Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00069
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00069
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text








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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


n i 7 Issae ---


Public Relations in Action . . .
Clearwater Observes "Architects' Week"
International Competition for Dublin Library
Urban Renewal Gets The Green Light . .
By H. Samuel Kruse, AIA
A Background for Improvement . ..
By John Martin Evans, AIA


. 4


. 6
. 9


. 11


It's The Newest Trend In Banking . . . . .
Contemporary design in three recently completed buildings
FAA Committees for 1960 . . . . . . .
Memoranda of Procedure Part I . . . . .
Checklist for Practice compiled by Thomas Larrick, AIA
Come on Join Us! ...............
Message from The President by John Stetson, AIA


News and Notes ..........
Advertisers' Index . . . . .
This Opportunity Has Knocked Twice .
Editorial by Roger W. Sherman, AIA


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolpjh; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugene
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, James E.
Windham, III; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, Jefferson N. Powell.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami

COVER
The third in our 1960 series of cover designs results of a sketch problem
by first-year architectural students at the U/F was submitted by Gene Choppa.
We selected it because we liked the boldness and freedom of the sketch and also
the manner in which the designer had handled such elements as composition and
contrast. What does it mean? We don't care much because we don't know. But
you can read several architectural suggestions into the design of you study it-
and if you think it matters!


. . 33
34
. 36


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, at 7225 S. W. 82nd Ct.,
Miami 43, Florida; telephone MOhawk 5-5032.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of Illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 10

NUMBER 31960

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 13

. 18 and 19
. 20


. . 26
































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Profession is Honored

As Clearwater Observes

Architects' Week


In at least one active community
of the Sunshine State public relations
is a pleasure instead of a problem to
architects who live and work there.
This is the city of Clearwater which
enthusiastic residents call "The Gem
of The Suncoast." Here architects
have become recognized and accepted
as the top-ranking professionals they-
really are-and to such a degree that
February was observed at the Florida
Gulf Coast Art Center, Clearwater, as
"Architects' Month" with a continu-
ing round of special exhibits, lectures,
panel discussions and entertainment
planned as tangible tokens of recog-
nition.
Architects' Month was officially
launched January 31 at the Center
with the opening of the FAA 1959
Convention Awards exhibit. The fol-
lowing Tuesday JOHN RANDALL MC-
DONALD spoke on "The Integration of
Architecture as a Fine Art"; and the
Sunday following another exhibit was
opened in the library gallery of the
Art Center-this a showing of recent
work by members of Architects' Lea-
Sgue of Clearwater. Both exhibits were




Ancient History

Finds a New Home

Visitors to the Octagon Gallery in Wash-
ington can now muse over man's transci-
ence compared to the durability of the
materials he has fashioned. On display
thee is a 5000-year-old brick from the
ancient Mesopotamian city of Ur. It bears
the royal stamp of King Shulgi, of the
Third Dynasty of Ur, and was presented
to AIA President John Noble Richards on
behalf of the Institute by Paul J. Belden,
Jr., president of the Structural Clay Prod-
ucts Institute. Presentation ceremonies
were held January 28; but announcement
of the gift was made last November to
mark the 25th Anniversary of the SCPI.


opened to the public during the entire
month. Suncoast newspapers reported
a constant flow of interested observers
-not only artists and architects, but
home-builders and buyers, interior de-
signers and other business and pro-
fessional men.
A talk by FABER BIRREN, a leading
authority on color, was given in the
Art Center's main gallery on February
9. On February 14, under the joint
sponsorship of the Architects' League
and the Clearwater Junior Womans'
Club, the public was invited on a
city-wide tour of outstanding houses
designed by six architect-members of
the Florida Central Chapter, AIA.
Other outstanding events of Archi-
tects' Week-all open to the general
public-included, on February 16, a
panel discussion on "The Architects's
Role in Modern Society," moderated
by DR. JAMES C. BOUDREAU, formerly
dean of art at New York's Pratt Insti-
tute. Panelists included architects Eu-
GENE H. BEACH, DANA B. JOHANNES,
ROBERT H. LEVISON and JOHN RAN-
DALL McDONALD. And on February
(Continued on Page 6)


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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BUDINA AND FREEMAN, A.I.A., Architects
HENRY W. ROBERTS, Structural Engineer
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Located in the heart of downtown Richmond
is the Heart of Richmond Motel-an example of
the new urban emphasis on informality and
convenience. Utilizing a downtown lot for this
4-story project called for ingenuity-both in
design and construction techniques.
Construction was by lift slab, using 4 L-
shaped Solite lightweight structural concrete
slabs. Here Solite saved 700 tons of deadweight.
It meant substantial savings in steel columns;
reduced footing size; afforded minimum floor
to floor height. Ceilings only needed painting.
And fire resistant Solite assures a completely
fire rated building.
Large accent panels on three sides of the
building are Solite lightweight masonry units,


in a smart shadow wall pattern. And Solite
units were used extensively in hallways and
bedrooms. Here their natural sound absorbency
and beauty will add to the comfort, quiet and
pleasure of guests. High insulation qualities
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This is another example of the happy compati-
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Architects' Week...
(Continued from Page 6).
23 actor VINCENT PRICE offered a
commentary during a showing of a
color film "An Adventure in Art."
Highlight of Architects' Week in
Clearwater was the Benefit Ball held
February 13 at the Gulf Coast Art
Center in honor of the architectural
profession- at which architects and
their wives were invited guests. The
first annual Benefit Ball was scheduled
for the evening following the Florida
Central Chapter's bi-monthly meeting
at the Fort Harrison Hotel in Clear-
water. Cold and windy weather did
not prevent attendance at the formal
party by over thirty Chapter members
with their wives.
During the Chapter meeting which
preceded the Benefit Ball, President


Trinity College, in Dublin, Ireland,
last month announced plans for an
architectural design competition of in-
ternational scope and interest. The
competition, open to architects
throughout the world, is for the de-
sign of a $1,400,000 extension to the
existing 18th Century library building
on its campus in the center of Dub-
lin.
The competition will be held under
the rules of the Federation Interna-
tionale des Architects in Paris. It is to
be in one stage only; and competitors
will be asked to design one complete
building capable of being completed
for library use in successive stages.
First prize including the award
sum and architectural fee will be
worth $65,000 to the winner-plus
a very considerable amount of honor
and prestige.Three competitive awards
will be made in the pound sterling
equivalents of $4,200, $2,100 and
$1,400. Judgment will be in Novem-
ber of this year.
The design problem covered by the
competition should be of challenging
interest to every architect. It is the
development of a building that will be
in harmony with the examples of
Georgian and Victorian architecture


A. WYNN HOWELL named these
members as delegates to the AIA Con-
vention in San Francisco: ERNEST T.
H. BOWEN, II., HORACE H. HAMLIN,
JR., A. WYNN HOWELL, ROBERT H.
LEVISON, WINFIELD LOTT, JACK MC-
CANDLESS and ANTHONY L. PULLARA.
Local and area newspapers provided
excellent reporting service on the va-
rious affairs highlighting Architects'
Week. Included in the overall pub-
licity coverage was a 15-minute radio
interview with DANA B. JOHANNES on
the subject "The Architect in Clear-
water." Johannes, president of the
Architects' League of Clearwater, was
formerly a director of the Washing-
ton, D. C., Metropolitan Chapter and
also served as the Potomac Valley
Chapter's first president. He became
an FAA member and active in Flor-
ida Central Chapter affairs' immedi-
ately upon moving to Florida in 1958.


that now exist on the campus. But far
from demanding that the new struc-
ture be of neo-Georgian design, the
College is asking that it be of con-
temporary character which will ex-
press the mid-twentieth century as
faithfully as the present library be-
gun in 1712 expresses its own peri-
od in history. In addition, of course,-
there exists the problem of meeting
the highly specialized requirements of
a modern library plant no simple
task in itself.
The following men will serve as
judges under the general chairmanship
of LORD ROSSE, Vice Chancellor of
Dublin University: KEYES DEWITT
METCALF, Director of Harvard Uni-
versity Library; SIR HUGH CASSON,
Professor of Interior Design, Royal
College of Art, London; Sic. FRANCO
ALBINI, Professor of Architecture at
Venice; and RAYMOND MCGRATH,
Principal Architect of the Office of
Public Works, Dublin.
Details regarding submission of
entries will be available in April. In-
formation may be obtained from the
American Council for Trinity College,
Dublin, at 53 East 93rd Street, New
York 28, N.Y.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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I f







