of the out-of-state archi-
tect; but the work is performed al-
most completely by the staff of the
Florida branch office with the non-
(Continued on Page 31)








"Man, Climate and The Architect"


November 10, 1960 is "C-Dayf' for
the Broward County Chapter. On that
day, the 46TH ANNUAL FAA CON-
VENTION will open in Hollywood at
the Hollywood Beach Hotel. We of
the Broward County Chapter, as host
chapter, are now busily laying the
groundwork for what we hope will be
the most stimulating and rewarding
FAA convention yet held.
The planning and design of archi-
tecture in a sub-tropical climate such
as we have in Florida presents many
unique problems. The 1960 conven-
tion theme, "MAN, CLIMATE AND THE
ARCHITECT," will sharply focus our
thoughts on the broad relationship
of man and climate-and, more spe-
cifically, the practical aspects of the
architect's role in this relationship.
What are the problems we face in
helping man live with or retreat
from- the elements? How can we
utilize the advantages and, at the
same time, minimize the disadvan-
tages of a sub-tropical climate? What
are the physiological psychological
effects of a man-made, man-con-
trolled climatological environment?
In seeking answers to these and
other similar questions we will have
the opportunity to share the knowl-
edge and thinking of experts and
researchers in the interrelated areas of
man, climate and architecture. Some


of the speakers who have agreed to
participate in our convention this fall
are DR. PAUL SIPLE, DR. CLARENCE
MILLS, ALADAR and VICTOR OLGYAY,
DR. MARSTEN BATES and ROBE CAR-
SON.
Dr. Paul Siple is a climatologist
with first hand experience. In 1928,
when 20 years old, he was selected
from 600,000 Boy Scouts to accom-
pany Admiral Byrd's Antarctic Expe-
dition. Although the youngest mem-
ber of the expedition, he was in
charge of the biological and zoological
work and later served as head of the
biological department of Byrd's sec-
ond expedition in 1933-35. In 1941,
Dr. Siple was employed by the U. S.
War Department as a civilian expert
,on the design of cold climate clothing


and equipment and later participated
in Operation Deep Freeze in 1956.
He is a Fellow of the American Geo-
graphical Society and has received
many awards and honors for his work
in climatology.
Dr. Clarence Mills, a physiologist,
is director of the Laboratory of Ex-
perimental Medicine of the University
of Cincinnati. He has conducted ex-
periments in such areas as radiant
cooling, and, in his book, Climate
Makes The Man, he explores the
social and economic interrelationships
between climate and man. As is ob-
vious from the title of his book, he
believes that the advancement of a
civilization is, by and large, a product
of its climatological environment.
Aladar and Victor Olgyay are con-


GEORGE M. POLK, JR. ROBERT E. TODD
Registration Co-chairman Registration Co-chairman


DONALD H. MOELLER
Products Exhibit
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


That's the theme ... And here are some of the people
who are planning the development of that theme into
a Convention Program that promises to be one of the
most significant in the FAA's 46 -year -old history.



By BETTY J. RITTER
Associate, Broward County .Chapter

























WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR.
General Co-chairman


sidered by many to be the foremost
experts on solar control devices. They
are identical twins with identical ca-
reers: both are associate professors at
the Architecture Laboratory of Prince-
ton University and have taught at
Notre Dame and carried on research
at the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. After graduation from
the Royal Polytechnic University in
Budapest, they both won Prix de
Rome Fellowships and later, Guggen-
heim Fellowships. No, they are not
Siamese, they are Hungarian!
Dr. Marston Bates, naturalist and
author of Where Winter Never
Comes, takes a stand opposing that
of Dr. Mills: climate is not necessarily
a prime factor in a civilization's de-
velopment but rather a natural re-


PAUL R. JOHN
Architectural Exhibits
JUNE, 1960


JAMES H. HARTLEY
General Co-chairman


source, so to speak, which can be
exploited by man. Dr. Bates is pro-
fessor of zoology at the University of
Michigan and has served on the Gug-
genheim and Rockefeller Foundations,
as well as on the National Science
Foundation.
Last, but not least, on our list of
convention speakers is Robe Carson,
a meteorologist who is presently sup-
ervisor of the Miami Flight and
Weather Service. Mr. Carson is cur-
rently writing a book on our Florida
tropics which will be published in the
near future.
But contributions of these speakers
are not the only values the Convention
will offer. Again this year an exhibit
of building materials and products
will provide conventioneers first-hand