Urban Renewal Gets The Green Light



By H. SAMUEL KRUSE

Florida South Chapter


On February 9, 1960, the Metro-
politan Dade County Commission
passed an urban renewal ordinance
over mild opposition from a surpris-
ing source.
Formerly, opposition to enabling leg-
islation for the redevelopment of our
urban areas has come from entrenched
landowners who strongly believe in
the divine rights of proprietorship over
public welfare. This time the champ-
ions of urban renewal opposed the
legislation. And it is because of this
surprising development that it seems
appropriate to review the urban re-
newal legislation situation in Florida
in order to more wisely evaluate pro-
posed legisaltion in the field so vital
to the well-being of the Florida com-
munity.
This review starts with the confu-
sion created in 1952 by the Florida
Supreme Court decision in the case of
Adams vs. The Housing Authority of
Daytona Beach. It will be recalled
that the Daytona Beach Housing Au-
thority proposed a project in which
6V2 acres of slums were to be acquired,
the displaced residents of these slums
relocated and the acquired property
sold to private investors for com-
mercial, warehousing and light indus-
trial purposes.
Heretofore slums were cleared from
acquired land for the purpose of erect-
ing low-rent housing for residents dis-
placed by the land acquisition and
others in the low income bracket.
This was found legally acceptable
under the constitution. But, when the
Housing Authority of Daytona Beach
proposed to acquire land to be sold
to private individuals, associations and
corporations for private enterprise and
for commercial and industrial pur-
poses for private gain and profit, it
was challenged and found unconsti-
tutional. Not only was the Daytona
Beach Redevelopment Project found
unconstitutional. The Supreme Court
found the whole act unconstitutional,
MARCH, 1960


When urban renewal and redevelopment legislation was signed
into law at Washington, few major communities in Florida
had seriously considered means for halting the growth of
blight and slums. But as publicity exposed the dark corners
of civic deterioration, need for improvement programs took
on new significance. Tempted also by the apparent possibility
of utilizing Federal funds for a gamut of improvements, civic
leaders were finally moved to action . Spurred by the
adverse ruling of the Florida Supreme Court in the Daytona
Beach case, enabling legislation in the form of a constitu-
tional amendment was proposed in 1957 at Tallahassee. It
was killed in committee. In 1958 Governor Collins called an
urban redevelopment conference in Orlando; but attempts
to pass follow-up bills during the 1959 legislature were beaten
down in a series of bitter floor fights . The Tampa law
opened up the road to accomplishment through local legisla-
tion; and the recent Supreme Court decision confirmed its
constitutionality. Now Dade's Metro has traveled it-and this
commentary is a timely clarification of these significant civic
steps toward the ultimate goal of revitalizing the life and
values of communities throughout the State . The author
is an FAA past president and chairman of the Florida South
Chapter Committee on Community Development.


whether clearance of the acquired land
was for low-rent housing or not.
All through the remainder of the
Fifties, renewal projects were shelved
to gather dust, while some wailed and
others groped for ways and means to
get the show back on the road con-
stitutionally. Tampa, Jacksonville, Or-
lando, Lakeland, Panama City, as well
as Daytona Beach, were cities with
renewal plans in advanced stages of
completion at the time of the Adams
case and these spearheaded moves
to get new legislation enacted during
the 1952 to 1957 period. That our
State legislators identify themselves
with those who believe the privilege
of owning slums transcends the dis-
proportionate expenditure .of public


funds to preserve public health and
.prevent crime, fire, accidents and
moral decay should be apparent after
the failure of the 1953-55-57 and 59
legislatures to enact general legislation
granting urban renewal powers to
Florida cities.
In the 1957 Session, the Legislature
passed a special act the Urban Re-
newal Law of the City of Tampa -
a law similar to the act declared un-
constitutional by the Adams case
decision. To date, this single law and
the Court's decision upholding its
constitutionality are the bright spots
in Florida's bleak urban renewal pic-
ture.
As in all situations where change
(Or 9Bvd uo panu.uoJ)






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Urban Renewal...
(Continued from Page 9)
is proposed, there are those who be-
lieve their individual rights are ag-
grieved if the status quo is upset.
The City of Tampa, with powers
granted by the Urban Renewal Law
of the City of Tampa, was challenged
in the courts in the case of Phillips
Grubstein vs. Urban Renewal Agency
of the City of Tampa. This case cul-
minated in the Florida Supreme Court
opinion, dated November 18, 1959,
This opinion demonstrates the im-
portance of semantics in law and the
necessity for proponents of urban re-
newal to learn in detail the powers
permitted government under the law
as well as to proceed cautiously as far
as current law permits -and no fur-
ther-until the political climate makes
possible a broader framework of au-
thority within which to act.
Under the Urban Renewal Law, the
City of Tampa approved a plan for
the clearance and redevelopment of
40 acres of slum area within the City.
The redevelopment contemplates the
replatting of the entire area including
an entirely new street plan. The area
will be returned primarily to resi-
dential use, consistent with the resi-
dential areas adjoining the project,
and the remainder devoted to neigh-
borhood commercial use necessary to
serve the residents and also to gen-
eral commercial uses on two bordering
main streets and light industrial uses
along the bordering railroad.
In studying the opinion of the
Tampa case, one discovers that, al-
though there seems to be only super-
ficial differences between the redevel-
opment plans of the Daytona Beach
Housing Authority in the Adams case
and those of the Urban Renewal
Agency in the Tampa case, the Court
found considerable differences be-
tween the exhibits and evidence pre-
sented the Courts in the two cases.
Since the plaintiff in the Tampa case
plead that the Tampa redevelopment
is for a private rather than a public
use, and therefore unconstitutional by
reason of the decision in the Adams
case, the opinion in the Tampa case
includes a discussion of the Adams
decision.
A study of the opinion will help to
understand the Court's reasons for up-
holding Tampa after denying the Day-
tona Beach similar project. The opin-


ion quickly upholds the Tampa claim
that the area for redevelopment is in
fact a slum, the conditions of which
cannot be corrected except by drastic
governmental action, since the divers-
ity of ownership, the pattern of exist-
ing streets and the unprofitable nature
of the necessary action-if undertaken
by private enterprise-make it a pub-
lic task. Since the action necessary
involves clearance of the whole slum
area in order to establish new pat-
terns which will prevent a recurrence
of the slum condition, the condition
of a single building within the area
cannot be reason to defeat the purpose
of the project. Following this, the
opinion tackles the problem of the
use of the power of eminent domain
for the purpose proposed by the City
of Tampa.
The right of the City to, acquire
land for slum clearance is valid by
law ". . by the previous decisions
of this court under the Housing Au-
thorities Law (Ch. 421, Fla. Stat.),"
reads the opinion, "that the power of
eminent domain may be exercised in
aid of the police power to clear slum
areas and construct low-rental houses
thereon . the primary . purpose
of the provisions of the Urban Re-
newal law with which we are con-
cerned here is exactly the same: the
clearance of slum areas and the re-
development thereof so as to avoid
a recurrence of the slum condition ...
In the one case the redevelopment is
in the form of low-cost housing for
low-income groups; in the other it is
in the form of private development.
But the public purpose sought to be
achieved is, in principal, identical."
The decision under the Housing
Authority Laws did not make a dis-
tinction between "public purpose"
and "public use" as justification for
the exercise of the power of eminent
domain. In the Tampa case, the Court
found no difference between the "pub-
lic purpose" of the Urban Renewal
Law and "public use" of the Housing
Authority Laws as these terms per-
tained to the ultimate use of the
property under the two Acts. Neither
did it find any difference between the
two Acts as to the retained title and
renting houses to private persons, and
the transfer of title to purchasers for
private persons, and the transfer of
title to purchasers for development
according to plans and specifications
(Continued on Page 28)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






A,4deteetAee fe Oasur &ate ...





A Background


for Improvement


By JOHN MARTIN EVANS
Broward County Chapter,
1960 FAA Convention Program Chairman


In a charming Georgian square in
Bloomsbury the School of Tropical
Architecture fills the third floor of a
converted Georgian house. It is the
graduate school of Architectural Asso-
ciation, an undergraduate architectural
school, and is the only school of its
kind in the world. For three months
I attended its courses and did its
programs along with 20 practicing
architects from 15 countries of the
world. From the spice islands of the
Pacific, from the Phillipines, Viet-
Nam, Iraq, Jamaica, architects having
the common profession of designing
buildings for warm climates assembled
to learn new techniques of construc-
tion and design. It was a UN of archi-
tecture ....



Bloomsbury is to London what St.
Germain des Pres is to Paris. It is the
University section of London. Just a
few blocks away, Soho, with its for-
eign restaurants and private jazz clubs,
lives its raucous life.
When the fogs and mists do not
obscure it, the high tower of London
University dominates the early 19th
Century architecture of Bloomsbury.
Clustered around are the various col-
leges of London University, the Lon-
don School of Hygiene and Tropical
Medicine, Birkbeck College, the
British Museum and hundreds of
bookstores and publishing houses. Its
denizens are the professors and stu-
dents from the world, with the em-
MARCH, 1960


phasis on the commonwealth nations.
The common meeting ground is the
ubiquitous espresso coffee houses scat-
tered about the area. No beatniks in
these coffee houses though- a few
angry young men perhaps protesting
against the "establishment," but no
beats. Unlike St. Germain des Pr6s
there are few painters about. I suppose
Chelsea or Hampstead has claimed
them all. London is not Bohemian
and the students seemed very serious
as they hurried to their classes dressed
in the duffel coat and bright scarfs.
The school was on Bedford Square,
a few minutes walk from the Totten-
ham Court tube station; and if you
managed to avoid being hit by the
awyful traffic at the corner of Charing
Cross Road and Tottenham Court,
you would emerge on the square, a
quiet oasis in the bustling West End.
It is much easier to set the scene of
the school then it is to describe the
architects that attended the courses
with me. Shall we start with Mr. Do
BA VINH, from Viet-Nam? Do Ba is
in his late thirties and is short and
jolly, an oriental Mr. Pickwick. He
works for the government of Viet-
Nam and his home is in Saigon. Mr.
VINH speaks French much better then
English and he is the favorite of all
of us. Mr. Ruiz is from Manilla--one
of three Phillipine architects that are
in the school. He worked on the U.N.
building as the architect of the Phil-
lipines and is a graduate of the Yale
Architectural School. He is attending
classes in London under a Colombo


Plan grant. This grant is similar to
a Fullbright Scholarship in the. coun-
tries of south-east Asia.
The only woman in the class is
Miss WANDI, from Thailand. On her
spike heels she barely reaches four feet
nine inches. Miss Wandi is very tiny
and feminine and when she speaks I
am reminded of a tropical bird. She
does not really speak English fluently
but nobody cares. The architects from
India are very serious, all but Mr.
PAWAR. They take page after page of
notes in classes and are very quiet.
Mr. Pawar has an elegent beard, a
Bond Street tailor and numerous pairs
of bright red socks. We see him at
irregular intervals. Mr. MAVLANKER is
from Nagpur, in central India. He is
a wise, experienced architect. He is
cleanshaven, smooth- complexioned
and short. We spent hours discussing
architectural practice in our respective
countries.
The director of the school is Dr.
O. H. KOENIGSBERGER. Dr. "K" as
we called him has a brilliant back-
ground of research for the UN on
building technics in tropical countries.
He has practiced in India for many
years designing the new towns for the
Government of India. The faculty is
composed of architects, physiologists,
public health officers, quantity sur-
veyors, physicists, building researchers
and other specialists that the syllabus
required. The lectures were extremely
good and were scheduled three or four
times a week. In addition to the lec-
(Continued on Page 12)





Background...
(Continued from Page 11)
ture specific problems were assigned
to us.
The students, like their countries
seemed to be divided into the "Hot-
humids" and "Hot-drys." There is a
vast difference between these two
basic climatic divisions; and while we
discussed both types of climates, the
majority of the architects came from
areas that had "Florida-like" climates.
The question session, at the end of
each lecture was a fruitful source of
information. Frequently the language
barrier brought a bit of humor into
the lecture hall, but I remained quite
sober remembering my many goofs
with the French language while a stu-
dent in Paris. The lectures were fin-
ished by seven in the evening. London
in December is dark by four o'clock;
and walking home in the chilly Lon-
don drizzle I'm sure that more than
one architect's mind turned toward
blue skies and palm trees thousands
S of miles away.
The aim of the school was to ex-
amine all techniques of hot climate
architecture and to tailor a curriculum
to bring the practicing architect up to
S date with the latest research on these
S problems. Specifically of interest are
those aspects of the problem that
differ from the usaul western Euro-
pean or American approach. The trop-
ical school has an informal association
with the research departments of the
British Universities and with the fam-
ous Building Research Station of the
British Government.
In this atmosphere of precise
Georgian formalism the emphasis is
on the technio-not at the expense
of design, but to integrate the two
into a final product that will have
both beauty and utility. In the past
the great mass of industrialization has
occurred in temperate climates. Build-
ing products, heating systems, plan-
ning aiid design philosphies have been
predicated on the premise that keep-!
ing warm in the winter was the greater
problem than keeping cool in the
summer.
And so it was. Unfortunately, when
this thinking was used in hot climates
during the post war development of
tropical countries the end product was
frequently not up to par.
I'm sure the architect just ar-
rived from the north in Florida has


noted these problems in our own
state. The intense solar radiation, fre-
quent showers and high humidity har-
rasses us. We notice the chalking
paint, warping and checking and rot-
ting of exposed wood. Our own state
has been described by EARL DE NOON
as having the highest deterioration
rate in the nation. Such has been the
case with much of the post-war con-
struction in tropical climates.
The young countries of the world-
and I use the word "young" as an ex-
pression of their industrialized youth
-invariably attempt to copy the
building technique of larger and more
industrialized lands. From camel-dung
Bricks to curtain walls has sometimes
taken only a generation. This transi-
tion can be painful. Even in Florida,
with the products of our industrialized
nation at our fingertips, we have not
yet related our climate to our archi-
tecture. Thus we can understand why
the problem of hot-climate architec-
ture exists in those countries of the
world that contain the majority of the
world's population.
In addition to the yet unsolved
problem of building in hot climates,
the economic end of the problem is
causing problems that directly relate
to construction. An increase in the
standard of living-a most sought
after thing- sometimes prices highly
skilled native carpenters and tech-
niques out of the market. Most hot
countries had perfectly satisfactory so-
lutions to their living problems for
hundreds, if not thousands, of years.
Based on highly skilled craftsmanship,
they frequently will not work in mass
housing where speed and efficiency in
completing the project are essential.
Yet with all of this the new housing
must be of high quality to last the
long amortization period of 30 to 40
years.
We were fortunate to have a lec-
turer, Dr. THOMAS BEDFORD, one of
the world's authorities on environ-
ment and man. Dr. Bedford has been
Researching this problem since the war
and both he and his associates had
the hlrd job of distilling their knowl-
edge into edible bites for the archi-
tects at the school. Man was the
starting point in the course; and we
were given a short course in environ-
mental physiology early in October
when the course began.
Some of the lectures on heat stress
were in the London School of Hygiene


and Tropical Medicine. In its labs we
watched experiments on this subject
with specific instruction to determine
cor ted effective temperatures by a
rather complicated method. This is an
objective evaluation of a comfort fac-
tor in any habitable area.
We found, that heat stress is
based on norms that are much the
same for all races in the world. The
unacclimatized White, Asian and Af-
rican all felt heat stress in much the
same way. Similarly, when acclima-
tized either in hot box experiments
or in actual site conditions in Singa-
pore, the subject, whether White, Af-
rican or- Asian, reacted on the same-
curve. The skin colors of Africans give
only a slight increase in resistance to
ultra violet rays. In sweat glands and
pores all races of the world showed
similar characteristics, I think the
myth that the hot climates are not
for white people is finally scientifically
debunked. The human body is re-
markably adaptable for the climatic
variations found on this planet.
I would like to make three points
at the conclusion of this first article
to try to fit our state of Florida into
the world of 1960. We in Florida
have a unique role to play in devel-
oping our own hot climate architec-
ture. First of all we have no traditions
that would hamper our development
of an architecture that fits our climate.
Secondly we have all the advantages
of our highly industrialized economy
of America to back up our design. We
have skilled labor force to execute our
work. This is not the case in other
regions.
Lastly we have the opportunity to
lead this march of progress in tropical
countries by contributing the know-
how that we obtained in Florida since
the war. We must assemble this data
and make it available to the other
countries with which we share a com-
mon climate. In London I found an
acute interest in what we were doing
in Florida. The question was always-
what are you designing? or how are
you solving this problem? There was
a strong sense of identification by
them with us in the Pennisula. I don't
think we want to disappoint them. I
think we have too many good things
in Florida to keep them to ourselves.
Let us sow our ideas to the world-
for we are much more clever, enter-
prising and imaginative than our cri-
tics give us credit for.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






'ienwdhe aNd et zee Patknn . .