JOSEPH PHILLIPS, JR.
Awards


opportunity to learn about the newest
and the latest. In addition, an exhibit
of work by tropical architects-from
South America, Mexico and the Ca-
ribbean Islands as well as from our
own region-will not only dramatize
the central theme of the convention,
but will effectively demonstrate a
variety of ingenious solutions to the
problem of taming the tropics with
examples of contemporary tropical de-
sign.
Student participation is being spe-
cially encouraged this year. Architect-
ural students of the Universities of
Florida, Miami and Mexico have been
invited to submit solutions to an arch-
itectural design involving a climatic
problem. Submissions will be juried
(Continued on Page 14)


ROBERT E. HANSEN
Hospitality


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Conventions .. .
(Continued from Page 13)
and prominently displayed at the Con-
vention.
Development of the Convention
theme-by speakers, through seminar
discussions and graphically in exhibits
-will hopefully raise the question,
"Where do we go from here?" The
Convention is being planned to pro-
vide what every architect worthy of
the name should welcome-an oppor-
tunity to evaluate his own work as
a creator of tropical architecture.
Against the background of expert
knowledge and demonstrated tech-



MORE TO COME..
As plans for various phases of
the 46th Annual FAA Conven-
tion become definite, they will
be reported in these columns
-particualrly those involving
entertainment, publicity, the
ladies' program, student activ-
ities and general arrangements.
Chairmen of these com-
mittees, not pictured here, are:
WILLIAM A. GILROY, enter-
tainment; ROBERT E. HALL,
publicity; MRS. WILLIAM F.
BIGONEY, Jr., ladies' program;
THOR AMLIE, student activi-
ties, and CLINTON GAMBLE,
arrangements. NEXT
MONTH General Co-Chairman
JOHN M. EVANS will by-line
another article on the impor-
tance of climate control as an
influence in Florida building
design. Forecasting the theme
for the November Convention,
much of his material is based
on his studies at the School of
Tropical Architecture in Lon-
don-which were reported in
an article by him in the March
issue of The Florida Architect.


nique he can check his own accom-
plishments. And in doing so he can
gain from the Convention program a
wealth of practical suggestions, an ex-
pansion of his vocabulary of tropical
design toward the end of improving
his own solutions to climatology prob-
lems.
At this writing, details of the 1960
FAA Convention program are still
incomplete. But committee chairmen
of the host chapter are working on
them, and arrangements now under
way give promise that every phase
of Covention activity will justify your
enthusiastic participation. So plan
now to attend.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







AIA Convention Exhibit Awards


For the past several years the AIA has conducted two exhibit programs for which awards
have been made. One is the Honor Award Program; the other, the Homes For Better Living
Program-the latter divided into custom-built and merchant-built categories. This year the
work of four Florida architects was selected for citation from among the hundreds of
exhibits submitted from every section of the country ...


HONORABLE MENTION RESIDENCE OF RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA
Homes for Better Living Miami
Program-Custom-built category Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham,
Architects


JUNE, 1960


--*:


15




I ____ __ _


Built on the east side of its street, this house is screened on
the west by hammock growth edging the car court; and on the
east it opens full to a never-tiring view of a lake which laps at
the foundations of a lower-level, cantilevered terrace which spans
the water between two limerock anchorages. On the west, too, the
floor is cantilevered from the foundation. This, and the visual
lightness of the steel-tube framing and moveable glass enclosures
of the living room combine to make this structure appear to
float. Essentially it is a great canopied platform, characterized
by a remarkable sense of openness and freedom-but shrewdly
disposed for convenience, impeccably finished and furnished and
fitted with equipment and elements of construction designed to
make it easily, and almost instantly, adjustable to the variables
of the Florida climate. Most exterior walls are sliding glass doors;
and sliding interior partitions permit combination of living and
guest room at will. A four-zone, reverse-cycle system insures
continued comfort conditions during extremes of temperature.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















































