It's The Newest Trend in Banking


Photo by William Amick


PINELLAS
CENTRAL BANK
Clearwater

WAKELING & LEVISON,
Architects


In no other field, has institutional policy done a more complete
about-face than in banking. The barred windows, the forbidding facade,
the caged-in tellers' spaces these have gone the way of the dodo and
the anti-maccassar. Today, invitation, openness, convenience are the
rule. What were once the inner sanctums of financial fortresses have
become tastefully furnished areas where the public as well as the per-
sonnel can be comfortable. The institutional attitude has gone; and
the personal touch has replaced it to such an extent that today a well-
designed bank is more than anything else an inviting home for the
business of its customers . This is enlightened self-interest on the
part of the bankers which is another name for good public relations.
It is also good salesmanship. In going all-out for this new policy, bankers
are more and more recognizing that in their business, particularly, good
salesmanship is inextricably linked with good architecture. They have
discovered that the character of their buildings has a direct influence
on the nature of their balance sheets. They have realized, too, that an
architect is a bank's best salesman as suggested by the three recently
completed buildings shown here.


MARCH, 1960





































The Pinellas Central Bank
recently finished a virtu-
ally complete remodelling
operation to enlarge and
modernize facilities along
the trend line of more
convenient and personal-
ized service. The bank's
"Near and Neighborly"
slogan is the key to the
character and scale of the
exterior design and the
almost-residential atmos-
phere of the interiors.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































Photos by Joseph B. Brignolo


WEST PALM BEACH FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSN.

EDWIN T. REEDER ASSOCIATES,
Architects and Engineers


Particularly notable here is the scale
and detailing of both exterior and in-
terior to produce an overall impression
of inviting informality and a complete
absence of any institutional character
as an unpretentious background for
the friendly conduct of personalized
financial business. Business is good
when clients feel "at home".


MARCH, 1960



















CURTISS

NATIONAL

BANK

Miami



EDWIN T. REEDER


Photos by Joseph B. Brignolo


ASSOCIATES,

Architects and Engineers













This bank is located in the vicinity of
Miami's busy International Airport
and offers a variety of financial ser-
vices to the increasing number of
commercial and industrial businesses
which have become established in the
area to meet needs of the airlines. As
such it is more of a "commercial"
bank than the two shown on foregoing
pages; and in keeping with this, the
design is more broadly scaled and of
a crisp, somewhat more impersonal
character than the others. But it, too,
exemplifies the new architectural
trend in banking in the lightness and
freedom of its design concept and de-
tailing, outdoors and in.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ade with Trinity White-the whitest white cement

IRff%%'ti r


Building: Mont.
gomery County (Ala.)
Courthouse
Archilecis Pearson,
Title & Narrows
General Contractors:
Bear Brothers Inc.
Panels Made by:
Jackson (Miss.) Stone
Co.


The white decorative panels were
made with 100% Trinity White port-
land cement. The darker panels were
made by combining 50% Trinity
White with 50% standard gray
cement.


PORTLAND CEMENT

A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
CHICAGO CHATTANOOGA DALLAS FORT WORTH
FREDONIA, KANSAS HOUSTON JACKSON, MICHIGAN
TAMPA MIAMI LOS ANGELES


MARCH, 1960


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Memoranda of Procedure.

Compiled by THOMAS LARRICK, AIA.
Professor of Architecture,
College of Architecture and Fine Arts, U/F


Section 1
PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS
Registration See Book I, Art. 3.02, "Registration."
Check and meet state registration and local licensing
requirements before offering to practice.
Partnership -See Book II, Art. 1.02, "Partnerships";
Appendix, pp. A-5.01 through 5.04, "Normal Partnership
Agreement" and "Senior-Junior Partnership Agreement";
and Book I, Art. 3.06, "Contracts." Do not enter any
type of a partnership agreement without legal counsel.
Tendering Services- See Book II, Arts. 3.02, "Advice
to Prospective Clients" and 3.04, "Project Development";
A.I.A. Documents No. J-330, "Standards of Professional
Practice," pp. A-2.03 through 2.06, and No. B-411,
"Selection of an Architect," pp. A-7.05 and 7.06; Appen-
dix, p. A-7.07, "Guide for Building Committees."
Public Relations See Book II, Arts. 3.06, "Organized
Public Relations," 3.07, "Newspaper Publicity Pro-
grams," and 3.09, "Summary"; A.I.A. Public Relations
Handbook for the Architect; and PR Primer by Donald
Lloyd Patton, published by College of ArchitecttAe and
Allied Arts, University of Florida, 1955.
Employment In considering terms of an agreement
see Book II, Art. 3.03, "Compensation"; Book I, Arts.
2.02, "Normal Architectural Service," 2.03, "Extra Ser-
vices," 2.04 "Special Arrangements," and 2.05, "Partial
Service and Special Services"; A.I.A. Document No. B-501,
"Schedule of Architectural Services"; and Appendix, pp.
A-2.10 through 2.12, "Notes on the Basic Services of the
Architect."
20


Legal Responsibility See Book I, Arts. 3.03 "Legal
Responsibility," 3.04, "Reasonable Care and Skill," and
3.05 "Legal Protection."
Expenditures See Book II, Chapter 6, "Architects'
Accounts," pp. II-6.01 through 6.05, and A.I.A. Docu-
ment No. L-211, "Standardized Accounting for Archi-
tects," pp. A-18.11 through A-18.14. Keep a record of all
receipts and expenditures.
Section 2
AGREEMENT BETWEEN OWNER
AND ARCHITECT
Discussion with Client For general information per-
taining to this agreement and the services rendered, see
Book I, Chapter 4, "Owner-Architect Agreements," pp.
I-4.01 through 4.07; A.I.A. Document No. B-501,
"Schedule of Architectural Service"; and Appendix, pp.
A-2.10 through 2.12, "Notes on the Basic Service of the
Architect." Explain your services to client.
Form of Agreement Agreement should be prepared
on one of the Standard Forms, A.I.A. Documents Nos.
B-101, B-121, B-131, B-211, B-311, or B-321, pp. A-4.01
through 4.25. For notes on dates, names or titles of the
contracting parties, signatures, witnesses, and seals, see
Book I, Art. 3.06, "Contracts" and Chapter 2, "The Law
of Contracts," Engineering Contracts and Specifications
by Robert W. Abbett.
Execution of Agreement -Record date; and also
record date of delivery to owner. Retain a signed record
copy in a place of safety. Make an Office Copy for ready
reference.
(Continued on Page 2S)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. S


Material published here is an up-dated revision of that first compiled from the AIA
"Agenda for Architects," 1947 edition, for use as text material in the author's course,
Professional Administration. Since then it has proved so helpful as a checklist of archi-
tectural practice that Professor Larrick has graciously made it generally available in
the revised form presented here . All references not specifically noted are to the
1958 edition of the AIA "Handbook of Architectural Practice" . Space limitations
have made it necessary to publish the Memoranda of Procedure in two parts. Part II
will appear in the April issue of The Florida Architect.





















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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Section 3
PRELIMINARY SERVICES
Record See "Architect's Project Record Book," pp.
III-10.04 through 10.25. Keep a complete record of
necessary information, data, dates, schedules, approvals,
summaries, and procedure for each commission.
Conferences needed to determine problems of pro-
ject. Make a record of any interviews with, or instructions
received, from Owner, and proposed dates for submission
of preliminary studies. This record should contain every-
thing of importance suggested by Owner or Architect,
agreed on, postponed or disapproved, including matters
of design and construction as well as cost. A copy of this
record should be furnished Owner for verification as soon
as possible after each interview.
Owner's Survey Request Owner in writing to furn-
ish, or direct Architect to obtain at Owner's expense,
as per his agreement, a complete and accurate survey of
building site, giving grades and lines of streets, pavements,
and adjoining properties; rights, restrictions, easements,
boundaries, and contours of building site, and full in-
formation as to sewer, water, gas and electrical service.
Impress upon Owner the importance of accuracy and
completeness in this matter. See Appendix, pp. A-12.01
and 12.02, "Instructions to Surveyor and Check List."
Detailed information on survey regarding utilities should
include:
1. Water Main-location, size, depth, and pressure.
2. Sewer-location, size, depth, and whether sanitary
or storm, or a combination of both.
3. Electric Current-location, DC or AC, cycles, volt-
age, phase, and number of lines.
4. Telephone-location and under or above ground.
5. Gas Main-location, size, depth, and natural or
manufactured.
Architect's Survey If the work consists of alterations
or additions see Book III, Art. 2.02, "Investigation."
Building Laws See Book I, Art. 3.01, "The Architect
and the Law." When in doubt about intent of or com-
pliance with codes, regulations, or laws check with the
proper authorities. Also check with Owner to avoid
premature disclosure of his intention to build. It is the
duty of the Architect to design his building in compliance
with both state and local laws and building codes.
Time for Preparation- See that Owner is informed of
the importance of sufficient time for Preliminary Services.
Record any proposed dates for Delivery and Acceptance
of Preliminary Studies.
Schematic Drawings Show recommended solutions
until an agreement on a solution is reached. See Book III,
Arts. 2.01, "Project Program," 2.02, investigationn, and
2.03, "Schematics." Give each set of sketches a title,
number, and date for proper identification. Keep copies
and/or tracings of all sketches sent to Owner. Show area
or room sizes, square footage, and/or cubage of the build-
ing on each set as may be required. Keep a record of all
presentations, estimates, revisions, and Owner's approval
of schematic design drawings.
Models Consider advisability of making a model.
See Book III, Art. 2.07, "Presentation of the Design."
Estimates -See Book III, Chapter'3, "Estimating."
pp. III-3.01 through 3.04. Make approximate estimates by
MARCH, 1960


square foot, cubic foot, in place cost, or semi-detailed
method as may be required. Keep a record and date of all
estimates and any statements made to Owner as to
probable cost of the work.
Design Development and Presentation See Book
III, Arts. 2.04, "Design Development," 2.05, "Collabora-
tion," 2.06, "Economy in Design," and 2.07, "Presenta-
tion of the Design." Keep a record of all presentations
of preliminary design studies, preliminary specifications.
estimates, revisions, and of Owner's approval of design
and authorization of the construction documents phase.
Bill for Services Send a statement of services for
that part of Architect's fee due upon completion of
preliminary studies and for any reimbursements due under
the Agreement. Note that the time for sending statements
of services will depend on the article regarding payments

to Architect in Owner-Architect Agreement for each
commission.
Section 4
WORKING DRAWINGS AND
SPECIFICATIONS
Date of Ordering working drawings and specifica-
tions. (Record date)
Time for Preparation If Owner, by insistence on
undue haste in the preparation of drawings and specifi-
cations, is impairing their thoroughness, it is the Archi-
tect's duty to impress upon him the importance of
sufficient time.
Production Schedule Set up a proposed schedule for
development of the construction documents with a place
for recording proposed and actual beginning and com-
pletion dates. Keep Owner advised on the progress of
his job.
Survey If Owner has not furnished the survey and
information required by Agreement between Owner and
Architect, urge him again to furnish it. If Architect has
to pay for the survey, charge Owner for cost. See "Instruc-
tions to Surveyor and Check List," pp. A-12.01 and 12.02.
Borings and Test-Pits -If borings or test pits are
needed but have not been made, ask Owner's authority
to have them in accordance with Agreement between
Owner and Architect.
Engineers- If contract with Owner is on basis of
A.I.A. Document No. B-101 or B-211 select the Engineers.
If necessary, notify Owner of their names and of their
terms of payment and secure Owner's approval before
making appointments. If contract with Owner is on basis
of A.I.A. Document No. B-121 or B-131, select such
Engineers as may be necessary. Enter names of Engineers
in a "Directory" of those connected with the work. See
p. III-10.08.
Methods of Letting Contracts- Confer with Owner
as to methods. See Book III, Arts. 7.01, "The Architect's
Part," 7.02, "Competitive Bidding," 7.03, "Cost-Plus-Fee
Contracts," and 7.06, "Legal Requirements."
Number of Contracts to be Let- See Book III, Art.
7.04, "Separate Contract System." Ascertain legal require-
ments regarding separate contracts on public work. Consi-
der whether Owner's interests will be better served by
letting the work under a single or separate contract
system. Advice Owner on this subject and obtain his
instructions.
(Continued on Page 24)






Use of Standard Forms See Book III, Art. 8.01
"Contracting for the Work."
General Conditions See latest edition of A.I.A. Docu-
ments No. A-201, "The General Conditions of the Con-
tract for the Construction of Buildings," and No. A-107,
"The A.I.A. Short Form for Small Construction Contracts
-Agreement and General Conditions between Contractor
and Owner." Use appropriate form for job involved.
See that lien clause is in accordance with the law of
the place of building, and that it gives Owner all protection
afforded by law. See Book I, Art. 3.08, "The Owner and
the Law."
See that all provisions for arbitration are in accordance
with the law of the place of building. See Book I, Art.
3.09, "Arbitration"; pp. III-6.21 and 6.22, Comment on
Art. 40 of the General Conditions; and A.I.A. Document
No. M-201, "Standard Form of Arbitration Procedure."
If any laws or ordinances relating to such subjects as
alien labor, length of day's work, or minimum wages
should be recited, add them in a supplement to the
General Conditions.
Note that Supplementary General Conditions will
generally be required to cover many subjects named in the
list given in Book III, Art. 6.02, "Supplementary General
Conditions."
Bind a copy of the General Conditions and Supple-
mentary General Conditions into each set of Specifications.
Specifications See Book III, Chapter 5, "Specifica-
tions," and Architect's Specifications-How to Write
Them, by Goldwin Goldsmith. See that title of Specifica-
tions is identical with that of the Drawings and General
Conditions.
See that all cash allowances are clearly stated and, by
cross reference, covered by Art. 41 of General Conditions.
Note many subjects named in the list given in Book III,
Art. 6.02, may, if needed, be covered in Supplementary
General Conditions or in the trade section to which they
may naturally belong.
Constantly bear in mind the laws and regulations con-
trolling planning and construction at the place of the
building.
Working Drawings See that drawings bear titles as
described in Book III, Art. 4.07, "Title Block."
See that a record of drawings and of the distribution
of prints is kept.
See Book III, Art. 4.05 "Standards," and pp. A-14.01
through 14.06 of "Working Drawings References." See
that indications of materials, equipment, and work is in
accordance with standard symbols, and that schedules
of standard symbols are given on the drawings.
Job Expense Record See Book III, Art. 6.04 "Archi-
tects' Project Cost Analyses," and Standardized Account-
ing for Architects, by A.I.A. Keep a record of all time,
salaries, fees, and any other expenses that may be directly
chargeable to the cost of producing working drawings and
specifications.
Extra Services and Special Cases As the work pro-
ceeds, note cost of any changes in working drawings and
specifications, ordered by Owner, that come under heading
of "Extra Services and Special Cases" of Agreement
between Owner and Architect.
Date of Completion of Working Drawings and
Specifications (Record date)