JUNE, 1960































lla~- .-U-.~l l~PI B


MERIT AWARD

Homes for Better Living Program

Merchant-built Category


ROBERT C. BROWARD
Architect


This is the second award to have been given
houses designed for the Jacksonville develop-
ments of Hall Enterprises, Inc., the builders.
This was one of two merit awards given for
Class B entries houses costing from $15,-
000 to $25,000. Other award-winning houses
in the Laurel Grove area were described in the
March, 1959, issue of The Florida Architect.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


eLu
;*~L-~s


~na



































1960 AIA Honor Awards Program





AWARD OF MERIT


National Airlines Nose Hanger,
Miami

WEED JOHNSON ASSOCIATES
Architects




In commenting on the results of the 1960 Honor Award
Program, the Jury noted that "... Many of the buildings
submitted were extremely competently handled, but the Jury
was searching for examples which demonstrated true leader-
ship." In designating the awards, the Jury stated that each
"... represented an outstanding contribution to the cause
of good architecture." The structure, designed in 1957
to service DC-8 jet-liners, provides two unobstructed areas
112 by 450 feet on either side of a 48-foot wide shop and
equipment core. The folded plate cantilevered roof was designed
for a 150 mph. wind load and can flex within an 18-inch
range-12-inches up, 6-inches down.


JUNE, 1960











































1960 AIA Honor Awards Program


AWARD OF MERIT


VICTOR A. LUNDY, Architect


St. Paul's Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall,
Sarasota


fI 4
* .


This building was one of
two by Florida architects
to win design honors in
the 1960 program. Sub-
missions by architects
throughout the country
totalled 289. Of these
the Jury selected but 16
as worthy of special ci-
tation.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


0 0 0








tessage afro 74e Preiadent...






Reorganization Was The


Convention's Prime Concern


By JOHN STETSON, AIA
Flr *:.3-r,r


General Impressions .
Site One of the world's most
interesting cities historical back-
ground physically beautiful- pros-
perous and well dressed people-good
food representing the tastes of many
lands.
Attendance Second largest con-
vention in history of A.I.A (Centen-
nial in Washington, D. C. largest)-
best attendance at panels, business
meetings, etc.
Facilities Excellent many
hotels within a few blocks of Masonic
Temple. This structure provided best
meeting facilities we've ever had.
Convention Spirit Very best-
a notable unity of purpose-less argu-
ment for a return to the "old days
in A.I.A." Good weather and good
food may have contributed much.
Costs to Delegates An eye
opener--although highest yet, no
grumbling. Maybe we are ready to
reconsider what an architect can and
will spend at conventions.
Florida Delegation My count,
16 -very good considering distance
involved-all active throughout. Many
took side trips both going to and
coming from convention. Reed Fuller
(Palm Beach Chapter) attended with
new bride, taking, the long way out
and back by automobile.
New Fellows of the A.I.A. .
Three from the Miami area Robert
M. Little, Robert L. Weed and Rob-
ert Fitch Smith. This makes nine I
believe, all members of the Florida
South Chapter-more than the rest
of the State combined. Come on you
other Chapters.
JUNE, 1960


Next Year Convention in Phil-
adelphia (City of Brotherly Love)-
already well planned. They started
two years ago. With Florida playing
host in 1963, we'd better be getting
our plans under way.

Institute Reorganization ...
After a very brief discussion at one
of the early convention meetings, the
proposed reorganization plan was re-
ferred back to committee for further
study. It was also recommended that
this committee be expanded to in-
clude other members of the Institute,
not necessarily officers or directors.
Like Florida, California, Texas and
most of the regions were opposed to
certain parts of the plan as presented.
Later, discussions with officers, direc-
tors and just plain members brought
out these facts:
A streamlining of the Institute is





The San Francisco Con-
vention brought double
honors' to Robert Law
Weed, FAIA. First was
his election to the Col-
lege of Fellows on the
basis of design; and sec-
ond was his Award of
Merit for the NAL Nose
Hangar, illustrated on
page 19 of this issue.
Here retiring AIA Presi-
dent John Noble Rich-
ards, left, offers his Con-
gratulations on the Award
of Merit citation.