Section 5
COMPLETION OF DRAWINGS & SPECS.
Submission to Owner- Send a complete set of working
drawings, general conditions, supplementary general condi-
tions, and specifications to Owner. Urge him to give
thorough consideration to these documents and offer to
explain any part of them that he may not understand.
Notify the Owner in writing of anything needed for
completion of the work, but not covered by the contracts.
The record of such notification may be a very present
help in time of need.
Date of Owner's Approval -of working drawings
and specifications. (Record date)
Charge Owner's Account with Services to Date.
Bill for Services Send Owner a bill for payment due
at this time for fee, reimbursements, and extra services
if any, unless it is deemed wiser to await receipt of
proposals before sending the bill.
Submission to Building Inspectors-If legal authori-
ties in control of building operations will, at this stage.
give an approval or tentative approval to the plans and
specifications, it is well to submit a complete set to them.
Such submission, since it permits any necessary changes
to be made before or during bidding, may avoid tension
resulting from an insistence upon changes after proposals
are received.
Date of Approval-by such authorities. (Record Date.)
Ascertain following items: (Also advise Owner re-
garding items as necessary).
1. Whether the form of Agreement and the General
Conditions are to be submitted to Owner's counsel.
If so, secure his approval before asking for bids.
2. Whether advertisement for bids is necessary. If so,
assist in development of advertisement and have it
inserted by Owner or Owner's counsel.
3. Whether the law requires or Owner desires a Bond
of Suretyship. See Book III, Art. 8.03, "Bonds of
Suretyship."
4. Whether a public opening of bids is necessary or
advisable.
5. Whether Owner requires the bids to be addressed
to himself and insists on opening them or whether
he desires them to be addressed to and opened by
Architect.
6. Whether, if. public advertisement for bids is not
necessary, Owner leaves list of bidders to Architect.
Offer suggestions and secure Owner's approval of a
list of bidders. See Book III, Art. 7.02, "Competitive
Bidding."
Bidding Procedure -See A.I.A. Document No. A-501,
"A Suggested Guide to Bidding Procedure," pp. A-16.25
through 16.28, and Book III, Art. 7.08, "Bidding Prac-
tices."
List of Bidders Make a record for job files of the list
approved by Owner.
Prepare and obtain approval on following:
1. Instructions to Bidders. See "Instructions to Bidders,"
p. III-7.06.
2. Advertisement for Bids or an Invitation to Bid as
needed. See form of Invitation to Submit a Proposal,
p. III-7.06.
3. Form of Proposal. See Form of Proposal, pp. III-7.06
through 7.08.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














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MARCH, 1960





This message is directed to those
architects residing in Florida who are
not presently members of the Florida
Association of Architects. We, the of-
ficers and members of the Association,
would like to extend an invitation to
you to join us in promoting the pro-
fession and the lot of the individual
member.
Ours, the world's oldest honored
profession, is too often unheralded
and misunderstood. For this we can
blame no one but ourselves. In this
day of automation and speedy com-
munication, both the individual and
the group must be continuously alert
just to maintain the status quo. If
this status doesn't happen to be quite
as high as we'd like, then we must
redouble our efforts to improve our
situation.
You, the non-members, hold the
key to the profession's future success
in the nation's fastest growing state.
The Association, with your help, can
set forth to achieve the goals now
unattainable because we don't pres-
ently represent the entire membership.
Some professions require membership
in their association as a prerequisite
to practicing that particular profession


Mftesa49e owm 7Te Presient...




Come On... Join Us!


By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


within the state. This may or may
not be the best solution. One thing
clearly indicated is the fact that an
association speaking for the entire
profession stands a far better chance
at the legislative and public relations
levels than does a group with less than
100 percent membership.
We, the officers and members of
the Association, are more than proud
of the achievements of the Association
these past few years. About ten years
ago less than 25 members turned out
at an annual convention. Now we
expect an attendance of over 500-
counting associates, junior associates,
wives, guests and exhibitors. Ten years


ago one exhibitor set up a display in
the hotel lobby that representing
our entire manufacturers' exhibit. To-
day the character of our convention
exhibits rivals those of the AIA na-
tional conventions.
Less than ten years ago we had no
publication as such. Today our maga-
zine THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is con-
sidered the finest of the state archi-
tectural publications -and by some
one of the finest anywhere. Your
president and the editor continually
receive letters from architects and
non-architects commending the Asso-
ciation on our publication and on
the efforts of the Association.


RESIDENTIAL

INTERIORS


Working closely with

architect and client

for residential

decorations and furnishings

of distinction


RICHARD PLM /ER



155 Northeast Fortieth Street


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Of all this we are justly proud. Of
this we would like you to be also
proud through your individual mem-
bership and efforts for the good of the
profession.
Those who only criticize the Asso-
ciation and dwell on the failure of
the profession probably forget that it
is up to someone or several some-
ones to carry the burden of many.
In spite of the longevity of the pro-
fession, we are poorly organized in
comparison to some of the trades and
associations representing men with far
less invested in education, experience
and office overhead. This coming
decade can be architecture's greatest
era. Construction is at an all-time
high. New ideas and materials offer
challenge beyond comprehension. To
successfully meet the competition
offered by plan services, unlicensed
draftsmen and some of the other pro-
fessions and trades, we must be ever
vigilant, ever before the buying public
in the correct light and united in the
proposition that architecture is the
world's most honored profession.
The Association is currently doing
everything possible to assure a new


building for the College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts at the University
of Florida. The present temporary
structures are a disgrace to the State
and to the profession. This drive is
of utmost importance to every prac-
ticing architect and should not be the
responsibility of a few. We'll do every-
thing we can but you can help by
pointing out the facts to your legis-
lator. Visit our school and 'acquaint
yourself with what exists. In addition,
we are assisting in every way possible,
through the Student Chapter and the
University, to properly indoctrinate
the aspiring young architect in the
proper manner.
Annually we set aside a portion of
our budget to cover the expenses in-
curred each legislative session. We
sincerely hope to clarify the present
overlapping registration laws of the
architects and the engineers at the
next session. This, together with our
annual appropriations and efforts in
the field of public relations, is most
necessary to maintain our present
position and to attempt wherever
possible to improve the lot of the
practicing architect in our State.


Another of our programs deals with
active participation in cooperative
enterprises with the construction in-
dustry and with the other design pro-
fessions. It has proven most heart-
warming to observe the many joint
programs that have been successfully
put into effect. Our Joint Cooperative
Council, uniting the component orga-
nizations of the building industry,
already has helped us all and shows
every indication of obtaining, in the
near future, goals heretofore seem-
ingly unattainable.
We can help each other in many
ways. The Association can be of tre-
mendous assistance to you but only
if you are available to help and be
helped. Join with your Chapter in
making your community a better place
to live and to practice. Find out when
the next meeting of your nearest
Chapter will be held, and try not
just attending, but actively participat-
ing in the meeting. If you can't attend
a meeting, look up an officer of the
Chapter or the Florida Association
and discuss the whole matter with
him. You hold a much more im-
portant position than you may realize.


Aft



~~ON


Fulfilling the original concept of architect and client for outstanding
business interior designs
POLEVITZKY JOHNSON & ASSOCIATES Architects RICHARD PLUI
M. R. HARRISON CONSTRUCTION CORP. contractor BUSINESS INTE
RICHARD PLUMER BUSINESS INTERIORS, INC.
Interior Design and Furnishings 155 Northeast Fortieth S
MARCH, 1960


RUEf


Street, Miami, Florida






Urban Renewal...
(Continued from Page 10)
required under the redevelopment
plan.
If the above is valid, why was the
Daytona Beach project invalid? This
question is answered in the Tampa
decision in the following way:
"A use to be public must be fixed
and definite. It must be one in which
the public, as such, has an interest;
and the terms and manner of its en-
joyment must be within the control
of the State, independent of the rights
of the private owner of the property
appropriated to the use. The use of
the property cannot be said to be
public if it can be gainsaid, denied,
or withdrawal by the owner ... If the
main object for which the land is
taken is a public use, it obviously
matters not that incidental benefit
will inure to private individuals.
"Manifestly, incidental benefits will
inure to private individuals or corpo-
rations under the Housing Authorities
Law and the Urban Renewal Law. But
in both, the use to be made of the
condemned property is fixed and defi-


nite and control of such use is retained
by the condemning authority . .
Thus, under both laws, the plan of
slum clearance and redevelopment
may be said to be for a 'public use'
under the definition quoted above."
The definition of "slum" and "slum
areas" of the two Acts are found in
agreement: "On the other hand, the
statute involved and stricken down in
the Adams case, Ch. 23077, Acts of
1945, authorized the clearance and
redevelopment of 'blighted areas," the
definition of which included, among
others, areas which by reason of ex-
cessive land coverage, deleterious land
use, or obsolete layout, or any com-
bination of these or other factors, are
detrimental to the safety, health,
morals or welfare of the community.
"It is not clear to us how the
quoted factors, singly or in combina-
tion, could have any direct relation
to the health, safety, or welfare. They
seem to reflect the idea that an area
could be condemned and taken from
the owners merely because the con-
demning authority was of the opinion
that the area was not being used in
the most efficient or economical man-


ner, or was improperly or inartistically
laid out, and sold to another so that
it could be developed more efficiently.
And for all that appears in the record
of the Adams case, it was solely to
apply the area in question to what
was thought to be a more efficient use
that the Project plan there considered
was developed.
"Reference to the record reveals
that there was not one scintilla of evi-
dence that the area was a breeding
place for crime or disease, or that the
condition of the area was such that
it constituted a real hindrance to the
redevelopment of the city and could
not be eliminated or improved with-
out resort to the power of eminent
domain; or that the condition men-
aced in any way the public health,
safety, morals, or welfare.
"It can thus be seen that the real
distinction between the statute and
the Project plan involved in the
Adams case and those involved in the
instant case lies in the purpose sought
to be achieved thereby. There can be
no doubt that the provisions of the
Urban Renewal Law here in question
(Continued on Page 31)


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Users of 250 gallons per month can save $293
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MARCH, 1960






NEXT winter, that is...


MR. BARNES DID...

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r
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Mr. William B. Barnes relaxes in the comfort of his oil-
heated home at 1075 E. Hibiscus Lane, Delray Beach.


Mr. Barnes says, "It has been
my experience that oil home
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nomical. The economy of opera.
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lines and automatic features,
leads me to say I can heartily
recommend oil heating, and
would have no other for myself."


Why not enjoy the luxury, safety
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and best fuel for heating youth
home. The supply is always de.
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a premium price when you use
fuel oil for home heating only.


PLO feA HOME HEATING oNe- ?I-ru1e


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


MR. ARCHITECT: You know oil heating is by
far the best and most economical for Florida homes.
We know it. And now, through ads like this one, your
clients know it. So now, when you specify central oil
heating, you will assure immediate acceptance of your
recommendations as well as long-term satisfaction. We
will be glad to supply any information you need on oil
home heating. See us at the Buildorama, Miami.






Urban Renewal...
(Continued from Page 28)
have for a primary purpose the elim-
ination of a slum condition and pre-
vention of the recurrence thereof ...
Nor can it be doubted that these pur-
poses and the use contemplated by
the Urban Renewal provisions . .
are a public purpose and use ... But
statute involved in the Adams case
authorized condemnation for . a
purpose which might be beneficial to
the public, but which fell far short of
being such a public purpose as to
justify the exercise of the power of
eminent domain. This court is com-
mitted to the rule that 'public bene-
fit' is not synonymous with 'public
purpose' .
"If the point had been raised .
this court might have saved some
portions of the Acts stricken down in
the Adams case, since it was necessary
only to strike down the Project plan
itself. The point was not raised, how-
ever ...
"Insofar, however, as the Adams
decision may be in conflict with the
opinion herein expressed, it is hereby


modified to the extent of such con-
flict."
In light of the study of the Tampa
opinion, one can understand why the
proponents of the Metropolitan Dade
County Urban Renewal Ordinances
avoided the task of pioneering a new
law. Excepting for the obvious changes
in County name, authority, and clear-
er distinction of "boards" scattered
throughout the body of the law, and
the provision for overlapping terms for
members of the Urban Renewal
Agency, the Metro ordinance is a
verbatim copy of the Tampa Act. By
passing such an ordinance, the Metro
government has bought precious time
for actually getting urban renewal
projects started-time which certainly
would have had to be spent in courts
defending a completely new law or
one using new language. There comes
a time when debating and legal lint-
picking must give way to the necessity
for action.
For this reason it is surprising to
find some of the Dade County lay
leaders in the urban renewal program
decrying the enactment of the Metro
ordinance. Their cry that the ord-


finance "reads badly" and "doesn't go
far enough" seems very inopportune
considering the present climate.
With the passage of the Metro
ordinance, all the cities that can have
urban renewal powers before the next
session of the Legislature will have
them. They are Tampa, by special act;
and the cities of Dade County, by
the Metro ordinance. By looking at
the list of Florida cities with Work-
able Programs filed with HHFA
(Chattahoochee, Chipley, Cocoa, Cot-
tondale, Delray Beach, Lake Butler,
Milton, New Smyrna Beach to name
a few), indications are that the large
urban areas are not alone in desiring
to do something to improve their com-
munities.
These cities must wait for the next
Legislature for the necessary urban
renewal powers, either by getting their
local acts passed (as did Tampa and
seems the procedure most likely to
succeed), or getting a general act
passed (which will take more pro-
moting than has been done in the
past three sessions). Many are pre-
paring legislation and projects now,
for another crack at the Legislature.


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for electrical living. It guarantees that the home is designed to
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reflects the architect's professional pride in up-grading residential
standards for modern living... Better Living, Electrically.

a MEDALLION HOME must meet these
basic requirements:
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* FULL HOUSEPOWER (100-200 amp service) with large enough wire and
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* LIGHT-FOR-LIVING properly planned for every part of the house and
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The Medallion Home campaign
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Medallion Awards.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


Dates to Remember . .
The School Fire Safety and In-
surance Rating Conference, MARCH
17 and 18 at the Roosevelt Hotel,
Jacksonville. This will be conducted
by the State Department of Educa-
tion; and all architects are invited to
attend. C. ELLIS DUNCAN, chairman
of the FAA Committee on Schools
and Educational Facilities, has asked


A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, JR., JOHN
GRAVELY and ROY M. POOLEY JR., all
of the Jacksonville Chapter, to repre-
sent the FAA at the conference. FAA
president JOHN STETSON will act as
panel moderator.
The Architectural Exhibit at the
1960 Conference on Church Architec-
ture to be held at Minneapolis, Minn.
MAY 3, 4 and 5. Entries for the ex-


NEW OFFICERS Here
are the 1960 officers of
the Florida South Chap-
i ter, photographed after
their installation at the
Inaugural Ball, January
23rd at the La Gorce
Country Club, Miami
Beach. Seated are C.
S Robert Abele, president,
and Mrs. Betty Skeels,
executive secretary. Be-
hind them, left to right,
Howard M. Dunn, treas-
ruer, John 0. Grimshaw,
vice president, and Theo-
dore Gottfried, Secretary.


hibit must be received not later than
APRIL 15. For information and entry
blanks write to WALTER J. WEFEL,
J8., 17405 Scottsdale Blvd., Shaker
Heights 20, Ohio.


Two Florida Architects
Win AIA Merit Awards
Again this year Florida architects
have made ". . an outstanding con-
tribution to the cause of good archi-
tecture . .," to quote from the AIA
Honor Awards Jury's commentary. No
Florida architect was selected for a
First Honor Award in the AIA's 1960
Honor Awards Program. But among
recipients of the Awards for Merit
was Victor A. Lundy, Sarasota who
is now well along to becoming a
perennial winner and Weed John-
son Associates, Miami.
The Sarasota winner was selected
for his design of St. Paul's Lutheran
Church Fellowship Hall in Sarasota.
The National Airlines Nose Hangar,
Miami, won the award for Weed
Johnson Associates. It is hoped that
both buildings can be presented in
pages of the April Florida Architect.