desired; but on the other hand there
is a basic, inborn fear of further sep-
arating the member from the top.
The average member feels that already
there are too many channels between
him and the Institute without cre-
ating more. He admits that certain
functions are unwieldly-vertical com-
mittees still do not quite make the
grade at lower levels; too much is de-
manded of the officers and directors
-and that sooner or later we must
study the problem of an expanded
membership or else return to a
smaller, more compact organization
functioning primarily for the few
rather than the whole membership.
There is a definite weakness in
electing vice presidents from six Reg-
ions, creating a "succession series."
Being gentlemen, we would feel that
each State, or even possibly each large
(Continued on Page 22)

























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President's Message .
S(Continued from Page 21)

Chapter, would be entitled to a turn
at bat. This would rotate the selection
of a nominee over the years to en-
compass each subordinate group.
Unfortunately, this can only lead
to a situation distasteful to all. It is,
of course, possible for the organiza-
tions to produce six vice presidents,
good men all, but unsuited or unable
to step up into higher office. Or, a
man might very well serve a term
as vice president representing his Reg-
ion, then when he reaches a stature
recognizable as presidential material,
find himself out of office since some-
one else from another State is due to
replace him through rotation. Top
leadership should not be limited by
geographical boundaries, "after you
my dear Alfonso" rotation systems, or
organizational charts.
The reorganization plan as pre-
sented at the Convention recognized
the necessity of creating a council rep-
resenting the States, of reducing the
size of the Board to speed up delib-
erations and of eliminating regional
problems at the Board level. Unfortu-
nately, no actual power was given to
the National Council (representing
the States); they were to become a
discussion group, airing their prob-
lems, then passing them on in the
form of recommendations to the
Board for action. The Board seemed
too small and the Region looked a
little too important.
Each convention, either National
or State, has shown us the necessity
of a careful restudy of membership
classifications. At National level we
have a limited membership status; at
State level slightly more generous.
Finally at Chapter level it is left to
the Chapters to classify their mem-
bers in a manner suitable to their situ-
ation. This ignores the recognition
of many allied artists, engineers, de-
signers and architects not practicing
principals or financially able to as-
sume Institute membership.
At the expense of possible disagree-
ment with some of the older and
honored members of long standing, I
would like to make an observed rec-
ommendation for reorganiaztion of
the Institute based on experience at
Chapter and State level and on
studies of reactions at National level
in committee work and as a conven-


tion delegate on numerous occasions.
This I have broken down into types
of membership and dues pattern with
a notation as. to what each type of
member would receive within the
organization; a suggested National
structure -not an organization chart
-and, briefly, a long range program.

Membership ,..
1 ... General to include registered
architects with certain basic require-
ments for admission to membership.
Dues very nominal limited publi-
cations and materials from the Insti-
tute- full voting privileges bene-
fits limited to a membership in a
recognized powerful and honored or-
ganization.
2 ... Affiliated to include artists,
sculptors, certain engineers, etc. Vot-
ing limited at Chapter level. Dues
again nominal and benefits limited.
3 ... Associates to include long
time architectural employees, certain
registered architects and certain engi-
neer employees of architectural firms.
Dues limited voting at Chapter or
State level and with limited bene-
fits from publications, etc.
4...Renowned (R.A.I.A.) or a
similar title, to be composed of reg-
istered architects with a minimum of
five years A.I.A, membership, who
have proven themselves worthy of ad-
vancement to a membership plateau
above the general classification. Dues
about the same as present corporate
membership-full privileges and com-
plete publication service nomina-
tion at Chapter level, with submission
to State jury for recommendation to
Institute committee.
5 ... Fellows (F.A.I.A.) to remain
as is except for possible tightening of
membership to require nomination at
State level.
This would serve to broaden our
membership to a more representative
coverage of the profession, giving us
a stronger voice at State Legislative
and National levels. Our affiliate
membership would provide an im-
mediate liaison with other organiza-
tions in a unified drive toward better
public understanding and acceptance
of the arts. The step-up membership
classifications would give the young
practitioner a continuing goal toward'
which he could direct his professional
endeavors, and a series of membership
plateaus to encourage a more ethical
practice. (Continued on Page 30)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