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MARCH, 1960 33






SNews & Notes_
(Continued from Page 383)


Depend on Members of

AIR-CONDITIONING
REFRIGERATION
HEATING & PIPING
ASSOCIATION, INC.
1390 N.W. 43rd ST.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
Airko Air Conditioning Company
SCawthon, Dudley M., Inc.
SCentral Roof & Supply Co.
Conditioned Air Corporation
Domestic Refrigeration
C iffen Industries, Inc.
SHamilton, Sam L., Inc.
SHill York Corporation
McDonald Air Conditioning
SMiami Air Conditioning
Miami Super Cold, Inc.
Poole & Kent Company
Sydco Corporation
Zack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
SUPPLIERS
SA & B.Pipe t Florida Electric Motor
Steel Co. Uen. Sheet Metal
Air Filters Co. & Roofing
SAirtemp Div. Condas Corporation
Chrysler Corporation Crae Refrigeration
B oe Middleton and Co.
Brphy,,. Corge McMurray, H. L., Co.
Clark Equipment Co. O'Brian Associate
L Dean. A. C., Co. Trane Compan


nKa. E MUFnU n. MacU.VLLIN4,
President, FCC-AIA Auxiliary


Central Chapter Auxiliary
Wives of AIA members in the Flor-
ida Central Chapter locality are proud
of the fact that theirs was the first
AIA Women's Auxiliary to be formed
in Florida. Since its formation some
five years ago, the FCC Auxiliary has
rendered much helpful service. The
group has acted as "hostess chapter"
to the FAA convention in 1957 and
also to members and wives of the AIA
Board of Directors during its 1958
meeting at Clearwater.
Plans for this year include a pro-
gram to assist in raising funds for the
Sanford W. Coin Memorial Archi-
tectural Scholarship. The group holds
meetings coinciding with those of the
Central Chapter, and each features a
program. At the February 13 meeting
thZ speaker was Hunter Field, famed
as both architect and artist.

State Board Grants
80 New Registrations
Action taken by the Florida State
Board of Architecture during its week-
long meeting in January, this year,
resulted in the granting of 80 new
registrations to practice architecture
in Florida. Of this number, only 25
were registered on the basis of success-
fully passing the prescribed Junior
examination. The remaining 55 in-
cluded 24 registrations granted on the
basis of NCARB certificates and 31
by exemption. The following success-
fully passed the written examinations:
Clearwater.- RoY M. HENDER-
SON II, JOHN RICHARD HOWEY, JOE L.
MCCLUNG.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Aichel Steel and Supply Co 36
Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration,
Heating & Piping Asso.. 34
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co. .. .31
Better Fuel Council of
Dade County . . 29
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 21
Buildorama .... 22
A. R. Cogswell . . 34
Dunan Brock Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Dwyer Products of
Florida, Inc. .. 2nd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 10
Featherock, Inc. . .. 33
Florida Home Heating Institute 30
Florida Portland Cement Co. 25
Florida Power & Light Co.. 32
Florida Steel Corp. . 6
Florida Tile Industries . 1
General Portland Cement Co. 17
George C. Griffin Co. .. 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 28
Pacqua, Inc. . 3
Richard Plumer 26 and 27
Prescolite . . 34
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 7
Solite . .. 5
Tiffany Tile Corp. .. . 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 35


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























APPRECIATION At the Florida South
Chapter Inaugural Ball, Clinton Gamble
presented Russell T. Pancoast, FAIA,
right, with a token of the Chapter's ap-
preciation for his 13 years of service to
the architectural profession as a member
of the Florida State Board of Architecture.
The token was a small boat anchor, con-
taining a suitably inscribed plate. To the
recipient it will probably have a double
significance. Particularly it will keep fresh
his memory of the fishing trip during
which he (an ardent fisherman and able
sailor) threw the anchor over but
without a line bent to it!



Coral Gables -STANLEY N. GLAS-
GOW.
Ft. Myers-WILLIAM L. RIVERS.
Ft. Pierce JACK HANNER SCOTT.
Jacksonville- JOHN TAYLOR
BRICKERT, WILLIAM HILL GOODMAN,
LYNwOOD G. WILLIS.
Leesburg- ROBERT V. FORD.
Miami GORDON M. ALBURY, JR.,
JACOB L. GOTTFRIED, JACK D. RAU-
DENBUSH, GEORGE F. ROOT, JR.
Miami Beach- STANLEY H.
GREENE, DONALD J. SEIDLER.
New York JAMES S. ROSSANT.
Orlando ARTHUR E. ALLEN, JR.,
L. MONTAGUE HANSON, CHARLES H.
PARSONS.
St. Petersburg-JAMES R. BARNES.
Tampa- LEE DE FRANCE, GOR-
DON T. JOHNSON, RICHARD C. ROSEN-
VELD.
Winter Park LYLE P. FUGLE-
BERG.
During the annual meeting the
Board also selected officers for 1960.
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, Jacksonville, was
re-elected president and MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, Ft. Lauderdale, was con-
tinued as the Board's secretary-treas-
urer. Elected as vice president was
RICHARD BOONE ROGERS, Orlando.
ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA, St. Peters-
burg, was elected as assistant secretary.
MARCH, 1960


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pras.






ESTABLISHED 1910


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INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


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OFFICES AND YARD


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We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
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OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1.5154


ATLANTA

GA.
































~~;, N
;J r,
L J OPT
W ,1 *0


This Opportunity


Has Knocked Twice

The Supreme Court of Florida has again proved the old adage that there's
more than one way to skin a cat. This particular cat is Urban Redevelopment;
and in upholding the constitutionality of Tampa's new Urban Renewal Law,
the Court ripped the restrictive hide off a matter of first importance to the
progressive well-being of every community in our State.
In some legal quarters there may be argument as to whether the Court was
weasle-wording the distinction between the Tampa law and the Daytona Beach
ordinance found unconstitutional some years ago or was cagily indulging in
semantics to justify what appears to be a reversal of opinion. No matter. The
fact is what is important. And the fact here is that the way has now been
cleared for Florida communities to revitalize themselves in a fashion heretofore
legally impossible.
Big and little cities throughout the State can now realistically grasp a series
of bright new opportunities. They can plan for their future in terms of im-
proving their past. They can do whatever seems practically desirable to wipe
out their slum areas. They can tackle the knotty problem of salvaging the
virtues of Downtown with more than a fair prospect of success. What is even
more, they now have at hand a practical method for controlling their new
destinies thus assuring present and future citizens full values in terms of the
social and economic gains which urban redevelopment projects are designed
primarily to produce.
The basic means for doing all these things is founded on an age-old con-
cept the right of eminent domain. Practically, this provides a controlling
authority with power to utilize private properties for public purposes. Thus,
cities can now condemn slum and other blighted areas, acquire ownership of
them and then turn them over to an operating organization public or pri-
vate for redevelopment. This sequence, says the Supreme Court in essence,
is now constitutional.
This sequence, however, necessarily involves controls. Basic among these
is a workable plan for redevelopment a plan which not only concerns the
physical aspects of an area, but as well relates these to the community's overall
needs for social and economic improvement.
This is certainly a new and tremendous step toward the bright civic goals
many city planners have visioned. But it is a step which requires all that is
now available of objective understanding, subjective skill, demonstrated tech-
nical experience and the over-riding ability to adjust, coordinate and administer.
In a word, the core of all the urban renewal projects which Florida commun-
ities may now legally undertake is architectural.
Architects measure up most completely to the ability-standards requisite for
the successful execution of community redevelopment programs. For a half-
century past architects have proclaimed their interest in civic planning prob-
lems and their abilities to help solve them. Now is their chance in our State.
In the last decade, particularly, the architectural profession has tongued its
position as the coordinating leader of the construction industry. In Florida
there now exists a new opportunity to prove the contention.
The degree to which the architectural profession in Florida individually
and collectively -accepts the responsibilities of this new challenge will be
the measure of the profession's service-value to its community. The Supreme
Court's Tampa law decision opened the door. But architects themselves must
cross the threshold of a new opportunity if they are to capture the bright
future that lies beyond. -ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Concrete,


Imagination,


Know-How...


'W
2^~ *^
*r 3 ..


a--rl


tc


S ,


These three ingredients
have produced many
forms and textures which
architects have used in
the design of big and
little buildings of many
types . They have been
employed with particular-
ly striking effect by Wahl
J. Snyder, FAIA, in his
design of the J. Neville
MacArthur Engineering
Building, recently com-
pleted at the University
of Miami . .


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DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
Miami, Florida TUxedo 7-1525


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S. The first Convention of the new decade -
which some are already calling "The Sizzling
Sixties" will be at Hollywood in November.
The Broward County Chapter will be the host;
and members are already at work developing
the theme "Architecture for Our Climate" into
a program which promises to be both provoca-
tive and unusual. . It's not too early to plan
for the 1960 FAA Convention right now.
There's a good chance you'll be invited to par-
ticipate as well as to attend . .


46th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 1960 HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL HOLLYWOOD




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