*






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News & Notes


TCAA Tile Award Won
by Jacksonville Designer
RICHARD W. PEARSON, JR., of Jack-
sonville, won a $1,000 award and a
recognition plaque for his winning
entry in the tile design contest spon-
sored by the Tile Contractors' Asso-
ciation of America. The award pre-
sentation was made by THOMAS A.
GRAMLING, chairman of the TCAA


Design Awards Committee during the
organization's national convention in
Jacksonville last month. Pearson is a
designer with Reynolds, Smith and
Hills, Jacksonville architects, and an
associate member of the Jacksonville
Chapter, AIA.
Honorable mention went to WIL-
LIAM F. BIGONEY, JR., AIA, and JOHN
EVANS, AIA, both of Ft. Lauderdale,
for their entry showing use of tile on

A TCAA check for
$1,000 and a memorial
plaque goes here from
Thomas A. Gramling,
left, to Richard W.
Pearson, Jr., winner of
the tile design compe-
tition. Pearson's design
involved a three di-
mensional setting of
tile to provide texture,
shadow and a changing
effect of color. Called
"folded tile" the design
embodied various possi-
bilities of angular tile
settings.


exterior walls. Pearson's entry demon-
strated a novel use of tile in a three-
dimensional, "folded" design. The
awards were selected by a jury com-
posed of KENNETH D. EARLE, presi-
dent of the TCAA; JAMES T. LEN-
DRUM, AIA, head of the Department
of Architecture, U/F, and ROBERT C.
BROWARD, AIA, Jacksonville.
Presentation ceremonies were part
of the TCAA Convention's "Archi-
tects' Day," program regarded as a
main feature of the convention. M.
V. COSTELLO, president of the Stew-
ard-Mellon Co. of Jacksonville, was
chairman for the program which was
highlighted by an address by ROBERT
M. LITTLE, FAIA, of Miami, AIA
Regional Director for Florida. Also
speaking briefly were JOHN STETSON,
AIA, FAA president; FRANCIS R.
WALTON, AIA, FAA secretary; W.
STANLEY GORDON, AIA, president of
the Jacksonville Chapter, AIA; and
GEORGE LAMB, member of the Con-
struction Specification Institute's na-
tional Board of Directors.


An architect's specifications are the point of
purchase the selling points of his work.
When incorporated in his design, the materials make the
structure more lasting, more durable and more beautiful.
The use of Celcure Treated Lumber further
enhances the architect's work. Celcure's
twenty year guarantee against rot or termites
eliminates a major maintenance problem and adds
further intrinsic value to the structure.


; :- : : G ~J


JUNE, 1960






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 25)

Student Awards ...
Ten students of the Department of
Architecture were awarded annual
honors at an Awards Luncheon held
May 19 at the University Service
Center at Gainesville. FRANCIS R.
WALTON addressed the meeting on
the subject "Practicing Architecture"
and as FAA Secretary presented the
FAA Medal to LOWELL L. LOTSPEICH
of Miami. Other medalists were:
RICHARD J. PAULIN, Grafton, Wis.,
the AIA Silver Medal, and JULIAN
PETERMAN, Pensocola, the Alpha Rho
Chi Medal. Peterman is a February,
1960 graduate; the other two honor
students will graduate in June.
Five tuition grants of $115 each,
sponsored by the Allied Chemical
Corp. and The Tile Council, were
awarded to RONALD EARL, Gaines-
ville; JOSEPH VISLAY, Greensburg, Pa.;
WILLIAM DILATUSH, St. Cloud, and
FRANK LEACH, Jacksonville. Earl is a
fourth-year student in landscape archi-
tecture; the others are all third-year
architectural students. ROBERT SWIL-


Philip Will, Jr., FAIA, partner in the
Chicago firm of Perkins and Will and
newly elected president of the AIA,
will be one of the scheduled speakers
at the 1960 FAA Convention this fall.


LEY, Lake Worth, fourth-year archi-
tectural student, also won a scholar-
ship.
The second annual award of the
two $500 travel scholarships estab-
lished last year by EDWIN T. REEDER,
AIA, and B. ROBERT SWARTBURG,


AIA, went to FORREST LISLE, Winter
Haven, fifth-year architecture, and J.
R. DUSARD, Hollywood, fourth-year
architecture. The scholarship awards
were made by B. Robert Swartburg
who also addressed the student lunch-
eon meeting.

State Board Continues
Enforcement Activities
Four legal actions instituted by the
State Board of Architecture against
individuals charged with practicing
arhcitecture without having been duly
registered are now pending on the
Board's legal calendar. During its May
meeting at Ft. Lauderdale, the Board
held a formal hearing relative to
charges of the improper use of an
architect's seal.
The Board also considered a num-
ber of new complaints relative to the
practice of architecture by unreg-
istered persons. On the basis of evi-
dence submitted to it, the Board
authorized the start of two new court
actions to seek permanent injunctions
against individuals concerned.
The remainder of the Board's three-
(Continued on Page 28)


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 26)
day meeting was occupied in consid-
ering last-minute applications for reg-
istration examinations. Written, or
junior, examinations will be held con-
currently in Miami and Jacksonville
beginning June 14.

New Special Committee...
FAA President JOHN STETSON has
named a 10-man special College
Building Committee with the general
charge of assuring that the 1961 Leg-
islature appropriate funds needed for
the construction of the new buildings
proposed for the U/F College of
Architecture and Fine Arts. In ad-
dition to CLINTON GAMBLE, chair-



MARK THE DATE .
IT'S AUGUST 12th
That's date of the 1960
Office Practice Seminar.
Chairman Robert H. Levi-
son has announced that
the day-long Seminar will
be held at the Fort Harri-
son Hotel, Clearwater -
and that all FAA archi-
tects are welcome to at-
tend. A detailed program
for the Seminar will be
published in next month's
issue.


man, members are: DAVID A. LEETE,
Daytona Beach; ROBERT H. LEVISON,
Florida Central; TURPIN C. BANNIS-
TER, FAIA, Florida North; CHESTER
L. CRAFT, Florida North Central; W.
STEWART MORRISON, Florida North
West; JOHN STETSON, Palm Beach;
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, Jacksonville;
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Mid-Florida, and
EDWARD G. GRAFTON, Florida South.

New Information
On Competition for
Dublin College Library
On page 6 of The Florida Archi-
tect for March, 1960, appeared a story
on the international competition
scheduled for the design of a $1,400,-'
000 extension to the library at Trinity
College, Publin, Ireland. Recently re-
ceived are some changes to the orig-
inal release.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Elegibility is confined to "All archi-
tects authorized to practice in their
own country who are members of an
architectural institute or society." In
the U.S. this would confine entrants
to membership in the AIA.
Source of information on, and ap-
plications for, the competition has
been changed. Registration forms
should be obtained from Competition
Registrar, Trinity College, Dublin,
Ireland-instead of the New York
City address previously reported. Also,
a deposit of $14 must accompany
application for registration-which is
returnable to those actually submitting
a design or returning the registration
prior to December 31st.
The schedule has also been revised.
Registrations will be available June
15, and the last day for registration
is August 31, this year. Entries must
be received by the Competition Regis-
trar by 5 p.m., March 21st, 1961. The
Jury will meet for judging April 22,
1961.


Grimshaw Selected to
Head Miami CSI Chapter
JOHN O. GRIMSHAW, AIA, of Weed,
Johnson Associates, became the
Greater Miami Chapter CSI's second
president as of June 1st, succeeding
DONALD G. SMITH, AIA, who has
spearheaded the growth of the or-
ganization since its formation late
in 1958. When the Chapter received
its charter in December, 1958, mem-
bership was 24. Grimshaw will take
over with an active membership
roster of 107-a 400 percent in-
crease in just 18 months.
Other officers elected were: ERNEST
C. NORLIN, of Frank Shuflin & Asso-
ciates, Vice President; WILLIAM A.
RUSSELL, of T. Trip Russell & Associ-
ates, Secretary, and EARL M. STARNES,
AIA, of Starnes and Rentscher,
Treasurer.
The growth of the Miami chapter
is symptomatic of the national growth
of the CSI. To quote The Check-
list-monthly newsletter of the Miami
chapter ably edited by BRUCE M.
NOLAND and LEWIS HAIGH-"The
National CSI has grown from five
chapters and a mere handful of hardy
organizers with determination and
purpose, to 43 chapters in 1960 and
4300 members throughout the na-
tion. At present there are three
chapters in the State of Florida:
Jacksonville, Tampa and Miami."
JUNE, 1960


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President's Message...
,(Continued from Page 22)

Organization ...
Officers President, three vice
presidents, secretary, treasurer. These
officers, together with the immediate
past president, would make up the
Executive Committee.
Board of Directors- Eventually
this will consist of fifty men, one from
each State. Until the smaller state
organizations can be developed, pos-
sibly several would band together in a
sub-region and elect just one director.
Regional Executive Committee -
composed of directors of states within
a given Region.
State Organizations Similar to
Florida, California, Texas and New
York, to be composed of chapters
within the state. Each organization
to be similar to the National, or Flor-
ida's present structure.
Chapters-as now constituted, with
attempt made to form new chapters
in areas now too large geographically
to properly function as a Chapter.
Vertically it could read like this:
Chapters would handle business re-
lated solely to their area. States would
provide coverage for the Chapters
within their area; Regional Executive
Committees would seek to handle
regional problems (usually few and
requiring less effort than local or
national); National Board of Direc-
tors would meet about twice a year
to handle major issues, with the Na-
tional Executive Committee meeting
more often to take up routine matters
and to implement the work of the
Board or to handle emergencies. This
should require no more effort on the
part of any board member than is
expected at present. And it would
actually reduce necessary travel, yet
give every Chapter a closer affiliation
with the Institute and better repre-
sentation.
A long range program -covering
such items as better state registration
laws, architect-engineer relations, edu-
cation and many of our present pro-
gram items, beginning at a national
level-could then be carried out with
the emphasis required to achieve suc-
cess. Such problems important to all
should be solved jointly for and by
all members under the guidance of
the Institute, not left to local solu-
tion.


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Know Your State Law...

(Continued from Page 11)

resident practitioner visiting the of-
fice infrequently on trips of short
duration. Drawings, of course, are
sent to the out-of-state architect for
his signature and seal.
In most such situations there is
probably a series of legal violations in-
volved. If the local branch manager
is competent, the out-of-state archi-
tect may feel it unnecessary to do
more than keep in touch with him
and "check over" the drawings just
prior to sealing them. But the law says
clearly that this is not sufficient -
since such an operation could not
reasonably be construed as providing
the "responsible supervising control"
which the statute requires for the
proper use of a seal.
In the vast majority of such situa-
tions there is no intention whatever
to violate the law. Many such have
been brought to the attention of the
Board. And in the, majority of them
it has been necessary only to clarify
to the offender the provisions of Sec-
tion 467.15 and the real meaning
and reason for its existence.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Aichel Steel and Supply Co. 8
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration,
Heating & Piping Assoc. 30
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co. .. 25
Bagwell Steel Products Co. 24
Julius Blum & Co .29
A. R. Cogswell . 30
Dwyer Kitchens of Florida 28
Electrend Distributing Co.. 28
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works .. 30
Florida Home
Heating Institute .. .32
Florida Power and Light Co. 27
Florida Steel Corp.. 22
General Portland Cement Co.. 5
George C. Griffin Co. .. 6
Hamilton Plywood .. 26
Houston Corporation .. 23
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 10
Pacqua, Inc .. 1
Portland Cement Association 7
Profile Steel Products Co. 8
A .H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc 14
Solite . 9
Southern Bell Telephone Co... 24
Southern Water
Conditioning, Inc. .30
Thompson Door Co., Inc. 3
Tiffany -Tile Corp. . 4
F. Graham Williams Co. .31

JUNE, 1960


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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